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The heroin blues

VOL. 123, NO. 11

www.MiddletonTimes.com

SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

A firsthand account of lives torn apart by the drug

In the last couple of years, an unprecedented number of Dane County


residents have died from heroin overdoses. Most recently, Middleton High
School graduate Kyle Wood, 32, died
following a long battle with addiction.
As authorities struggle with how to
contain the epidemic, The Middleton
Times-Tribune, over the next several
months, will publish the first-person
accounts of an addict currently in recovery. That addict, Nathan J. Comp,
has contributed to the pages of this
newspaper as well as several other
publications throughout the state, including Isthmus and The Capital
Times.
His work has been recognized by
several distinguished organizations, including The American Academy of
Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatry
for a series he wrote in 2004 on drug
use among Middleton teens following
the death of 16-year-old Julie Zdeblick,
who died of an oxycodone overdose
that same year.
Comp has begun blogging about his
experiences as an addict in recovery at
TheFeralScribe.com, a travelogue he
launched in 2010. He published the following essay on Feb. 5, 2014, two
months after the heroin overdose death
of Sarah Novotny, 24, of Waunakee,
and in the days following the heroin
overdose death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman.
We believe Comps candid and unapologetic essays shed unique light on
a problem that invokes strong opinions
despite being too often misunderstood.

by NATHAN COMP
Times-Tribune

After nearly four years together, in which we scarcely spent a moment


apart, the ride had ended in the worst possible way, Nathan Comp writes
about his girlfriend, Sarah. Every dream we shared was gone, over, dead. I
had lost the best friend I ever had. She was 24. Photo contributed.
Photo contributed

Queens of the court!

Photo by Mary Langenfeld

Middleton senior Jenna Blair cuts down the net after the Cardinals defeated Janesville Craig in a WIAA Division 1 sectional final last Saturday.
Middleton earned a trip to the state tournament, and will now face DSHA
Friday at 6:35 p.m. at the Resch Center in Green Bay. For full coverage,
please see sports on page 12.

In the sordid, voyeuristic, details to


emerge from the presumed heroin
overdose death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman I hear echoes from my
own recent life, now marred by psychic
wounds that have barely begun to heal.
Of the many terrible things my girlfriend, Sarah, and I witnessed while
living in New Mexico, the icy blue
color that washed over the faces of
those overdosing on heroin jarred us
the most. This ghoulish discoloration
is caused by a sudden decrease in oxygen due to respiratory depression, preceded by a loss of consciousness. As
far as dying goes, one could hardly ask
for a more peaceful exit.
We moved to New Mexico, via
Madison, in March 2012. There I wrote
for a paper in the northern part of the
state, while Sarah continued with college.
We were at a house on Lower San
Pedro Road, in Espanola, the first time
we saw someone fall out, a euphemism
for overdose. Espanola, population
12,000, is a small valley town about 30
miles north of Santa Fe. Of its many
distinctions, the one most mentioned
with no deficit of bravado by its largely
Hispanic and Native American residents is its standing as Americas opiate capital. For more than a decade, its

heroin overdose death rate has hovered


around six times the national average.
In the Valley, the chiva is cheap, abundant, and deadly.
We were visiting Severo and Lupe
that day when, shortly after we arrived,
a young man named Ivan stopped by
on his lunch break to fix in their
kitchen. After getting well, Ivan went
to untie the tourniquet when, without
any warning, he dropped like a sack of
potatoes to the floor, hitting the ground
with a loudthud! A soft wave of blue
supplanted his maple complexion.
Sarah burst into tears. As Lupe and
I comforted her, Severo dashed to the
other end of the trailer, returning with
Narcan (naloxone), a nasal spray that
flushes the brain of opiates, instantly
reversing the overdose. Within seconds, the man opened his eyes, regained his color, and rose to his feet,
unaware he had nearly crossed over.
Watching someone nearly die rattled
me and Sarah enough that we decided
to quit usingjust as soon as we burned
through the stash we had just picked
up.
Days later, I picked up a few Narcans from the public health nurse. It is
given freely in New Mexico following
a brief training on how to assemble its
three-piece delivery system. It was a
strange, almost eerie, medicine to keep
at the ready. We carried one each in our
backpacks, with one at home. ComSee HEROIN page 10

Easy being Green

Times-Tribune photo by Matt Geiger

The Village Green, located at 7508 Hubbard Ave. in downtown Middleton, is a classic Wisconsin tavern and arguably the most iconic eatery
in the city. The reasons? Great food and drink, a friendly environment,
and an affable family that has been behind it all for nearly 40 years now.
A profile of The Village Green, the latest in the Times-Tribunes series on
local restaurants, begins on page 6.

PAGE 2

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Burglar
caught

On Monday, March 2, Middleton


Police were notified of a residential
burglary that had occurred in the 7300
block of Hubbard Avenue. The residents there reported someone had entered the home and had taken several
items.
During the morning of Sunday,
March 8, the Middleton Police Department received several calls about a suspicious person, including one where a
male was located inside of a garage.
Officers located this individual as he
See McGINNITY, page 4

Beer and cookies...

Times-Tribune photo by Matt Geiger

Girl Scout Troop 2331 is too smart to let a savvy business opportunity pass by. Thats why troop members and leaders, including (from left) Ann
Holman, Hope Lent, Maddie Holman and Stephanie Lent set up a Girl Scout cookie stand across the street from Bockfest at Capital Brewery on Saturday, Feb. 28. The event brought thousands of people by their stand.

Hanson named Friend of Town


THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 3

Founder of Freedom Festival will be honored in 2015


by KEVIN MURPHY
Times-Tribune

The founder of the Town of Middletons Freedom Fest was joyfully surprised last week to learn he had been
selected for the second-ever Friend of
the Town award, which is bestowed
annually on a resident who makes a
positive difference in the community.
Im shocked, I didnt even know I
was nominated, said Michael Hanson.
The town board deemed Hanson a
worthy recipient and successor to Mel
Others nominated for Friend
of the Town this year include:

Cathy Garfoot, a Plan Commission member since 1975, poll


worker since the 1970s, volunteers
for local charities, a former 4H
leader.

Dick and Cheryl Bakken, owners


of Northwestern Stone, for maintaining shoulders along Pleasant
View Rd.

Pope who was named Friend of the


Town in last years inaugural selection.
What he done has been a great effort to unite the town in an old fashioned way, town chairman Milo
Bruenig said of Freedom Fest, the July
4th celebration began four years ago.
Hanson was nominated last year but
his backing by Glenn and Vickie
Smith, Jack and Amy Hippen, Scott
Lindblom and Danny Thomas, factored into his selection this year, said
Bruenig.
When and he, his wife, Angela Han-

Mike Hanson (above) will receive the Friend of the Town award at this years Freedom Fest held in Pioneer Park.
son, and their children moved to the
town in 2008, Hanson said he wanted
to start a Fourth July event that will
bring families together for a parade,
races and a picnic in a park.
Attracted by what he calls the authenticity of the event, Freedom Fest
has grown in attendance from a few
hundred to several hundred in ensuring

years, pleasing Hanson with how people have volunteered to make it a success.
A day in the park is something that
was missing from the community. Its
a way to connect with neighbors in a
way we remembered as kids, he said.
Hanson said he appreciates the
honor of the Friend award but ac-

knowledges that Freedom Fest is a result of all the people who just love this
event, and contribute their time and
other resources to it.
For all those who enjoy their freedomand the spirit of community
Id like to see this continue for
decades, he added.
A lieutenant with the Madison police

File photo by Matt Geiger

department, Hanson said, community


events are in my blood, and that the
Fourth of July is his second favorite
holiday of the year, following Christmas.
Fittingly, Hanson will receive
Friend of the Town award at this
years Freedom Fest held in Pioneer
Park.

PAGE 4

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

City council approves TIF for pump station


by CAMERON BREN
Times-Tribune

The Middleton Common Council


last week approved a $300,000 TIF expenditure to upgrade the existing
pumping station near Esser Pond. The
council also approved a small expense
that could help the Youth Center create
a new full-time position, and adding a
fourth polling location at their latest
meeting.
In a memo to Public Works Director
Shawn Stauske, Strand Associates
Mike Bridwell explained the need for
upgrades at the Esser Pond pumping
station. The station was built in the
1990s to serve a mostly undeveloped
area. Since then the area has expanded
in commercial and industrial develop-

McGINNITY

was leaving the area and a subsequent


investigation discovered him to be in
possession of property from the Hubbard Avenue burglary.
Dylan J. McGinnity, 26, was arrested and jailed on a charge of bur-

ment. The land was also filled 4 to 5


feet to help to prevent flooding, leaving
the pumping station further depressed
and vulnerable to flooding.
Over the last few years, these increased flows have backed up to the
pumping station and began to flood the
pump room of the station through the
ventilation system, Bridwell wrote.
Without the intervention of City staff,
the station could have been completely
flooded and inoperable for several days
if not weeks. Given the capacity of this
pumping station, such an occurrence
would be very difficult if not impossible to deal with. Clearly modifications
are needed to prevent the possibility of
flooding from ever occurring.
The solution is to build a flood proof
structure around the pumping station.
The reasoning for using TIF funds is

glary. It is believed he may be responsible for additional suspicious incidents


in the City of Middleton and the investigation is ongoing.
If you believe you have seen
McGinnity at or near your residence,

City will add fourth


voting location

The council also approved


adding a fourth polling location at
the Heritage Senior Campus. The
city plans to send out post cards to
inform citizens about the added location. Ald. Richard noted the importance of doing more than
postcards because there have been
attempts to divert people to the
wrong polling place by postcard.
She said the city should also use a
few other methods so citizens know
the information is legitimate. The
motion with Richards friendly
amendment passed unanimously.

please contact the Middleton Police


Department at 608-824-7300.
We would also like to take this time
to remind citizens to remain vigilant
and make sure your residence is secure, says a statement issued by local

the pumping station serves TIF District


3. The project is essentially maintenance that comes with growth and development. The proposal passed with
little debate, except around one aspect.
Of the $300,000 total cost, $50,000
will be set aside for aestheticallyappealing architecture or public art.
Alder Gurdip Brar asked if the
$50,000 was necessary. City Planning
Director Eileen Kelley said it wasnt
but that the location is a gateway to the
city and that it should match the surrounding developments. After discussion, the council unanimously
approved the upgrade with the additional $50,000.
With funding approved by the Common Council, the Middleton Youth
Center will be eligible for a partnership
with the Dane County Department of
continued from page 2

police. Also, if you see suspicious activity in your neighborhood, please


contact the Middleton Police Department as soon as possible.

