P01547: 

Language, culture and  communication in online  learning 

 

 
Noamgalai: 'Socializing'   http://www.flickr.com/photos/noamg/218169158/   

‘Face work’ in Facebook:   An analysis of an online   discourse community     Tony McNeill  April 2008 

 

1. Introduction and context  My chosen online discourse community relates to my professional practice as a lecturer based in the  Academic Development Centre (ADC) at Kingston University.  Within the ADC I am involved in  providing, amongst other things, a range of academic staff development opportunities and guidance  in the area of e‐learning. An emerging area of interest at Kingston University is the use of Web 2.0  tools and platforms as a supplement to, or in some cases, as a replacement of, the Blackboard  Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), currently the institution’s main platform to support learning,  teaching and assessment.   A small but growing number of colleagues have articulated a concern that the university’s  technological infrastructure was too detached from the practice of its students; for example, there is  currently minimal support for outbound text messaging in a youth culture in which texting is the  norm and there is little use of social networking sites (SNS) which are growing in popularity amongst  young people of, or approaching, university age (JISC 2007a; JISC 2007b; JISC 2008; Kennedy, G. et al.   2006; Livingstone & Bober 2005; Salaway, G. & Borreson Carouso, J. 2007). In response to this, some  colleagues have begun to go ‘beyond Blackboard’ and experiment with alternative environments  including SNS such as Facebook.  The use of SNS in Higher Education raises a range of interesting issues about language, discourse,  power and culture that some researchers have begun to address (boyd 2007; boyd & Ellison 2008;  Ellison et al. 2007; Liu 2008; Merchant 2006; Selwyn 2007; Stutzman 2005). Questions that  particularly interest me include:  • What discoursal expectations emerge from the use of an informal 'outside' space to host a  learning community? What are the kinds of politeness strategies deployed?  Does communication in ‘their’ [i.e. student] space alter the power dynamic between tutors  and students, lessening social distance between participants?  Does the widespread use of SNS by students for particular forms of identity performances,  often at variance with ‘official’ academic identities (Selwyn 2007), militate against its use as  a virtual learning environment?  What are the key characteristics of language use in an SNS? Do they change as a result of the  involvement of an academic tutor? Is there a distinctive variation in language use between  an institutional VLE‐based discussion board post or email exchange and those situated  within a third‐party SNS?  

This analysis will consider these questions, respectively covering discourse, power, culture and  language, within the context of the use of the Facebook SNS as an environment for course‐specific  student support. I will take as my discourse community the staff and students enrolled on the BA  Film Studies programme (both single and joint honours) in the 2007/8 academic year. The corpus of  linguistic exchanges for analysis is comprised of Facebook interactions between a Lecturer in Film  Studies (henceforth known as David), and his students. I will concentrate primarily on a series of  group email exchanges and discussion board posts between David and his students. These emails are  2 | P a g e    

included in the Appendix. I have secured permission from the colleague concerned, as well as his  students, to analyse their Facebook exchanges for the purposes of this study. My analysis will draw  on the work of John Swales on discourse communities, Susan Herring‘s research on text‐based  computer‐mediated discourse (CMD) and Penelope Brown and Steven Levinson’s models of  politeness strategies.    2. Discourse communities and Facebook   According to John Swales, discourse communities are defined by broadly agreed common goals,  special mechanisms for communication and participation and some specialised vocabulary (1987  pp.5‐7). Swales’ later writing (1990) adds a further level of complexity, arguing that a discourse  community is not simply a group of people who share a particular common interest and forms of  communication, but one whose participation is delimited by that community’s discoursal  expectations. Participation within the environment of a particular discourse community is deemed  acceptable only insofar as it conforms to the underlying rules of the game (i.e. how things are done,  what constitutes appropriate or socially desirable behaviour) of that community. Susan Herring’s  work on CMD is potentially useful here and employs the term ‘norms’ (2007) to describe behavioural  standards and linguistic behaviour specific to a particular group. By way of example, she argues that  empathy, encouragement and support are expected and approved of in a women’s health  newsgroup (e.g. Stork Talk) but that rudeness, aggressiveness and profanity are expected and  desirable features of the alt.flame newsgroup. Joseph Kayany’s (1998) earlier research on flaming  adopted a similar line, arguing that intemperate language was not an intrinsic part, or inevitable  consequence, of online communication but, rather, the result of particular social and cultural  contexts.  The Facebook SNS provides a convenient environment for the development of discourse  communities with its varied participatory mechanisms. On Facebook users create their personal  profile page allowing them to list interests and activities they share with others. They also belong to  a ‘Network’ defined primarily by the educational institution with which they are, or have been,  affiliated. Communication with others within Facebook takes place via a range of tools including  email, discussion boards, uploaded videos and picture galleries that include a space for comments   and a ‘wall’ in which users can exchange messages with nominated friends. Other popular features  include status updates, ‘poking’ friends (an ambiguous tool but one of the many phatic uses of  Facebook) and gift‐giving (fish, flowers etc.).   Facebook users can also set up their own groups which they make public or else invite others to join,  thereby creating highly fluid and open ’community’ spaces for learning. Of interest to this study, is  the use of Facebook to create and sustain social networking communities (SNCs). I want to argue  that the sorts of SNCs operating within Facebook may be seen as distinct online discourse  communities with some, admittedly a minority, having learning, or the co‐production of knowledge,  as the common goal or interest. Facebook is currently the platform for various discourse  communities; it is not the space for a single monolithic one. To date, thousands of groups exist with  a range of common interests and discoursal expectations or norms. Alongside academic groups such  as Teaching & Learning with Facebook whose discoursal norms are little different to those of an  3 | P a g e    

