THE DIABETES FREE - TREATMENT PROGRAM

Table of Contents
WHAT IS DIABETES?
TYPE 1 DIABETES
Understanding Insulin and Type 1 Diabetes
Who Gets Type 1 Diabetes?
What Causes Type 1 Diabetes?
What Are the Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes?
How Is Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosed?
How Is Type 1 Diabetes Managed?
Consequences of Uncontrolled Type 1 Diabetes
TYPE 2 DIABETES
What Is Type 2 Diabetes?
Who Gets Type 2 Diabetes?
What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?
What Are the Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes?
How Is Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed?
Complications Associated With Type 2 Diabetes
WHAT IS A DIABETES MEAL PLAN?
What is a Healthy Diet?
OUTSMART DIABETES 5-WEEK MEAL PLAN

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What is Diabetes?
Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life.
And it does – in numbers that are dramatically increasing. In the last decade, the cases of people
living with diabetes jumped almost 50 percent – to more than 29 million Americans.
Worldwide, it afflicts more than 380 million people. And the World Health Organization
estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with diabetes will more than double.
Today, diabetes takes more lives than AIDS and breast cancer combined -- claiming the life of 1
American every 3 minutes. It is a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart
failure and stroke.
Living with diabetes places an enormous emotional, physical and financial burden on the entire
family. Annually, diabetes costs the American public more than $245 billion.
Just what is diabetes?
To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body.
When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is
supposed to release insulin.
Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter -- and allow you to use
the glucose for energy.
But with diabetes, this system does not work.
Several major things can go wrong – causing the onset of diabetes. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are
the most common forms of the disease, but there are also other kinds, such as gestational diabetes,
which occurs during pregnancy, as well as other forms.

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Type 1 Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body's own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells
of the pancreas (called beta cells).
Normally, the body's immune system fights off foreign invaders like viruses or bacteria. But for
unknown reasons, in people with type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks various cells in the
body. This results in a complete deficiency of the insulin hormone.
Some people develop a type of diabetes – called secondary diabetes -- which is similar to type 1
diabetes, but the beta cells are not destroyed by the immune system; rather, they are destroyed by
some other factor, such as cystic fibrosis or pancreatic surgery.

Understanding Insulin and Type 1 Diabetes
Normally, the hormone insulin is secreted by the pancreas in low amounts. When you eat a meal,
sugar (glucose) from food stimulates the pancreas to release insulin. The amount that is released is
proportional to the amount that is required by the size of that particular meal.
Insulin's main role is to help move certain nutrients -- especially sugar -- into the cells of the
body's tissues. Cells use sugars and other nutrients from meals as a source of energy to function.
The amount of sugar in the blood decreases once it enters the cells. Normally, that signals the beta
cells in the pancreas to lower the amount of insulin secreted so that you don't develop low blood
sugar levels (hypoglycemia). But the destruction of the beta cells that occurs with type 1 diabetes
throws the entire process into disarray.
In people with type 1 diabetes, sugar isn't moved into the cells, because insulin is not available.
When sugar builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body's cells starve for nutrients and
other systems in the body must provide energy for many important bodily functions. As a result, high
blood sugar develops and can cause:

Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination (to try to
clear the sugar from the body). When the kidneys lose the glucose through the urine, a large
amount of water is also lost, causing dehydration.

Weight loss. The loss of sugar in the urine means a loss of calories; therefore, many people
with high sugars lose weight. (Dehydration also contributes to weight loss.)

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Without insulin and because the cells are starved of energy,
the body breaks down fat cells. Products of this fat breakdown include acidic chemicals called

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ketones that can be used for energy. Levels of these ketones begin to build up in the blood,
causing an increased acidity. The liver continues to release the sugar it stores to help out.
Because the body cannot use these sugars without insulin, more sugar piles into the
bloodstream. The combination of high excess sugars, dehydration, and acid buildup is known
as "ketoacidosis" and can be life-threatening if not treated immediately.

Damage to the body. Over time, the high sugar levels in the blood may damage the nerves
and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart, and predispose a person to
atherosclerosis (hardening) of the large arteries that can cause heart attack and stroke.

Who Gets Type 1 Diabetes?
Although the disease usually starts in people under age 20, type 1 diabetes may occur at any age.
The disease is relatively uncommon, accounting for only about 5% of people with diabetes. The
condition is more common in whites than in blacks and occurs equally in men and women.