Human Services. The agency is requesting proposals to host an AmeriCorps volunteer position to specifically
focus on underperforming and disengaged middle and high school students. The volunteer would be
available 35 hours a week year-round
and be trained specifically in after
school activities.
The Commission on Youth found
out about opportunity after the 2015
budget was already finalized, so they
could not submit a request. The partnership requires Middleton to raise
$9,842 as a cash match by March 9th.
The Commission on Youth already secured $8,200 in donations from the
community, including $5,000 from the
school district. The council unanimously approved a motion to cover the
remaining cost.

CHURCH NOTES

City leaders tour WTS Paradigm


THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

by CAMERON BREN
Times-Tribune

The Middleton Committee of the


Whole toured the newly renovated
WTS Paradigm facility two weeks
ago. The companys CEO, Nate
Herbst, invited city officials and the
public to tour their new location. Last
year, the Middleton City Council approved a TIF agreement with WTS
Paradigm and Compass Properties for
$420,000 to cover relocation and renovation costs.
WTS Paradigm is a building products configuration software company
that has landed major national contracts with some of the largest retail
building products retailers and manufacturers.
The new location is a space for employees to enjoy and get work
done.When first entering the facility
there is a cafeteria and lounge area with
a breakfast bar, a variety of seating,
even foosball and shuffleboard.Massive LCDs and laser projectors illuminate the walls with industry news,
company announcements, and upcoming events. There are about a dozen
smaller offices and conference rooms
with unique themes such as Legoland,
the
Hall
of
Justice,
and
Skywalker. There are cubicles at the
center of the building where develop-

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

ers can work closely and collaborate.


We wanted a space that captures
the spirit of WTS Paradigm: fun, intelligent, and linked to the building industry, Herbst explains.This all really
started about 18 months ago and became a whole company project. Employees were encouraged to share their
design ideas and workspace preferences. Throughout every phase we
gathered employee feedback, as I really wanted this space to resonate with
all employees, so we used surveys,
idea boards, Pinterest, and hosted several tours while under construction, to
make sure that it captured what it
means to work at WTS Paradigm. In
the end I feel like our team of designers
and architects nailed it.
The facility mixes modern design
and technology with recycled, reused
materials.Hardware forged from pipes
used at Cave of the Mounds sets off the
doors. The doors themselves are made
of thick antique hemlock boards that
likely supported the roofs at the decommissioned Badger Ammunition
Plant.Other unique aspects include the
walls coated in dry erase paint, subway
tiles, deep cement-cast sinks, raw lighting conjuring steampunk elements,
white noise generators, and exposed
ceilings.
The renovated facility is at 1850
Deming Way, part of the Esser Place

PAGE 5

The Middleton City Council last year approved a TIF agreement with WTS Paradigm and Compass Properties
for $420,000 to cover relocation and renovation costs.

Times-Tribune photo by Cameron Bren

buildings. Compass Properties of


Madison owns the property and WTS
Paradigm leases 45,000 square feet of
the 148,000 total.
Compass Properties purchased the
Esser Place buildings from U.S. Bank
for $10.5 million in 2013.WTS Paradigm was credited by Compass for
making this possible by agreeing to
sign a lease before the deal went
through. The building was previously
leased to Natus Neurology.
In the TIF agreement with the city,
WTS Paradigm pledges to retain their

base employment of 127. That number


has fallen slightly due to operational
efficiencies, the companys CEO explains, but adds that WTS Paradigm
expects to not only retain the base employment, but to surpass it in the coming years. The city understands
employment shifts and has built in protections in the event that 127 people are
not retained. In this event the city will
award a lesser amount while the headcount is below the threshold, ensuring
a win-win strategy for both parties.
Herbst explained to city officials

that the people they hire are in a competitive work environment. He wants
them to find comfort in the new space
as pay isnt the only thing WTS Paradigm competes on. He says his employees value the smaller scale
workplace and closer community and
that the new location really creates an
environment that his employees want
to be in.
I love overhearing how proud
everyone is of the new space, Herbst
says. This is something that I want to
share.

Town board votes to rezone Watts land


by KEVIN MURPHY
Times-Tribune

Thirty-eight acres just west of the


Tumbledown Golf Course are being
slated for residential and commercial
development, but not immediately, the
Middleton Town Board was told last
week.
The board unanimously recommended a request from Marc Watts to
rezone three lots adjacent to the golf
course driveway from agricultural to
commercial, the courses driving range

from agriculture to recreational use and


the remainder of the property from
agricultural to residential.
Dan Paulson, of Paulson and Associates, land surveyors, said the Watts
family was not interested in developing
the commercial lots but would let
someone do so.
There are no individual plans for the
commercial lots at this time but zoning
regulations would limit their use to
what is compatible with the Tumbledown Trails neighborhood to the south,
said Paulson.

No timetable for residential construction on the property was given at


Mondays town board meeting but
Paulson and Watts indicated others
would develop the property.
At this stage of the approval process
Town Chair Milo Breunig said he was
not too interested in learning the
specifics of the development plans preferring to let it be initially vetted by the
Plan Commission.
What were trying to do is make
sure what they ask for is consistent
with the Tumbledown neighborhood

plan that was adopted several years ago


to ensure there is orderly development
among the neighbors there, he said
Tuesday.
Plans showed the driveway into the
golf course would be used to access the
38 acres in the rezone request. Under
questioning from board supervisors
Paulson admitted that driveway into
the golf course may not be built to
town specifications but rather just a
commercial driveway.
Watts said the portion of the driveway that connects to W. Mineral Point

Rd. is built to county road standards.


Town Engineer Rod Zubella said the
driveways locations differs on the various plans Paulson submitted with only
one matching the easement location
and the neighborhood plan.
Paulson said he preferred not to pin
down specific road locations until
plans to develop the interior of the
property are more advanced.
The boards recommendation goes
to the Dane County Board of Supervisors for further approval.

E AT Y OUR WAY A ROUND

PAGE 6

All in the Family

THE

W ORLD W ITHOUT E VER L EAVING M IDDLETON


MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Village Green is a Middleton icon


by MATT GEIGER
Times-Tribune

Growing up and working in the


family business, it just got into my
blood, and I still enjoy it today, explains Chad Boyer, whose family has
owned and operated The Village Green
since July of 1976.
And while the City of Middleton has
grown and changed around it some
say for better, some say for worse - this
small town, old school eatery has remained the same. And that, according

to the countless Middletonians who


consider this place a home away from
home, is a very good thing.
In fact, The Village Green is a place
where the line between family and
friend, between customer and worker,
is pleasantly blurred by an almost palpable camaraderie that can only pervade the air around burgers whose
simplicity is only matched by their legendary status in the community.
It is, according to Boyer, a low-tech
throwback to the early days of the busiSee GREEN, page 11

Happy

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

Letters to the Editor

Remove native
snake from its
local habitat?
To the editor,

Last summer a rattlesnake was spotted at Strickers Pond in a small


wooded area. On Mondaymy wife and
I were hiking around the pond and
came
across
a
poorly posted warning about the rattlesnake (scotch taped to a post) and no
warning on the other end of the
trail. Clearly this is not a problem at
this time of the year.
While I am sure this is not the first
sighting in an urban area I am
concerned for the children who play in
that narrow strip of woods and for the
gardener whose land boarders the
woods.
I think a better effort should be made
and, if necessary, remove the dangerous snake.

guide for assisting students at all levels.


It is important to recognize the outstanding proactive work that
MHS/CSCS faculty, staff and administration have done in helping students
process and understand this situation.
They continue to assist students in
dealing with this event and to work for
change to improve our schools and the
greater Dane County community.
As we move forward, we intend to
do everything we can to provide a safe
and respectful environment for all of
our students. Our priority is to create
an openness to discuss the fear, anger,
and frustration that this tragedy engenders.
Thanks for your ongoing efforts to
support all of our schools as we work
for greater understanding in MCPASD,
and the greater Dane County. We all
know that as a community, we need to
build bridges between racial groups
across the district. Your active support
is critical in this mission to make our
community a safe place to live and
learn.

gether for the common good. She is approachable, listens, reflects and makes
informed decisions based on facts, experience, and common sense. Anne understands the value in both attracting
and retaining quality educators. Anne
is an advocate for schools, for children,
and for teachers. We need BOE members like Anne who are committed to
quality schools and are willing to challenge the norm to achieve our goals.
Anne Bauer deserves a second term
to continue the work she has started in
keeping the Middleton-Cross Plains
School District a destination district for
students and for staff.

time to attend PTO and School Board


meetings, as well as the many extracurricular activities his children participate in throughout the year. He is
active, involved and committed.
Furthermore, as an attorney in commercial litigation, Todd knows how to
bridge gaps and act as a mediator. His
common-sense attitude, along with
these skills, makes him an excellent
candidate for School Board.
Were lucky to have a candidate of
his caliber and dedication who cares
deeply about the quality of education
for all students. Please exercise your
right and vote for Todd Smith.

Todd Smith
cares deeply
about schools

Annual Country
Breakfast was
a huge success

JoEllen Pauls
Columbus

Dear editor,

As many of you know, on


Friday evening, March 7, Tony Robinson, a 19-year-old African-American
male was fatally shot on Williamson
Street in an encounter with the Madison Police Department. Tony was a
2014 graduate of Sun Prairie High
School. We know that there are many
close relationships among MCPASD,
Madison, and Sun Prairie students and
families, and are sensitive to the impact
this event may have on many of our
students.
On behalf of the Board of Education, district leadership, and all staff in
MCPASD, we offer our deepest sympathy and condolences to the family
and friends of Tony Robinson. In an
environment in which we are working
hard to build understanding and solidarity among students, parents, and
staff, this is a truly sad time.
Middleton High School leadership
and Clark Street Community School
leadership, along with Student Services, met early on the morning of
March 9 to plan supports for students
who may have been impacted by this
tragedy. Counselors and advisers reviewed strategies that were developed
by Washington D.C. schools in the
wake of the shooting of Michael
Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. That
document has been sent to all staff as a

I am writing in support of Anne


Bauer for school board.
I currently serve with Anne on the
district Compensation Committee. As
part of our small group, Anne has
proven to be a valuable asset. Anne
brings her experience as a teacher, a
parent, a community member, and a
current Board member to our discussions. She demonstrates an ability to
work cooperatively with administration, teachers and fellow Board members also serving on the committee.
Anne has working knowledge of our
school budget, thinks outside of the
box to problem solve, and is dedicated
to her work.
Anne serves as the Board liaison to
the 4K program. She has spent numerous hours visiting 4K classrooms
across the district. During her visits,
Anne engages with students and staff.
She shares thoughtful observations,
asks meaningful questions, and always
follows up with positive feedback.
Anne has spent time listening to and
collaborating with the 4K principal to
better understand the needs and the direction of the 4K program. She uses
this information to educate and advocate on behalf of 4K to Board colleagues, the community, and the
administration. Anne came to the BOE
during some of the most trying times
for educators. Education continues to
face new challenges in budget and
practice. Anne has faced these challenges with a respectful, open, and an
honest commitment to working to-

