44

THE AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE JOURNAL

July, 1936

FREIGHT REVENUE CAR LOADING

RAIL COMMODITY MOVEMENTS

NUMBER OF
FREIGHT CARS

By LEON M. LAZAGA
Trt~Jlic M"""&"• Mllnilt~ Rt~ilrot~J Cmrpt~ny

.L.. . . . . -· . .

COMMODITIES

The volume of commodities received in Manila
during the month of June, 1936, via the Manila
Railr9ad Company are as follows:
Rice, cavans ................ .
89,377
Sugar, piculs ................ .
129,138
Copra, piculs ................ .
77,313
Desiccated Coconuts, cases ... .
29,072
Tobacco, bales............... .
159
Lll.Qlber, board feet. . . . . . . . . . .
291,898
Timber, Kilos.......... . .. . . . . 1,146,000
d.--'"

~

The freight revPnue car loading statistics for
four weeks ending June 30, 1936, as compared with the same period of
1935 are given below:

(Continued from page 39)
their annual volume of exports is expanding,
thetr percentage to .the toal export volume is
rather standing still or even declining. As measured by the value of actual expor.tcin 190~ wholly
manufactured goods were ac~ntable for 27.9%
of the total exports of ~e y.eli.r, while cotton piecegoods were 2.4% (agai.$·of the total exports, but
not of those of wholly Irlanufactured goods alone).
Silk tissues' share was 10.2%; rayon fabrics were
non-existent. The share of wholly .manufactured
goods other than cotton and silk fabrics was
15.3%. In 1913, wholly manufactured goods
were accountable for 29.2% of the total exports·
Cotton piece-goods rose to 5.3%, or more than
doubled. but silk tissues fell off to 6.3% and
"others" rose sharply to 17.6%.
In 1935,
wh~e

FREIOHT
TONNAGE

1936

1936

- - -1935
-- ---

Rice ..•...............•....•
Palsy .......................
Sugar ......•.•..............
Sugar Cane ..................
Copra ..••.•............•....
Coconut ..•. , ................
Molasses ....................
Hemp ...•....•........ ······
Tobacco ....•................
Livestock ....................
Mineral Products .............
Lumber and Timber ..........
Other Forest Products .•......
Manufactures ................
All others including L.C.L .....
TOTAL •••••••••••••••.••

570
82
215

-

-

405
148
19
1
11
3
232
123
15
165
2,637

-1
14
176
143
18
117
2,524

4,626 ~

Increase or
Decrease

~Tonnage

6,208 9,484
1,112
970
6,278 10,096

(173)
( 19)
(107)

(3,276)
142
(3,818)

2,924
2,701
1,974
1,211
547
407
11
119
5
13
53
2,583
2,027
3,041
3,759
103
150
2,352
2,112
16,226 15,060

8
49
5
1
10
(11)
56
(20)
(3))
48
113

223
763
140
11
114
(40)
556
(718)
(47)
240
1,166

----743)

(4,544)

743
101
322

397
99
14

I

1935

-

-

-

43,491 48,035

-

SUMMARY
Week
Week
Week
Week

ending
ending
ending
ending

June 6 ............ 11,100
June 13 ............ 1,231
June 20 ............ 1,130
June 27 ............ _1,_1_~6~

ToTAL . • • . • • . . • . . . . . • • • . • • •

4,626

1,152
1,111
1,257

10,965 12,038
11,539 10,654
10,257 14,129

4,669

43,491

(52)
120
(127)

(1,073)
885
(3,872).

1_0~- ~~~ 11,21~ -~- _(48~
48,035

(43)

(4,544)

N oTE:-Figures in parenthesis indicates decrease.

such old-time articles as cotton and silk textiles,
the so-called wholly manufactured goods are
rather nondescript; new articles unimportant
individually, but, collectively, representing a
tremendous stride in export trade.
Such have been, in substance, the real conditions of the foreign trade of Japan during the
past several decades, and should remain so in
future. An export balance of trade of the dimensions of Y 4,000, million, therefore, cannot be
dismissed as a mere day dream, but has every
probability of coming true. If such a trade
balance fails to develop, the time is not far off
when the living standards of the Japanese people
will be elevated considerably. All in all, the foreign trade outlook for Japan, both short- and longrange, seems entirely bright.

wholly manufactured goods were checked up as
more than half of all exports,-at 59%,---while
cotton piece-goods were 19.9%; a con~iderable
betterment from 1913, but a retrocession as compared with 1933, when cotton piece-goods registered 20.9%. Silk fabrics declined to 3.1 %. but
rayon textiles were now on the list at 5.1 %, while
"others" were accountable for 30.9%. This
1933 percentage of the ~'others", of 30.9, as
compared with 15.3% in 1903, indicates that almost one-third of Japan's exports consist of
wholly manufactured goods other than cotton,
silk, and rayon piece-goods. Undoubtedly these
comprise articles of miscellaneous description, but
they are of considerable significance. While
wholly manufactured goods are to be the motive
force of export expansion, with the exception of

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