academic newsgroup, there exist many others whose norms permit very different, often disturbing  (see Capriccioso 2004), types of online behaviour.      3. Discourse in our Film Studies Facebook community  Being part of a discourse community involves sharing its specific interests but also its ways of acting  discoursally. This is reflected in the way that members of a discourse community share expectations  in terms of appropriateness of topics and ways those topics can be discussed. These expectations,  Swales argue, create the genres that articulate the activities of the discourse community.   Within our Facebook discourse community, David served as the ‘expert’ member, creating groups  and initiating communicative exchanges. Genres deployed included: asking advice, inviting others  out for a drink, soliciting feedback on work produced and so on. The types of interactions observed  were typical of what Gary Burnett  has called ‘collaborative interactive behaviours’ (2000) with  either a transactional orientation related to information seeking and providing information to other  community members, or with a more interactional orientation (language games, conversational  humour and expressions of empathy and support) that were more about establishing and reinforcing  group identity. David’s Facebook communications also vary in tone:  those on academic matters  adopting a less playful, although relatively informal style (e.g. interaction 1: 38); whilst those on  social events such as organising an end‐of‐module drink adopt a less formal style characterised by  various forms of conversational humour (e.g. teasing, self‐deprecating jokes, mock‐competitiveness)  and in‐group references (e.g interaction 1: 1).  Analysing the exchanges, it appears that discoursal expectations developed as a result of three  factors: David’s initial Facebook communications which set a tone and invited particular types of  responses; participants’ prior expertise in online communication in Facebook and/or other forms of  CMD; and, perhaps most importantly, the rapport David had already established with his students  offline. It’s interesting to note that some of the conversational joking present in David’s exchanges  took the form of self‐deprecating humour in which David parodied his own adaption to the CMD  styles required of him:   that's "sick" (I believe that means "big" and good)  Interaction 1: 13  In part, this example refers to a strand of offline joking between David and Sunil. However, it also  indicates a playful awareness of the tension between David’s preferred style and the emerging  dominant style of the discourse community. It might be argued that this use of self‐deprecating  humour was also a means of downplaying his linguistic authority whilst simultaneously exercising it;  playing along with the language games – in this case, the use of slang terms like sick and big ‐ whilst  indirectly (and therefore maintaining the face needs of participants – more of which later) reminding  community participants that such words are not part of the ‘legitimate’ lexis of academic discourse.   Although I’ve indicated that so‐called ‘non‐expert’ community members played a key role in  establishing the dominant style, one drawn from earlier experiences of CMD, not all characteristics  of the discourse of SNS have been carried over. For example, as some researchers have already  4 | P a g e    

identified (Selwyn 2007; Thelwall 2007), the use of taboo words and swearing is commonplace in  SNS like Facebook and MySpace as a form of identity performance and/or to strengthen group  identity. However, there were no uses in any of the interactions studied.  There were occasionally  uses of substitute adverbial boosters – e.g. “thats so freakin weird” (student Facebook email Jan 28th  2008 – not in Appendix) – and two uses of now weak swear words – e.g. sod and git in two instances  of banter or mock offensiveness (interaction 1: 8 and 52 respectively). This might be explained in a  number of ways:  the limited scope of the corpus of interactions studied or the attitudes towards  swearing of the participants. However, my hypothesis is that there was a tacit prohibition of such  language; the discourse community’s implicit expectations led to a self‐policing of its behavioural  and linguistic norms.    4. Politeness strategies, humour and social distance  An integral part of the discoursal practices of this community involved the use of conversational  humour, including banter, teasing and self‐mockery. Sociolinguistic studies (Boxer & Cortes‐Conde  1997; Kotthoff 1996) have tended to confirm that joking behaviour serves an important social  function and that the playful use of language achieves a range of identity and relational effects (e.g.  attenuating power imbalances; licensing challenges to status hierarchies; establishing common  ground;  marking in‐group boundaries) .   I’d argue that conversational humour was one of the politeness strategies deployed to maintain  participants' ‘face’ within the discourse community. Brown and Levinson’s model of linguistic  politeness  adapts Ervin Goffman’s earlier concept of face ‐  "an image of self delineated in terms of  approved social attributes" (1967, p.5) – and face‐work – “actions taken by a person to make  whatever he is doing consistent with face" (1967, p.12). Brown and Levinson argue that behaviours  that infringe on other peoples' need to maintain face constitute what they call Face Threatening Acts  (FTAs). Politeness strategies are deployed for the main purpose of avoiding or dealing with FTAs.    In a number of Facebook interactions, verbal play and conversational humour is used by David to  present a positive face (i.e. as accessible, approachable and able to take a joke) and by students to  avoid the overly deferential attitude they might be expected to adopt towards their tutor (arguably  an FTA). This is apparent in the numerous exchanges in Interaction 1 in which students tease David.  I’d interpret the teasing about David’s alleged lack of pool skills (emails 5‐8), his typographical error  (emails 15‐19) and age (emails 51‐60) as particular forms of face work expressing solidarity and  friendship rather than distance and antipathy. In two of the three examples, about pool and his age,  David invites the teasing which some of his students respond to accordingly (joking is, after all, a  jointly constructed activity involving initiation as well as uptake). What David is doing is inviting, or  giving licence to, students to enter a more informal relationship with him whilst maintaining their  face needs by allowing them to accept that invitation in a way that avoids the FTA of ‘sucking up to  teacher’.     Moreover, the conversational humour is also linked to in‐group references (e.g. the ‘80s cult teen  film The Breakfast Club), shared experiences (David receiving an age‐related comment from a  barmaid) or mock rivalry with another module cohort (Simon’s group … intellectual inferiors) further  5 | P a g e    