For me, my childrens education is


an emotional topic. With six kids in the
Middleton-Cross Plains Area School
District at Middleton High School,
Kromrey Middle School, Elm Lawn
Elementary and the Early Childhood
Program their success in our
schools is extremely important. Ive
told friends repeatedly that if anyones
tax dollars needed to go toward rebuilding Kromrey, it was mine. Thats
why I encourage everyone to vote for
Todd Smith for School Board. Not only
was he a member of the 2012 Yes
Referendum Committee, he also has
demonstrated great community involvement with his position on the
Board of Middleton Outreach Ministry,
as well as in coaching youth sports.
As a highly active volunteer in all
three schools, and at many levels, Im
confident that Todd is committed to assuring that our schools maintain their
high performance while also addressing the achievement gap that still exists.Having grown up in Beloit in the
80s and seeing how the achievement
gap can have economic implications
for everyone, I believe its in our communitys best interest to elect someone
who is dedicated to addressing this important issue. Todd understands that
the strength of our district comes from
our outstanding teachers, and hes
committed to supporting them. If Todd
is elected, he will work toward gaining
public support to make changes toward
closing the gap, and he understands
that as a board member, he would be
held accountable. Those who know
him would agree that his integrity and
dedication are indisputable.
As a father of four and with a very
busy schedule like mine, Todd will be
a dedicated advocate for parents, listening to our community and understanding our values and concerns while
prioritizing the needs of staff and students to ensure both sides get the support they need. In between working
long hours and traveling, he still makes

The next Middleton Action Team


Open Mic Nightwill take place Thursday March 19, 2015, at Craftsman
Table & Tap, 6712 Frank Lloyd Wright
Ave. Middleton Hills,6-8 p.m.
Music will be provided by Malcom
Shabazz Old Time Fiddle Class. Spe-

cial Guest Speakers will be Eric Finch,


Attorney, Activist & Political Organizer and Karen McKim, Blogger &
Grassroots Organizer. The presentation
will be followed by a question and answer session.
The evening ends with people who

have signed up to rant, rave, recite poetry, sing, perform music, comedy,
each having three minutes.
Join them upstairs, order from the
menu and enjoy the cash bar. Feel free
to bring a food item for Middleton Out
Reach Ministry.

Marshall Alwin
Middleton

Johnson offers
deepest
sympathies
following
fatal shooting
Dear district residents,

Sincerely,
Don Johnson,
Middleton-Cross Plains Area
Schools Superintendent

Teacher
endorses
Anne Bauer

PAGE 7

Political activist to speak at MAT event

Lori Lee Roden


Middleton

This years 21st Annual Country


Breakfast held February 1 was a huge
success, especially considering the
snowstorm everyone woke up to that
morning. We owe a huge THANK
YOU to the following sponsors: Title
Sponsor: Willy Street Co-op; Gold
Sponsors: The Haunty Family and The
Jordahl Family; Silver Sponsors: State
Bank of Cross Plains, Huntington
Learning Center, Kicks Unlimited,
James A. Lord, DDS & Jennifer K.
Rypel, DMD Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, Middleton Community Bank,
Culvers, Pipers Mechanical, and Ace
Hardware-Middleton Springs; In Kind
Donors: Barriques and The Printing
Place. We are also very thankful to all
the student and adult volunteers whose
time helped to make this event a huge
success. We are so fortunate that this
event raised just over $10,000 to support choral music at MHS. Photo Caption: Broadway Bound made their
second stage appearance singing and
dancing to the tunes from Footloose

at the 21st Annual Country Breakfast


held on Feb.1 at the MHS Courtyard.
Letter to the Editor: The MHS Choral
Boosters would like to thank everyone
who played a part in our 21st Annual
Country Breakfast held Sunday, February 1. We were very impressed that the
accumulation of snow everyone awoke
to didnt deter most people from attending this wonderful event. It is
heartwarming to see so may segments
of our community come together, raising just over $10,000 to support the
choral music program at Middleton
High School. Thank you to our Title
Sponsor: Willy Street Co-op; Gold
Sponsors: The Haunty Family and The
Jordahl Family; Silver Sponsors: State
Bank of Cross Plains, Huntington
Learning Center, Kicks Unlimited,
James A. Lord, DDS & Jennifer K.
Rypel, DMD Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, Middleton Community Bank,
Culvers, Pipers Mechanical, and Ace
Hardware-Middleton Springs; In Kind
Donors: Barriques and The Printing
Place. Our event would never have
been so successful without all the support from parents and students volunteering in so many different ways.
Thank you to all the local businesses in
Middleton and the surrounding community and choir families that donated
items for the silent auction. Your generosity is greatly appreciated and truly
helps raise significant funds to support
the choral program at MHS. And finally, a big thank you to Mr. Tom
Mielke, who has been involved with
coordinating all the student talent and
providing the organizational support
for the Country Breakfast since it
started 21 years ago. We are so grateful
for the wonderful experiences afforded
our students through his care and support in the choral program each and
every day.
Sincerely,
Dina Boyle and Melissa Bernauer,
Country Breakfast Chairs Heidi Ropa,
Choral Boosters President

Middleton High School


Orchestra Concert!

This popular concert showcases two featured student performers


playing concertos. Performing with the MHS Symphony Orchestra will
be violinist Savannah Albrecht, playing Finale of the Bruch Violin Concert No.1, and pianist Michelle Xie, playing the opening movement of
the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No.2. The concert is on Thursday,
March 19 from 7:30 9:30 p.m. at the Middleton PAC, 2100 Bristol
Street.
The show will also include string music by Newbold, Nelhybel and
Meyer, the famous Sabre Dance by Khachaturian, and the toe-tapping
Hungarian Rhapsody No.2 by Franz Liszt. A reception follows.
Joining the Symphony Orchestra will be the UW-Russian Folk Orchestra directed by Viktor Gorodinsky.
The MHS Symphony Orchestra is under the direction of Mr. Steve
Kurr.
Come see this free and excellent musical performance right in the
community!

Seven members
of Boy Scout
Troop 140 earn
Triple Crown
PAGE 8

The Boy Scout Triple Crown award


is earned by Scouts that successfully
complete the high adventure activities
at 3 of the 4 National High Adventure
Bases. The Triple Crown award was
created in 1996 to both promote all National High Adventure programs and
help identify those Scouts with a thirst
for High Adventure.
These Scouts and Leaders attended
the following high adventure bases
over the course of 2 years: Philmont
Scout Ranch located in Cimarron, New
Mexico where they hiked over 75
miles in 10 days in the mountains;
lived on a boat for 7 days while sailing,
snorkeling and fishing in the Florida

Keys near Islamorada, FL; and winter


camping for 5 days at Northern Tier located in Ely, MN near the boundary
waters, camping outside on a lake in
temperatures reaching negative 20 degrees.
Seven Scouts and Leaders from Boy
Scout Troop 140, sponsored by St.
Lukes Church earned this award.
They are: Doug Booher, Charlie
Booher, Andrew Nicholson, Sam Rapacz, David Vande Sande, Tony
Nicholson (leader) and Matt Vande
Sande (leader).
If you would like more information
about Boy Scout Troop 140, please
visit them at: www.bsatroop140.com.

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Seven Scouts and Leaders from Boy Scout Troop 140, sponsored by St. Lukes Church earned this award. Scouts
in the front are: Charlie Booher, Andrew Nicholson, Sam Rapacz and David Vande Sande. Back row: Leaders Tony
Nicholson and Matt Vande Sande. Not pictured is Doug Booher.

Photo contributed

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 9

Kromrey releases honor roll


HONOR ROLL AND
HONORABLE MENTION
2nd QUARTER/ 1st SEMESTER

6TH Grade Honor Roll


(3.600-4.000)
Bold denotes 4.0

Adler, Zachary
Ahmad, Zamaan
Allee, Alyson
Allison, McKenna
Anstaett, Henry
Arrington, Felicity
Ashley, Alexander
Barmore, Zoe
Bertalot, Genevieve
Boehnen, Chloe
Borden, Noah
Bresnick, Jaren
Bunz, Victoria
Burns, Eleanor
Cermak, Ivan
Chetty, Harit
Chirafisi, Isabella
Cho, Jeremy
Clark, Ava
Colbert, Lynnea
Cole, Aidan
Collins, Elena
Culp, Jenna
Cushman, Emma
Dahmen, Beau
Daniel, Devin
Del Moral, Miguel
Dunn, Ayla
Eggert, Samuel
Evans, Abigail
Ezman, Jaxson
Fischer, Halle
Fisher, Emily
Fitzgerald, Lauren
Fleischman, Jude
Foelker, Ava
Foland, Max
Foley, Sarah
Gaab, Molly
Garber, Mena
Genyk, Elyse
Gibson, Emma
Gibson, Guyan
Glinberg, Talia
Gold, Nathan
Griffith, Nora
Guevara, Charlie
Gussel, Chandler
Hallquist, Annika
Halterman, Lauren
Haynes, Madigan
Hellenbrand, Kayley
Hiorns, Celia
Hodgman, Quinn
Holman, Madeline
Huang, Yale
Hujanen, Caroline
Hursh, Ella
Jin, Hansen
Joseph, Ezra
Kaplan, Amber
Kim, Geneghee
Kinney, Dominick
Koeshall, Karleigha
Korink Romani, Lara
Krenke, Brett
Kubsh, Genevieve
Landretti, Jordann
Larson, Eden
LaScala, Lauren
Ledin, Emily
Lent, Hope
Lewandowski, Vivian
Liegel, Jaden
Liu, Janna
Mackey, Philip
Mael, Jessica
Mangano, Francesca
Marquez Pina, Mireya
Marrione, Alexander
Martin-Rivera, Mary
Matthews Lund, Marli
Meyer, Jackson
Meyer, Madeline
Mintz, Anna
Moriarty, Aidan
Nair, Namita
Niece, James
Parker, Sydney
Pattnaik, Akshita
Perez Wilson, America
Peters-Michaud, Sophia

Pincombe, Tyler
Rajpal, Noor
Ralphe, Gabrielle
Ratsimihah, Rija
Raval, Kirin
Raymond, Alyanna
Recob, Mollie
Ricke, Isabella
Riter, Henry
Ruhly, Sean
Ryan, Rachel
Salgado, Destiny
Sanderson, Glenna
Schink, Elizabeth
Schwetz, Kaitlin
Secor, Jack
Shaffer, Kathryn
Simmons, Taylor
Smith, Nolan
Snortum Haney, Torii
Spalitta, Heidi
Spevacek, Alexia
Stajkovic, Sheldon
Staresinic, Ian
Steele, Nikolaas
Stettner, Nathan
Stricker, Sydney
Tankersley, Erin
Taylor, Sophie
Tenley, Ethan
Thompson, Mia
Underkofler, Elle
Viscarra, Annaliese
Walkington, Avery
Warriner, Analise
Westbrook, Jack
Whittingham, Luke
Wiltzius, Gwenyth
Wincek, Althea
Xiao, Madison
Yard, Rachel
Zhu, Amanda
Zumbrunnen, Abigail

