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MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

METROWEEKLY.COM

MARCH 12, 2015

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EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman

MARCH 12, 2015
Volume 21 / Issue 44

ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
POLITICAL EDITOR
Justin Snow
NEWS & BUSINESS EDITOR
John Riley

NEWS

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by Justin Snow

ASSISTANT EDITOR
Rhuaridh Marr

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10

CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR
Scott G. Brooks

FEATURE

12

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

17

JANE LYNCH
by Randy Shulman

WEBMASTER
David Uy

OUT ON THE TOWN

22

PUBLISHER
Randy Shulman

24

BRAND STRATEGY & MARKETING
Christopher Cunetto
Cunetto Creative

26

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Dennis Havrilla

MARY GAUTHIER
by Doug Rule

SALES & MARKETING

NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863

MULLING BIDS FOR CONGRESS
by John Riley

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
Ward Morrison, Julian Vankim

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim

AGS FOR EQUALITY
by John Riley

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Doug Rule

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Christian Gerard, Troy Petenbrink,
Kate Wingfield

MAKING THE CASE

WAMMIES
by Doug Rule

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN
by Kate Wingfield

FOOD

29

SPIRITED REPUBLIC
by Doug Rule

GAMES

31

DYNASTY WARRIORS 8
by Rhuaridh Marr

PATRON SAINT
Christy Cummings

SPORTS

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by Doug Rule
TECH

35

NIGHTLIFE

All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no
responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims
made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or
their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or
advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of
such person or organization.

© 2015 Jansi LLC.

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MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

APPLE WATCH
by Rhuaridh Marr

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
Jake Bailey

METRO WEEKLY
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Washington, DC 20005
202-638-6830
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UNITED SOCIAL SPORTS

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FREDDIE’S 15TH ANNIVERSARY
photography by Ward Morrison

46

LAST WORD

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MARCH 12, 2015

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Social Security sued for recouping
same-sex benefits

TODD FRANSON

LGBT

News

Now online at MetroWeekly.com

Making the Case

U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court urged to rule for marriage equality in briefs from
across the political spectrum
by Justin Snow

I

N A SERIES OF BRIEFS, THE
U.S. Supreme Court is being asked
to strike down state bans on samesex nationwide.
Making good on Attorney General
Eric Holder’s promise to weigh in on
marriage equality should it return to
the Supreme Court, the Obama administration urged the high court to rule in
favor of marriage equality nationwide
on Friday — a move aped by Republican
leaders and hundreds of thousands of
everyday Americans.
“The marriage bans challenged in
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MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

these cases impermissibly exclude lesbian and gay couples from the rights,
responsibilities, and status of civil marriage,” the “friend of the court” brief filed
by the Justice Department states. “These
facially discriminatory laws impose concrete harms on same-sex couples and
send the inescapable message that samesex couples and their children are second-class families, unworthy of the recognition and benefits that opposite-sex
couples take for granted. The bans cannot be reconciled with the fundamental
constitutional guarantee of ‘equal protection of the laws.’”
In January, the nation’s highest
court agreed to consolidate four cases

challenging same-sex marriage bans in
Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee
after the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals
upheld marriage bans in those four
states. Last week, the Supreme Court
announced oral arguments on the issue
of marriage equality would be heard
April 28, with a ruling expected by the
end of June.
According to the Justice Department
brief, state bans on same-sex marriage
“impose a more direct stigma that is all
the more painful because its source is
the home State and not the federal government; they exclude lesbian and gay
couples from the institution of civil marriage; and they deprive the children of

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MARCH 12, 2015

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LGBTNews
those couples of equal recognition of their
family structure. There is no adequate
justification for such a discriminatory and
injurious exercise of state power.”
The brief is one of dozens filed with
the high court calling for a ruling in
favor of marriage equality later this year.
More than 300 social and political conservatives, moderates and libertarians
signed on to the brief organized by Ken
Mehlman, the former aide to President
George W. Bush and chairman of the
Republican National Committee, who
came out as gay in 2010.
According to the brief, the signatories “share the view that laws that bar
same-sex couples from the institution of
civil marriage, with all its attendant profoundly important rights and responsibilities, are inconsistent with the United
States Constitution’s dual promises of
equal protection and due process.”
The brief was signed by a number of
prominent Republican politicians, including seven current and former governors:
Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld,
former Massachusetts Gov. Jane Swift,
former Michigan Gov. William Milliken,
former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge,
former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman and
former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson.
Of the Senate’s four Republican supporters of marriage equality, Sens. Mark
Kirk (Ill.) and Susan Collins (Maine) signed
the brief. Sens. Rob Portman (Ohio) and
Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) did not. Of the
four Republican supporters of marriage
equality in the House of Representatives,
Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.), Richard
Hanna (N.Y.) signed the brief. Reps.
Charlie Dent (Pa.) and David Jolly (Fla.)
did not. Rep. Chris Gibson (N.Y.), who had
not previously endorsed same-sex marriage, signed the brief as well.
Other notable signatories include for-

mer New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani,
billionaire and political activist David
Koch and General Stanley McChrystal.
Mehlman organized a similar brief
filed two years ago in the Proposition 8
case arguing same-sex couples have a
constitutional right to marry. Around 100
attached their names to that brief.
Although the brief argues in favor
of the principle of judicial restraint,
it also states that there are moments
when actions by legislatures and popular
majorities can pose “significant threats to
individual freedom,” requiring intervention by the courts.
“Our constitutional tradition empowers and requires the judiciary to protect
our most cherished liberties against overreaching by the government, including
overreach through an act of the legislature or electorate. That principle, no less
than our commitment to democratic selfgovernment, is necessary to individual
freedom and limited government,” the
brief states. “It is precisely at moments
like this one—when discriminatory laws
appear to reflect unexamined and unwarranted assumptions rather than facts and
evidence, and the rights of one group of
citizens hang in the balance—that the
courts’ intervention is most needed.”
A total of 167 members of the House of
Representatives and 44 members of the
Senate signed on to another brief, which
was led by Democratic leaders in both
chambers.
“As federal legislators who represent
families across this nation, we believe
that—like DOMA—state marriage bans
deny our citizens the equal protection
that the Constitution guarantees. We
urge the Court to make the Constitution’s
promise of equality a reality for gay and
lesbian couples throughout the nation,”
the brief stated.
And on Friday, the Human Rights

Campaign delivered the “People’s Brief”
to the Supreme Court with the signatures
of 207,551 people calling for marriage
equality nationwide. James Obergefell,
the named plaintiff in Obergefell v.
Hodges, the consolidated marriage
equality cases to be heard by the court,
joined HRC in delivering the brief to the
Supreme Court.
“Each and every signature on this
brief — more than 200,000 of them —
is a piece of evidence that this country is ready for marriage equality,” said
HRC President Chad Griffin in a statement. Each copy of the “People’s Brief”
is approximately 3,500 pages long, for a
total of approximately 175,000 pages for
the 50 copies required by the Supreme
Court. It was delivered in 19 boxes Friday
morning.
Such briefs are read by the justices
as they deliberate the cases before them.
According to Roberta Kaplan, the out attorney who represented Edith Windsor in her
fight against the Defense of Marriage Act
and lead counsel on the “People’s Brief,”
the historic number of signatures will further make the case to the justices that marriage equality cannot wait.
“The People’s Brief is yet further proof
that the time is right for the Supreme
Court to recognize the simple proposition that all Americans, regardless of
their sexual orientation, and regardless
of the state in which they live, are entitled to be treated the same under the
law, including with respect to the right
to marry the person who they love,”
Kaplan said in a statement. “The history
of our country shows that ‘times truly can
blind.’ Today, Americans in all 50 states
can now understand that the families
of their gay brothers, sisters, neighbors
and friends have the same dignity and
deserve the same recognition and respect
as all other families.” l

AGs for Equality

Local Attorneys general add their voices to those calling on Supreme Court to
overturn same-sex marriage bans

T
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by John Riley
HE TRIO OF ATTORNEYS
general representing the
Washington metropolitan area
joined in the swelling cho-

MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

rus of voices calling upon the justices of
U.S. Supreme Court to once and for all
resolve the debate over marriage equality by overturning all existing bans on
same-sex marriages and declaring there
is a fundamental right to marriage. Oral
arguments before the nation’s top court

are scheduled to begin April 28.
In Virginia, Attorney General Mark
Herring filed an amicus brief arguing in
favor of granting same-sex couples the
right to marry, highlighting the state’s
often fraught relationship with the LGBT
community over the years, but also enu-

marketplace

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MARCH 12, 2015

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LGBTNews
merating the number of same-sex nuptials, adoptions, and
orders of parentage that had occurred since marriage equality
came to the commonwealth last October. Herring also sought
to focus the Supreme Court’s attention on a particular emphasis
previously ignored or not fleshed out in previous rulings supporting marriage equality. His brief defines the right at issue in
the cases as “the fundamental right to marriage,” rather than
just “the right to same-sex marriage.”
By framing the issue as whether a fundamental right to marriage exists, Herring hopes to force the Supreme Court to consider whether there is a “compelling state interest” in limiting
marriage to heterosexual couples. If there is no such interest,
then there is no justification for states to ban same-sex marriages under the Fourteenth Amendment.
The brief argues that explanations offered by opponents of
same-sex marriage have fallen short in asserting that such a
“compelling interest” exists, as those rationale were torpedoed
by the majority opinion in the Supreme Court’s decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in United States
v. Windsor in 2013.
“The State’s proffered justifications for their same-sex marriage bans cannot survive rational-basis review, let alone the
more demanding standards,” the brief reads. “Windsor rejected
the same procreation-channeling and optimal-child-rearing
justifications, finding that Congress had ‘no legitimate purpose’
in refusing to recognize valid same-sex marriages. The States’
excuses for denying marriage equality are no stronger here. It is
utterly implausible that permitting same-sex couples to marry
and raise their children in two-legal-parent households will
make different-sex couples less likely to marry and raise their
children in two-legal-parent households. Other courts have
justifiably ridiculed such excuses.”
D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine and Maryland Attorney
Geenral Brian Frosh added their voices to the fray on Friday as
part of a coalition of states filing a similar amicus brief, arguing
that the Constitution requires marriage equality nationwide.
In that brief, Racine and Frosh joined with attorneys general
from 16 more liberal-leaning states that have had a longer history with same-sex nuptials, including Massachusetts, a chain
of states down the country’s Northeastern and West Coasts —
except New Jersey — Iowa, Illinois and New Mexico. In their
brief, the states argue that the refusal of some states — most
notably Alabama in recent weeks — to fully license or recognize
same-sex marriages in all counties inflicts widespread harm on
the couples who wed and their families. The brief argues that
the lack of recognition for those marriages — including the recognition of parental, hospital visitation, insurance or inheritance
rights — can even impact other basic life decisions made by a
couple, such as education, employment and residency, as those
couples will try to avoid states hostile to marriage equality.
“As in other states with full marriage equality, couples married here in the District face serious disadvantages when they
travel in or move to states without marriage equality,” Racine
said in a statement. “It is time for the Supreme Court to declare
that, no matter where they might go in this great country, the
District’s same-sex couples are equal to other couples.”
Similar to Herring’s brief, as well as separate briefs filed by
the attorneys general of Hawaii and Minnesota, the coalition’s
brief also urges the Supreme Court to resolve the issue of marriage equality by issuing a comprehensive ruling. Otherwise,
the coalition argues, 21 other states where same-sex marriages
must be recognized due to court decisions overturning existing
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MARCH 12, 2015