reinforcing a sense of common group identity. The cultural references that are an integral part of the  humour (The Breakfast Club, Star Wars, superheroes etc.) presuppose a shared culture that  attempts to bridge generational differences as well as the student‐tutor power asymmetry. For  example, the assumption of shared cultural competence in David’s suggestion that “I will be the  beauty, you can all be the jocks and the dorks” (interaction 1:1), which presupposes prior knowledge  of The Breakfast Club and an understanding of the conventional character types of the ‘teen flick’,  may be interpreted as an example of the politeness strategy of finding common ground whose aim is  to support a sense of solidarity and camaraderie.     5. Facebook culture  A growing area of interest amongst some academics is the culture of SNS (boyd 2007; boyd & Ellison  2008; Ellison et al. 2007; Liu 2008; Merchant 2006; Selwyn 2007; Stutzman 2005). According to  Stutzman (2005), undergraduates use Facebook to ‘hang out’, to shoot the breeze, waste time, to  learn about each other or simply as a directory. Students often use Facebook as a means of  managing their social lives; staying in touch, organising nights out and the like. However, Guy  Merchant’s writing on the culture of SNS, influenced by sociologists like Anthony Giddens and  Zygmunt Bauman, has drawn attention to the use of sites such as Facebook to produce and perform  “an ongoing narrative of the self” (2006, p.238). So, Facebook pages and communications are as  much about the construction of a dynamic story of the self as that self interacts with various social  contexts as they are about arranging going out clubbing. Hugh Liu’s work is an interesting addition to  this line of inquiry and highlights the role of SNS profile pages as the location for ‘taste  performances’ (2008) that define and distinguish social identity.    Neil Selwyn’s study of undergraduate uses of Facebook at an unnamed London university deploys its  extensive data to argue that undergraduates use Facebook for particular forms of identity  performances at variance with ‘official’ academic identities:  On Facebook students could rehearse and explore resistance to the academic ‘role set’ of  being an undergraduate (Merton 1957) – i.e. the expected and ‘appropriate’ behaviours  towards their subject disciplines, teachers and university authorities. Students who were  facing conflicting demands in their roles as socialites, minimum‐wage earners and scholars  could use Facebook as an arena for developing a disruptive, challenging, dismissive and/or  unruly academic identities. Thus Facebook was acting as a ready space for resistance and the  contestation of the asymmetrical power relationship built into the established offline  positions of university, student and lecturer (Bourdieu and Passeron 1977). This was perhaps  most clearly evident in the playful and often ironic rejection of dominant university  discourses throughout the posts, with the students certainly not conforming to the passive  and silenced undergraduate roles of the seminar room or lecture theatre. (2007)  Although my analysis of Kingston University students’ use of Facebook confirms many of the trends  Selwyn identifies (e.g. exchange of practical and academic information; displays of supplication  and/or disengagement; and exchanges of humour and nonsense), I’d argue that it can also house  more conventional academic identities. Provided care is taken to lessen the social distance between  6 | P a g e    

students and tutors, Facebook can function as an environment for the articulation of interests and  enthusiasms related to formal academic study and, thereby, for the performance of ‘official’  academic identities.      Let’s consider the following student email from Sunil:  I propa enjoyed it [the module] too, even though it's not over. But it was really BIG!  and uno wat, i knew NOTHING on post‐modern. Hadn't watched Blade Runner, Dark City,  nothing!  Watched em one by one n OMD!!!! lol (Unimaginable)  (interaction 1:26)  Here the student expresses his appreciation for the course and its content (postmodernism, the sci‐fi  film genre) in a way that, if articulated differently, might be interpreted as an indication that he was  overly engaged with his course. Selwyn has identified the widespread practice of student users  categorising others according to their levels of engagement with formal academic study; those  overly keen on their course tending to be assigned negative labels such as spod, geek or keeno (2007  p.15). However, the very informality of the language used (discussed in more detail in the next  section) asserts a separateness from formal academic linguistic norms that allows the participant to  distance himself from an identity performance that might be so labelled. So, Sunil’s email both  expresses excitement about the module – and is, therefore, a kind of identity performance as  ‘motivated student’ ‐ whilst maintaining his particular face need to be perceived as ‘having a life’  outside the academic context. Similarly, Sarah’s question “Is any of you thinking of doing the MA  next year @ Kingstonia?” (interaction1: 27) expresses both academic aspirations whilst adopting a  tone of gently‐mocking distance.     6. Language  In an earlier section I touched on the linguistic style of the Facebook community, describing it as  drawn from participants’ earlier experience of CMD, defined by Herring as “predominantly text‐ based human‐human interaction mediated by networked computers or mobile telephony ”(2007).  Although David Crystal’s (2001) notion of a homogenous computer‐mediated language (‘Netspeak’)  has been criticised by more recent scholarship (Herring 2007), certain forms of CMD such as email  correspondence, text‐messaging and synchronous chatroom interaction nonetheless share a number  of characteristics found throughout the  selected corpus of Facebook interactions. Let’s consider  interaction 2: 8 in the Appendix in order to identify some key linguistic features:  deletion of subject pronoun  abbreviations and other typographical  irregularities including improvised phonetic  renderings  slang  was gd, met som new ppl  gd (good), nxt (next), ya (you), tho (though) ppl  (people), soz (sorry) and plz (please) 

catch ya nxt week (see you next week) 

7 | P a g e    

use of single case 

i.e. no use of the upper case at the start of  sentences – upper case tends to be used as a  substitute for prosodic  clues as in: why this  obsession with ... "pool". what's wrong with  going somewhere to DRINK and TALK TO PEOPLE  without these stupid games. (interaction 1:5) 

  Another feature widely observed in the corpus was the use of specific textual means to substitute  for paralinguistic (e.g. winking, smiling) and prosodic (e.g. stress, tone, loudness) features.  The  following table draws on our corpus to exemplify common textual strategies adopted:   asterisk emoting  *heartbroken* (interaction 1: 8)    *Waves fist* (interaction 1: 26)  they have pool tables muhahahah! (interaction 1: 3)    hahaha, i'm guessing it was Serena hahaha; see you all soon  yahooo (interaction 1: 61) 

orthographic representation of  laughter ( including mock ‘evil  mastermind’ laughter –  muhahahah – from a range of  cultural sources such as cartoons  like Pinky and the Brain or films  like the Austin Powers series)    abbreviations  

lol meaning laughing out loud (interaction 2: 16)   OMD meaning oh my days (interaction 1:26)  :)  (interaction 1: 25)    (,”) (interaction 1: 34)     There was one use of what I call a ‘reverse emoticon’ in a  comment on a video posted by David in which a student used  the words angular‐bracket three for the emoticon <3  (generally used to designate love).  It indicates a playful  approach to emerging CMD conventions and a desire to find  new forms. 

