Michigan’s oldest college newspaper

Vol. 138 Issue 19 - 19 March 2015

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

ends on the national podium
Micah Meadowcroft
Arts Editor

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said.

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tle bit of time afterwards and put

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The back of the Withrow house at 25 Rippon, where the
kitchen fire started. (Morgan Delp/Collegian)

College rallies
around employee

meters.

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in teamwork.
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Morgan Delp
Editor-in-Chief

dows.

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earned

See Track A7

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J u -

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able to respond in about two

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(Courtesy of NCAA)

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No charges filed in Ransom shooting
Macaela Bennett
City News Editor
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James Momenee often went into
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Q&A: Kevin Williamson, roving correspondent
Kevin D. Williamson is the roving correspondent for National Review. At Hillsdale, he is teaching a course as the Dow Journalism Program’s spring

What did you learn from starting your
own newspaper, The Bulletin?
I learned to not start a newspaper. It was
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Why did you reply with that?

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r.

(Courtesy of Cato Institute)

you tweeted in response to a question
asking if doctors who perform abortions
should be killed and if women who abort

See Q&A A2

INSIDE
Emily Oren wins 3K

Wearing the Ivy Crown

SAB hosted St. Patrick’s Day themed bowling at Hillsdale Lanes. Students even enjoyed green beer. (Elena
Creed/Collegian)

Airport Advisory Committee
member resigns amid council
dispute

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A3

A6

‘Once-in-a-lifetime’

A Hillsdale UFO
In 1966, dozens of witnesses
B1

(Courtesy of the DIA)

B4

(Courtesy of Dawn Oren)

News........................................A1
Opinions..................................A4
City News................................A6
Sports......................................A7
Arts..........................................B1
Features....................................B3

Republicans in 2016
A5

NEWS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

A2 19 March 2015

WHIP visits the Pentagon, remembers 9/11
Vivian Hughbanks
D.C. Correspondent

WASHINGTON, D.C. —
Lights shone serenely through
the early evening darkness, illuminating benches in the 9/11
Pentagon Memorial as a group
of nine students crowded up to
colossal building.
Looking out on Arlington,
Virginia, Career Services Executive Director Michael MurWHIP at the Pentagon: Senior Bailey Arlinghaus, Executive Director of Career Services Michael Murray, junior
Christy Allen, junior Randy Keefe, junior Daniel Sunne,
junior Vivian Hughbanks, senior Rossteen Salehzadeh,
junior Bri Hearn, and sophomore Emily DePangher. (Courtesy of Vivian Hughbanks)

American Airlines Flight 77,
erately crashed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. Dressed
in a tan Marine utility uniform,
Murray held an enlarged photograph of the burning wreckage.

courtyard and memorial chapel,
in the photo. So as you can see,
we’re standing not too far from
the point of impact.”
Murray served for seven
years in active duty in the U.S.
Marine Corps, and deployed to
Iraq in 2006 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Now in
the Marine Reserves, he works
duties.
Students of the Washington
Hillsdale Internship Program
visited the Pentagon for a tour
with Murray last Thursday evening. Instead of walking quickly
with a guide through crowded
hallways as tourists would, Murray led the group through corhistory after hours.
The group walked a circuit
through the building, visiting the

Secretary of the Navy. They also
perused exhibits about the military’s involvement in disaster
relief and U.S. presidents who
served as military commanders,
among others.
While in the halls of the Defense Intelligence Agency, students got to see a gold-plated
AK-47 that once belonged to
Saddam Hussein. The gun is displayed alongside a set of Iraqi
Most Wanted playing cards, developed by U.S. military to help
troops identify members of Hussein’s government during the invasion of Iraq.
Students said standing in an
tacks was, without a doubt, the
most moving experience.

commandant of the United States
Marine Corps — for whom Murray now works when at the Pentagon. On the morning of the attack, Hogue was in the suite, but
ing near the suite door, he was
thrown approximately 15 feet
from the impact of the plane.
Since most students were
younger than 10 years old in
2001, the trip allowed them to
see the impact of the attacks in a
new and valuable way.
“Seeing the intricacies of the
9/11 memorial with the lights
and the chapel gave a wonderful
perspective of the effect the attack had on the Pentagon,” sophomore Emily DePangher said.
“And how quickly the military
rebuilt and revitalized.”