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bans may refuse to implement any change that would recognize
same-sex relationships.
“State officials openly defying federal courts in an attempt to
limit the rights of a minority group should bring up bad historical memories for all Americans,” Racine said, invoking the 50th
anniversary of the Selma-to-Montgomery March that is a historic milestone in the history of the Civil Rights Movement. “...I
urge the justices of the United States Supreme Court to move us
one giant step down the road in our nation’s long march toward
living up to its founding principles.”
On Monday morning, Frosh released a report, previously
cited in the coalition brief, further outlining the argument for
why the Supremes should issue a sweeping ruling recognizing marriage equality nationwide rather than allowing states
to decide for themselves. The report, in analyzing the origins
of marriage bans, found that they were largely fueled by animus towards members of the LGBT community. As a result,
he argued, it is imperative that the Supreme Court step in and
resolve the issue.
“Maryland has been a leader in advancing marriage equality,” Frosh said in a statement. “We must continue to play a role
in making sure that everyone in the nation can enjoy the benefits
of marriage regardless of sexual orientation. It is a matter of
fundamental fairness.”
Maryland Deputy Attorney General Thiru Vignarajah also
elaborated on the points made in the report released by Frosh’s
office, saying: “Contained in the Attorney General’s report are
illustrations of prejudice and misinformation that make it clear
that to ask same-sex couples to be patient asks too much. The
promise of equality has long been within the province of the
Supreme Court to protect.” l

Mulling Bids
for Congress
Mikulski retirement could open
up opportunities for at least two
prominent LGBT lawmakers
by John Riley

U

.S. SEN. BARBARA MIKULSKI’S (D-MD.) DECIsion not to seek a sixth term has upset the proverbial
apple cart in Maryland Democratic politics, resulting in a flood of potential candidates who say they
are weighing their options, either for Mikulski’s seat itself or for
one of the House seats that may open up as those incumbents
seek a promotion to the upper chamber. Most notably, former
out lesbian gubernatorial candidate and Del. Heather Mizeur
(D-Montgomery Co.) and Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery
Co.) are among those who may seek a promotion to Congress.
U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen’s decision to seek Mikulski’s
seat propelled him to frontrunner status. He is likely to face a

LGBTNews

TODD FRANSON

If the Senate primary becomes too crowded, or there’s not
enough ideological space for Mizeur to distinguish herself from
the other opponents, the other obvious option for her would be
to run for Van Hollen’s open 8th District seat, which contains
her home base of Takoma Park. But that race, too, has attracted
the interests of several potential primary contenders, including
the openly gay Madaleno.
As more candidates announce their intentions in the coming
days and weeks, and the primary field for both the Senate and
any House seats begins to take shape, it is likely Maryland voters will be hearing more from those candidates who ultimately
decide to jump into the race for Congress. Whether that final
pool of candidates will include Mizeur, Madaleno, or any other
LGBT candidate, remains to be seen. l

Mizeur

contested primary against U.S. Rep. Donna Edwards, who represents Prince George’s and Anne Arundel counties. U.S. Rep.
John Delaney has also expressed interest in the seat. Because all
three House members hail from the D.C. suburbs, there is room
for a Baltimore-area candidate, which could include U.S. Rep.
John Sarbanes, U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, or Baltimore Mayor
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Although liberal-leaning groups are
salivating over the prospect of an Edwards run, Mizeur has also
had her name touted among some other progressive-leaning
groups within the Democratic Party.
Mizeur, who “beat the spread” by performing better than
expected in the 2014 gubernatorial primary against then-Lt.
Gov. Anthony Brown and then-Attorney General Doug Gansler,
was the leading contender in a non-scientific poll on CBS
Baltimore’s website asking readers who they would prefer to
succeed Mikulski. In that poll, Mizeur ran away with the field,
earning 32 percent, ahead of former Gov. Bob Ehrlich, whose
name has been touted as a potential GOP nominee, with 14 percent and Edwards with 11 percent. Every other potential statewide candidate registered less than 7 percent.
In response to the CBS Baltimore poll, Mizeur took to her
Facebook page to thank supporters, saying, “Grassroots, I hear
you and deeply appreciate the enthusiasm of your outreach and
expressions of support. It’s only fair to give an opportunity like
this serious reflection and discernment. I’ll let you know soon if
we should gear up for another journey together.”
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MARCH 12, 2015

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LGBTCommunityCalendar
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.

SATURDAY, MARCH 14
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer organization, volunteers today for the Gay Men’s Chorus of
Washington’s production of “When You Wish”. To
participate, burgundycrescent.org.

CHRYSALIS arts & culture group holds annual

meeting during dinner at a Metro-accessible DC
restaurant. All welcome. 7 p.m. Craig, 202-4620535. craighowell1@verizon.net.

COMMON THREADS, a training session hosted

THURSDAY, MARCH 12

FRIDAY, MARCH 13

BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer organization, volunteers today for Food & Friends. To
participate, visit burgundycrescent.org.

BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer organization, volunteers today for the Gay Men’s Chorus of
Washington’s production of “When You Wish.” To
participate, burgundycrescent.org.

DC METRO CIRCLE OF FRIENDS meets at The

DC Center. 7:30-9:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite
105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
7:30-9 p.m. swimdcac.org.

DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian squaredancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m.
Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston,
11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9
p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. At the
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing

in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,
301-422-2398.

METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by

appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.

US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous

Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young

LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410 7th
St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

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MARCH 12, 2015

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“FORESKINS OPTIONAL” MIXER between Nice
Jewish Boys DC and Queer for Christ, hosted by
Moishe House DC. 8 p.m. Moishe House DC, 1753
Euclid St. NW. For more information, visit gatherthejews.com.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION (GAMMA)
is a confidential support group for men who are
gay, bisexual, questioning and who are married
or involved with a woman, that meets regularly in
Dupont Circle and monthly in Northern Virginia
and Hagerstown, Md. 7:30-9:30 p.m. For more
information, visit gammaindc.org.

The DC Center, Capturing Fire and Queer Cookie
present the first ever QUEER COOKIE POETRY
SLAM, holds an open mic event on the second
Friday of each month. Admission is $5. 7:30-10 p.m.
The DC Center, 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. More
information, mack.krebs@thedccenter.org.

WOMEN IN THEIR TWENTIES, a social discussion

and activity group for LBT women, meets on the
second and fourth Fridays of each month at The
DC Center. Social activity after meeting. 8-9:30 p.m.
2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information,
visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

by the policy and advocacy department of The
Women’s Collective to discuss HIV/AIDS prevention and care interventions. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. DC CARE,
7059 Blair Rd. NW, Suite 101. For more information,
visit www.womenscollective.org.

FREE HIV TESTING offered at The DC Center. 4-7
p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.
LET’S KICK ASS, a program for long-term survivors of HIV/AIDS, meets at The DC Center. 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more
information, visit thedccenter.org.
The MILITARY PARTNERS AND FAMILIES
COALITION and Nancy St. Claire from Give an
Hour hold a teleconference providing information
on creating safe spaces for LGBT military members
and their families. 3-5 p.m. Registration: milpfc.
org/programs/virtual-hangout. More information,
Eric Perez, eric.perez@thedccenter.org or 202682-2245.

WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH offers

free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by
appointment). 202-291-4707 or andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat
services, 10 a.m., followed by Kiddush luncheon.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/time,
email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session

DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social

GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. 202682-2245, gaydistrict.org.

DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey

at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr. SW. 6:30-8 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.

Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.

DIGNITYUSA sponsors Mass for LGBT community,

PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social

family and friends. 6:30 p.m., Immanuel Churchon-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary Road, Alexandria. All
welcome. For more info, visit dignitynova.org.

SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social atmo-

GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s, 900 U St.
NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@gmail.com.

group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Contact Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.

sphere for GLBT and questioning youth, featuring
dance parties, vogue nights, movies and games.
More info, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

LGBTCommunityCalendar
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 10.2
strenuous miles with 2400 feet of elevation gain to
Signal Knob at the northern end of Massanutten
Mountain, Va. Bring beverages, lunch, sturdy boots,
and about $15 for fees. No dogs, please. Carpool at
9 a.m. from East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride
lot. Craig, 202-462-0535. adventuring.org.
Frank BOOK PARTY/TEA DANCE celebrating the release of Barney Frank’s autobiography,
hosted by Bank Information Center, the National
Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, the Human
Rights Campaign and several other partners. 4 p.m.
Marrakech, 2147 P St. NW. More info, bicusa.org.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and indi-

viduals of all creeds and cultures to join the church.
Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New Hampshire
Ave. uucss.org.

UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT

Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.

MONDAY, MARCH 16
CENTER FAITH, a group for LBGT people of faith

and their allies, meets to plan the annual Capital
Pride Interfaith Service. 7:30-9 p.m. The DC Center,
2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information,
visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a program of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green Lantern,
1335 Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers welcome. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

Join THE DC CENTER as it becomes the first LGBT
contingent to march in the Washington, D.C. ST.
PATRICK’S DAY PARADE. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Meet at
Constitution Avenue NW. For more information,
email rita@thedccenter.org.

YOU AREN’T THE ONLY ONE, a social and support group for gay men in the D.C Metro area with
HSV-2, meets once a month. For location and time,
email not.the.only.one.dc@gmail.com.

WEEKLY EVENTS
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30

a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G

St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.

HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes

GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.

Join LINCOLN CONGREGATIONAL TEMPLE –
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST for an inclusive,
loving and progressive faith community every
Sunday. 11 a.m. 1701 11th Street NW, near R in
Shaw/Logan neighborhood. lincolntemple.org.

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by

Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.

NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an

“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.

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13

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr.
SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit swimdcac.org.

DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary,
1200 S St. NW. dcscandals.wordpress.com.

GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House, 2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.
wdc@gmail.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. At the Elizabeth Taylor Medical
Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit
whitman-walker.org.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES, 3333 Duke St., Alexandria,
offers free “rapid” HIV testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV testing. No appointment
needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 5-7 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200,
Arlington. Appointments: 703-789-4467.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by appointment and walk-in, for
youth 21 and younger. Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or testing@
smyal.org.
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE SENIOR LGBT
COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000 14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening affinity group. 3636 Georgia
Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma
Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504, secretary@wetskins.org,
wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed
individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@
whitman-walker.org.

TUESDAY, MARCH 17
CENTER BI, a group of the DC Center, holds its monthly roundtable discus-

sion meeting. 7-8 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit
thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m.
afwash@aol.com, afwashington.net.
THE GAY MEN’S HEALTH COLLABORATIVE offers free HIV testing and STI
screening and treatment every Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT
Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King St. 703-746-4986 or text 571214-9617. james.leslie@inova.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER hosts “Packing Party,”

where volunteers assemble safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.

IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East

Diamond Ave., and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411. Walkins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.

KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES, at 3333 Duke St.,
Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703823-4401.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—LGBT focused meeting every Tuesday, 7 p.m.
St. George’s Episcopal Church, 915 Oakland Ave., Arlington, just steps from
Virginia Square Metro. For more info. call Dick, 703-521-1999. Handicapped
accessible. Newcomers welcome. liveandletliveoa@gmail.com.
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SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by appointment and walk-in, for
youth 21 and younger. Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155, testing@
smyal.org.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21 meets at SMYAL, 410 7th
St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black gay men 40 and older. 7-9
p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH AND WELLNESS/STD
CLINIC opens at 6 p.m., 1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia. Hepatitis and
herpes testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature group, discusses “Eminent
Outlaws: The Gay Writers Who Changed America,” by Christopher Bram. 7:30
p.m. DC Center, 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. All welcome. bookmendc.blogspot.
com
THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB meets for Social Bridge. 7:30
p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St SE, across from Marine Barrack. No reservation
and partner needed. 301-345-1571 for more information.
WOMAN TO WOMAN: A SUPPORT GROUP FOR HIV-POSITIVE WOMEN
WHO LOVE WOMEN, meets on the third Wednesday of every month. Light

refreshments served. 5:30-7 p.m. The Women’s Collective, 1331 Rhode Island
Ave. NE. For more information and to RSVP, contact June Pollydore, 202-4837003.

WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets about 6:30-6 p.m., Steam, 17th
and R NW. All welcome. For more information, call Fausto Fernandez, 703-7325174.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m.,
and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707, andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr.
SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit swimdcac.org.

DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary,
1200 S St. NW. dcscandals.wordpress.com.

HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH offers Wednesday worship 7:15 a.m. and 12:05
p.m. All welcome. 118 N. Washington St., Alexandria. 703-549-1450, historicchristchurch.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing in Gaithersburg, 414

East Diamond Ave. Walk-ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.

JOB CLUB, a weekly support program for job entrants and seekers, meets at

The DC Center. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. More info, www.
centercareers.org.

METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV testing. No appointment
needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012 14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200,
Arlington. Appointments: 703-789-4467.

PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay men, hosts weekly happy
hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m., Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th
St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. At the Elizabeth Taylor Medical
Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit
whitman-walker.org. l
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A Volkswagen Golf.
A lemon tree.
A powder blue touch-tone phone.
A live cabaret.
It’s the simple things in life that keep Jane Lynch happy.

Gleeful
Interview by Randy Shulman

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MARCH 12, 2015

17

METRO WEEKLY: What about your early life

led you to the career you’re in now?
JANE LYNCH: I don’t think there was any-

J

ANE LYNCH IS GLEEFUL. TRULY, GENUINELY GLEEFUL.
About a phone.
“It’s a Touch Tone, it’s powder blue, and it’s just beautiful,” she
exclaims. “I paid $200 for it. It’s a phone that the phone company
would have given you for free back in 1973. And this is the first time
I’ve used it.”
Lynch had been a familiar face for years on TV in the ’90s,
appearing on countless television programs, but it was Christopher
Guest’s uproarious 2000 mockumentary, Best in Show, that truly elevated her brand. She
played no-nonsense lesbian dog trainer Christy Cummings, who embarks on a romance
with her employer, portrayed by another up-and-comer at the time, Jennifer Coolidge.
Nine years later, Lynch would land the role of a lifetime — as high school coach and
all-around glee club nemesis Sue Sylvester on Ryan Murphy’s groundbreaking musical
series, Glee. Lynch’s portrayal — assertive, commanding, vastly entertaining, and vulnerable when needed — snagged her both an Emmy and a Golden Globe. In 2011, The
New York Times Magazine featured her as part of a cover story entitled, “Eight Actors
Who Turn Television into Art.”
Lynch is modest about her considerable talents. She just enjoys what she’s doing,
especially if it involves making others laugh.
“I like to be tickled and I like to laugh and I always like to look for what will make
something funnier,” she says. “And I mean in every aspect of my life. I have friends
where all we do is sit around and try to make something funnier. That’s just kind of
how I exist. I find any other existence drab and boring and lifeless and without any
color.”
It’s hard to pinpoint when Lynch publicly acknowledged her sexuality, though
articles online suggest as early as 2010. She widely credits Ellen DeGeneres as the
trailblazer who made the terrain safe for other actors to be open about their sexuality.
But along with openness — and celebrity — comes scrutiny. Lynch married clinical
psychologist Lara Embry in 2010, only to divorce in October 2014. It’s still a sore spot
for Lynch, one she clearly prefers to keep private. She’s frank and concise about her
feelings on the subject, and during a 45-minute phone conversation, it’s the only time
she stops laughing and grows audibly strained.
With Glee out of production, ending a successful six-year run, Lynch is searching
for her next big project. Meanwhile, she’s casually touring the country with a cabaret
show, See Jane Sing!, which she’ll bring to The Birchmere in Alexandria on Tuesday,
March 24.
“It’s me and Kate Flannery from The Office,” says Lynch. “I have a five-piece band
— an amazing quintet — and we sing these obscure standards, and some beautiful
three-part harmonies, because my friend Tim Davis — the vocal arranger on Glee —
also joins us.”
At the moment, however, Lynch is content to lounge on her bed, on her new powder-blue phone, Lhasa Apso by her side, and talk about her career, her coming out, her
first kiss, and the many, many things that make her, well... gleeful.

18

MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

thing in my early life that you could connect the dots and go, “Well, of course, it’s
logical she’d be an actress.” I was born
with a desire that revealed itself as I got
older. I grew up in a suburb of Chicago,
and there was not much there to inspire
any kind of artistic thoughts or creation.
Nonetheless, and in spite of that, I always
wanted to create, I always wanted to act,
I loved singing, I loved performing. And
maybe the fact that I didn’t get much nurturing in that way made me seek it.
MW: Your parents weren’t a guiding force?
LYNCH: My parents loved each other very
much, which was, I realized, a rarity.
They were partners and we were all on
the same team. They loved music, they
loved musicals, they would play musicals
and they loved to sing, but they weren’t in
the business.
I went to the local high school and did
plays and stuff like that, but my being an
actress was something that made them
cock their heads and go, “What? You
can’t do that.” In fact, my mother famously said, “You can’t always get what you
want.” I also think the Rolling Stones
famously said that. I remember being very
upset. Years later, my mother said, “Oh, I
regret ever saying that to you.” It is kind
of a horrible thing to tell a child. [Laughs.]
MW: Are they still with us, may I ask?
LYNCH: No, they both passed. My mother
died a year and a half ago, and my dad,
about 10 years ago.
MW: At least they got to see your success.
LYNCH: They did. Especially my mother.
She got to see Glee. She got to see that
I won an Emmy and a Golden Globe. I
don’t think she saw Hollywood Game
Night — I think she had passed by then
— but yeah, she got to see a lot. My dad
died right after A Mighty Wind came out.
I think that was the last thing he saw.
That was good for him to see, especially
since we loved music so much in my family. He loved those kind of vocal arrangements.
MW: At some point, you realized “I’m
not straight.” When did that happen?
LYNCH: I think the biggest thing I realized was that I didn’t want to kiss a boy.
That’s when I knew there was something
different, and I did want to kiss a girl.
I didn’t even know the word “gay,” and
when I first heard it I was about 13 or 14
and thought, “Oh, my goodness, I have the
girl version of that.” It really felt like it
was a disease, that it was like a diagnosis.
In fact, it was a diagnosis at that time. It

JAKE BAILEY

was classified as a mental illness, a mental
aberration.
MW: Do you remember what it was like the
first time you kissed a girl?
LYNCH: I do, yes. The woman I kissed
— and she was a woman — said “I feel
like we opened up Pandora’s Box.” And
that’s exactly what happened. I was like,
“Ohhhh, that’s what everybody writes
songs about. This is what people write
poetry about, this is what happens to
people in movies and in books.” I didn’t
get it before.
MW: When was this?
LYNCH: It would have been the ’70s.
MW: How did you feel after it happened?
LYNCH: It was one of those things where
I said I will never tell anybody about this
— and I didn’t until I was about 21 years
old, when I had my first encounter that
turned sexual. I didn’t tell my parents
until I was 30. I think it was clear that had
I told them when I was 18, it would have
been a completely different thing than
when I was 31. Because by then things
were already starting to change, socially.
People were coming out of the closet.
My mother worked for a man who never
never professed to be gay but you knew
he was. And she loved him very much, so
when I came out, they were kind of surprised, but not.
MW: How did you come out to them?
LYNCH: I sent them a letter. I was living
out here in Los Angeles and told them I
was distant from them and I didn’t want
that to continue, and one of the reasons
was that I felt that I couldn’t tell them
this thing. I told them — and they were
wonderful about it. They called me, and it
was a very loving, wonderful thing. They
said, “Of course we’re not going to throw
you away.” Which was a huge relief to me.
It was everything — I was going to
say “I hoped it would be,” but I really
didn’t have any faith that it would be
that, because I had too much internalized shame. They really helped me. Their
response really lifted me.
MW: The breadth of your career is extraordinary. Prior to Glee, you showed up on
countless popular sitcoms and television
series. Cybill, Third Rock from the Sun,
Gilmore Girls, Frasier, Dawson’s Creek.
This is all pre-Glee fame. What’s it like to
enter these sets and be part of these shows
for a moment?
LYNCH: Well, the first thing you feel is
“Oh, I wish I could stay. I wish I was one
of those who gets to come every week.” I
was making a fine living doing what I was
doing, but I would always wish I could
be the person who got to stay. That being

“The biggest thing I realized
was that I didn’t want to kiss
a boy. That’s when I knew
there was something different,
and I DID WANT TO
KISS A GIRL.”
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MARCH 12, 2015

19

said, there’s something really fun about
coming into a new place and getting to
know a whole new group of people and
doing my absolute best, maybe giving
people something they didn’t even know
that they were looking for, and walking
away having done a job well done.
And you don’t stick around. You just
kind of come in, you show off for a week,
and then you leave. There was something
really nice about that. I must say that I
wasn’t frustrated with my career by the
time Glee came along. I had moments of
like “Why I can’t have a regular gig?” or
“Why can’t I be somebody who’s making this kind of money?” But for the most
part, I really enjoyed that part of my
career.
MW: Was there a sitcom or series you recall
as being particularly enjoyable?
LYNCH: Let me think. My memory is so
awful. Let me think, let me think. I loved
doing Criminal Minds. I played a completely different character than I was usually cast as — a woman with schizophrenia. I was the mother of Matthew Gubler,
and I loved doing that. I loved that set,
loved the actors, loved Matthew — he’s so
great. And I loved doing sitcoms, I loved
doing the live multi-camera things. Two
and a Half Men — I had an arc on that.
That was so much fun to do. It was such
great writing. Every time I got a call from
them, it was a thrill.
MW: I think of Best in Show as your big
career turning point. It brought you into
the mainstream.
LYNCH: Best in Show was definitely a
huge leap — there was association with
my name after that point. Jobs started
becoming easier to get. I still auditioned,
but I got a lot of offers, too. It’s so nice not
to have to go through the “Dog and Pony
Show” of trotting your cookies out for
something. It’s kinda nice to be handed
something. That’s just the best. I love that.
MW: When a show like Glee happens, turning you into a household name, you’ve
reached a completely different level of stardom. Can you talk a little bit about how
that changed your life?
LYNCH: I’m recognized now everywhere
I go. There are certain things I can’t do
anymore, like, I can’t go to Disneyland —
and that’s okay — but for the most part
it’s been all positive. I get “paparazzied”
every now and again. And that’s okay. I’m
not a big partygoer so the fact that I get
invited to parties doesn’t really matter.
I think one of the biggest things is that
I have more money now, which is nice.
I have a nice house which I love. That’s
about it. I still drive a Volkswagen Golf.
20

MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

“[Ryan
Murphy] is an
extreme guy.
He loves to
push as far
as he can go
— and then
go further.
THE LAST
THING HE
THINKS
ABOUT IS
PLEASING
GLAAD.”

MW: Really? A Golf?
LYNCH: Believe me, I drove some expen-

sive cars before, and I love my little Golf.
It’s fantastic.
MW: Volkswagen will be happy to hear that.