emoticons or smileys 

  The example confirms the conclusions of some linguists who have characterised CMD as an  emerging oral‐written hybrid (Crystal, 2001; Herring, 2007). Although produced by 'writerly' means  (a computer or mobile phone keyboard), the email is characterised by features of orality defined by  Herring as "rapid message exchange, informality and representations of prosody" (2007).     Another feature observed was the use of intertextual references, that is to say, discourse features  8 | P a g e    

drawn from the specific texts, genres, styles and practices of popular culture. In part, this may be  explained by the nature of this particular discourse community’s shared interest in film and popular  culture. However, I’d argue that the nature of SNS as spaces for identity performances through the  articulation of specific cultural practices and tastes lends itself to various forms of intertextual  referencing. Many exchanges conformed to one linguist’s early description of IRC language as a  "bricolage of discursive fragments drawn from songs, TV characters and a variety of different social  speech types" (Werry, 1996 p.58). Examples include:   parodic use of formal or  antiquated style and lexis    catch phrases   slang terms imported from a  range of sub‐cultures such as Hip  Hop, slacker etc.  Do you want to come to a public house called "The Mill"  (interaction 2:1)  sounds like a swell idea (interaction 2:9)  Im there like a bear mon frere (interaction 2:7)  I read it. Dude, that was really nice man!  I propa enjoyed it too, even though it's not over. But it was  really BIG!  and uno wat, i knew NOTHING on post‐modern. Hadn't  watched Blade Runner, Dark City, nothing! (interaction 1:26)  yer im down sounds safe (interaction 2:11)  other cultural practices  *air guitar solo* wild stallions!! (interaction 1: 29) ‐ although  this alludes to a broader cultural practice it is probably a direct  intertextual reference to Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure  (1989), a film in which the two main characters play air guitar  as a sign of approval and which features a rock band called  Wyld Stallions. 

  On some occasions, intertextuality was used as a means of cueing the use of humour (e.g. David  adopting the tone of a parade ground sergeant‐major, a character type in British popular culture  from Carry on Sergeant to It ain’t half hot mum, in “alright you horrible lot”, interaction 1:1).  Moreover, the mimicry or quotation of an authority figure is also a parody of authority used to  undermine or soften his own status. Generally though, much of the intertextuality present is, as I  have argued earlier, part of the use of specific in‐group references and the assumption of shared  cultural literacy that seeks to establish group cohesion.     7. Conclusion  The use of Facebook, in lieu of Blackboard, for the creation of an academic discourse community is,  I’d argue, a partly political act made to facilitate a different kind of student‐tutor relationship based  on reduced social distance. David hoped to develop an environment that recognised and valued  students and that helped foster of community of scholars. This was achieved through a variety of  face‐to‐face interactions including holding optional group sessions in a local pub. The use of  9 | P a g e    

Facebook followed easily from the perception of a real life community and provided a space for the  extension of real life dialogues. David’s use of Facebook confirms the “offline to online trend”  identified by Ellison et al. (2007) as is it provided an environment for the continuation of already  established, although developing, offline relationships based on a pre‐existing mutually‐respectful  group identity.  In the opinion of both David and his students in their module feedback questionnaires, the  community‐building objective was successful. However, the degree to which interactions inside  Facebook contributed to this success is less clear. There is some emerging research from other  institutions that supports the case that Facebook is appreciated by students and that it can play a  role in facilitating closer student‐tutor relationships (Mazer et al. 2007 and the Teaching & Learning  with Facebook group). However, I’d argue that this Facebook initiative is an example of a successful  use of technology in which the use of the technology is so fully integrated or ‘blended’ with other  forms of activity that it is impossible to extricate it and accurately assess its particular contribution to  the specific objectives set. Because Facebook was embedded in the social practices of  undergraduates (I check facebook 5 times more often than BlackBoard tbh and BB is quite  temperamental, interaction1: 39), I would argue that it provided a more effective participatory  mechanism for learning purposes than centrally supported technologies such as the Blackboard VLE  or the University email system.  A key characteristic of the Facebook interactions observed was the use of language varieties  common to a range of computer‐mediated communication (email, SMS, chat). These forms of  language sit uneasily with the notion of the ‘legitimate’ academic language (Bourdieu 1992)  expected of undergraduates coursework. However, there was no evidence encountered in this study  to support the fear that the CMD literacies of undergraduates undermine their ability to produce  coursework in acceptable academic English when required. Indeed, David has confirmed that both  coursework and email exchanges using the Kingston University email  system were produced in  appropriate forms and that the students concerned were more than able to switch styles according  to context. Although the 'complaint tradition' (Milroy and Milroy 1985) of some academic writing on  standards of literacy has articulated a concern at the perceived impoverishment and  oversimplification of undergraduates’ language (Crawford 2006),  I observed many instances of an  imaginative adaptation to the medium of e‐communication to articulate expressive speech acts. In  deploying a range of textual strategies, David’s students have succeeded in creating a more  complete discourse within the confines of a primarily text‐based (“lean”) medium.     Like wearing skinny jeans and a porkpie hat, using Facebook to support one’s students is something  not everyone can pull off or will feel comfortable in attempting. Facebook can provide a kind of  liminal space between university and non‐university territories, as well as between social and  academic identities, for interactions based on less fixed hierarchies. If a lecturer seeks to decrease  social distance, and to minimise or mitigate the power they exercise (‘doing power less explicitly’),  then Facebook may be an environment, used in conjunction with other forms of contact and  interaction, that merits further consideration. 

10 | P a g e    

8. Acknowledgements    My thanks to Sahib Singh, Becca Heaton, Alex Birt, John Glover, Simon Donnelly, Iwona Grazyna  Dabrowska, Rachel Matthews, James Hoare, Teresa Orlando, Leah Godard, Sonia Nayyar, Tom  Griffith, Aaron Allmark, Alex Kirk, Ryan Tyler, Joann Randles, Theresa Mopelola Arinke Adebiyi, Paul  Hammond and Samuel Smith for the permission to use their Facebook exchanges for the purposes of  this essay.  My special thanks to Dr Will Brooker for his generosity in opening up his use of Facebook for  external scrutiny and for his time in reading and commenting on a first draft.    9. References   Bourdieu, P. (1992). Language and Symbolic Power. Cambridge: Polity Press    Boxer, D. & Cortes‐Conde, F. (1997). From bonding to biting: Conversational joking and identity  display. Journal of Pragmatics, 27 pp. 275‐294.  Burnett, G. (2000). Information exchange in virtual communities: a typology. Information Research, 5  (4). http://informationr.net/ir/5‐4/paper82.html  Burnett, G. & Buerkle, H. (2004). Information Exchange in Virtual Communities: A Comparative  Study. Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication, 9 (2).  http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol9/issue2/burnett.html   boyd, d. (2007). Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage  Social Life. In Buckingham, D. (ed.) MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Learning – Youth,  Identity, and Digital Media Volume. MA: MIT Press pp.119‐142.    boyd, d. & Ellison, N.B. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of  Computer‐Mediated Communication, 13 pp.210‐230    Brown, P. & Levinson, S.C. (1987) Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press.  Capriccioso, R. (2004 February 14). Facebook Face Off. Inside Higher Ed.  http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/02/14/facebook  Collot, M., & Belmore, N. (1996). Electronic language: A new variety of English? In Herring, S. (ed.),  Computer‐mediated communication: Linguistic, social and cross‐cultural perspectives  Amsterdam:  John Benjamins pp. 13‐28.  Crawford, S. (2006). Not LOL@Nu Wrtng: Lamenting Text Lingo. FACCCTS Journal. 19.  http://www.faccc.org/pubs/facccts/features/feature_winter07_crawford.pdf  Crystal, D. (2001). Language and the Internet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  11 | P a g e    