D. Hogue, the counsel for the

Hearing from the professors’ younger selves
Andrew Egger
Assistant Editor
Assistant Professor of Philosophy Lee Cole ’04 captivated
an enthusiastic audience in Lane
125 yesterday afternoon with a
letter written to his freshman self.
Cole’s lecture was the most
recent entry of Academic Services’ new “Letters to my Undergraduate Self” series, in which
Hillsdale professors turn back
the clock to relate what they wish
they had known when they began
college.
Professor of Psychology Collin Barnes kicked off the series
on Feb. 18, and Visiting Assistant
Professor of History Miles Smith
IV followed suit on March 2.
Distinguished Visiting Professor of History Samuel Negus
will share his thoughts at the end
of March, and Assistant Professor of Physics Paul Hosmer will
speak in mid-April.
The lecture series is the brain-

child of senior MacKenzie McGrath, student director of Academic Services.
“My years at Hillsdale have
conversations I’ve had with my
professors outside of class,” McGrath said in an email. “Their
wisdom and support has been
an irreplaceable part of my life
here. In dreaming up this series,
I wanted to pose a question that
could offer to a wider audience
some of the same sorts of wisdom that I have received one-onone from my professors.”
The question McGrath posed:
Knowing what you know now,
what advice do you wish you had
gotten before your freshman year
of college?
The question was intentionally broad, and the professors
who have spoken have taken it in
unique directions. Cole, for example, mentioned the appropriateness of his previous relative
lack of knowledge.

“If anything, I’m pretty certain that I’m actually happy that
I didn’t know then all that I know
now,” Cole said. “Not because
I was once blissfully ignorant
whereas now I’ve become worldweary and cynical, but because
I simply wasn’t ready to know
everything that I know now and
so not knowing those things was
okay, was even appropriate.”
During his lecture, Smith discussed his gradual intellectual
awakening, his conversion to
Christianity, and his migration
from Southern student to Northern professor.
“You probably think it’s tragic
single and living in small town in
Michigan, sharing a house with a
Lutheran dude from Riga,” Smith
said to his undergraduate self.
But this trajectory wasn’t
tragic at all, he said: Beginning
in his junior year, he became a
devout Christian.
Smith said that the experience

of preparing for the lecture gave
him new insights about his own
past.
“I thought about things I
hadn’t thought about in eight or
nine years,” Smith said. “You do
that you conjure up memories
of your undergraduate experience that you’d kind of forgotten
about.”
McGrath said that she has
been happy with the lectures so
far.
“Our speakers have been gracious enough to take the time to
delve into their past and present
selves,” she said. “While I certainly hope that it is proving to
be a valuable exercise for its own
sake, my greater hope is that their
doing so contributes to fostering
the kind of conversation, the kind
of community that helps us see
ourselves and the world around Assistant Professor of Philosophy Lee Cole presents his
us through each other’s eyes.”
letter to his undergraduate self. (Elena Creed/Collegian)

Bookstore bag
contest opens

Kids with guns: Bart to
speak on gun culture
Stacey Egger
Collegian Freelancer

Associate Professor of English
Patricia Bart will give a lecture in
the Heritage Room on Friday at
4:30 p.m., entitled “Guns N’ Younguns: Growing up in gun culture.”
Bart will discuss the position of
guns in modern culture, as well as
her perspective on what gun culture really is, or should be.
“We need to refound American culture as a whole,” Bart said.
“And ‘gun culture’ is a part of
what we need to refound.”
Bart has a lifetime of familiarity with guns, particularly in her
childhood.
Her talk will include stories of
experiences in her youth such as
“shooting squirrels and making
stew,” which will provide both
shape to her discussion and, almost certainly, great entertainment
to her audience.