Let’s talk Glee. You’re done shooting now?
LYNCH: We just finished on Saturday. The
fact that it’s over is still very fresh and
very sad and happy all at the same time.
But the last 13 episodes have been just
a joy. I think these were just some of
the best episodes we’ve ever done. They
really pulled the stops out.
MW: How do you feel about it all ending?
LYNCH: It’s one of those things that if they
said, “Let’s do another season,” I’d be
“Right on, let’s!” But I think it’s good for
me creatively to move on. It’s good for
me to exercise different muscles and try
some different characters, step it up a bit
in terms of producing and writing, which
I’m doing. It’s time for the next phase,
but I have to be pulled out by the powers
that be, whether that’s the universe or the
show ending, because I would have stuck
with the safe, fun, known quantity for as
long as they wanted me to stay with it.
MW: What will you miss most about your
character, Sue Sylvester?
LYNCH: How she’s unabashed about her
opinions. How she’s contrary to be contrary. She says the most outrageous things
that nobody calls her on. Every once in
awhile someone might roll their eyes and
go, “That’s ridiculous,” but for the most
part, she’s somebody who can throw kids
under the lockers with no ramifications.
She’ll call a meeting in the middle of
the night and everybody shows up. She
makes people wear ridiculous costumes
and people just do it. They just do it! I
love it. That’s Ian Brennan, the guy who
created the show, and also created my
character. Almost every line I utter was
written from his pen.
MW: What are some things about the character you didn’t like?
LYNCH: That she took the low road many
times. She did not follow her higher
angels — which doesn’t mean I judge her
on that at all. We all do this, and that’s
what I love about her. She has the angel
and the devil sitting on her shoulder at all
times and she’s almost always choosing
the devil.
She sees life as a battle, which I can’t
say that I do. Playing this character has
cured me of seeing the world in that way,
as a place where you have to attack and
defend because that’s what she’s about —
she’s a warrior, and if there isn’t a battle
she will create one. In that she’s your
worst enemy and also your best advocate.
And I think it was kind of a spiritual
battleground for her and I think I exorcised that for myself. I don’t really see the
world that way at all any more.
MW: What’s interesting to me about Glee

was how gay positive it was. It dealt with
being gay, at times, as simply a matterof-fact.
LYNCH: That is exactly what they did
and that’s the best thing about it. Not as
being special, just as being matter-offact. Someone who’s gay is as normal as
somebody who is six or seven feet tall.
And that is I think the most important
part of expunging shame within society.
It’s a great, empowering show for kids to
watch because there’s a kid for everybody
in that show.
MW: Is this the Ryan Murphy effect?
LYNCH: Yeah. It is the Ryan Murphy effect.
And it’s also the craziness of Ian Brennan,
who just has a very beautifully skewed
view of the world, so much like my own.
He’s just better at writing it down than I
could ever be. And then Brad Falchuk, the
other guy of this great trifecta responsible
for Glee who kind of brings the heart to it.
He was the guy who wrote all those Burt
and Kurt scenes — where the kid comes
out to the dad. No one is better at writing
that stuff than Brad.
MW: Murphy has really been at the forefront of bringing gays into the storyline
and not treating them with kid gloves. The
latest season of American Horror Story is
a great example of that, with a gay person
as a central villain. What’s it like working
with him?
LYNCH: It’s great. He always tries to look
for the most impactful moment. He’s an
extreme guy. He loves to push as far as
he can go — and then go a little further. I
love that, because I don’t like being safe,
either. I love doing crazy. The last thing
he thinks about is pleasing GLAAD.
MW: Did you ever think we’d be seeing
things like gay marriage in your lifetime?
LYNCH: No. No, no, no. I didn’t think so.
My whole thing was you keep it quiet,
you don’t let anybody know. So, in fact,
I was not one of the people jumping up
and down with excitement when people
started talking about “Oh, now we should
have marriage!” I was like, “Don’t do that!
Don’t do that! Don’t make ’em mad!” I
jumped on the bandwagon later, when it
was safe. I wasn’t pioneering it.
MW: How do you feel about gay marriage?
LYNCH: You know what, at this point how I
feel about it is that it’s a personal decision.
But I think everybody should be able to do
it. And I think it’s great that kids — like my
nieces and nephews, young adults from
their early to late 20s — judge people on
a person-to-person basis, which was not
the case for our generation.
MW: I agree. I think I’m still stuck in the
mindset that I’m never gonna have kids,

“What has
made me really happy is I
don’t do anything unless
I want to —
which means
I stay home a
lot. But
I’M
GIDDY
WITH
JOY
WHEN
I STAY
HOME.”

that it’s not for my generation. We were
“trained” a different way, so to speak.
LYNCH: Yeah, there’s some untwisting you
have to do. Definitely. I don’t think I’m
twisted anymore — I don’t even know

how to explain it, but what I want for
myself personally is exactly where I’m at.
I’m a happy single person.
MW: There’s an opportunity here to discuss
something gays never really talk about. The
fact is you were married and then you were
divorced. We don’t often discuss the other
side to it, gay divorce. Do you feel that’s
an important consideration for gay people
going into marriage?
LYNCH: For people period. You should
really think about that decision. Really
think about it. And you know, with any
kind of marriage it’s possible that divorce
can happen because 50 percent of most
marriages end in divorce. Seventy-three
percent of second marriages end in
divorce, so it’s pretty amazing. I think
you’ve really gotta know what you’re getting into. That’s all I will say on it.
MW: Of course, the majority of us don’t have
to have to contend with TMZ and bloggers and the Internet looking at our every
move when we do through something of a
personal nature. Has society gone a little
overboard intruding on celebrity lives?
LYNCH: I don’t care. I don’t read it, I don’t
care about it, I don’t have a feeling one
way or the other about it. It’s up to everybody, if they want to pick up that magazine or turn on that television show, that’s
up to them. It doesn’t affect me at all.
MW: You choose to ignore it, then.
LYNCH: I don’t even actively ignore it. It’s
not even in my realm of thought.
MW: The one thing that strikes me throughout this interview — you’re constantly
laughing and you sound incredibly happy.
LYNCH: [Laughs.] What has made me really
happy is I don’t do anything unless I want
to, unless I have a desire to do it — which
means I stay home a lot. But I’m giddy
with joy when I stay home. I’m on my bed
right now with my dogs and I couldn’t be
happier. I’m looking out into my backyard
and I’ve got a beautiful lemon tree and I
couldn’t be happier. Couldn’t be happier.
MW: I want your life. Can we trade?
LYNCH: You can have it. You can have
your own version of it. You just have to
be uncompromising, and don’t do anything you don’t want to do. Follow your
own path. I don’t care if you’re an actor
or whatever. Do what you love, do what
inspires you, and don’t waste your life on
doing something you don’t love for one
moment.
Jane Lynch stars in See Jane Sing! on
Tuesday, March 24, at The Birchmere,
3701 Mount Vernon Ave., in Arlington.
Tickets are $89.50. Call 703-549-7500 or
visit birchmere.com. l
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MARCH 12 - 19, 2015

Compiled by Doug Rule

SPOTLIGHT
BARNEY FRANK

JACK SPENCER

To be published next week, Frank: A Life in Politics
from the Great Society to Same Sex Marriage is the
former Congressman’s account of the changes he’s
witnessed or helped propel in American life. But in
characteristically blunt fashion Frank also discusses
the frustrations and fears that come with elected
office and recalls the emotional toll of living in the
closet for many years. He’ll sign books at Sixth and I
after a conversation with Bloomberg View columnist
Albert R. Hunt. Wednesday, March 18, at 7 p.m. Sixth
& I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets are
$17, or $30 with one book, $40 for two tickets and
one book. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.

Torch
and
Twang
Mary Gauthier has found her place in country music
S

INCE FIRST PURSUING A CAREER IN COUNTRY MUSIC NEARLY TWO
decades ago, Mary Gauthier has noticed big changes in Nashville.
“There are more opportunities for people that don’t fit the traditional
mold,” says the singer. “And that’s encouraging.”
One such opportunity is ABC’s drama series Nashville, which regularly features
songs penned by under-the-radar songwriters. In two weeks, the show will feature
a Gauthier song, performed by one of the leading characters. “I love the way that
they recorded it,” she says. “I’m thrilled.”
The song, “How You Learn To Live Alone,” is drawn from last year’s Trouble
and Love, which Gauthier calls “an intense breakup album.” The set, her eighth,
follows the Gauthier tradition of sharing deeply personal reflections. She’s explored
everything from the complications of being adopted to overcoming addiction. But
her songwriting is never used as a therapeutic exercise.
“That would just be dreadful, wouldn’t it?” she says. “I find that to be narcissistic. I don’t use songwriting for therapy — I use therapy for therapy. I use songwriting to try and make beauty out of something that didn’t exist in a beautiful form
before I created it.”
Gauthier, who performs at Jammin’ Java next Thursday, March 19, calls herself
“an old-fashioned troubadour type. I tell stories and play my songs and make it into
a cabaret-style thing.” Her live set touches on her experiences, which doesn’t really
include coming out — in general, let alone in country music.
“I was gay in junior high,” she says. “I never came out, because I’ve never
been in.” Which is not to say she didn’t struggle. In fact, while country music and
America as a whole may be a bit more accepting of gay people today, it’s still no
walk in the park.
“I don’t think we’re in a place yet where it’s easy for anybody to come to terms
with being gay,” she says. “I think it’s still hard — especially coming from a small
town in the South — to find peace with it.” — Doug Rule
Mary Gauthier performs with Allison Moorer Thursday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m. at
Jammin’ Java, 227 Maple Ave. E. Vienna. Tickets are $25. Call 703-255-3747 or visit
jamminjava.com.

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CINDERELLA

Cate Blanchett is the wicked stepmother, Helena
Bonham Carter is the Fairy Godmother and Derek
Jacobi plays the king in Disney’s latest take on the
classic fairy tale, with Lily James in the title role
and Richard Madden as Prince Charming. Kenneth
Branagh directs this live-action version written by
Chris Weitz. Opens Friday, March 13. Area theaters.
Visit fandango.com.

GAY MEN’S CHORUS OF WASHINGTON

“When You Wish” is a salute to music from the
world of animation in the Gay Men’s Chorus’s patented style — you know, as sassy and campy as it is
sweet and sincere, featuring drag queens, tap dancers and sing-a-longs. John Moran directs this show
with tunes you’ll know from Disney, Schoolhouse
Rock! and Saturday morning cartoons. Friday, March
13, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, March 14, at 3 p.m. and 8
p.m. Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St. NW. Tickets are $25
to $63. Call 202-328-6000 or visit thelincolndc.com
or gmcw.org.

ORCHIDS:
INTERLOCKING SCIENCE AND BEAUTY

Orchids: Interlocking Science and Beauty is the
20th annual orchid exhibition presented by the
U.S. Botanic Garden and the Smithsonian Gardens.
Featuring several hundred colorful flowering plants
on any given day, the focus is on how new ideas,
technologies and inventions are changing the way
we study, protect and enjoy orchids. Through
April 26. First Floor in the Special Exhibits Hall,
National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street
and Constitution Avenue NW. Call 202-633-1000 or
visit mnh.si.edu.

SARAH MCLACHLAN

The Canadian crooner returns to the region
for a concert presented by IMP Productions at
Baltimore’s Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. McLachlan
continues to tour in support of last year’s Shine On,
which was partly inspired by the death of her father.
Sunday, March 15. Doors at 7 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff
Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., Baltimore.
Tickets are $76. Call 202-628-1776 or visit dar.org/
conthall.

THE CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION

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Rep Stage presents this sharp comedy from Annie
Baker about a group of small-town residents
enrolled in a community center drama class, in
which they play various seemingly harmless theater
games. What could possibly go wrong? Suzanne
Beal directs. To March 22. Rep Stage: The Horowitz
Center’s Studio Theatre at Howard Community
College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia,
Md. Tickets are $40. Call 443-518-1500 or visit
repstage.org.

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW

ALLISTER ANN

Landmark’s E Street Cinema screens the biggest cult
classic of them all once a month as part of its regular midnight screenings of classics. The screening
comes with a live cast, meaning it’s even more interactive than usual. Friday, March 13, and Saturday,
March 14, at midnight. Landmark’s E Street Cinema,
555 11th St. NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit landmarktheatres.com.