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and  college students' use of online social network sites.  Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication,  12(4).  http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html     Goffman, E. (1967). Interaction Ritual. New York: Anchor Books    Herring, S. (2001). Computer‐Mediated Discourse. In Tannen, D. & Hamilton, H. (eds). Handbook of  Discourse Analysis. Oxford: Blackwell pp.612‐634    Herring, S. (2007). A faceted classification scheme for computer‐mediated discourse.  Language@Internet, 4.  http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2007/761/Faceted_Classification_Scheme_for_CMD.pdf  JISC (2007a) In Their Own Words: Exploring the Learner’s Perspective on e‐Learning  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning_pedagogy/intheirownwords  JISC (2007b) Student Expectations  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/studentexpectations.aspx  JISC (2008) Google Generation.  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/resourcediscovery/googlegen  Kayany, J.M. (1998). Contexts of uninhibited online behavior: Flaming in social newsgroups on  usenet. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 49 (12) pp.1135‐1141    Kennedy, G. et al. (2006) First Year Students' Experiences with Technology: Are they really Digital  Natives? http://www.bmu.unimelb.edu.au/research/munatives/natives_report2006.pdf  Kotthoff, H. (1996). Impoliteness and conversational joking: On relational politics. Folia Linguistica,  30 (3/4) pp.299‐327.    Liu, H. (2008). Social Network Profiles as Taste Performances.  Journal of Computer‐Mediated  Communication, 13 pp. 252‐275  Livingstone, S. and Bober, M. (2005) UK Children Go Online Full Report.  http://personal.lse.ac.uk/bober/UKChildrenGoOnlineReport1.pdf  Mazer, J. P., Murphy, R. E., & Simonds, C. J. (2007). I'll see you on "Facebook:" The effects of  computer‐mediated teacher self‐disclosure on student motivation, affective learning, and classroom  climate. Communication Education, 56 (1) pp.1‐17.    Merchant, G. (2006). Identity, Social Networks and Online Communication. E‐Learning, 3(2) pp.235‐ 244  Milroy, J. & Milroy, L. (1985). Authority in Language. London: Routledge and Kogan Paul.      12 | P a g e    

Mitrano, T. (2008) Facebook 2.0. EDUCAUSE Review, 43 (2) March/April.  http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Review/Facebook20/46324?time=1207135143  Porter, J. (1986) Intertextuality and the Discourse Community. Rhetoric Review, 5(1) pp.34‐47    Porter, J. (1992). Audience and Rhetoric: An Archaeological Composition of the Discourse Community.  New Jersey: Prentice Hall.    Paolillo, J. C. (1999). The virtual speech community: Social network and language variation on IRC.  Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication, 4(4).  http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol4/issue4/paolillo.html  Paolillo, J. C. (2001). Language variation on Internet Relay Chat: A social network approach. Journal  of Sociolinguistics, 5 pp.180‐213.  Salaway, G. and Borreson Carouso, J. (2007) The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and  Information Technology.  http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ers0706/rs/ERS0706w.pdf  Selwyn, N.   (2007). Screw Blackboard... do it on Facebook!  an investigation of students' educational  use of Facebook. Paper presented to Poke 1.0 – Facebook social research symposium, November.  http://www.scribd.com/doc/513958/Facebook‐seminar‐paper‐Selwyn    Stutzman, F. (2005). Our Lives, our Facebooks. www.ibiblio.org/fred/pubs/stutzman_pub6.pdf  (also available as a video at video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3910777240176719644)  Skulstad, A. S. (2005). Competing roles: student teachers using asynchronous forums. International  Journal of Applied Linguistics, 15(3) pp. 346‐363.    Swales, J. (1987). Approaching the Concept of Discourse Community. Paper presented at the  Conference on College Composition and Communication.  http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1b/e4/d7.pdf  Swales, J. (1990) Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge  University Press.  Thelwall, M.  (2007). Fk yea I swear: Cursing and gender in a corpus of MySpace pages.  http://www.scit.wlv.ac.uk/~cm1993/papers/MySpaceSwearing_online.doc  Werry, C. (1996). Linguistic and interactional features of internet relay chat. In Herring, S. (ed.),  Computer‐mediated communication: Linguistic, social and cross‐cultural perspectives (pp. 13‐28).  Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 

13 | P a g e    

P01547: 

Language, culture and  communication in online  learning   

 

 
Laughing Squid: Facebook  http://flickr.com/photos/laughingsquid/986548379/ 

  ‘Face work’ in Facebook:   Appendix    Tony McNeill  April 2008 
  1 | P a g e    

Interaction 1    Text of group email sent by David to his final‐year Special Subject: Cinema and the Postmodern City  students. The original email was sent to organise a social event to celebrate the end of the module  but subsequent responses covered such topics as academic progress (posts 21‐26 and 29 and 30),  postgraduate study (27 and 28), the use of Facebook (38, 39 and 41) and assessment (42‐45). 63  Facebook email messages, 8 participants and 1,731 words in total.    Original email message title: school’s out  1  David      Dec 7th  alright you horrible lot  next thursday at 5pm school's out... for ever! or at least, SPECIAL  STUDY is over.    where do you want to go for a drink to celebrate the elite think tank  that mortals called: cinema and the postmodern city.    it will be just like The Breakfast Club. i will be the beauty, you can all be  the jocks and the dorks.  I'm easy, but preferably somewhere cheap...please and thank you! 