What Causes Type 1 Diabetes?
Doctors don't know all the factors that lead to type 1 diabetes. Clearly, the susceptibility to the
condition can be inherited.
Doctors have identified that an environmental trigger plays a role in causing the disease. Type 1
diabetes appears to occur when something in the environment -- a toxin or a virus (but doctors aren't
sure) -- triggers the immune system to mistakenly attack the pancreas and destroy the beta cells of the
pancreas to the point where they can no longer produce sufficient insulin. Markers of this destruction
-- called autoantibodies -- can be seen in most people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, they are present in
85% to 90% of people with the condition when the blood sugars are high.
Because it's an autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes can occur along with other autoimmune
diseases such as hyperthyroidism from Grave's disease or the patchy decrease in skin pigmentation
that occurs with vitiligo.

What Are the Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes?
The symptoms of type 1 diabetes are often subtle, but they can become severe. They include:

Increased thirst

Increased hunger (especially after eating)

Dry mouth

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Nausea and occasionally vomiting

Abdominal pain

Frequent urination

Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry)

Fatigue (weak, tired feeling)

Blurred vision

Heavy, labored breathing (Kussmaul respiration)

Frequent infections of the skin, urinary tract, or vagina

Signs of an emergency with type 1 diabetes include:

Shaking and confusion

Rapid breathing

Fruity smell to the breath

Abdominal pain

Loss of consciousness (rare)

How Is Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosed?
If your health care provider suspects type 1 diabetes, he will first check for abnormalities in your
blood (high blood sugar level). In addition, he may look for glucose or ketone bodies in the urine.
There is currently no way to screen for or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes.

How Is Type 1 Diabetes Managed?
Many people with type 1 diabetes live long, healthy lives. The key to good health is keeping your
blood sugar levels within your target range, which can be done with meal planning, exercise, and
intensive insulin therapy. All people with type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections to control their
blood sugar.
You will also need to check your blood sugar levels regularly and make adjustment of insulin,
food, and activities to maintain a normal sugar.

Consequences of Uncontrolled Type 1 Diabetes
When type 1 diabetes isn't well controlled, a number of serious or life-threatening problems may
develop, including:

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Retinopathy. This eye problem occurs in about 80% of adults who have had type 1 diabetes
for more than 15 years. Diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes is extremely rare before
puberty no matter how long someone may have had the disease. Medical conditions such as
good control of sugars, management of high blood pressure, and regulation of blood fats like
cholesterol and triglycerides are important to prevent retinopathy. Fortunately, the vision loss
can be prevented in most people with the condition.

Kidney damage. About 20% to 30% of people with type 1 diabetes develop kidney damage,
a condition called nephropathy. The risk for kidney disease increases over time and becomes
evident 15 to 25 years after the onset of the disease. This complication carries significant risk
of serious illness -- such as kidney failure and heart disease.

Poor blood circulation and nerve damage. Damage to nerves and hardening of the arteries
leads to decreased sensation and poor blood circulation in the feet. This can lead to increased
risk of injury and decreased ability to heal open sores and wounds, which in turn significantly
raises the risk of amputation. Damage to nerves may also lead to digestive problems such as
nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

SOURCES:
American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care, January 2004.
American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Basics: Type 1."
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Faxct Sheets:

webmd.com

Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

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Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes, once called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the most common form of
diabetes, affecting 90% to 95% of the 26 million Americans with diabetes.

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?
Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes make insulin. But
either their pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin well enough.
This is called insulin resistance. When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should
be, glucose (sugar) can't get into the body's cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of
going into cells, the body's cells are not able to function properly. Other problems associated with the
buildup of glucose in the blood include:

Damage to the body. Over time, the high glucose levels in the blood can damage the nerves
and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart and lead to atherosclerosis, or
hardening of the arteries that can cause heart attack and stroke.

Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination, causing
dehydration.

Diabetic coma (hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma). When a person with type 2
diabetes becomes very ill or severely dehydrated and is not able to drink enough fluids to
make up for the fluid losses, they may develop this life-threatening complication.

Who Gets Type 2 Diabetes?
Anyone can get type 2 diabetes. But those at highest risk for the disease are those who:

Are over 45

Are obese or overweight

Have had gestational diabetes

Have family members who have type 2 diabetes

Have prediabetes

Don't exercise

Have low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides

Have high blood pressure

Are members of certain racial or ethnic groups including:

African Americans

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Latinos

Native Americans

Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?
Although it is more common than type 1 diabetes, the causes of type 2 diabetes are less well
understood. It is likely caused by many things.
Type 2 diabetes can run in families, but the how it's inherited is not known.
For more detail, see Causes of Type 2 Diabetes.