Young Summer

WAMA
Jam
A selective look at nominees for the 29th Annual Wammies
T

HE DISTRICT HASN’T ALWAYS BEEN KIND TO ASPIRING MUSICIANS.
It was once accepted practice to escape D.C. as soon as talent — and opportunity — became apparent.
Dissatisfied with that attitude, Mike Schreibman helped found the Washington
Area Music Association (WAMA). Each year, they present their own version of the
Grammys — the “Wammies” — to spotlight local talent and encourage artists to
remain in the city.
This weekend, WAMA’s 29th annual show presents 91 awards in categories as
native to the Washington area as go-go, punk and bluegrass, in addition to rock,
rap and jazz. However, some familiar names — the National Symphony in classical,
Cathy Fink and Marcy Marxer in children’s music, Sweet Honey in the Rock in both
gospel and a cappella — are out of the running, having won too many times already.
(They’ve been given emeritus status instead.)
Despite competition from national rap sensations WALE and LOGIC, both majorlabel artists, area residents’ likely pick for best rapper is Grammy-nominated
CHRISTYLEZ BACON, the self-described “nerd with the word…got my speech slurred,”
who mixes cleverly playful rhymes with musical elements from classical and jazz.
Bacon, who got early career boosts from Strathmore, the Kennedy Center and the
Atlas, is the reigning WAMA Artist of the Year. In addition to Wale, another nominee to succeed Bacon for this general artist award is the very D.C.-sounding postpunk/”riot grrrl”-inspired band PRIESTS, led by intense, intriguing vocalist Katie
Alice Greer.
Two standout nominees as Pop Rock Vocalist include the lesbian folk belter LAURA
TSAGGARIS and the moody electronica-tipped YOUNG SUMMER, a leading contender for
New Artist of the Year. Among eight nominees in the Electronica category is BLK W/
BEAR, whose eerie instrumental music has been used by the Discovery Channel and
is led by J.S. Adams, curator of the longtime local festival Queering Sound. Also of
LGBT note: The GAY MEN’S CHORUS is up against some heavy choral hitters, from the
Choral Arts Society to the Congressional Chorus.
Unlike the Grammys, the public is welcome to attend the Wammies, this year
hosted by Bill Wax and Jim Bohannon and featuring performances by at least seven
acts, including 14-piece Latin ensemble Orquesta La Leyenda. Daryl Davis & Friends
will be playing in the pit, ready to cut off any award winners who ramble on too
long. —Doug Rule
The Wammies are Sunday, March 15, at 8 p.m. The State Theatre, 220 North
Washington St., Falls Church. Tickets are $35 for the general public.
Call 703-237-0300 or visit wamadc.com.
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FILM
MERCHANTS OF DOUBT

Robert Kenner, the director of Food, Inc., looks at the
ways climate-change deniers have been able to spin
American opinion on the topic, which is all but unassailable scientifically. Based on the book by Naomi
Oreskes and Erik M. Conway. Opens Friday, March
13. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.

TOUCH OF EVIL

Orson Welles’s 1958 film is the final installment in a
month-long, four-film Hitchcock/Welles Film Series
at D.C.’s Hill Center. What’s the Hitchcock connection? The most obvious is Janet Leigh, so memorable
from the infamous shower scene in Psycho. Only two
years before, though, Leigh was similarly the scantily clad object of prey at a rural motel in Welles’s
film, which also inspired Hitchcock in other ways,
from the use of daring shots and bravado sequences
to the value in establishing a strong mise en scène.
Welles again stars in his own picture: In Touch of
Evil, he plays a crooked fat cop to Charlton Heston’s
good guy detective. Marlene Dietrich plays one
of Heston’s girlfriends. Capitol Hill resident and
Hitchcock expert Tom Zaniello leads a post-show
discussion. Saturday, March 14, at 2 p.m. Hill Center,
Old Navy Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free.
Call 202-549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org.

STAGE
BACK TO METHUSELAH

One of the first works of science fiction ever put on
stage, George Bernard Shaw’s Back to Methuselah
features the writer’s celebrated wit and touch of
satire as it examines the human lifespan, from the
Garden of Eden to “as far as thought can reach.”
Bill Largess directs the latest Washington Stage
Guild production. Closes this Sunday, March 15.
Undercroft Theatre of Mount Vernon United
Methodist Church, 900 Massachusetts Ave. NW.
Tickets are $40 to $50. Call 240-582-0050 or visit
stageguild.org.

BESSIE’S BLUES

HHHHH
Twenty years ago, Studio Theatre won six Helen
Hayes Awards with its production of Bessie’s
Blues by Thomas W. Jones II. If you missed its first
outing, you might wonder what all the fuss was
about. Bernardine Mitchell reprises the lead role at
MetroStage, and she is the chief reason to see the
revival. Mitchell has one of the most powerful voices
around, with stupendous range, conjuring Smith and
other blues-informed divas, from Aretha Franklin

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25

to Patti LaBelle. The subtle way the music helps
narrate the history and the influence of the blues is
impressive, but the script itself is a little too loose in
telling us about Smith especially. Bessie’s Blues uses
both interpretive acting as well as interpretive dancing — and even if you don’t find that pretentious, it
can be befuddling. The show is on soundest footing
when it keeps the focus on Mitchell and the music.
To March 15. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St.,
Alexandria. Tickets are $55 to $60. Call 800-4948497 or visit metrostage.org. (Doug Rule)

SCOTT SUCHMAN

BIGGER THAN YOU BIGGER THAN ME

Seaworthy

The Washington National Opera revives a much-improved Flying Dutchman

T

HOSE OF US A LITTLE LONGER IN THE TOOTH WILL RECOGNIZE
the return of Flying Dutchman (HHHHH) — a production last seen here in
2008. Sharply lit and scored with the harsh lines of a primitive woodcut, the
set was memorable for the enormous birdwing which dipped occasionally into view
like the well-meaning contributions of a gigantic toddler.
This time around, however, with more cohesion from director Stephen Lawless
and more dramatic chemistry and tension, there is none of the remoteness that
turned props (and ghostly apparitions) into amusements. Here, the potency of the
narrative allows one the framework in which to find the forlorn beauty and emotion
embedded in Wagner’s searching score -– an appreciation of the opera’s more rarified themes remaining optional.
And the plot itself is accessible. The story begins with sea captain Daland
anchored near port, waiting out bad weather. A ship comes alongside and, after a
brief but intense acquaintanceship with its mysterious Dutch captain, the greedy
Daland promises his daughter Senta in exchange for the man’s treasure. Meanwhile,
back at home, Senta pines for a mysterious seafarer of folkloric legend, while her
boyfriend Erik watches in frustration. When the ships finally arrive in port, myth
and reality collide.
At the heart of this version’s more effective storytelling is Eric Owens, who gives
his Dutchman a strange and striking presence. A bear of a man, Owens traps his
immense strength in the smallest of movements, lending them a portentous kind
of delicacy. It suggests the potential for violence but also speaks to the unbearable
moral and spiritual burden roiling within him. Befitting this Dutchman, Owens sings
with a deeply gratifying precision, his sound lustrously hewn.
It wasn’t easy to feel the passion of Senta in 2008, but here soprano Christiane
Libor makes for a very convincing young woman, believable in her increasing willingness to loosen earthly ties for idealized love. Libor captures the sad eeriness of
this tale –- and of this woman — bringing an otherworldly magic to her song for the
mythical seaman with an exquisitely beautiful tone.
Though he seems rather young to be her father, Ain Anger is a charismatic captain
and sings with befitting energy. As Erik, Jay Hunter Morris brings a credible angst.
He uses his tenor with a great, bowing roundness and at times it distracts, at others it is quite beautiful. As The Steersman, Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Michael
Brandenburg is nicely showcased for his natural acting and clear, attractive tenor.
And so, seven years later the Dutchman returns. This time his vessel is far more
sea-worthy. —Kate Wingfield
To March 21. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $25 to $300.
Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

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Field Trip Theatre, a company focused on supporting
new plays, engaging diverse audiences and reflecting
the perspectives and identities of people in D.C.,
offers a new play by Kathryn Coughlin focused on
facing fears and putting things in perspective. Nick
Vargas directs a production featuring Mia Branco,
Sophie Schulman and Josh Simon playing D.C. residents whose new friendship has a cascading effect
on their lives and jobs. Opens in a preview Thursday,
March 5, at 7:30 p.m. To March 15. Anacostia Arts
Center, 1231 Good Hope Road SE. Tickets are $10 for
the preview, or $15 regular performances. Call 202631-6291 or visit fieldtriptheatre.com.

FABULAS MAYAS

GALA Theatre presents an entertaining children’s
play by Cecilia Cackley, with bilingual adaptation
by Karin Tovar, relating traditional Mayan fables
and featuring shadow and hand puppetry by the
experimental company Wit’s End Puppets. Now to
March 21. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th
St. NW. Tickets are $10 to $12. Call 202-234-7174 or
visit galatheatre.org.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

The 11th installment in Synetic Theater’s “wordless
Shakespeare” series is one of the Bard’s best-loved
comedies. Synetic’s Paata Tsikurishvili has set Much
Ado About Nothing in the mid-20th Century Rat
Pack-era Las Vegas, so expect Sinatra-esque crooning tunes and chipper early rock songs. To March
22. Theater at Crystal City, 1800 South Bell St.,
Arlington. Tickets are $20 to $95. Call 800-494-8497
or visit synetictheater.org.

THE METROMANIACS

Michael Kahn directs a new adaptation by David
Ives of Alexis Piron’s classic 1738 French farce,
about a would-be poet who has fallen for the works
of a mysterious Breton poetess. In fact, the works
are by a middle-aged gentleman, who pawns his own
daughter off as the author in an attempt to separate
her from the son of a sworn enemy. Chaos ensues,
as does some poetic wooing reminiscent of Cyrano.
Extended to March 15. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th
St. NW. Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.org.

THE ORIGINALIST

Molly Smith directs an Arena Stage world premiere of John Strand’s play about one of the biggest enemies to the LGBT cause and civil rights in
general: Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. It’s
hard to get excited about this one, although no doubt
four-time Helen Hayes Award winner Edward Gero
will do Scalia justice. The play is performed in the
Mead Center’s Kogod Cradle in a new three-quarter
thrust configuration. To April 26. Mead Center for
American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Call 202-4883300 or visit arenastage.org.

COMMUNITY THEATER
EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL

The Greenbelt Arts Center offers a production of
the Off Broadway stage adaptation of Sam Raimi’s

cult classic zombie film featuring book and lyrics by
George Reinblatt and music by a team led by Frank
Cipolla. Jeffery Lesniak directs this community theater production, choreographed by Rikki Howie
Lacewell. The seats up front are designated the
Splatter Zone as, naturally, patrons will be splattered
in blood from the stage battles. And who wouldn’t
pay more for that? To March 28. Greenbelt Arts
Center, 123 Centerway. Greenbelt, Md. Tickets are
$22, or $30 for the Splatter Zone. Call 301-441-8770
or visit greenbeltartscenter.org.

MUSIC
ANDRAS SCHIFF

One of the world’s preeminent pianists presents
a new two-year project, “The Last Sonatas,” with
Washington Performing Arts. The organization
offers two engagements with Hungarian-born Schiff,
focused on the final sonatas by Mozart, Haydn,
Schubert and Beethoven. A discussion with performed selections is Saturday, March 14, with a
recital of the sonatas in full on Sunday, March 15.
Discussion is Saturday, March 14, at 6 p.m. Baird
Auditorium at the National Museum of Natural
History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
Tickets are $20. Recital is Sunday, March 15, at 4
p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman
Lane, North Bethesda. Remaining tickets are $35 to
$60. Call 202-785-9727 or visit washingtonperformingarts.org.

BROOKLYN RIDER

Washington Performing Arts presents a return
engagement by this groundbreaking string quartet,
celebrating 10 years together and offering the newest
chapter of its ongoing, cross-disciplinary Brooklyn
Rider Almanac project with the world premiere of

a work by multi-instrumentalist Tyondai Braxton,
formerly of the rock band Battles and a Philip Glass
collaborator. Saturday, March 21, at 8 p.m. Sixth & I
Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $28.
Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.

DUBFIRE

Once again, U Street Music Hall invites Ali
Shirazinia, better known as Dubfire and one half of
D.C.’s Deep Dish, to spin an open-to-close set of progressive house to kickoff its anniversary week, now
in its fifth year. Sunday, March 15, starting at 10 p.m.
U Street Music Hall, 1115A U St. NW. Tickets are
$12. Call 202-588-1880 or visit ustreetmusichall.com.