Natalie DeMacedo
News Editor

“I’m going to reminisce,” she
said.
Bart said that these kinds of
experiences are part of what she
considers good gun culture, but
there is much more to it. The more
central parts of her discussion,
however, she is saving for Friday.
Although there may be a comparatively large number of Hillsdale students who are familiar
with guns, Bart suggested that
the majority of the students have
lives. These students, she said,
will be “surprised at the true nature of gun culture, and they need
to be surprised by it.”
She encourages those who have
grown up around guns to attend as
well and “lend support.”
American culture’s variety of
opinions on guns have spawned a
vast and confusing contemporary
dialogue.

As one of the St. Patrick’s Day festivities, the
pastor at Countryside Bible Church Bob Snyder
gave a talk titled “Why St. Patrick of Ireland?”
(Elena Creed/Collegian)

The bright yellow
bollards are gone for now
Sarah Chavey
Collegian Reporter
Unnoticed by almost everyone
but the few who protested against
them, the yellow bollards previously installed to prevent cars
from driving on campus have
been removed.
Director of Campus Security
and Emergency Management
William Whorley said the removal is due to some potential construction plans as well as some
severely needed repairs for damages caused by snow removal and
other equipment.
“If we raise all the money that
we need for the chapel, the chapel
will go where the bollards were,”
Associate Dean of Men Jeffery
Rogers said. “This is all a work
in progress, but construction projApart from exciting a few students and an alumnus, the change
most likely will not affect students on campus.
“They spent money to install
them and nobody noticed. It was
like they didn’t even exist — people kept driving up there anyway.
And then they got rid of them, and
no one really noticed — people

drive up there anyway,” sophomore Kate Patrick said.
While the money spent on their
installment now may seem like a
waste, Whorley said they may attempt to repair and re-install the
bollards, if construction plans do
not interfere. The maintenance
crew provides free removal and
re-installation of the bollards.
These re-installation plans may
upset some.
“There has been no greater enemy to the defense of liberty and
the education of young people in
the liberal arts than the bollards
at Hillsdale College. It warms
my heart to know that those impediments to freedom have been
removed,” alumnus Casey Harper
’14 said.
Both Harper and Patrick said
they believe the bollards detract
from the beauty of the campus.
“There’s something cool about
learning about beautiful things
in a beautiful place, and rusty
make it more beautiful,” Harper
more beautiful now. With this
small of a campus, every little bit
counts.”
“That’s probably the only advantage of their removal, that
the campus looks better,” Patrick
said.

Whorley, on the other hand,
said he found the bollards a good
option for campus.
“Others options didn’t look
décor of the campus,” Whorley
said. Other options such as gates,
chains, and cables impede the
walkways.
The color, however, was not
entirely intended for decoration,
but also to make the bollards
more apparent. Immediately after their installment, security received some complaints about
students tripping over them.
“It’s a great big yellow thing.
Unless your eyes are closed or
you’re asleep, I don’t know how
you could miss it,” Whorley responded to those complaints. Patrick felt differently.
“I’ve tripped on them before,
because there’s all this ice, and
then snow. You don’t see them,
and then you trip over them,” Patrick said.
Though the bollards are now
gone, Rogers and Whorley are
not worried about the safety of
students as they were before.
“Security is vigilant about
making sure that when cars do
come on campus, they’re watching the speed. Everyone is cognizant of right-of-way to pedestrians,” Rogers said.

Q&A
From A1

it, but, of course, they wrote it as
though I believe that. I’ve said if
we’re going to have capital punishment, we should use hanging
antiseptic things like lethal injections. The state should be forthright about violence. Let’s be
honest about this sort of thing.
Unlike most people, I’ve actually seen someone shortly after they were hanged. It was a
lynching in India. If you change
the order of things, it might look
like I argued that when it’s not
actually what I believe.
On numerous occasions,
you have expressed that you do
not vote. As a journalist who
writes on political issues, why
don’t you vote?
I think that as things currently
stand, operational politics are,
at a certain level, dishonorable.
There’s a lot of good people