Honorable Mention
(3.400-3.599)

Andrews, Olivia
Bartkowiak, Jake
Bishop, Sylvie
Blumer, Thomas
Brenton, Michael
Dovenbarger, William
Gallay, Amaya
Hensen, Bryce
Hewuse, Treyden
Johnson, Amanda
Kasel, Kaden
Kruck, Madeline
Monroe, Samari
Namsey, Tenzin
Reyes Carranza, Armando
Saldana Silva, Elssie
Schweitzer, Carter
Sosa, Isaiah
Wagner, Kaleb
Witkovsky, Aidan

7th Grade Honor Roll


(3.600-4.000)
Bold Denotes 4.0

Allawi, Raad
Allen, Mara
Baird, Lily
Balasubramaniam, Max
Becker, Maya
Berryman, Hunter
Boorstein, Aaron
Boswell, Miles
Braaten, Oliver
Browning, MaryAnn
Buck, Charlotte
Carpenter, Wesley
Carranza, Hernan
Castillo, Nicolas
Chang, Annie
Chen, James
Collier, Benjamin
Collin, Erica
Collu, Barbara
Compton, Julia
Connell, Madeline
Craker, Clay
Dean, Oscar
Demitrios, Ada
Dietz, Gavin
Donndelinger, Ryan
Dorn, Juliette
Elliott, Georgia

Engle, Elizabeth
Engle, Julian
Engler, Samuel
Espinoza, Isabella
Fattouh, Tarek
Feldt, Adam
Florin, Emily
Fortney, Lauren
Foster, Benjamin
Francois, Kennedy
Frisch, Carson
Frye, Katherine
Fussell, Gianna
Garamendi, Bridget
Gerkey, Emmett
Giles, Payton
Goldrosen, Hannah
Gonter, Maeve
Hafeman, Lauren
Hanson, Adam
Harless, Chase
Hathaway, Isaiah
Hauser, Saskia
Healy, Sarah
Hellenbrand, Annika
Hodgman, Casey
Hu, Maylynn
Huang, Christine
Humphries, Sarah
Hutter, Grace
Inman, Alec
Irwin, Indy
Joers, Mattie
Johnson, Egan
Jones, Julie
Kaur, Anjleen
Kean, Joseph
Kessenich, John
Kim, Nathan
Kinne, Natasha
Klug, Claire
Knight, Amber
Kortbein, Jonathan
Kostecki, Emma
Kruck, Andrew
Lamers, Nathan
Larson, Ava
Lavallee, Raymond
Lee, Jung Won
Leffel, Zachary
Lehmann, Drake
Lim, Cheryl
Lima Sanchez, Julio
Lobaugh, Nicholas
Lohrei, Zoe
Ludtke, Megan
Ludwig, Delaney
Maasch, Aimee
Mackey, Amelia
Martinez, Claire
Matejka, Kathryn
Maves, Logan
Mayhew, Zachary
McDonough, Maxwell
McGuffey, Lili
McLeod, Aidan
Meister, Samantha
Meland, Nolen
Mitchell, Elizabeth
Mormino, Madison
Mosley, Owen
Moyer, Callie
Newcomer, Anja
Nisbet, William
Nurani, Rithika
Ohly, John
Opland, Avery
Orum, Solomon
Pankow, Klaus
Patel, Shankhil
Patton, Sophia
Paulsen, Anna
Pflasterer-Jennerjohn, Isaiah
Pierobon Mays, Gabriela
Raval, Serena
Reisinger, Julia
Richards, Thomas
Roach, Gabriella
Roberts, Calvin
Roden, Elena
Roquet, Kendall
Rosen, Elizabeth
Ross, Emily
Roush, Isaac
Rozum, Emma
Sacchetti, Elena
Salyapongse, Zoe
Sanchez Cortes, Cecilia
Schuster, Alexander
Schuster, Emma

Scudder, Paul
Shulfer, Bailey
Smink, Moniek
Smith, Berkley
Smith, Emmett
Smith, Sydney
Spence, Addison
Stefanek, Cindy
Stevens Williams, Desiree
Stine, Richard
Ulfig, Emily
Vander Sanden, Lauren
Vinje, Kara
Vogt, Isaac
Vogt, Jacob
Voss, Nicole
Waddell, Casey
Walther, Kevin
Weigert, Clare
Zeker, Sarah
Zhang, William
Zopf, Magdelena
Honorable Mention
(3.400-3.599)

Adkins, Tyrell
Balster, Chloe
Bills, Conner
Butler, Gabriella
Cownie, James
Ferderer, Nicholas
Fosdick, Katrina
Hungness, Daniel
Knupp, Colton
Miller, Mallory
Nutini, Caleb
OConnor, Caitlin
Perez Reyes, Osvaldo
Randle, Delijah
Saez, Maya
Said, Karim
Shi, Stephen
Sullivan, Keara
Tormey, Emily
Tuttle, Peter
Walsh, Zachary
Warren, Quinlan
Zahed, Bjaka

8th Grade Honor Roll


(3.600-4.000)
Bold Denotes 4.0

Akbar, Salaar
Alcorta, Elena
Andrews, Megan
Ashe, Alexis
Babler, Jazmyn
Ballweg, Kyle
Batchenkova, Anna
Batley, Kai
Becker, Elora
Berge, Amaya
Bergenthal, Robert
Bertalot, Sean
Braaten, Hadley
Brenton, Aaron
Brunel-Hamel, Maia
Burns, Abigail
Buxton, Isaac
Callahan, Danielle
Carranza, Jennifer
Cheng, Jordan
Chi, Meixi
Choi, Jin Seop
Cunningham, Gabrielle
Dagitz, Isabel
Dahler, Lauren
Davey, Megan
Dillon, Grace
Drane, Owens
Dunk, Brandon
Eggert, John
Farquhar, Tianna
Fischer, Erin
Flock, Stacia
Foth, Brianna
Fullerton, Leigha
Funch, Searra
Gralnek, Sarah
Griffith, Dylan
Griffith, Thomas
Gundlach, Kyia
Hathaway, Kelly
Hellenbrand, Casey
Hendricks, Lauren
Hiorns, Charles
Hoffman, Joseph

Hogendorn, Tristan
Huang, Stephanie
Jason, Liam
Jensen, Katie
Jurgella, Luke
Kim, Jessica
Kim, Mia
Kim, Sae Mee
Kirch-Whitmore, Rachel
Kohlhoff, Kylee
Krenke, Grace
Kushner, Rachel
Larson, Olivia
Lastine, Kristen
Laurent, Maria
Lee, Eric
Lewandowski, Aidan
Long, Cassidy
Lorman, Claire
Madigan, Grace
Mahal, Madeline
Mangas, Abigail
Martin, Danielle
Meyer, Chloe
Miller, Samuel
Monroe, Terra
Mueller, Chase
Murdoch, Susannah
Nemr, Clara
Newcomer, Max
Noughani, Hanna
Petersen, Benjamin
Postle, Teresa
Prestigiacomo, Maxwell
Prichard, Logan
Pritts, Taina
Raisleger, Emily
Ramirez, Alexa
Regan, Cameron
Reitano, Marguerite
Rocero, Isaiah Kyle
Ronnie, Nicholas
Saleh, Amena
Scher, Benjamin
Schremp, Carmen
Schroeder, Ella
Schuster, Bryce
Shoemaker-Allen, Aliza
Shulla, Michael
Smith, Connor
Speth, Adriana
Stern, Nathan
Stern, Sidney
Stousland, G A
Struck, Alexander
Sullivan, Andrew
Swanson, Andrew
Teodorescu, Alexander
Tian, Yating
Trinrud, Raina
Wagner, Jenna
Wagner, Madelinn
Ward, Ethan
Warriner, Amalia
Whittingham, David
Wiegand, Kayla
Williams, Noah
Wodzro, Stuart
Yan, Alton
Zabrowski, Zeke
Zambrano, Angel
Zheng, Susanna
Zillner, Blake
Zimmerman, Megan
Zocher, McKenzie
Zopf, Isabella
Zweber, Jakob
Honorable Mention
(3.400-3.599)

Adams, Hazel
Bindl, Ashley
Carey, Bryce
Carey, Margaret
Culp, Joseph
Dohse, Cooper
Garlough-Shah, Isabel
Hickman, Morgan
Kaplan, Allison
Nurani, Rahul
Oelerich, Lars
Parkin, Archer
Rahman, Melina
Robinson, Mitchell
Simani, Nora
Thayer, Brynn
Thomas, Chandon
Weber, Gabrielle

PAGE 10

HEROIN

pletely inert, Narcan had but one drawback: someone other than the person
overdosing had to administer it.
Sarah worried that Narcan would
create a false sense of security around
what we both knew were increasingly
reckless and short-sighted decisions.
Foremost, we had begun using when
the other wasnt present, something we
said we wouldnt do. Still, she brushed
off my attempts to show her how to assemble the Narcan. It was her way of
trying to frighten me, by raising the
stakes, because I was hitting the needle
a lot harder than she was.
Consequently, when I fell out, her
only recourse was to slap and shake me
and hope I came out of it without Narcanand without calling paramedics.
She was good at towing the line, but
heroin was tightening its grip on her,
too, or else she may very well have left
me behind.
She tried finding humor in the situation.
I like slapping you almost as
muchasIlikerescuingyou, she said
once after I woke up to her tearstreaked face. Wevegottostop.Im
notalwaysgoingtobeheretosave
you.
The overdoses cut both ways.
In August, not long before we decamped for North Dakota, Sarah fixed
early one morning when her eyes
dropped shut and she fell back onto the
pillow. I thought she was just enjoying
the rush of the black juice sieving
through the blood-brain barrier, but
then the transformation came. In an instant, her pale face had turned a ghostly
blue, her breathing reduced to shallow
gasps.
Because we had detoxed during a
30-day road trip we had returned from
only three days earlier, our Narcan was
packed away. I spent several painstaking minutes tearing through boxes in
the dark, moonless night, but was unable to find it. Paramedics arrived 30
minutes later and administered the lifesaving antidote. Eight hours later we

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

fixed as she got ready for work.


That night we resolved to quit using
once and for all. Sarah was distraught
after contemplating the devastation her
death would impose on her younger
brothers. I was still in shock from having nearly lost someone I loved dearly.
We took inventory of our shared
dreams, and, as the night turned into
morning, we held each other close,
more determined than ever to not sabotage this beautiful thing we shared.
Everything we wanted was still within
reach, but if we stayed in Americas
opiate capital, one of us was going to
die.
That truth was now inescapable.