FAIRFAX SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Christopher Zimmerman leads the symphony in an
intimate performance of well-loved string pieces by
Mozart, Vaughan Williams and Dvorak. The focus
is on Bach’s Violin Concerto in A Minor, featuring
up-and-coming violinist Paul Huang, whose recent
debut at the Kennedy Center was hailed as auspicious by the Washington Post. Saturday, March 14,
at 8 p.m. Harris Theater at George Mason University
Center for the Arts, 4373 Mason Pond Drive, Fairfax.
Tickets are $25 to $60. Call 703-563-1990 or visit
fairfaxsymphony.org.

MADONNA

She’s gonna carry on: The queen of queens — to
many of a certain generation, at the very least — has
announced the first leg of her Rebel Heart World
Tour 2015. General public sale begins Monday,
March 16, for concert Saturday, Sept. 12. Verizon
Center, 601 F St. NW. Call 202-628-3200 or visit
livenation.com.

MIXTAPE

For over six years now, DJs Shea Van Horn and
Matt Bailer have thrown this insanely popular party
all over D.C., from Town to the Howard Theatre to
the 9:30 Club. It’s not quite a normal night out at
the club — the focus is on vocal-driven dance-pop,
both new and classic, mainstream and alternative,
with minimal musical transitions from song to song.
This month the party returns to one of its original,
bigger club venues, the Black Cat. Saturday, March
14. Doors at 9:30 p.m. Black Cat, 1811 14th St. NW.
Tickets are $10. Call 202-667-4490 or visit blackcatdc.com.

OVER THE RAINBOW:
THE SONGS OF HAROLD ARLEN

Any fan of The Wizard of Oz or its star, the original
gay diva Judy Garland, is by default a fan of composer Harold Arlen. For an Arlen cabaret revue
this weekend at the area’s newest live music venue,
Amp by Strathmore, Michael Lavine has recruited
some impressive singers to perform from the Arlen
songbook (the Garland classics as well as “Stormy
Weather” and “That Old Black Magic”): Eleasha
Gamble, a Helen Hayes Award winner who most
recently starred in Arena Stage’s Oklahoma!; Erin
Davie, who last year played the introverted conjoined twin Violet Hilton in the Kennedy Center’s
Side Show; and Sean McDermott, a Broadway veteran and soap opera actor who toured and performed
with Barbra Streisand a decade ago. Lavine will also
sing in addition to playing the piano and serving as
the show’s musical director. Saturday, March 14, at
8 p.m. Amp by Strathmore, 11810 Grand Park Ave.
North Bethesda. Tickets are $30. Call 301-581-5100
or visit ampbystrathmore.com. l

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food

American Spirit
Derek Brown and The National
Archives toast alcohol’s key role
in American history
by DOUG RULE
photography by TODD FRANSON

S

HERRY HAS SOMETHING OF A BAD REPUTAtion in the alcohol world. Too often maligned as the
elderly woman’s drink of choice, it seems an unusual
variety for any fledgling bar to focus on.
Not so for Derek Brown. Two years ago, he was inspired to
open Mockingbird Hill, specifically because of his love of sherry.
Inspired by similar places in the sherry-originating region of
southern Spain, the small, narrow establishment in Shaw serves
a regularly changing menu of snacks and small plates, from
nuts to specialty hams and cheeses, all of which are meant to be
paired with the bar’s vast selection of sherries.
“Most people are like, ‘Why do you care about sherry at all?
That’s what my grandmother drank, or that’s what Niles and
Frasier Crane drank,’” says Brown. Well sure, but not all sherry
is sweet, nor do the dry and complex varieties appeal only to the

Cranes of this world. In fact, sherry was apparently the first wine
brought to the Americas. “Christopher Columbus had it on his
voyage” — something we know to be true coming from Brown,
the “Chief Spirits Advisor” to the National Archives Foundation.
If you didn’t know the National Archives had such a position,
that’s because it was announced earlier this week at a reception
for Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History. This nearly
yearlong exhibit examines the production, consumption and
especially federal regulation of booze — a complicated history
that’s equal parts silly, solemn and sordid. In addition to tours
led by Bruce I. Bustard, the exhibit’s curator, Brown was also on
hand at the reception to talk more specifically about the types of
spirits consumed throughout America’s history, from cocktails
— “a uniquely American invention,” dating to the early 1800s —
to punch.
And just as sherry is often misunderstood, even maligned, in
America today, so it is with punch. It’s not just the too-sweet,
non-alcoholic swill you might remember from your childhood,
nor is it the Gatorade-flavored alcoholic dump that may have
been served from a trashcan at your college fraternity. Brown
has developed a special punch based on the more refined, classic style regularly imbibed by early American settlers, including our Founding Fathers — or “Founding Drinkers,” as Brown
calls them.
It turns out this punch is just the first of nearly 20 such
Spirited Republic-tied concoctions that Brown is developing
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to appear on the drink menus at local restaurants and bars.
Although the details are still being finalized, key establishments
set to participate include Bourbon Steak, Daikaya, Farmers
Fishers Bakers, Rose’s Luxury, Slipstream, Tryst, and Brown’s
three side-by-side Shaw establishments — Mockingbird Hill,
the whiskey-themed Southern Efficiency and the oyster bar Eat
The Rich.
As the Archives’ first spirits advisor, Brown is also set to lead
an upcoming seminar series focused on the history and culture
of spirits, as well as the link between alcohol and food. Brown’s
expertise on the subject is increasingly gaining recognition: He’s
a semifinalist for a 2015 James Beard Award for Mockingbird
Hill, and was picked as the 2015 “Bartender of the Year” by the
national Imbibe magazine.
Spirited Republic builds on an earlier Archives exhibit, 2011’s
What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam? The Government’s Effect on the
American Diet. It helps highlight a topic that isn’t as well-appreciated as it should be: The fact that alcohol has been as integral
to American history as food. And fundamentally speaking,
alcoholic concoctions are as American as apple pie.“I could not
imagine our country without punch,” says Brown, who asserts
that the drink helped fortify the founding fathers to think and
do things that most of us can’t even imagine — such as fight the
superpower of the time. How did such “a small ragtag bunch of
rebels” do it? “They were drinking punch!”
Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History is on exhibit
through Jan. 10, 2016, at the National Archives, Constitution
Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets NW. Call 202-357-5000 or
visit spiritedrepublic.org.

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SPIRITED REPUBLIC PUNCH

Created by Derek Brown
Rye Whiskey, Rum, Peach Liqueur and Hickory-Smoked Cola
Syrup
1 Bottle Catoctin Creek Rendezvous Rye Whiskey
1 Bottle Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum
6 oz. Rothman & Winter Orchard Peach Liqueur
9 oz. Lime Juice
Oleo Saccharum*
6 oz. Hickory-Smoked Cola Syrup
Apollinaris Sparkling Water (to taste)
Grated Nutmeg
Lemons and limes
Muddle lemon peels with fine sugar to create the lemon/sugar
paste or oil known as oleo saccharum.* Add the fresh-squeezed
lime juice** and hickory-smoked syrup. Combine all with spirits
and top with sparkling water to taste. Serve from a punch bowl
over large ice cubes and garnish with lemon and lime wheels and
grated nutmeg.
*To make oleo saccharum, it takes approximately six lemons and
one cup of fine sugar — muddled together, set aside for 30 minutes,
then strained to extract the oil — though the exact amount may
vary depending on individual tastes.
**Brown notes: “Without fresh lime juice, you’re not going to get
that zippy characteristic; you’re not going to get a balance out of
the drink.” l

games

Fallen Dynasty
Enjoy Empires until you tire
of its repetition. Then go
play something else
by RHUARIDH MARR

OMEGA FORCE / KOEI

I

N THE GAMING INDUSTRY, NOSTALGIA IS WORTH
its weight in gold — or at least year-end profits. Certain
franchises can thrive on the strength of nostalgia alone,
regardless of whether or not the actual content is worth
the investment. Gran Turismo’s fifth and sixth outings were
shaky at best, but gamers fondly remembering its glory days on
PlayStation and PS2 racked up huge sales for Sony. Square Enix
knows that fans grew up with Final Fantasy and will continue to
buy into the series — even if certain titles are less than deserving
of either your money or entry into its canon.
The mantra rings especially true for Dynasty Warriors. With the
exception of the PlayStation original, Koei Tecmo and developer
Omega Force have produced essentially the same game for fifteen
years. I spent many months playing Dynasty Warriors 2, 3, and 4,
hacking and slashing through the series’ depictions of the ancient
kingdoms of China. Stepping into Dynasty Warriors 8: Empires, it’s
both galling and oddly comforting how little has changed.
I’ve all but ignored the series since its PS2 heyday — there’s
only so many people you can hack, swipe, fan and smash your
way through before repetition sets in. I even skipped main entry
Dynasty Warriors 8, which launched almost two years ago. So
consider Empires my re-entry to the series.
First, we need to establish some ground rules: this is not a

game for those with no prior experience of the series. This is
also not a game for those who hate strategy titles. This is really
not a game for players who prefer to jump straight into action.
Dynasty Warriors 8: Empires may focus on the large-scale battle
between various dynasties and factions in China, but, more than
anything, it will make you feel part of a large-scale Microsoft
Office project.
There’s dense text to read through (which I find fascinating,
with its mix of history, lore and legend), including detailed biographies of each character and location. There’s dozens of menus
to jump through just to get started on the battlefield — between
starting a campaign and actually taking control of a character, I
could have flown to China and back to see the game’s locales for
myself. You’ll also be served a litany of facts, figures and other
information related to performance, warrior stats, army details,
territorial disputes, buffs, equipment and dozens of other minutia — if you don’t like spreadsheets, you’re going to hate the level
of control and customization on offer here.
Of course, if you do enjoy being able to customize everything
— and I really do mean everything, from the officers in control
of your armies, the horses you’ll ride into battle and the banners your troops carry, to your characters individual traits such
as active and passive buffs, armor types, weapons and special
moves, then there’s a lot to love here. A campaign will take place
on a month-by-month basis, and can stretch into years depending on difficulty and extent. You’ll typically be tasked with
conquering a region of China, with various factions and leaders
working for and against you in each area. It’s up to you how
you go about this — but, really, your main focus will be cracking skulls until whomever opposes you flees with their weapon
between their legs.
You have various ways to help destabilize a region prior to a
full-scale battle to reclaim it. You can perform raids on enemies,
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31

stealing weapons or supplies, or assassinate important leaders.
You can form relationships, both literal and platonic, with other
leaders to gain their trust and their army’s aid in battle. There
are important strategies to be worked out, such as troop placement, and you can pick and choose where you’d like to wage
war next. Underneath it all is the essential maintenance that
comes with running an army — you’ll have to mine for resources
and erect buildings, as well as earn enough money to pay your
troops, for instance. It’s possible to play the game without all
of this management — let the computer order you around and
you’ll be an officer, jumping between battles as it sees fit — but
really, why bother? If you don’t want to get into the nitty-gritty
of running your campaign, buy Dynasty Warriors 8.
That said, it’s not exactly beginner-friendly. I have a least a
passing familiarity with the game, but having never played an
Empires expansion before, I was surprised at how challenging the interface is. Even after time with the game, it still feels
dated and obtuse. You’ll get lost in menus and have so many UI
elements thrown at you that it’s tough to remain focused on the
task at hand — and you’ll likely forget what the task is unless you
have a firm grasp on the monthly workings of your campaign.
Undoubtedly, however, the strategy elements are needed, as
core gameplay remains as shallow as it was a decade ago. Battles
will always go the same way: you’ll hack and slash through
thousands (really, thousands — I finished one small battle with
4,400 kills) of enemies, tackling the occasional, challenging general or officer, until you’ve cleared enough of the battlefield and
caused enough opposing officials to flee to secure the win. It’s
the same game I loved playing years ago — for better or worse.
There’s still the same satisfaction that comes with dispatching
enemies in great waves with a well-timed Musou attack (though