What Are the Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes?
Very often, people with type 2 diabetes will have no symptoms. When symptoms of type 2
diabetes happen, they vary from person to person and include:

Increased thirst

Increased hunger (especially after eating)

Dry mouth

Nausea and sometimes vomiting

Increased urination

Fatigue (weak, tired feeling)

Blurred vision

Numbness or tingling of the hands or feet

Frequent infections of the skin, urinary tract, or vagina

Sores that are slow to heal

Rarely, a person may be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after falling into a diabetic coma.

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed?
To diagnose type 2 diabetes, your doctor will first check for abnormalities in your blood (high
blood glucose level) during a random fasting blood test or through a screening test known as the 2hour glucose tolerance test. Or you may get a blood test called a hemoglobin A1c that shows your
average blood sugar for the past 2 to 3 months. Also, he or she may look for glucose or ketones in
your urine.

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Because adults can be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, your doctor may suggest a zinc transporter
8 autoantibody (ZnT8Ab) test. This blood test -- along with other information and test results -- can
help determine if a person has type 1 diabetes instead of another type. The goal of having the
ZnT8Ab test is a prompt and accurate diagnosis and that can lead to timely treatment.

Complications Associated With Type 2 Diabetes
If your type 2 diabetes isn't well controlled, there are a number of serious or life-threatening
problems you may have, including:

Retinopathy. People with type 2 diabetes may already have eye problems related to diabetes.
Over time, more and more people who initially do not have eye problems related to the
disease will develop some form of eye problem. It is important to control not only blood sugar
but also blood pressure and cholesterol to prevent eye disease from getting worse.
Fortunately, the eye problems aren't bad in most people.

Kidney damage. The risk of kidney disease gets worse over time, meaning the longer you
have diabetes, the greater your risk. If not caught early, kidney damage can lead to kidney
failure.

Poor blood circulation and nerve damage. Damage to the blood vessels can lead to a higher
risk of stroke and heart attack as well as peripheral artery disease. Damage to nerves and
hardening of the arteries leads to worse sensation and poor blood circulation in the feet. This
can lead to more infections and a higher risk of skin ulcers, which significantly raise the risk
of amputation. Damage to nerves may also lead to digestive problems, such as nausea,
vomiting, and diarrhea.

SOURCES:
American Diabetes Association: “Type 2 Diabetes.”
American Diabetes Association: “All About Diabetes.”
National Institutes of Health: “Type 2 Diabetes.”
American Diabetes Association: "How to Tell if You Have Diabetes or Prediabetes."
American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Basics."
News release, FDA.
webmd.com

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What is a Diabetes Meal Plan?
A diabetes meal plan is a guide that tells you how much and what kinds of food you can choose to
eat at meals and snack times. A good meal plan should fit in with your schedule and eating habits.
Some meal planning tools include:

The plate method

Carb counting

Glycemic index.

The right meal plan will help you improve your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol
numbers and also help keep your weight on track. Whether you need to lose weight or stay where you
are, your meal plan can help.
People with diabetes have to take extra care to make sure that their food is balanced
with insulin and oral medications (if they take them), and exercise to help manage their
blood glucose levels.
This might sound like a lot of work, but your doctor and/or dietitian can help you create a meal
plan that is best for you. When you make healthy food choices, you will improve your overall health
and you can even prevent complications such as heart disease and some cancers.
There are many ways to help you follow your diabetes meal plan. Some ways are Creating your
Plate or Carbohydrate Counting. These two meal planning methods are different but hopefully one is
right for you.

What is a Healthy Diet?
A healthy diet is a way of eating that that reduces risk for complications such as heart disease
and stroke.
Healthy eating includes eating a wide variety of foods including:

vegetables

whole grains

fruits

non-fat dairy products

beans

lean meats

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poultry

fish

There is no one perfect food so including a variety of different foods and watching portion sizes is
key to a healthy diet. Also, make sure your choices from each food group provide the highest quality
nutrients you can find. In other words, pick foods rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber over those that
are processed.
People with diabetes can eat the same foods the family enjoys. Everyone benefits from healthy
eating so the whole family can take part in healthy eating. It takes some planning but you can fit your
favorite foods into your meal plan and still manage your blood glucose, blood pressure and
cholesterol.
Source: http://www.diabetes.org/