Sarah     Dec 7th  Patrick  Dec 7th   

Somewhere everyone will know... or somewhere new? Druid's Head  was quite popular... could take over the upstairs of the mill... they have  pool tables muhahahah! I don't mind; but out of what's left; I bagsy  being the basketcase... great fun!  Perhaps Coconut? It has a good music, a pool table and it's quite  cheap. It's a pretty tiny place though but as we're going early then  shouldn't be a problem with sits! Otherwise The Mill sound good to me  as well! :)  why this obsession with ... "pool". what's wrong with going  somewhere to DRINK and TALK TO PEOPLE without these stupid  games.  Are you bad at pool Will? Is that why you resent it so much?    And if John's Judd Nelson, can I be Ally Sheedy's character please and  fanks?  i am in a league below bad at pool, ie. I have never played it. i think it is  antisocial. I go to a pub to drink and talk, not play... "games". 

Yuliana      Dec 7th   

David  Dec 7th 

Sarah  Dec 7th   

David 

2 | P a g e    

Dec 7th    8  Sarah  Dec 7th  David  Dec 7th    10  Sarah  Dec 7th  David  Dec 7th  Sunil  Dec 8th 

  the basketcase IS Ally Sheedy, that role is taken by John.  

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo  *heartbroken* fine, then I'M gonna be Judd Nelson, sod the lot of you.  does someone know how to include XXX XXXXXXXXX on this, I forgot to  include him.    and anyone else I left off by accident.  ....who's XXX? I'll forward this onto XXXX 

11 

XXX XXXXXXXXX, I don't know how else to specify who he is except by  giving his first name and surname. he wore a suit for presentations.  Lol at I don't know how else to specify who he is...   V‐true how else would you specify him.  And that's cold, how you going to forget XXX? He's so safe...  Btw I'm good for drinking and chatting :D  that's "sick" (I believe that means "big" and good)  

12 

13 

David  Dec 8th  Jane  Dec 8th  David  Dec 8th 

14 

sounds good to me 

15 

ps. Simon's group is going to the Spring Grove after their class. he has  invited us to join them. if you want to be in the company of your  intellectual interiors, let me know. or perhaps you prefer a pub  without builders in it?    he is buying them all a drink. I don't have to buy people like that.  inferiors*    i can't spell  as long as it's cheap i'm not that fussy 

16 

David  Dec 8th 

17 

Peter  Dec 10th 

3 | P a g e    

18 

Sarah  Dec 7th  David  Dec 10th 

I'd prefer the intellectual interiors in all fairness... 

19 

maybe the builders would make you an intellectual interior    OK might as well make it the MILL then, that's cheap.  the mill sounds good. i'm not fussy though.  

20 

Jake  Dec 10th  David  Dec 10th 

21 

everyone if you check your Outlook i wrote you a "pep‐talk" type mail  about how good you are academically and how i would gladly give you  a reference for work or further study.    i don't know why i bothered because nobody reads outlook, CLEARLY,  but have a look sometime. it took me hours to write.  I read it. although i only read it today and about a minute before i read  that post. I also replied.   I read it. Didn't know what to reply, so I didn't....Thank you [David] 

22 

Jake  Dec 10th  Sarah  Dec 10th  Jane  Dec 10th  David  Dec 10th  Sunil  Dec 10th    

23 

24 

email was great, thanks 

25 

i was feeling like a right idiot sending out a nice email that nobody read  :)  I read it. Dude, that was really nice man!  I propa enjoyed it too, even though it's not over. But it was really BIG!  and uno wat, i knew NOTHING on post‐modern. Hadn't watched Blade  Runner, Dark City, nothing!  Watched em one by one n OMD!!!! lol (Unimaginable)  I was talking about this to someone the other day.   Yea really good course, you create it over summer?    And you better not steal none of my ideas, ovawise I'll be Anti [David]  like you are with whas his face, Jude Law!!   *Waves Fist*  Is any of you thinking of doing the MA next year @ Kingstonia? 

26 

27 

Sarah  Dec 10th 

4 | P a g e    

28 

David  Dec 10th   

sab gives me beh jokes  lol    i would love to see some of you to do the MA... i think you may get a  discount on the fees if you go from the BA to the postgrad, but I'd have  to check on that.    Andrea is course director of the theory MA ‐ she, Cathy, Simon, Ron  [xxxxxx]  and Mark [xxxxxx] teach it, with me doing two guest slots.     so she is *directly* in charge of its running and she would welcome  your interest. but I am *generally* responsible for everything in Film  and TV so you can also ask me about it.  that was lovely email, really was an excellent course *air guitar solo*  wild stallions!!    btw whats those little things in star wars that ani has lots of? i'm trying  to explain the strory arc of star wars to my girlfriend from ep.1 – 6  Just read the email... Thank you [David]! When's your 'office hours'?  Got something I want to talk to you about. See everyone on  Thursday!!!!!!!  btw; Simon; midichlorians lol  MIDICHLORIANS do i win  lol  make sure you explain how Leia knows that her mother looked "very  beautiful but very sad" even though Padme Amidala died when Leia  was ONLY JUST BORN.  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  well John, it is end of semester now so technically my office hours  ended on Monday at 3pm.    HOWEVER i am having a student rep meet at 1pm tomorrow, if you  come to that you can hang around afterwards and talk to me (Rachel is  your Level 6 student rep).     or just come to my office around 2pm, 2.30 tomorrow? but let me  know first.  i don't see that fact as particually important 

29 

Peter  Dec 11th   

30 

Patrick  Dec 11th    

31 

David  Dec 11th   

32 

Peter  Dec 11th  Patrick 

33 

It can wait till Thursday drinkies after the presentations. Thanks. Best 

5 | P a g e    

Dec 12th  34  Sunil  Dec 12th  Sarah  Dec 12th  Patrick  Dec 12th  Sarah  Dec 12th 

of luck everyone :)  Cheers John...  (,")  I hope you have that T‐Shirt ready to wear tomorrow young man!!  Booth, Clark and Kent would be most upset if you didn't :P  tsk; you can't even remember their names... Bruce and Clark! 