Covering the scourge

It is strange that I would relapse after


13 years abstaining from heroin.
Strange because one of my responsibilities covering the crime desk for Espanolas
newspaper
was
to
aggressively report on the Valleys
overdose epidemic. The position gave
me front-row seats to the nations most
vibrant theater of heroin addiction,
overdose, and death.
One morning, I spied a nice-sized
ball of black tar in the police departments evidence room. Police had
seized it during the bust up of a fencing
operation the night before. I caught a
whiff of its nasty, vinegary odor and
couldnt stop thinking about how much
I had enjoyed using the stuff years earlier.
By then we had been crushing
painkillers on and off for several
months. A couple Sarah met at work
had turned us on to them and, before
even realizing it, we would hurt for the
candy, as it was called. It wasnt long
before the pills no longer hit like they
used to, with the first casualty being
Sarahs grades. To save money, we
switched to heroin, a bigger buzz at
less than half the cost. For me, it was
an old-times-sake kind of thing. Sarah
just wanted to try it to say that she had.
We pinky swore we would only use it

a couple of times, after which we


would getclean.
As our personal lives headed toward
the abyss, I flourished professionally,
producing work that later earned me
two first place awards from the New
Mexico Newspaper Association. Each
week I filed several requests with the
states Medical Investigators Office
for various autopsy reports to keep tabs
on the number of County residents who
had fallen out from opiate toxicity.
I also kept a photographic record of
many overdoses, rushing around town
to wherever a body had been found.
The officer manning the scene would
tell me warm or cold, meaning
whether the victim was dead or alive.
The dead-on-arrivals were heart
wrenching, as the deceaseds family
began arriving at the scene, their anguish palpable enough to choke up the
hardest of hearts.
Survivors made the most interesting
photo subjects, as they were walked or
wheeled from their residences, attached to IVs and sometimes other devices. Two years before we arrived,
Lupe overdosed in the park behind
City Hall. The papers then-crime reporter arrived moments after paramedics gave her Narcan, saving her
life. She woke up with first responders
hovering over her like guardian angels
and a man standing feet away photographing her.
Youbetthatpictureraninthe
paper,rightthereinthepoliceblotter, she lamented to us. Everyone
wascallingmeLupe!Lupe!You
madethepaper!
That wasnt the last time she turned
blue. Severo, after waking from his
own stupors, found her on multiple occasions since then, barely breathing.
Narcan saved her each time.
Although survivors made a better
photo, its the blue faces that continue
to haunt me. In one photo, taken by my
predecessor, a pair of legs dangled
from the doorway of a shed behind the
Baskin Robbins, a scoop of mint ice
cream still melting beside the mans
body. At another angle, his eyes were
open and a syringe lay nearby. His face
was not only blue, but frozen in time,
the muscles relaxed in such a way that
there was no mistaking him as among

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

the living.
The man turned out to be homeless,
making him just another dead blue
overdosed face among many. Too
many for anyone to really care.

A new beginning

North Dakota was the worst for her


and it was the worst for me. What we
had hoped would be a quiet few
months running a 52-room motel in
Dickinson, a city in the middle of
nowhere, turned into an even worse situation than the one we left behind in
New Mexico.
As live-in motel managers, we were
basically slaves to the owner and his
guests, earning a biweekly pittance
that, when broken down, averaged
about 17-cents an hour. Life as we
knew it was on indefinite hold, because
one of us had to remain onsite at all
times. We couldnt even walk our dog
together.
The first month was fresh and new,
hopeful even, but as autumn descended
on Dickinson, we both became terribly
depressed with the situation. The
guestsmany of whom were addicts,
dealers, and prostitutes lured by the oil
boom to western North Dakotawere
like needy children, rude, and calling
at all hours of the night with problems
that many times couldve waited until
morning. Boredom and cabin fever set
in, then the cold came and we receded
even further inward.
Initially we planned to stay a year,
but by November we had decided to
leave come spring, then bumped our
departure even closer, to just before
Christmas.
With a few short weeks between us
and our return home, we became even
more reckless, this time without any
pretense of being responsible junkies.
In September, our second month there,
we were back at it, though our use was
infrequent as heroin was difficult to
find in Dickinson, not to mention very
expensive. In time we met an actual
trafficker who cut preferred-customer
deals and it was on.
With an eye toward sobriety, those
final weeks became an occasion to
slam as much as we could, our last hurrah.
But in late November, reality

continued from page 1

checked us once again when Lupe and


Severo fixed after returning home following a visit with their children, nodding off next to each other.Lupe woke
up; Severo did not.
That night I spent nearly two hours
on the phone with Lupe as she wept inconsolably over Severos passing. I
could feel the pain seething inside her.
She begged us to come back to New
Mexico, not only for his funeral, but so
that together we could all get clean.
She was afraid to do it alone.
Sarah and I stayed up late that night,
fixing shots, and discussing how awful
it would be for the other if one of us
died. She had taken an interest in photography while in North Dakota and
had begun photographing our lives as
addicts. We grieved for Lupe, who relied on Severo for so much, the same
way Sarah and I relied on each other
for the things we did.
Whatwouldhappentomeifyou
died? she asked that night while snapping pictures.
The ride would end and you
wouldgohome, I replied. ButIm
notgoingtodie.
The unthinkable happened less than
three weeks later. Around 2 a.m. on
Dec. 5, I woke up to Sarah sitting at the
foot of our bed. She was folded over so
that her head hung down above her lap,
her arms hanging listlessly at her side.
Her face and lips were blue. But this
time it was too late. There was no gasping, no pulse, no life. All the Narcan in
the world couldnt bring her back.
After nearly four years together, in
which we scarcely spent a moment
apart, the ride had ended in the worst
possible way. Every dream we shared
was gone, over, dead. I had lost the best
friend I ever had. She was 24.
I am still breathing, but barely feel
alive. I relive that moment, and so
many others, dozens of times each day,
sometimes bargaining with fate, or
whatever it is, for her return. My only
consolation is that its unlikely she suffered and that is of little consolation at
all.
Had I woken earlier I likely could
have saved her with the Narcan we
kept less than four feet from where she
died. As with her first overdose in August, I mull over the countless what-ifs,
only this time I go at it alone, without
my friend.
I never asked her what I would do if
she died, because I never thought she
would. I dont think she thought she
would. She wasnt reckless and excessive like I was reckless and excessive,
insofar as one can use heroin safely.
Regardless, I now have an answer to
that unfortunate question.

The aftermath

Today marks two months since she


passed, and four days since Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead in his
apartment with a needle in his arm.
Much has been written about the latter,
about his greatness as an actor and his
kindness as a man. His immortalization
in the canons of pop culture is assured.
Far fewer people are thinking of
Sarah today, even though she too was
a kind, warm, and wonderfully loving
person. The world wont anoint her as
an artist or romanticize her death. It
wont even give a passing thought to
the person she was and had yet to become. It wont take stock of all that she
gave.
But her legacy lives on in the hearts
she touched and the smiles she gave,
and that is not insignificant. Indeed, as
I struggle to make sense of my own
world upended, and grieve over the
loss of someone I thought I would
spend my life with, I can only hope that
time tempers the ache that has been so
loud and persistent since that dreadful
morning.
What I do know is that now, two
months on, I still love her deeply and
miss her terribly.
I wish I could tell her that.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

GREEN

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

continued from page 6

Photos by Matt Geiger contributed

The Village Greens Old Fashioned (top) and Reuben (above) are both
classics that never go out of style.
ness.
Purchased by Ron Boyer, Chads father, it was originally a four-lane bowling alley with a small bar. After many
years in the restaurant industry with
Kellys Drive-Ins, Ron was looking to
start his own restaurant.
Ron covered the bowling lanes to
make room for seating and installed the
kitchen. Over the years, the menu has
expanded from 15 items to the menu
you see today which includes popular
items such as the Road Kill Burrito.
Otherwise, very few things have
changed since then.
The kitchen is still the same layout,
the burgers are still quarter-pound fresh
patties, and the Boyer family is still
working the grill and serving up frothy
tap beer and quintessentially Wisconsin brandy old fashioneds.
Chad says two things make The Village Green unique. [The] involvement
of the Boyer family in the daily operations and the fact that the restaurant has
changed so little over the nearly 40
years weve been in business, he explains. We are still the small-town bar
that does everything by hand, from
writing up orders to preparing all the
food.
While Ron is no longer actively involved in the business, hes still keeping an eye on things. What he sees is
his sons, Chad and Craig, flipping
burgers and jesting with regulars the

way he did for decades.


Chad says hes well aware that in a
seemingly endless sea of chain restaurants, patrons take pleasure and pride
in seeing the owners hard at work
when they walk in the door.
The building is essentially an ode to
comfort food, family and this unique
state. We are a classic Wisconsin tavern featuring great burgers, sandwiches, and a traditional Friday fish
fry, Chad says.
He adds that you cant go wrong
when making your order, even if you
stray a bit from those mainstays.
Everything we make has a special
place, he says. If its not good, then
we dont have it on the menu. Our
corned beef Reuben is probably our
most distinctive sandwich; we figure it
to be the best around. And our burgers
are always hard to turn down.
He went on to say it take a special
community, not just good food and
service, for a place like The Village
Green to thrive.
If it wasnt for the support of the
Middleton community and surrounding
areas, we would not be here today, he
says. We see grandparents, kids,
grandkids all come together over the
years - many of them I remember from
when I was a kid. There are so many
choices for dining and socializing, but
they come to see us. Thank you from
the staff of The Village Green.

PAGE 11

PAGE 12

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Follow Rob
Reischel on
Twitter at
@robreischel

Middleton storms to state

Cardinals top Craig


in sectional finals
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

SUN
PRAIRIE

Bria
Lemirande kept looking up at the
scoreboard.
And Middletons super sophomore admits she was getting awfully
worried.
I was definitely getting nervous, Lemirande said. I kept looking up at the clock and I thought,
Weve got to get going. We need to
play some urgency.
Middletons girls basketball team
did exactly that. And now, the
Cardinals are headed back to their
second home the WIAA Division
1 state tournament.
The Cardinals trailed Janesville
Craig, 48-39, early in the fourth
quarter of their sectional final in Sun
Prairie Saturday afternoon. But
Middleton smacked Craig with a 21See STATE, page 17

Times-Tribune photo
by Mary Langenfeld

Party time

Middletons girls
basketball team
was all smiles after
d e f e a t i n g
Janesville Craig in
a sectional final
and earning a trip
state
last
to
Saturday.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

End of
the road

Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld

Tyree Eady and Middletons boys basketball team fell to Madison East in a
regional final Tuesday night.