Until March 27, the Hillsdale
College Bookstore is accepting submissions for their spring
break photo contest.
Before spring break, the
bookstore encouraged students
to pick up a plastic bag, take it
with them wherever they were
headed, and snap a picture with
it. In order to enter the contest,
students must submit the picture
with their name, the location the
photo was taken, and the names
of any people in the photo.
Angie Berry, trade book coordinator, said they did the same
thing in 2008. It went very well,
so she wanted to bring it back.
submitted a photo, but Berry
said other students have come
in asking about how to enter and
she expects more pictures soon.
doing good things, but it’s not
something I want to be involved
in directly. More broadly, the
premise of politics as such is
coercion. It’s using the state to
force people into doing things
you want them to do. I have
some questions on the legitimacy of government as it stands.
I’ve written a lot about abortion,
and what that says on the relationship between the individual
and the state.
I happen to be born to an
unmarried, 15-year-old girl a
trimester before Roe was decided. If abortion had been legal, I
probably would not be here. I’m
not really sure a government that
doesn’t recognize my right to life
and to exist is something I want
to participate in directly. Voting
is a small part of how things get
changed. I do what I think is the
humane thing to do, which is to
argue with people, change their
minds. I’m not a complete anarchist, but I would much rather
work through persuasion than

One student has a picture
with the bag while skydiving.
Another shows the bag on the
beach surrounded by warm sand
and a towel.
The grand prize is a $50
bookstore gift card, while the
second and third place winners
will receive me.u stereophonic
earphones, according to the conBerry added that Barbara
Bushey, department chairman
of art, Cindy Hoard, science
division secretary, and John
Somerville, associate professor
of English, will judge the contest entries on March 31.
Until then, students can
see the pictures hanging in the
bookstore window.
“Just enjoy it. This is fun,”
Berry said. “I’m just glad I don’t
have to judge it. That would be
very hard.”

using the state to force people to
do the things I want them to.
What is your interest in
teaching here at Hillsdale?
I like teaching when I get the
chance. It’s just not something
I can do because of my travel
schedule. It’s fun to talk to students who are interested in what
I do. I always like being at Hillsdale. Hillsdale is like a monastery. Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, spent some time at a
monastery in upstate New York.
When he went into the monastery, he thought it was a place
people went to escape the “real
world.” After he’d been there, he
realized the monastery was the
real world, and everywhere else
was the place you went to escape
it. Hillsdale has a reputation
for being cloistered, but this is
the real world, developing your
life, mind, ideas, relationships,
the spiritual aspect of your life.
That’s a lot more real.
-Compiled by Breana Noble

NEWS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

A3 19 March 2015

Admissions extends
application deadline
Breana Noble
Collegian Reporter

The debate team spent their spring break competing at nationals, and placed well throughout the tournament. (Courtesy of Keyona Shabazz)

Debate Team goes to Nationals
Jessie Fox
Collegian Reporter

Over spring break, 22 Hillsdale students competed in
a national speech and debate
tournament hosted at Ohio
University.
Hillsdale has a comprehensive debate program, so
students competed across multiple genres of speech as well
as multiple formats of debate.
dividual Team Sweepstakes
and second in Debate Sweepstakes. In Combined Sweepa tie for seventh place.
Matthew Warner, assistant
director of debate and forensics, said the competition was
tournament was cancelled due
to a snowstorm that closed
Ohio University’s campus.
Due to the cancellation, the
remaining three days included
four days’ worth of competition.
Debate coach Matthew
Doggett said the team “succeeded in the unexpected” as
the students handled unforeseen pressures very well.
“I thought everyone who

competed in debate did something excellent,” Doggett said.
“The whole team had to survive a snowstorm and a change
to the tournament schedule
that put far more pressure on
the debaters to do well in fewer rounds.”
Judges gave students scores
ranging from “Good” to “Excellent” to “Superior” for each
event.
“The team did exceptionally. There were over 80 schools
competing, and most individual events had over 100 entries,”
Warner said. “Aside from a
handful of novice competitors,
every Hillsdale student earned
at least a Good award in a majority of their events.”
Doggett gave credit to the
students who competed in both
individual events and debate
events.
“What they did was amazing because they all had two
debating events plus several
individual events, so they were
speaking at 8 in the morning
until 8 or 9 o’clock at night,”
Doggett said.
Senior Ian Fury gave more
than 30 speeches in eight different categories over the
course of the tournament and
earned Excellent scores in vir-