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I still don’t remember magical abilities being mentioned in any
Chinese historical text), or cutting through a particularly tough
officer after a lengthy battle.
Repetition, though, is never far away. There’s only so many
constantly-spawning plebs you can cut through (or fan-smash
as I prefer to do — yes, I’m one of those who play as Xiaoqiao
with her awesome battle fans). Eventually, you’ll tire of it all.
You’ll tire of the cheesy dialogue. You’ll tire of the death cries,
which still sound like wimp orgasms. You’ll tire of the awful,
repeating rock soundtrack. You’ll tire of everything and seek
another, deeper experience.
Indeed, Empires seems to encourage that play style — enjoy
it until you tire, then go play something else. Log in for an hour
or so every couple of days to manage your campaign, or devise
your own battles in Free Mode, and hack away to your heart’s
content.
Sticking to that short length will keep the fires burning for
those who fondly remember the game as a teenager, or for
those who are still actively invested in the series. For everyone
else? You’re fighting a losing battle if you try to get into Dynasty
Warriors now. The game is created for those with experience
of the series and actively fights against making your time with
it streamlined or usable. If you can get through the menus and
text and stats, there’s a semi-deep game on offer. I suspect that
the vast majority, however, will turn it off after a few hours
and never go back. Nostalgia may keep a series alive, but in the
long-run, it can’t sustain it — Dynasty Warriors steady decline is
testament to that fact.
Dynasty Warriors 8: Empires (HHHHH) is available on PS3, PS4
and Xbox One. l

sports

Game On
Robert Kinsler’s United Social
Sports focuses on building social
communities through sports
by DOUG RULE
illustration by CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO

I

T IS PROBABLY OUR SILLIEST, MOST TONGUE-INcheek sport,” says Robert Kinsler. “But it’s also the most
accessible. And just really easy for people to get involved
with.”
The sport? Skeeball.
“It’s where it all started,” says Kinsler, who runs United
Social Sports. On the rings of this popular arcade attraction,
Kinsler grew what is now a prominent adult sports company. In late 2009, he and a friend started a skeeball league

in Arlington after reading about a similar league in New
York. “We decided to start the skeeball league, and it was
more popular than we had anticipated. And one thing led to
another, and here we are.”
These days, Kinsler runs an entire company comprised
of various sports leagues, including more traditional sports
such as softball, soccer and volleyball. However, even with
more mundane sports and his official title of Commissioner,
Kinsler refuses to take cues from the usual sports playbook.
In any given season the company presents up to two dozen
sports leagues — held at venues throughout D.C. as well as
suburban Virginia and Maryland — and all are non-competitive and “focused on bringing people together,” having fun in
a collegial, social environment.
“People kind of assume that I’m a sports guy,” says the
Arlington native, who studied to be an actor and previously
worked in real estate. While he loves playing softball and
kickball as well as skeeball, “it’s really less about the sports
and more about the relationships and building a community,
and creating something from scratch — that’s my passion.”
Each year, United Social Sports increases its offerings,
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33

with most drawn from the school playground — kickball,
dodgeball, frisbee — and sometimes even grouped together,
as in DC Recess, an “indoor recess league” currently wrapping up its inaugural season. (Most leagues last from six to
eight weeks.) There’s also what Kinsler calls “really crazy
stuff,” including leagues focused on shuffleboard and cornhole. Perhaps the craziest addition is a two-month fall event
“Pongapolooza,” which features various beer-centric games
from pong to flip cup to Battleship, presented in partnership
with All American Beer Pong.
“You name it, we’re probably running it — unless it’s just
a typically very competitive sport,” Kinsler says. “If it’s social
and involves a puck, a ball, a stick, a basket — something
along those lines — we’re probably playing it.”
The company also works to expand its outreach by forming partnerships, including most recently with Stonewall
Sports. “We’ve had various LGBT leagues over the years but
we wanted to do more. Partnering with Stonewall allows
us to give back to the community,” says Kinsler, noting that
United Social Sports makes a donation to the DC Center
for the leagues it runs with Stonewall. The partnership also
offers expanded opportunities for gays and straight allies
to play in leagues together, and allows the volunteer-run
Stonewall to augment its services by tapping into the relationships and resources that United Social Sports can provide, from its eight-person staff to a warehouse full of equipment. At the moment the company offers four spring leagues
with Stonewall: Two Thursday night kickball leagues and a
Sunday morning soccer league held at Stead Park near JR’s,
plus a Sunday evening volleyball league at Our Lady Queen of

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the Americas church in the Dupont/Kalorama area.
Of course, LGBT players can join any league presented
by the company, not just those offered through Stonewall.
“We have a very diverse player base across all of our sports
— people from all walks of life, all different nationalities,
gender, sexual orientations. We’re very open and welcoming.” The focus is on community and collaboration more than
competition. Occasionally the company offers a sport in two
different leagues, splitting them into advanced and beginner
levels — or varsity and junior varsity. “Sometimes it’s a little
bit more fun if people are playing on similar skill levels. But
beyond that, the focus is always on being social and building
relationships.”
Late last year United Social Sports launched an official charitable arm, the Social Sports Foundation. Kinsler
describes this as “a new initiative to specifically help youth
in and around D.C. to be more active and to focus on total
wellness and getting outside and playing.” It’s just one more
way the company aims “to continue to build ourselves as a
member of the communities that we’re apart of and to be able
to give back more.”
For more information about the spring kickball, soccer and volleyball leagues in partnership with Stonewall Sports, visit unitedsocialsports.com/lgbt-spring-leagues.
For more information about United Social Sports or to register
for all spring leagues, call 1-855-PLAY-USS or visit unitedsocialsports.com. l

tech

Watchful
Apple’s Watch is almost here, but
will it be worth the asking price?
by RHUARIDH MARR

APPLE

F

INALLY, AFTER MONTHS OF TEASES AND
speculation, Apple’s entry into the smartwatch market is finished and ready for sale. Following its debut
late last year, The company has kept quiet on most
of the details, but at a press conference earlier this week, they
finally spilled the beans on the important details of its “most
personal product ever.”

For starters, this isn’t just a me-too notification viewer like
many other smartwatches. Instead, Apple is focusing on three
key areas: fitness, interactivity, and, of course, its ability to tell
the time.
In terms of fitness, the company called it a complete health
and fitness package. Using a similar processor to that found in
the latest iPhones, the Watch will constantly track your movement over the course of a day. It can detect various types of
exercise and movement, from walking, to cycling, to running, to
driving in a car. It can also detect when you’ve been inactive for
too long — such as sitting at a desk at work — and it’ll alert you
with a simple “tap” using its haptic feedback engine (essentially,
it’ll vibrate).
It’ll also send fitness reminders, helping coach you through
workouts by showing calories, distance, time, etc. Apple brought
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35

Christy Turlington Burns on stage to talk about her incredible
organization Every Mother Counts, but also about the Watch’s
help in marathon running. It helped keep her going, providing
stats for her overall run as well as coaching her to stay at her
peak. The Watch will even show a weekly assessment of your
overall fitness, offering advice and information on how to beat
your own achievements over the coming week.
The Watch is also, unsurprisingly, very capable at telling
the time. It’s synced to within 50 milliseconds of Coordinated
Universal Time, while the watch face itself is easily customized.
In addition to a standard clock, you can add reminders, a world
clock, the date, a stopwatch and other items. The clock itself can
be selected from a wide variety — forcibly press the screen (it’s
designed for this, so don’t worry about breaking it) and pick the
watch face you want. Mickey Mouse remains a firm favorite for
this writer.
Under the clock face is the Glance screen, accessed by swiping up. Here lies all of the information you need at that given
moment. If you’re at work, you’ll find appointment reminders,
flight information, or messages from colleagues. If you’re at
home, you’ll get social media updates, sports scores, trending
topics on Twitter and others.
Any notification on your phone will be displayed on your
Watch — though this can also be customized, via the Watch app
on iPhone. Thanks to the included mike and speaker, calls can
be answered on your wrist (Samsung made a huge display of this
with its original Galaxy Gear watch), while texts and emails can
also be replied to, either with short word replies, or with voice
dictation, much like other smartwatches. Like Pebble’s latest
watch, you can even send your voice as an audio clip, if dictation isn’t working well — such as in a loud environment. Siri,
naturally, is also on board, and can be activated by pressing the
Watch’s side button or saying “Hey Siri” to your watch. After
that, feel free to set reminders or ask questions or tell her you
love her — whatever you normally use Siri for.
The main draw of the Watch, however, is its apps. Accessed
in a large, dynamic bubble view, apps are a core part of the
experience. Access sports scores with the MLB.com app, view
upcoming flight information and get a barcode of your boarding card with American Airlines, or use your watch to check in
to your room (and even unlock the door at certain hotels such
as Starwood Hotels). Summon a car with Uber and the driver,
car model and license plate will be shown on your wrist — it’ll
even display a map of the driver’s location. If you’re in a bar and
want to know what’s playing, Shazam will work on the Watch.
If you use Alarm.com, you can view your home security cameras
and lock or unlock your home from your wrist. You can listen
to music, view photos (both on your phone and through services such as Instagram), and even pay for items with Apple pay.
Double tap the button to bring up your credit card, then hold
your watch near to the wireless terminal. It’ll play a sound and
vibrate, to let you know the payment has been successful.
All told, Apple’s vision of what a smartwatch should be is
strong. It makes a more compelling argument than Android
Wear thanks to its better focus on apps, as opposed to quick
notifications. Apple still maintains that the Watch is intended to
be used for ten-second bursts over the course of a day, but what
you can accomplish in those ten seconds should be more than on
Google’s smartwatch platform — at least until the latter receives
its next big update.
None of this matters, however, if the thing will die before
you can make it home. Apple is promising up to 18 hours of battery life in a “typical” day, but unless you’re the sort who never
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checks their watch or phone (in which case, we’d ask why you
were considering a Watch in the first place), you’re going to be
charging this every night alongside your iPhone. Apple touted
its magnetic charger, which snaps onto the back of the watch
when you hold it near, as something only the company would do
— that’s true, but Motorola built wireless charging into the Moto
360, and taking a watch off and placing it on a custom stand is
infinitely more elegant than fumbling with a charging cable.
Smartwatches are still in their infancy, that much is true, but
Apple presented several compelling reasons for purchasing a
Watch. Minimizing the amount of time you need to retrieve your
phone from your pocket, aiding you to be healthier, removing
the need to bother with boarding cards or hotel keys (or even
your car keys, Tim Cook teased in an interview) — these are all
ways the Watch can certainly be of use. Whether it’s enough to
justify its price, is entirely up to you.
Let’s get the important facts out of the way: the Watch isn’t
going to be cheap. No one thought it would be, but Apple has
finally talked money — and we’re looking at fashion watch prices, not smartwatch prices (which have typically hovered around
the $200-$300 mark).
The base Apple Watch Sport starts at $349 for the smaller,
38mm model, while the bigger, 42mm watch will cost $399. It’s
made from anodized aluminum, which has been blended into an
alloy that’s 60 percent stronger than similar alloys, and coated to
help prevent scratches to the metal. It’ll come with a variety of
colorful, rubber bands, befitting of its sporty status.
The Apple Watch collection, as CEO Tim Cook described
them, will start at $549 for a 38mm device, stretching to $599
for the 42mm model. Available in silver or space black, its metal
has been subjected to alloying and processing to make it up to 80
percent harder and less likely to pick up cosmetic damage with
daily use.
Apple is selling a variety of bands, including leather, metal
links, and Milanese loop. Adding on some of the more intricate
bands, however, will vastly inflate the price. Want the full-size,
42mm watch with the most expensive band? You’ll be looking at
a sticker price of $1,099. And if that shocked you, perhaps have a
stiff drink before hitting the next paragraph.
Perhaps the most talked about version, the Apple Watch
Edition finally has a price. It was never going to be anything
less than “if you have to ask, you can’t really afford,” but exactly
how much will Apple be demanding? If you’d like to wrap the
18-karat gold watch around your wrist, it’ll cost $10,000. Yes,
you read that correctly — but Engadget reports that some variations, depending on size and strap type, could cost upwards of
$17,000. To aid that inflated price, the Watch Edition will be
limited availability and only sold in select retail stores. Don’t
expect to find it at your local mall (unless your local mall is in the
center of a major city).
Preorders for the Apple Watch start April 10, with Apple’s
stores showcasing the watches in unique display tables from
that day. Customers are permitted to try on watches with the
help of employees — so don’t think you can strap on a Watch
Edition and sashay out the door. Actual units will start shipping
to customers on April 24.
If the Watch sounds like something you’d enjoy having
strapped around your wrist — whether as a fashion statement, a
fitness coach, or another way to prove your endless devotion for
all things Apple — you’ve got just over six weeks left until that’s
a reality. For everyone else, keep pulling your phone out of your
pocket to stay connected and enjoy the extra $350 (or $17,000)
in your bank. l