35 

36 

37 

OOOOOOH!! I thought you said Booth...I thought it didn't make much  sense on the phone. Ok ok ok ..... Bruce and Clark then. They would be  very upset :P  do you think if I set up a facebook group for my modules next  semester, Concepts and Investigating (Audiences) it will be a good idea  ‐‐ i thought it would help people get some sense of group community  anyway and get in touch with each other (and me if they want) even if  they don't talk about work.    could put some links and videos on there too. I don't know if anyone  actually ever looks at blackboard so a facebook group might be better  for announcements etc.    WHAT DO YOU THINK    ps. Booth Wayne??  sounds like a plan, very postmodern lol. I check facebook 5 times more  often than BlackBoard tbh and BB is quite temperamental.    PS: Bruce and Clark; names of my pets after their heroic counterparts.  :D  I thought they were the names of our tall and Nobel Prize winning  children? I'm gutted.     It SOUNDED like he said Booth. It didn't make any sense to me  whatsoever at the time...I'm not completely stupid. I got the Clark Kent  bit and I heard Booth and he made no mention of any Wayne! Stop  picking on me!!  it sounds like a good idea, and also in 'Concepts' as it involves lots of  group research, it could help develop some extra ideas even through 

38 

David  Dec 12th   

39 

Patrick  Dec 12th 

40 

Sarah  Dec 12th   

41 

Yuliana 

6 | P a g e    

Dec 12th   

messaging here, plus sharing videos is also an advantage that  Blackboard don't have :P     btw. if anyone just received a graffiti it was an accident!!;)  POP POP  Just thought i'd make some noise!    You lot working on your assignments yet?  Times ticking....  I have been looking at my 25,000 words of postmodern city notes...  getting some structure out of it. I might even sound out some  publishers to see if they would take that kind of book. If you lot can  write essays during holiday I think I should be making an effort too.  your just trying to show off with your 25,000 words, ooh la la. i could  write 25,000 words, i won't, but i could......possibly  seriously if I gave in those 25,000 words as an essay, it would fail... it is  just random musings and quotations. just wanted to let you know i am  working too!  WHOOP WHOOP  Not long till our Pagan worshiping ritual is complete and we bring in a  new year :D  "I'm looking well forward to it"  any one else thinking drinks on the 16th to both celebrate the  completion of work and commiserate the fact that the postmodern  city module is over!?!  Yea i'll second that :D 

42 

Sunil  Dec 19th 

43 

David  Dec 19th   

44 

Peter  Dec 19th  David  Dec 19th 

45 

46 

Sunil  Dec 31st   

47 

Jane  Jan 10th 

48 

Sunil  Jan 10th  Peter  Jan 10th  David  Jan 10th  David  Jan 15th 

49 

sounds like a plan 

50 

but that's the start of my MARKING loads of 6000 word essays. i dont  know if that's something to celebrate or commiserate.  if anyone wants to see ME at these drinks, let me know details soon...  if you don't want old men there, don't let me know :) 

51 

7 | P a g e    

52 

Sarah  Jan 15th   

Of course we want you there [David]! It's just not the same without  you and you're old mannish ways! Only this time...turn up later so the  Irish Bird doesn't think you're a sad git :P    p.s...are we actually meeting up tomorrow?  i'm definately up for it if anyone else is. Finishing so much work needs  to be marked by drinking a lot too much.   Well...I'm gonna be down the Mill tomorrow anyhoo..so, if anyone  cares to join me?  yeah, me too actually so maybe see some people there? 

53 

Jake  Jan 16th  Sarah  Jan 16th  Jake  Jan 16th  Jane  Jan 16th   Sunil  Jan 16th  Patrick  Jan 16th  Sarah  Jan 16th  David  Jan 16th 

54 

55 

56 

mill sounds like a plan 

57 

What time people???  Six???  i'll be there around 6ish :) 

58 

59 

Six it is. 

60 

i will have to pop off for my horlicks before long but I will stop by.  thanks for inviting me, yes that barmaid was a right cheeky bitch, "are  you sure this is the pub you want", ie. "it's full of YOUNG people, you  might feel a wee bit out of place"  hahaha, i'm guessing it was Serena hahaha; see you all soon yahooo 

61 

Patrick  Jan 16th  Sarah  Jan 17th   

62 

Those who didn't turn up last night missed out on Sab's new tash,  Lauren's inability to have a photo taken without her touching her hat,  Laurie absolutely wasted and John being harassed by 18 year olds.    tut tut 

8 | P a g e    

63   

Sunil  Jan 18th 

lool 

Interaction 2    Text of Discussion board forum posts between David and his second‐year Concepts and Perspectives  students. The original post was sent to organise a social event. 19 discussion board posts, 13  participants and 383 words in total.    Discussion board forum title: Concepts Field Trip  1  David   Feb 6th  Do you want to come to a public house called "The Mill" on Monday 18  Feb after the lecture. You can get to know your fellow students and  lecturer.  Certainly;) 

Phil  Feb 7th  Helen  Feb 7th  Trish  Feb 7th 

Count me in as well..!   Very nice idea to get to know each others :)  look forward to it :)  i wanted to get a couple of people to go anyway!  x x  yup yup! 

Tanya  Feb 7th  David   Feb 7th 

how sad that everyone replies to this thread and nobody replies to the  ONE ABOUT FILM ANALYSIS. you are not doing a degree in DRINK you  know :mad:  Im there like a bear mon frere 

Andrew   Feb 7th  Darrel  Feb 9th  Al  Feb 10th 

count me in, im always up for a couple of drinks and a film chat 

sounds like a swell idea will, u sure the mill tho, essence is actually  quieter early on and only £1 drinks on mondays !! 

9 | P a g e    

10 

David  Feb 11th  Mike  Feb 11th  Petra  Feb 11th  David  Feb 11th  Carolyn  Feb 12th  James  Feb 13th 

I don't know Essence, where is that and what's it like. 

11 

yer im down sounds safe 

12 

£1 drinks at the Mill on Mondays.  