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Outsmart Diabetes 5-Week Meal Plan
The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber,
vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight
loss. Build your daily meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two
snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "FatFighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Follow this mix and
match meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight
fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk.
BREAKFAST
Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100 percent fruit spread on ½
of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk.
Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed,
and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste.
Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with
¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100 percent whole grain English
muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1 percent) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk.
Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp
ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans.
Nutty Oatmeal: Top 1/2 c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon
and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage.
Bagel and cream cheese: Spread 1/2 100% whole grain bagel with 1 Tbsp low fat cream cheese.
Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage.
Veggie omelet: Cook 1 egg white in a pan with 2 tsp canola, peanut or olive oil. Add ½ c spinach
leaves, ½ c mushrooms, onions, garlic, and herbs as desired; and top with 2 Tbsp reduced fat cheese.
Serve with 1 slice 100% whole grain toast spread with 1 tsp canola-oil margarine and 1 c fat-free
milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage.
LUNCH
Tuna melt: Top 1 toasted whole grain English muffin with 1/4 c tuna mixed with 1 tsp
mayonnaise (or 1 Tbsp light mayonnaise), 1 Tbsp minced dill pickle and/or chopped celery and 1 oz

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reduced-fat cheese. Place in pre-heated oven (450ºF) for 5 to 10 minutes (or microwave for 30
seconds until cheese melts). Serve with 8 baby carrots with 2 Tbsp reduced fat ranch dressing, and 1
c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy beverage.
Lean-body salad: Toss 2 c mixed dark greens, ½ c canned garbanzo beans (rinsed well), 1 oz
reduced-fat Mozzarella shredded cheese and 2 Tbsp light Italian dressing. Serve with 1 fresh peach or
½ c canned peaches (in juice or water).
Chicken salad: Combine 2 c mixed dark greens, 2 stalks chopped celery, and ¼ c sliced green or
red grapes. Top with 2 oz cooked chicken breast, and drizzle with 2 Tbsp light honey mustard
dressing (such as Newman's Own). Serve with 1 slice reduced-calorie 100 percent whole grain toast,
spread with 1 tsp canola oil soft tub margarine.
Roast-beef sandwich: Layer 2 oz lean roast beef, ½ c chopped romaine lettuce and ½ sliced
tomato on 2 slices reduced calorie 100 percent whole grain bread, spread with 1 tsp mayonnaise
and/or mustard.
Pesto pizza: Split and toast a 100 percent whole grain English muffin. Top each half with 1 Tbsp
pesto basil sauce, 1 slice tomato or ½ c canned tomatoes, and ½ slice reduced-fat cheese. Broil or
bake in oven until cheese melts.
Bean tostada: Bake 1 corn tortilla in 400-degree oven until crisp. Spread with ½ c cooked or
canned pinto beans (rinsed) and 2 Tbsp shredded reduced-fat Mexican blend cheese. Return to oven
for 5 to 10 minutes until cheese melts. Top with ¼ c salsa. Serve with a cabbage salad (1 c shredded
cabbage and 1 chopped tomato with 2 Tbsp reduced-fat dressing).
Tuna salad: Mix 3 oz water-packed tuna with 2 stalks chopped celery, 4 chopped green olives,
and 1 tsp regular (or1 T reduced-fat mayonnaise). Add 1 Tbsp seasoned rice vinegar, if desired.
Scoop tuna onto 2 c mixed dark greens, and top with 1 Tbsp chopped almonds. Serve with 1 oz 100
percent whole grain crackers.
SNACK OPTIONS #1
1 medium orange or tangerine and 2 T dry roasted almonds (no added salt)
1 c fresh strawberries and ¼ c unsalted nuts
1 c seasonal melon and 6 oz fat-free light yogurt
4 dried apricot halves (or 3 dried plums) and 7 walnut halves