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37

NIGHT

LIFE
LISTINGS
THURS., 03.12.15

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4
Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm • $3
Rail Drinks, 10pm-midnight,
$5 Red Bull, Gatorade
and Frozen Virgin Drinks
• Locker Room Thursday
Nights • DJs Sean Morris
and MadScience • Ripped
Hot Body Contest at midnight, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka •
$200 Cash Prize • Doors
open 10pm, 18+ • $5 Cover
under 21 and free with
college ID
DC EAGLE
Eagle Hour: Men in any DC
Eagle shirt drink free rail
and domestic, 9-10pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Thursday,
10-11pm • Featuring music
by DJs BacK2bACk

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour

JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close •
Throwback Thursday featuring rock/pop retro hits

METROWEEKLY.COM

39

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scene
Freddie’s Beach Bar’s
15th Anniversary Pruple Party
Saturday, March 7
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!

PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON

-- $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 03.13.15

9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Friday Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van Horn
• VJ • Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm

COBALT/30 DEGREES
All You Can Drink Happy
Hour • $15 Rail &
Domestic, $21 Call &
Imports, 6-9pm • Guys
Night Out • Free Rail
Vodka, 11pm-Midnight, $6
Belvedere Vodka Drinks
all night • Watch your
favorite music videos with
DJ MadScience in the
lounge • DJ Keenan Orr
on the dancefloor • $10
cover 10pm-1am, $5 after
1am • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
Potomac MC at Club Bar •
Coat check open
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm

JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1, 11pm-midnight • Happy Hour: 2-for1, 4-9pm • $5 Coronas, $8
Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour -- $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Miss
Tatianna, Shi-QueetaLee, Epiphany B. Lee
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, BacK2bACk
downstairs • Doors open
at 10pm • For those 21 and
over, $5 from 10-11pm and
$10 after 11pm • For those
18-20, $12 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers,
hosted by LaTroya Nicole •
Ladies of Illusion with host

Kristina Kelly, 9pm • DJ
Steve Henderson in Secrets
• VJ Tre in Ziegfeld’s •
Cover 21+
SAT., 03.14.15

9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• $5 Absolut & Tito’s, $3
Miller Lite after 9pm •
Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Drag Yourself to Brunch
at Level One, 11am-2 and
2-4pm • Featuring Kristina
Kelly and the Ladies of
Illusion • Bottomless
Mimosas and Bloody Marys
• Happy Hour: $3 Miller
Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• AFTERGLOW Dance
Party, 10pm-close • DJ
Team Electrox & Milko in
the lounge • DJ Tom from
Prague on the dancefloor
• $5 Rail, $3 PBR, $8 Red
Bull & Vodka, $4 Fireball all
night • 18+

DC EAGLE
Eagle Wings Charity
Auction Bar Night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner-style Breakfast
Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy
Hour, 4-7pm • Freddie’s
Follies Drag Show, hosted
by Ms. Destiny B. Childs,
8-10pm • Karaoke, 10pmclose
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • JOX:
The GL Underwear Party,
9pm-2am • Clothes check
• $5 Cover after 10pm • $3
Bud Light, $4 Fireball Shots,
$5 Bacardi, all flavors, all
night long
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka highballs, $7 Vodka Red Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15

METROWEEKLY.COM

NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm • No
Cover • DILF Daddy Party,
9:30pm-close • Featuring
DJ Douglas Sullivan • $3
Miller Lite, $5 Titos and
Bulleit bourbon, 9pm-close
TOWN
Dirty Pop with DJ Drew
G • Tempest DuJour
of RuPaul’s Drag Race,
Season 7 • Music and
videos downstairs with DJ
Wess • Drag Show starts
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Miss Tatianna, Shi-QueetaLee, Epiphany B. Lee and
Ba’Naka • Doors open
10pm • Cover $10 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Men of Secrets, 9pm •
Guest dancers • Ladies
of Illusion with host Ella
Fitzgerald, 9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets •
DJ Don T. in Ziegfeld’s •
Doors 8pm • Cover 21+

MARCH 12, 2015

41

SUN., 03.15.15

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
$4 Stoli, Stoli flavors
and Miller Lite all day •
Homowood Karaoke, 10pmclose • No Cover, 21+
DC EAGLE
Barbecue and Beer Blast
• $2 off pitchers of beer
all day
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch Buffet,
10am-3pm • Crazy Hour,
4-7pm • Karaoke, 8pm-1am
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $3
Smirnoff, all flavors, all
night • #SundayFunday
upstairs, 6-10pm • Mama’s
Trailer Park Karaoke,
9:30pm-close

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JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all flavors), all day
and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+

• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports •
Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Drag Show hosted by
Kristina Kelly • Doors open
at 10pm, show starts at
11pm • $3 Skyy Cocktails,
$8 Skyy and Red Bull • No
Cover, 18+
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm

MON., 03.16.15

GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour All Night Long,
4pm-close • Michael’s
Open Mic Night Karaoke,
9:30pm-close

9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &

Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
-- $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Poker Texas
Hold’em, 8pm • Dart
Boards
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
TUES., 03.17.15

Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• SIN Industry Night •
Half-price Cocktails, 10pmclose
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour All Night Long,
4pm-close
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/Alt/
Brit Rock), 9pm-close • DJ
Wes Della Volla • 2-for-1,
all day and night

9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports •
Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
-- $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Karaoke and
Drag Bingo

ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis

NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover • Safe Word: A
Gay Spelling Bee, 8-11pm
• Prizes to top three
spellers • After 9pm, $3
Absolut, Bulleit & Stella

COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3

WED., 03.18.15

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Wednesday Night
Karaoke downstairs, 10pm
• $4 Stoli and Stoli Flavors
and Miller Lite • No Cover
• 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • $6
Burgers • Drag Bingo
Night, hosted by Ms.
Regina Jozet Adams •
Bingo prizes • Karaoke,
10pm-1am

GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $4
Drafts all night long • Boys
of HUMP upstairs, 9pm
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay Ray,
8pm • The Queen, 10-11pm
• $2 JR’s Drafts & $4
Vodka ($2 with College I.D./
JR’s Team Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
SmartAss Trivia Night, 8pm
and 9pm • Prizes include
bar tabs and tickets to
shows at the 9:30 Club •
$15 Buckets of Beer for
SmartAss Teams only •
Bring a new team member
and each get a free $10
Dinner
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Night, 10-11pm,
12-12:30am • Military
Night, no cover with
military ID • DJ Don T. in
Secrets • 9pm • Cover 21+

THURS., 03.19.15

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4
Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm • $3
Rail Drinks, 10pm-midnight,
$5 Red Bull, Gatorade
and Frozen Virgin Drinks
• Locker Room Thursday
Nights • DJs Sean Morris
and MadScience • Ripped
Hot Body Contest at midnight, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka •
$200 Cash Prize • Doors
open 10pm, 18+ • $5 Cover
under 21 and free with
college ID

METROWEEKLY.COM

DC EAGLE
Throwback Thursday • Ted
on the Bar • Peter on the
Boot Black Chair • Eagle
Hour: Men in any DC Eagle
shirt drink free rail and
domestic, 9-10pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Thursday,
10-11pm • DJs BacK2bACk
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close •
Throwback Thursday featuring rock/pop retro hits
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
-- $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ

MARCH 12, 2015

43

Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 03.20.15

9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Friday Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van Horn
• VJ • Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
All You Can Drink Happy
Hour • $15 Rail &
Domestic, $21 Call &
Imports, 6-9pm • Guys
Night Out • Free Rail
Vodka, 11pm-Midnight, $6
Belvedere Vodka Drinks
all night • Watch your
favorite music videos with
DJ MadScience in the
lounge • DJ Keenan Orr
on the dancefloor • $10

44

MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

cover 10pm-1am, $5 after
1am • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
Bear Nonsense: Bear Happy
Hour, 6-10pm • Coat check
open
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • The
Boys of HUMP, 9pm-2am
• Featuring VJ Tre and
Friday Night Videos •
$5 Cover • 1 free rail or
domestic drink, 9-10pm •
$5 Smirnoff, all flavors, all
night long
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1, 11pm-midnight • Happy Hour: 2-for1, 4-9pm • $5 Coronas, $8
Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour -- $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Miss
Tatianna, Shi-QueetaLee, Epiphany B. Lee
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, BacK2bACk
downstairs • Doors open
at 10pm • For those 21 and
over, $5 from 10-11pm and
$10 after 11pm • For those
18-20, $12 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers,
hosted by LaTroya Nicole •
Ladies of Illusion with host
Kristina Kelly, 9pm • DJ
Steve Henderson in Secrets
• VJ Tre in Ziegfeld’s •
Cover 21+ l

SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE

45

“There’s never been a closet that I’ve been in.
I don’t own a closet.”
— JUSSIE SMOLLET, who plays gay character Jamal Lyon on Fox’s Empire, coming out to Ellen DeGeneres on the latter’s ABC
talk show. Smollet has never publicly confirmed his sexuality, but told DeGeneres because he was worried that
not confirming his sexuality was sending the wrong message.

“We didn’t have to call it marriage,
which offends myself and a lot of people.

— Senator RAND PAUL (R., Kentucky), speaking on Fox News about his distaste for same-sex marriage. “I’m for traditional
marriage. I think marriage is between a man and a woman.”

“People have asked me straight up,
is Frank Underwood bisexual? Is he gay?”
— BEAU WILLIMON, creator and showrunner of Netflix’s House of Cards, speaking with Huffington Post about the character portrayed by Kevin Spacey. The show has hinted at various aspects of Underwood’s sexuality, but never confirmed a specific label. “I
don’t think Frank Underwood really puts much stock in those sort of labels.”

“If being gay is a choice, prove it. Choose it.
Choose to be gay yourself.”
— DAN SAVAGE, advice columnist and founder of the It Gets Better campaign, responding to homophobic conservative commentator Ben Carson, who stated in a CNN interview that homosexuality was a choice. Savage, writing in his weekly column, told
Carson, “Show America how that’s done, Ben, show us how a man can choose to be gay. Suck my dick.”

“Access to safe restrooms is
an important transgender rights issue —
Refuge seeks to aid this mission.

— HARLAN KELLAWAY, app developer, writing in the App Store about newly launched iOS app Refuge Restrooms. The app was
coded to work in sync with RefugeRestrooms.org, owned by transgender woman Teagan Widmer, which seeks to detail all of the
restrooms considered “safe” for transgender, intersex and gender nonconforming people to use in their vicinity. Users can
add restrooms to the app, including details for other users, expanding the database.

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MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM

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MARCH 12, 2015

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MARCH 12, 2015

METROWEEKLY.COM