13 

i love the way 2nd years have all the important information... you can  see what they learn during their time at KU  sounds fun, but at a pound a pint... 

14 

15 

ah mannn  i wish i could do it, but im having to rush off after the lecture to brixton  to see jimmy eat world.  bum  lol stereotyping 2nd years Will, I have learnt fair amount at KU other  than the prices of drinks down the Mill lol. Just happened to know all  drinks are £1 down the Mill on a Monday after being told by a 3rd  year, 3rd years are a bad influence on me in a good way :oP ! Anyway I  am really looking forward to going to the Mill on Monday! However I  also have location filming that day so I may be a bit tired and won't be  able to stay late, as I am filming on Tuesday morning as well.   who went on this "field trip" and did you enjoy it? post here 

16 

Petra  Feb 14th 

17 

David  Feb 18th  Bill  Feb 19th  Al  Feb 20th 

18 

Was good, ta! 

19 

yeh was gd, met som new ppl etc., gotta go to the mill more often on  mon nights now, soz to scare ya tho with the calendar lol !!    but plz do spread the word, we need to sell like another 2 hundred or  so, catch ya nxt week. 

 

10 | P a g e    

Comments from David on the first draft of the essay   (additions to Word document attached to email sent 15th April 2008)    David’s familiarity with CMD  I have been part of online communities since 1995 and still spend a fair amount of time on  discussion boards and msn, so I would say I am familiar with what you call CMD... to a  certain extent anyway, as forms of internet discourse, slang and conventions vary according  to age groups and community norms as well as evolving over time. For instance, the “Lolcat”  linguistic conventions are quite recent, or recent within the mainstream anyway.  My jokey, mock‐self‐conscious (complex!) use of “big” and “sick” meaning “good” was  picked up not so much from Sunil using the terms online but from his use of the slang in  person. The facebook interaction was a continuation of our banter in class, where I would  joke that I was “gangsta” because I grew up in South East London. Our student‐teacher  relationship involved my appreciation of his slang, which was unfamiliar to me, and his  pleasure in teaching me it (a similar process to him giving me a disc of his favourite hip‐hop).  There was an occasion in an interaction I haven’t given you (it may be lost) where a student  remarked something along the lines of “you’ll have to explain ‘lol’ to [David]”, sincerely  believing I wouldn’t know the term, and was pleasurably shocked when I did.  So overall I’d suggest that I dropped elements of CMD into my online conversations with  students because I knew they found it amusing... like putting on a voice or accent.    David on his use of slang  This [reassertion of appropriate linguistic norms] wasn’t so much my (conscious) intention –  consciously I would say my intention was as a little tribute to and “official” (because it came  from me) recognition of Sunil’s slang... what he might call a “shout‐out”. Also, there was an  element of playful reversal of the teacher/student relationship, where I put myself in an  uncertain position (making a fool of myself by using/not being sure about slang) – a  temporary reversal, of course, which may well as you say enforce the normal power  structure.    David on the offline to online movement  Again it should be noted that the Facebook group and its discourse did not just spark up in  isolation. It was an online platform that continued and extended the group relationship  already‐established during five weeks of class, and then three optional, full‐group  discussions (about academic work, but held upstairs in a pub). So the relationships exhibited  in the Facebook case study had evolved in real life.  11 | P a g e    

  An interesting question is whether I would have added these students on Facebook, and  initiated online discussion, if I hadn’t felt we were enjoying a positive, relaxed working  relationship as a group, in which discussion of theory and assessments was mixed with some  easy‐going jokes. I think the answer is probably no. I feel Facebook is inherently quite  informal and blurs the boundaries between professional and personal. If the group dynamic  had been different, I don’t believe I would have had those group discussions on Facebook at  all.     Did the students write essays in appropriate (aka ‘proper’) academic English?)  Yes, there was no issue here – they also wrote most of their emails to me on Outlook in  conventional “proper” English, though there was some slippage. It was interesting to me the  way [Sunil] in particular would write a formal email (with Dear.... Yours faithfully etc) and  then sometimes follow it up with an informal postscript (along the lines of “uno... u give me  such jokes man....!!!”)  They could clearly shift between registers very easily (as I suppose I did too) and recognised  when each was appropriate/permitted.    Comments on the conclusion  Firstly, I don’t know if I’d call it “minimal” [social distance]. I would agree “reduced”.  Secondly, the use of Facebook was not entirely a planned‐out decision on my part. I would  say, with hindsight, that it evolved from the way the in‐person (irl) dynamic had evolved...  which had pleasantly surprised me. This was my first Special Study module, which involves a  small, final year group dedicated to a tutor’s specialist topic, and to an extent I was playing it  by ear. The optional group tutorials upstairs in a pub were improvised because the group  discussion in the formal sessions had been so productive, and because the group dynamic  was so clearly positive. The use of Facebook, I’d say, followed naturally from the feeling of  real life community, and the online discourse was an extension of the real life conversations  (or a translation from spoken into written format) that were possible because of the  comfortable, mutually‐respectful group identity.  […]  So, yes it was a “political” decision to try to foster a small scholarly community based on the  sharing of original ideas, on mutual respect, aspiration towards further study, enthusiasm  for cinema and for theory; I wanted this to become more than just a module towards an  assessment, a means to an end. But that took place before the discourse moved on to  Facebook.   12 | P a g e    

[…]  The student work and the Module Evaluation Questionnaires provide some evidence that  this experiment was successful, in my opinion.  […]  I’d like more on the fact that this worked and was successful, from my own selfish and  personal point of view! Otherwise it might come across as a potentially failed and  embarrassing attempt for a tutor to mix online with students... and I don’t think this was the  case. I think the online discourse reflected the aspects of the module which students  explicitly appreciated (in MEQs [module evaluation questionnaires]) – recognition of them as  individuals, group discussions that they felt part of, close tutorial attention and feedback,  tutor’s approachability, their own satisfaction at joining in and feeling part of a community.  To my mind, the Facebook discourse reflects aspects of the group dynamic that were  integral to its success – I think you imply here that we can’t know whether it really worked  out, and I don’t feel myself that this is the case. 

13 | P a g e    

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer: Get 4 months of Scribd and The New York Times for just $1.87 per week!

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times