Boys basketball
team falls in
regional finals
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

PAGE 13

Gymnasts
shine at state
PAGE 14

MHS surprises,
finishes fifth
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

There were no delusions of


grandeur. No talk of a state championships.
Instead, Middletons girls gymnastics team was thrilled to be at last
Fridays WIAA Division 1 state meet
at Wisconsin Rapids High School.
Anything more was now gravy.
Well, the Cardinals got themselves
one giant serving surprising many
and finishing fifth at the state meet.
Arrowhead won the team title with
a 148.3333 team score. Franklins
combined team was second (146.4667)
and Mukwonagos combined team was
third (144.167).
Middleton posted a 138.1667 score,
just behind fourth place Brookfield
East/Central (138.7333).
Going into the meet on Friday we
didnt talk much about wzqhere we
expected to end up in the standings,
Middleton senior Lucy Bergenthal
said. So finishing fifth was a huge
accomplishment for us.
Cardinals standout sophomore
Madeline
Pflasterer-Jennerjohn
agreed.
We didnt really know what to
expect going into Fridays competition, Pflasterer-Jennerjohn said. We
went out and hit all of our routines, so
we were very happy coming in fifth.
Rightfully so.
The Cardinals had an extremely
solid season, finishing second in both
the Big Eight Conference regular season and postseason. Middleton then
won its own sectional.
But the Cardinals scores were
slightly lower than past seasons, leaving them uncertain how theyd fare at
state. Turns out, Middleton matched up
just fine with the states best and
brightest.
Middletons best event was the
vault, where it posted a 35.250 score.
Bergenthal led the way with a 9.283,
while Pflasterer-Jennerjohn scored a
9.183. Freshman Chloe Young scored
an 8.567 and freshman Eleanor
Mackey had an 8.217.
The Cardinals also scored a 34.750
on the balance beam. Bergenthal
scored an 8.950, while senior Lauren
Ace (8.783), junior Katherine Marshall
(8.767) and Pflasterer-Jennerjohn
(8.250) all had solid routines.
Pflasterer-Jennerjohn led the way
with a 9.050 on the floor exercise and
Bergenthal scored an 8.733. Middleton
also counted an 8.50 from Marshall
and an 8.0 from sophomore Dani
Aranda.

Pflasterer-Jennerjohn had a terrific


routine on the uneven bars (9.317) and
Bergenthal scored an 8.683. Middleton
also counted scores from Young
(8.017) and Marshall (7.867).
This has by far been the most
memorable season for me, Bergenthal
said. We have accomplished and
grown so much as a team and I could
not be more proud to be a part of this
experience. Im glad that we achieved
so much when people werent expecting as much from us this year.
Middleton also fared well during
Saturdays individual state meet.
Pflasterer-Jennerjohn finished ninth
in the all-around competition with a
score of 36.10. Individual champion
Molly Benavides of Burlingtons combined team scored a 38.30.
Pflasterer-Jennerjohn was 11th on
the uneven bars (8.817), 12th on the
floor (9.067), 16th on the vault
(9.217). She also scored a 9.0 on the
beam.
I was very pleased to finish in the
top-10, said Pflasterer-Jennerjohn,
who finished 20th in the all-around
competition at state last year. My goal
for state was to improve from last year,
and I felt like I definitely did that.
I was especially happy with my
beam routine. It has been my most difficult event this year, so having a solid
routine was a nice way to finish.
Bergenthal felt the same way after
finishing eighth on the vault with a
9.383.
I was very happy with my performance, Bergenthal said. Being
able to compete individually on my
favorite event and placing eighth was
an unforgettable way to end my gymnastics career.
In all, it was a great finish to the
season for all the Cardinals.
The most memorable part of season was winning the team sectional
and going to state, PflastererJennerjohn said. We have all worked
hard and have become close this year,
so it was a rewarding and meaningful
way to end the season.
March 6
WIAA DIVISION 1 girls state gymnastics
meet
Team scores (Beam, Floor, Vault, Bars) 1,
Arrowhead (37.467, 35.783, 37.633, 37.450)
148.3333;
2,
Franklin/Muskego/Oak
Creek/Whitnall (36.300, 36.817, 36.517, 36.833)
146.4667; 3, Mukwonago/East Troy/Kettle
Moraine (34.983, 36.517, 36.517, 36.150)
144.1667; 4, Brookfield East/Central (33.950,
36.100, 35.517, 33.167) 138.7333; 5, Middleton
(34.750, 34.283, 35.250, 33.883) 138.1667; 6,
Gale-Ettrick-Trempealeau/Cochrane-Fountain
City/Luther/Melrose-Mindoro/Whitehall
(33.300, 34.500, 34.783, 32.350) 134.9333; 7,
Grafton/Cedarburg (33.033, 34.283, 34.300,
32.200) 133.8167; 8, Stevens Point (31.833,
35.350, 34.00, 31.717) 132.9000; 9, Madison
Memorial (31.483, 32.533, 34.733, 31.883)
130.6333; 10, Sheboygan South/North (32.833,
33.867, 33.800, 30.033) 130.5333.

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

News Publishing Co.


photo by Jeff Seering

Middleton sophomore standout


M a d e l i n e
PflastererfinJennerjohn
ished ninth at state
in the all-around
competition last
The
Saturday.
Cardinals also finished fifth as a
team.

Lemirande,
Middleton
KO Verona

MIDDLETON GIRLS HEADED TO STATE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Sophomore guard
comes up huge
for Cardinals
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

WAUNAKEE The lead a


comfortable 11 points just 90 seconds
earlier was suddenly down to three.
Verona had all the momentum and
was charging hard. Middleton was
desperate for any kind of spark.
Enter Bria Lemirande.
The sophomore guard was the best
player on the floor during the
Cardinals WIAA Division 1 sectional
semifinal with the Wildcats Thursday.
And at crunch time, Lemirande was
her absolute best.
Lemirande drained a cold-blooded
three-pointer that stopped Veronas
rally and gave Middleton a 64-58 lead.
The Cardinals went on to a 71-59 win
and advanced to Saturdays sectional
final against Janesville Craig at 1 p.m.
in Sun Prairie.
That was money, Middleton head
coach Jeff Kind said. Big players
make big shots and that was huge.
Lemirande was huge throughout
the second half, when she scored 15 of
her game-high 20 points. Senior guard
Elizabeth Norregaard added 19 points,
including 15 in the first half.
Veronas Big Three of Alex
Luehring, Grace Mueller and Kira
Opsal a trio of 6-foot-2 players
combined for 43 points and 24
rebounds. But the Cardinals interior
defense was much improved from last
month, when they lost to the Wildcats.
Middleton improved to 21-4 overall and will now be gunning for the
ninth trip to the state tournament in
school history. Verona finished the
year 22-3 and had its 20-game winning streak snapped.
I just remember last year and the
feeling of what it was like to lose in
the playoffs, Lemirande said. I definitely didnt want that again. Nobody
did.
So Lemirande took things into her
own hands.
Middleton trailed, 39-31, early in
the third quarter. But Lemirande had
seven points during an 11-2 burst that
gave the Cardinals a 42-41 lead with
3:55 left in the third. That was
Middletons first lead since 14-12
midway through the first quarter.
She definitely took the game over
at times in the second half, Kind said
of Lemirande. She had a big-time
game.
Lemirande scored four straight
Middleton points late in the third quarter to give the Cardinals a 48-45 lead.
Then freshman forward Halle White
had a rebound basket as the period
expired and the Cardinals who
trailed by 10 points late in the second
quarter took a 50-48 lead to the
fourth.
We thought the game would go
right to the wire, said Lemirande,
whose team split with Verona during
the regular season, as both teams
notched three point road wins. We
had practiced for a lot of late-game sit-

uations expecting that.


But the Cardinals gained some separation early in the fourth quarter.
Trailing, 51-50, Middleton embarked
on an 11-0 run over an 86-second
stretch to take a 61-51 lead with 4:24
remaining.
Sophomore
guard
Alyssa
Lemirande began the fun by banking
in a three-pointer. Senior center Cole
Jordee followed with a three-point
play, senior guard Emily Bergum
drilled a three-pointer, then Alyssa
Lemirande had a lay-up.
That fast, Middleton had a 10-point
lead and appeared in total control.
There were two or three kids in
there that just made a play, Kind said.
You get a chance to get out there on
the floor and make a play and they
did.
Verona wasnt done, though.
The Wildcats went on a 7-0 run
over the next 1:34 and closed within
61-58. But thats when Bria
Lemirande had the shot of the night, a
three-pointer set up by her sister,
Alyssa.
I kind of felt when Alyssa had the
ball that I was kind of open, Bria
Lemirande said. I was kind of leery
about shooting it but I kind of just
went for it. I saw the opportunity and
I guess I just shot it and it was just
really good that it went in.
That three-pointer sparked a 10-1
run to finish the game. And down the
stretch, Middleton made seven of nine
free throws, including four straight
from Norregaard.
We came into the season and we
knew had a lot of potential, junior
forward Grace Douglas said. We definitely have a lot more energy especially with the two groups we always
play and were using that to our
advantage.
One huge key to the win was
Middletons improved post defense
particularly in the second half.
Veronas combination of size and
skill up front are a nightmare matchup
for any foe. Its even more trouble for
a team like Middleton, which lacks
interior size.
The Wildcats took full advantage
of that in the first half, when their
inside trio shot 12-of-25 from the
field. But Douglas spearheaded a second half turnaround that held Veronas
terrific threesome to just 4-of-12
shooting.
Youre never going to stop them
in the post, thats for sure, Douglas
said. They have so much height. But
thats really what we focused on in
practice the last week. And I think our
energy on defense really helped us
pull out the win.

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 15

Verona had all of the energy early,


though.
There were four ties and four lead
changes in the first quarter alone, and
the Wildcats grabbed a 19-17 lead.
Verona then went on a 10-1 run
midway through the second quarter
and built a 33-23 advantage. The
Wildcats scored on five of six possessions during that surge, all coming on
shots inside of 3-feet.
Youve got to be worried, Kind
said. Not only were they getting baskets, they were easy baskets.
Norregaard keyed an 8-3 run to
close the half, though, as Middleton
pulled within 36-31 by the break.
Norregaard had six points in that
stretch, including a steal and layup to
end the half.
Bria Lemirande then took her game
to new heights in the second half. And
Middleton defeated Verona for the
second time in three meetings this season.
Our defense against this team is
what always kills us, Bria Lemirande
said. But we worked on that the last
week, week-and-a-half and we played
a lot better.
Which is why the Cardinals are still
playing.