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2 fresh or dried figs and ¼ c unsalted nuts
1 kiwi and 12 whole almonds
1 medium apple, sliced, with 2 Tbsp all-natural peanut butter
DINNER
Barbecue chicken: Grill or roast 3 oz chicken and top with 2 Tbsp barbecue sauce. Serve with 1
slice garlic sourdough toast, spread with1 tsp olive oil and garlic, and colorful coleslaw (mix 1 c
shredded red and green cabbage and carrots with 1 Tbsp regular coleslaw dressing or 2 Tbsp
reduced-fat dressing).
Roast beef and rice: 3 oz lean roast beef, sliced, with 2/3 c cooked brown rice and 1 c cooked
spinach, seasoned with 1 tsp olive oil and 1 tsp balsamic vinegar.
Halibut and potatoes: 3 oz foil-baked halibut or other fish with 1 c green peppers and onions.
Serve with ½ c red potatoes, roasted in 1 Tbsp olive oil and seasoned with herbs and spices.
Pasta with meatballs: Toss 1 c cooked whole grain pasta in garlic and 1 Tbsp olive oil and garlic.
Top with 3-oz lean meat balls (made with turkey, chicken or soy) and 1 tsp grated Parmesan cheese.
Serve with cucumber salad (toss 1 c mixed greens, 1 c cucumber slices, 10 halved cherry tomatoes, ¼
c chopped red onions and 2 Tbsp reduced-fat Italian dressing).
Shrimp salad bowl: Mix 1/3 c cooked brown rice and 2 Tbsp crumbled feta cheese. Scoop onto 2
c mixed greens, and top with 3 oz grilled or sautéed shrimp and 2 Tbsp reduced-fat dressing. Serve
with 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat ricotta or cottage cheese.
Oven fried chicken: Toss 4 oz raw chicken breast in 1 Tbsp reduced-fat Italian dressing, coat
with 2 Tbsp seasoned bread crumb and spray lightly with canola oil. Place on lightly oiled cookie
sheet. Bake at 350ºF for 30 minutes or until browned and no longer pink inside. Serve with 3-bean
salad (toss ½ c green beans, ¼ c garbanzo beans, ¼ c red beans, 2 Tbsp chopped onion and 2 Tbsp
reduced-fat Italian dressing)
Tofu stir fry: Stir-fry 3 oz tofu and 2 c mixed vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, green beans,
onions) in 2 Tbsp reduced sodium stir fry sauce and 1 Tbsp olive oil. Serve over 2/3 c cooked brown
rice.
SNACK OPTIONS #2

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2 graham crackers spread with 1 Tbsp all natural peanut butter
3 c light popcorn and 16 oz light lemonade
¼ c cashews, almonds, walnuts or other nuts
4 vanilla wafers and 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage
6 oz fat-free light yogurt and ¾ cup blueberries, raspberries or blackberries
½ c light ice cream (choose ice cream with no more than 2 grams saturated fat and 20 grams total
carbohydrates)
Stir 1 Tbsp chopped dried fruit and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts into 6 oz fat-free light yogurt.
SOURCE: http://www.prevention.com/

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The Diabetes Free - Treatment Program (review)
Created by Dr. David Pearson, a speaker, diabetes and insulin production specialist, author, and
independent medical researcher, The Diabetes Free is a step-by-step guide that was designed to help
people reverse their diabetes permanently and naturally.
Inside his guide, Dr. Pearson shares all he believes you need to know about living a healthy
lifestyle, and focuses especially on the diet aspect. He said that this is extremely important because
people’s diets are mostly comprised of processed foods, which fill the stomach with toxic substances
that make its environment more acidic. This then overworks the pancreas, thus diabetes could
develop.
As a medical researcher, Dr. David Pearson learned that insulin is not the best glucose regulator,
contrary to popular belief. He said there’s a more potent glucose regulator that’s innately found in our
bodies. According to his claims, the only thing that’s stopping people from using this is simply the
lack of knowledge.
As a result, inside the Diabetes Cure guide Dr. David Pearson offers the users all the information
that they really need to know about their condition, and listed below are some of the main things that
he covers:

Step-by-step advice on how to know which foods you should and shouldn’t eat.

How to use simple lifestyle and diet modifications to enhance your immune system,
effectively control your blood sugar, and treat diabetic acidosis (a life-threatening problem
that occurs when fats are used as energy source).

Detoxification methods to allow your pancreas to heal and remove acids from your system.

Information about the truth behind the diabetic drugs you’re taking and how they only make
your disease worse, and much more…

Dr. David Pearson also offers 3 bonus reports inside the Diabetes Cure package, and in short, here
they are:
1. “Foot Miracle” This report will reveal an ancient and powerful technique which can
significantly improve your feet’s blood circulation at the cellular level and prevent common diabetic
foot problems, from neuropathy (damaged nerves) to infections.
2. “27 Desserts” Dr. Pearson claims that the “27 Desserts” was the result of the collaboration of
bakers, qualified endocrinologist, and dietitian. With this, you’ll be able to enjoy 27 dessert recipes
without fear of messing up your blood sugar levels.

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3. “Breathe In To A New Life” According to Dr. Pearson, the right breathing could help you avoid
life-threatening diseases, like cancer. In this free report he shares breathing techniques he learned
from Siddha Yoga Master, an 85-year-old man from West Bengal, India.
In a nutshell, these are the main things you can expect to learn by getting the Diabetes Cure
program. For more information about the methods that Dr. David Pearson offers you can check this
video.