March 5
WIAA Division 1 sectional semifinal
Middleton ............................. 17 14 19 21 71
Verona ................................... 19 17 12 11 59
MIDDLETON Norregaard 19, Alyssa
Lemirande 9, Douglas 6, Fermanich 3, Bergum 5,
Jordee 7, Bria Lemirande 20, White 2. Totals 22
18-23 71.
VERONA Opsal 16, Mueller 15,
Luehring 12, Cheyenne Trilling 6, Kateri Trilling
5, Erdman 3, Schraufnagel 2. Totals 21 14-19 59.
3-point goals Mi 9 (Norregaard 3, Bria
Lemirande 3, Alyssa Lemirande 1, Fermanich 1,
Bergum 1), Ve 3 (Cheyenne Trilling 2, Kateri
Trilling 1). Total fouls Mi 18, Ve 18. Fouled
out Cheyenne Trilling.

Times-Tribune photos by Mary Langenfeld

Bria Lemirande (top) and Elizabeth Norregaard (above) helped power


Middletons girls basketball team past Verona in a sectional semifinal last
Thursday.

Cards turn
attention to
Ogunbowale
PAGE 16

MIDDLETON GIRLS HEADED TO STATE

DSHA star will


be a handful
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

She is arguably the finest high


school player the state has ever seen.
Shes been the Gatorade State
Player of the Year the last two seasons.
Shes won gold medals playing for
USA Basketball.
And next season, shell take her
immense skill set to Notre Dame.
Yes, Arike Ogunbowale a senior
guard at Divine Savior Holy Angels
has a name thats tough to pronounce. Opponents have had even
more trouble trying to solve
Ogunbowales game.
Ogunbowale is averaging 26.2
points per game. She erupted for 41
points in a late-season game against
Milwaukee Riverside and has six
other games in which shes exceeded
30 points.
Middleton knows it wont stop
Ogunbowale when the teams meet
Friday night at 6:35 in a WIAA
Division 1 state semifinal game at the
Resch Center in Green Bay. But the
Cardinals know they have to try and
slow Ogunbowale if they hope to
advance to Saturdays title game.
Shes amazing, Middleton sophomore guard Bria Lemirande said of
Ogunbowale. Im sure shell be a
focus of everything we do this week in
practice, because shes really, really
good.
Middleton senior guard Elizabeth
Norregaard agreed.
Shes good, really good,
Norregaard said of Ogunbowale. But
we definitely have confidence that we
can go against the best and play really
well, too. It will be a great matchup.
The Cardinals got a first-hand look
at Ogunbowale during a scrimmage in
November. What Middleton saw was
the same thing the rest of the state has
witnessed the last 3 years.
The 5-foot-9 Ogunbowale is a topnotch athlete, capable of beating foes
off the dribble or from long range.
Ogunbowale is dynamic in transition,
has terrific court vision, and is
extremely powerful in the lower body.
This season, Ogunbowale shot
47.9% from the field and 30.7% on
three-pointers. She averaged 9.1
rebounds per game, 2.7 assists, 2.5
steals and 0.9 blocked shots per game.
If theres something anything
the Dashers need, Ogunbowale usually provides it.
Shes something else, Middleton
coach Jeff Kind said. Well have our
hands full, thats for sure. But well be
prepared.
DSHA fell short of the state tournament in Ogunbowales first three seasons. The Dashers lost in the first
round of the playoffs in 2012, then
reached the sectional semifinals in
2013 and 2014.
But theres no doubt that this is the
best supporting cast Ogunbowale has
ever had.
Junior forward Taylor Drost is
averaging 13.0 points per game.

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

G IRLS

B ASKETBALL
N OTES
Fridays Division 1
state semifinals

6:35 p.m. Middleton (22-4)


vs. Divine Savior Holy Angels (242)
*8:30 D.C. Everest (26-0) vs.
Arrowhead (21-5)*

Saturdays Division 1
state finals

*8:30 Fridays winners*

* Games will begin 25 minutes following the previous game.

Junior forward Megan Misiewicz


whos also a volleyball standout is
a
terrific
all-around
player.
Sophomore guards Ovi Young and
Rachel Heinrich are both dangerous,
too.
DSHA has won 22 straight games
after opening the year 2-2. The
Dashers defeated defending state
champion Oak Creek in the sectional
finals.
They have a lot more talent
around (Ogunbowale) than theyve
had, Kind said. Theyre a lot more
than just her.
Still all eyes will be on
Ogunbowale Friday night.
Shes the type of player that gets
casual fans into the building. Shes the
once-in-a-decade talent that basketball
enthusiasts will someday say, I saw
her play.
And
shes
undoubtedly
Middletons greatest focus Friday.
Shes just a tremendous player
and a tremendous kid, said DSHA
first-year coach Jeff Worzella. Shes
so dynamic on the offensive end and
weve asked her to start guarding the
best (offensive) player and shes taken
that role and thrived in it.
His turn: Middleton coach Jeff
Kind has now taken nine teams to
state.
Kind has led the Cardinals to runner-up finishes in 1993, 2003 and
2011. But Kind has never won a state
title.
Kinds legacy in the sport is safe no
matter what happen this weekend in
Green Bay. But theres no doubt hed
like to hoist that elusive gold ball.
For sure, Kind said. I dont
know what that feels like, to do that
the final night of the season ... but Id
like to find out.
Weve done some great things
with the program here. But thats the
one thing wed still like to accomplish.
Odds and ends: Verona and
Janesville Craig tied for the Big Eight
Conference title, one game ahead of
Middleton. But the Cardinals defeated
both co-champs at sectionals. ...
Middleton seniors Cole Jordee and
Jenna Blair both were part of the
Middletons last state team in 2012.
Jordee was a little-used reserve, while
Blair missed that state tourmanent
with a concussion.

Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld

Middleton girls basketball coach Jeff Kind and the Cardinals meet DSHA in a state semifinal Friday.

MIDDLETON GIRLS HEADED TO STATE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

n STATE

Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld

Middleton sophomore guard Alyssa Lemirande sparked the Cardinals comeback win against Janesville Craig.

3 run and posted a thrilling 66-57


win over the gritty, gutty Cougars.
Middleton, which was the No. 3
seed in the sectional, improved to
22-4 and will play DSHA in a state
semifinal Friday at 6:35 p.m. at the
Resch Center in Green Bay. The
Cardinals are making the ninth trip to
state in school history and their sixth
since 2008.
Craig, which shared the Big Eight
Conference title with Verona and
was the sectionals top seed, ended
the year 22-4.
Its pretty awesome, said
Middleton coach Jeff Kind, who has
led Middleton to each of its state
appearances, but is still looking for
his first championship. Theres not
much that beats cutting downs these
nets and winning a sectional championship.
It certainly didnt look like a sectional championship was in the cards
this year. When Craigs Delaney
Schoenenberger (13 points) made a
pair of free throws with 6:35 left in
the game, Craig held a 48-39 lead
its biggest of the night.
But Middletons quartet of Alyssa
Lemirande,
Bria
Lemirande,
Elizabeth Norregaard and Cole
Jordee combined for all 27 of the
Cardinals points from that point forward. Craig, meanwhile, seemed to
run out of gas and managed just nine
points on its final 17 possessions.
Alyssa Lemirande led Middleton
with 16 points, including eight in the
fourth. Bria Lemirande had nine of
her 13 points in the final period.
Both Jordee and Norregaard scored
nine points, while sophomore forward Alexis Thomas added eight.
I think we were all starting to get
nervous, Alyssa Lemirande said.
We all knew this could be our last
game and it was just time to turn
it up.
Middleton did exactly that.
With Craig leading by nine points,
it tried to take the air out of the ball
and run clock. But Middletons full
court press and half court trap began
paying dividends.
First, the Cardinals embarked on a
12-0 run and took a 51-48 lead
their first since 12-10. Alyssa
Lemirande had six points in that
surge while Bria Lemirande added
five.
After the Cougars answered with
a three-point play that tied the game,
51-51 with 4:28 remaining,
Middleton dropped the hammer.
The Cardinals drilled Craig with a
9-0 run and surged to a 60-51 lead
with 2:12 remaining. This time
Norregaard had four points on a pair
of nifty, driving layups and Jordee
had three points at the line.
I was so frustrated that at one
point I almost started crying,
Norregaard said of Middletons earlier struggles. But nobody was ready
for our year to end.
This is unbelievable. Ive never
done anything like this before. Ive
won a Danish championship, but
nothing like this.
During the Cardinals gamechanging 21-3 run, they scored on a
remarkable 12 of 14 possessions.
Middleton turned defense into
offense, attacked inside, and seemed
to wear out the undermanned
Cougars.
I do think we wore them out,
Kind said. They did a nice job, but
they dont sub a lot. Im sure they got
tired.
Sensing the Cougars fatigue,

PAGE 17

continued from page 12

Middleton went to work inside and


drew foul after foul. In the fourth
quarter alone, the Cardinals made
17-of-26 free throws (65.4%) and
they finished 30-of-45 for the game
(66.7%).
We just kind of noticed how they
were playing defense against us and
that we could drive a lot more, Bria
Lemirande said. We just needed to
start finishing our layups and making
easy shots. We werent doing that
most of the game.
No they werent.
The Cardinals, who won at Craig
by 19 points on Feb. 21, looked like
theyd run the Cougars out of the
gym again. Middleton raced to an 80 lead and had a 12-4 advantage midway through the first quarter. But the
Cougars countered with a 10-0 run
including eight straight points to
finish the first quarter and
grabbed a 14-12 lead.
We were very set and focused on
not
underestimating
them,
Norregaard said. And I dont think
we did at all. Theyre a really good
team.
Craig played that way through the
middle quarters.
The Cougars stretched their lead
to six points midway through the
second quarter and held a 31-28 edge
at the break. Craig senior guard
Alison Hughes the Big Eight
Conference Player of the Year had
nine of her 24 points in the second
quarter.
Middleton, meanwhile, was getting solid looks. But the Cardinals
failed to convert and shot just 8-of27 in the first half (29.6%).
We just didnt finish in the first
half, Kind said. And my halftime
speech was about two minutes long.
It was just that we needed to do a
better job finishing.
That didnt happen in the third
quarter, though, when the Cardinals
shot just 4-of-14 from the floor.
Craig also got eight points from
Hughes including a pair of deep
three-pointers and carried a 46-39
lead to the fourth quarter.
Youve got to be worried, Kind
said. We werent playing well
and then Craig tried pulling the ball
out pretty early in the fourth. I know
we couldnt let them do that or it
would be game over.
Middleton didnt let the Cougars
play keep away. Instead the
Cardinals fought back with their
most important run of the year and
stormed into the state semifinals.
Its just so exciting and Im so
happy to be going to state, Alyssa
Lemirande said. It was really hard
to get this far but now that were
here, this is amazing.
Bria Lemirande agreed.
This team is amazing, she said.
When we had to play our best, we
played our best.
And now, the Cardinals are just
two steps away from a title.

March 6
WIAA Division 1 sectional final
Middleton 66, Janesville Craig 57
Janesville Craig ................... 12 19 15 11 57
Middleton ............................. 12 16 11 27 66
JANESVILLE CRAIG Schumacher 1,
Carlson 2, Hughes 24, Slatter 10,
Schoenenberger 13, Brittingham 7. Totals 17 2030 57.
MIDDLETON
Norregaard
9,
A.Lemirande 16, Fermanich 2, Thomas 8,
Bergum 2, Jordee 3, B.Lemirande 9, White 13.
Totals 17 30-45 66.
3-point goals JC 3 (Hughes), M 2
(Norregaard 1, Jordee 1).Total fouls JC 27, M
23.

PAGE 18

MIDDLETON GIRLS OFF TO STATE


MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld

Middletons girls basketball team will play in a WIAA Division 1 state semifinal Friday night at 6:35 at the Resch
Center in Green Bay.
In front (from left) are Katie Fermanich, Alyssa Lemirande, Amanda Tonnesen, Katherine Hibner, Bria
Lemirande, Abbey Webber and Elizabeth Norregaard. In the middle are assistant coach Tom Lesar, manager
Amanda Kalscheur, Emily Bergum, Alexis Thomas, manager Amber Maas and head coach Jeff Kind. In back are
Samantha Ballweg, Jenna Blair, Cole Jordee, Grace Douglas and Halle White.

No.
4
5
10
12
14
15
20
22
25
30
32
35
40
42
44

MIDDLETON GIRLS
BASKETBALL ROSTER

Name
Elizabeth Norregaard
Alyssa Lemirande
Katherine Hibner
Grace Douglas
Abbey Webber
Katie Fermanich
Alexis Thomas
Jenna Blair
Amanda Tonnesen
Emily Bergum
Cole Jordee
Bria Lemirande
Carlee Lemirande
Samantha Ballweg
Halle White

Pos.
G
G
G
F
G
G
G
G
G
G
F
G
G
F
F

G/GS
24/24
24/23
24/1
23/22
24/11
24/13
22/10
24/2
23/0
24/12
11/0
21/0
15/0
24/0
16/0
24/24

Opponent
Janesville Parker
Kettle Moraine Luth.
Verona Area
Madison East
Madison La Follette
Sun Prairie
Madison Memorial
Beaver Dam
Waunakee
Madison West
Beloit Memorial
Janesville Craig
Janesville Parker
Madison East
Kenosha St. Joseph
Madison La Follette
Sun Prairie
Madison Memorial
Verona Area
Madison West
Beloit Memorial
Janesville Craig
Madison West*
Oconomowoc*
Verona Area#
Janesville Craig#
* - Regional
# - Sectional

W/L
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
L
W
W
W
L
L
W
W
W
W
W
L
W
W
W
W
W
W
W

FG-FA
120-318
92-219
66-118
58-119
49-120
40-120
42-115
30-95
29-56
22-62
10-26
12-33
10-16
9-46
3-12
592-1475

Pct.
.377
.420
.559
.487
.408
.333
.365
.316
.518
.355
.385
.364
.633
.196
.250
.401

3FG-3FA Pct.
64-190 .377
28-82
.341
11-37
.297
1-8
.125
33-82
.402
15-56
.268
0-9
.000
17-54
.315
2-7
.323
9-33
.273
9-21
.430
10-29
.345
0-0
.000
8-34
.235
3-9
.333
210-651 .323

MIDDLETON SEASON RESULTS


Score
85-80 (2 ot)
74-66
65-62
71-40
84-40
71-59
70-66
48-58
59-50
64-30
91-33
60-65
46-62
85-43
59-51
65-41
77-71
68-31
49-52
90-53
98-26
70-51
69-53
86-48
71-59
66-57

FT-FTA
49-55
63-98
22-30
41-66
14-26
29-39
29-64
9-24
18-26
17-23
2-2
2-5
6-7
6-15
2-4
309-484

Pct.
.891
.643
.733
.621
.538
.744
.453
.375
.692
.739
1.000
.400
.857
.400
.500
.638

Reb.
70
145
47
149
36
31
67
39
49
63
13
14
18
63
6
895

Avg.
2.9
6.0
2.0
6.5
1.5
1.3
3.0
1.6
2.1
2.6
1.2
0.7
1.2
2.6
0.4
37.3

Ht.
5-6
5-7
5-8
6-1
5-8
5-7
5-8
5-10
5-8
5-9
6-0
5-8
5-10
5-9
5-10

Head Coach: Jeff Kind (UW-La Crosse, 1978)


Career Record/Years: 563-242/37 yrs
School Record/Years: 378-169/23 yrs

MIDDLETON SEASON STATISTICS

No. Name
4
Elizabeth Norregaard
35
Bria Lemirande
5
Alyssa Lemirande
32
Cole Jordee
22
Jenna Blair
20
Alexis Thomas
12
Grace Douglas
30
Emily Bergum
44
Halle White
15
Katie Fermanich
40
Carlee Lemirande
10
Katherine Hibner
42
Samantha Ballweg
14
Abbey Webber
25
Amanda Tonnesen
Team Totals

Yr.
12
10
11
11
11
12
10
12
11
12
12
10
10
11
9

Ast.
25
81
29
24
18
34
23
12
8
24
1
7
2
62
0
359

Stl.
25
42
19
8
7
16
31
14
12
16
4
1
0
25
0
227

Blk.
0
0
0
37
0
0
20
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
62

TO
42
48
51
25
16
41
29
24
15
32
4
3
5
23
0
375

Pts.
353
275
165
158
145
124
113
86
78
70
31
36
26
32
11
1703

Avg.
14.7
11.5
6.9
6.9
6.0
5.2
5.1
3.6
3.4
2.9
2.8
1.7
1.7
1.3
0.7
70.1

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

Photo courtesy of
Mary Bavery

Storm Murphy
(ball)
and
Middletons boys
basketball team
cruised
past
Madison
La
Follette in a
regional semifinal last Friday.

Turning it up a notch

Boys basketball
team surges past
Madison La Follette
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune

There were nerves, anxieties and


tension.
Thats what happens when the
overwhelming majority of your team
has never played in a postseason
game.
But when Middletons boys basketball team found its sea legs last Friday,
it looked like the group that surprised
foes all season long.
Middleton trailed visiting Madison
La Follette, 26-25, at halftime of its
WIAA Division 1 sectional semifinal.
But the Cardinals played a terrific second half and pulled away for a 63-44
win.
Middleton, the No. 5 seed in the
sectional, improved to 17-6. La
Follette, which was seeded 12th,
ended the year 10-13.
This was the first tournament
experience for a lot of our guys,
Middleton coach Kevin Bavery said.
And there were some uncharacteristic things our guys did early.
But we played really well in the
second half, and it gives you a good,
genuine feeling. It really validates

your season. For us that was the pressure game.


Middleton, one of the deepest and
most balanced teams anywhere, had
11 players score. Sophomore forward
Tyree Eady led the Cardinals with 10
points and three steals, while sophomore guard Storm Murphy had seven
points and four assists. Junior forward
Cody Markel had seven points and 10
rebounds, while junior guard Cam
Maly and sophomore guard C.J.
Fermanich both had seven points.
Middleton routed the Lancers, 8648, on Feb. 17. But Bavery and the
Cardinals expected a far tougher fight
this time around.
We knew they wouldnt be the
team we beat before, Bavery said.
Since that game, they had played
pretty well. They were just kind of
getting their house in order, and I
thought they were very, very dangerous.
For a half, anyhow, the Lancers
were exactly that.
Middleton had six turnovers during
a sluggish first quarter and trailed, 7-4,
after one period.
The Cardinals offense got rolling
in the second quarter as Fermanich
had six points. Kellan Schulz, Jordan
Smith and Murphy all made threepoint shots, as well.
Still, Middleton trailed 26-25 at the
break.
We knew theyd be much better,
Bavery said of La Follette. And in

that first half, they certainly were.


Middleton played a terrific third
quarter, though, outscoring the
Lancers, 16-4 and surging to a 41-30
lead. The Cardinals defense was terrific in the period, and Maly drained a
three-pointer at the buzzer to cap the
big quarter.
We just had a dominant quarter,
Bavery said. And then in the fourth,
we played really smart.
They sure did.
Middleton was patient, protected
the ball, and made a living at the free
throw line throughout the fourth quarter.
After going just 2-for-8 from the
line in the first three quarters, the
Cardinals went 12-of-15 (80%) in the
fourth quarter. Maly led the way by
making all four of his foul shots.
Its just nice to get that first one
out of the way, Bavery said. Now,
well see if we can keep it going.

March 6
WIAA Division 1 regional semifinal
Madison La Follette ... 7 19 4 14 44
Middleton ... 4 21 16 22 63
MADISON LA FOLLETTE Shere 11,
OBrien 2, Sobah 18, Green 6, McCree 2, Drake
2, Ewing 2, Brown 1. Totals 14 13-24 44.
MIDDLETON Schultz 6, Ballweg 4,
Smith 3, Hokanson 4, Murphy 7, Maly 7, Eady
10, Gardner 6, Markel 7, Fermanich 7, Sprecher
2. Totals 22 14-23 63.
3-point goals MLF 3 (Sobah 1, Green 2),
Mi 5 (Schultz 2, Smith 1, Murphy 1, Maly
1). Total fouls MLF 23, Mi 19. Fouled out
Green, McCree.

PAGE 19

PAGE 20

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

briefs

Sports

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

Baseball, softball
commission fundraiser

The Middleton Baseball and


Softball Commission will hold a
Good Hops beer and wine
tasting event on March 14 from
4-8 p.m. at the Holiday Inn
West.
Tickets are $50 per person
purchased in advance. Your ticket includes craft beer and wine
tasting from a variety of area
breweries and wineries, hors
doeuvres, music, silent auction
and raffles. A cash bar will also
be available.
The MBSC is partnering with
the
Middleton
Outreach
Ministry for this event, and is
encouraging patrons to bring
canned goods or non-perishable
items to the event for donation
to MOM. Patrons bringing food
donations will receive a $10
refund at the door.
Tickets may be purchased
online
at
www.mbscwi.com/goodhops.
The MBSC is also looking for
sponsors for the event, along
with silent auction and raffle
items. Event sponsors or those
with silent auction or raffle
items may also sign up at the
above website.
Proceeds from the beer and
wine tasting event will be used
to fund MBSC youth baseball
and softball programs. Event
proceeds will also go toward the
construction of an indoor practice facility that the MBSC is
planning to build at Firefighters
Memorial Park. For more information on this proposed indoor
practice
facility,
visit
www.mbscwi.co/indoorfacility.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

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MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

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