tually every event. Fury said
he was most proud of his After Dinner Speech in which
he aimed to persuade his audience through humor about
the discrimination against conservatives in the competitive
speaking circuit.
“I am most proud of this
speech because my teammate
and I rewrote most of my
jokes in the days leading up
to the tournament. We rewrote
some of the jokes as late as
11 the night before I gave the
speech,” Fury said. Fury won
two out of three rounds with
this speech.

The debate team
“succeeded in the
unexpected,” as
students handled
unforseen pressures very well.
Other key performers in
individual events included seniors Brandon Butz and Anna
Wunderlich, sophomores Erin
Graham and Keyona Shabazz,
and freshman Mary Blender-

mann.
Senior Taylor Wessel and
junior Graham Deese placed
second in JV Parliamentary
Debate. Junior Alex Eaton and
freshman Allie Howell placed
in Novice Lincoln-Douglas
debate.
The two partnered to receive an Excellent score in
Novice Parliamentary debate.
Freshmen Rachel Behr and
Adrienne Carrier partnered
to receive an Excellent score
in Public Forum debate and
placed ninth.
competing in Public Forum
debate, but she has been partnering with Behr since the
girls were in high school.
“We have really good experience that way, we knew how
each other would function, and
we could kind of bounce back
and forth off of each other,”
Carrier said. “It was an open
event so there were seniors
competing, not just Novice
and JV — so we were really
excited about how we placed.”

Admissions has extended this
year’s application deadline for
incoming freshmen from Feb. 15
to April 15 because of additional
merit scholarship donations. Also,
a new Frederick Douglass Fund
for need-based aid has slightly altered the focus of the admissions
counselors.
According to Assistant Director of On-Campus Recruiting John
Papciak, there is additional merit
money left over, as well as a few
donations, from the alloted funds
for the incoming class’s scholarship fund.
“We are fortunate to raise some
additional scholarship funds due to
the generous support by some of
our donors which has enabled the
college to provide some additional
scholarships,” Vice President for
Institutional Advancement John
Cervini said. “The cost of educating a student per year is $56,000
at Hillsdale so every student to
receive a scholarship is made possible by our supporters.”
While not uncommon for Hillsdale to accept applications past
extension on the website and is
promoting it through its communications and call team.
“It’s something we’re just being more open about,” Papciak
said. “In the past, we would extend
it, but maybe wouldn’t have told
the applicant pool. It’s less ambiguous this year. We have more contact with our prospective students
and parents, and more clear-cut,
this-is-the-date applications for the
sake of any confusion.”
Papciak said the general pool of
extending the application deadline,
it makes the process more competitive.
“We award based on strength of
application,” he said.
While the April 15 deadline
is close to the May 1 deposit cutoff date, counselors will continue

looking at applications as they arrive, and letters will be submitted
soon after the extension.
The extended deadline will not
alter the size of the incoming class.
With a goal of about 380 students,
the college hopes to retain its student-to-faculty ratio as well as not
exceed on-campus living facilities.
“Our small classes allow students to relate to their professors
and have personal relationships,”
Papciak said. “We’re a small, private liberal arts college. Small is
important to us.”
The remaining money is to be
used for next year’s freshmen only,
each class having its own endowment, according to Financial Aid
Director Rich Moeggenberg.
On the need-based front, the
Frederick Douglass Fund, which
started last year, is supplementing
other scholarships for students in
need, according to Moeggenberg.
donation already,” Moeggenberg
said. “It gives preference to highneed students. This program, I’m
excited about it, because it gives us
an opportunity to look at students
who, from an affordability point
of view, wouldn’t be able to look
at Hillsdale. This is something
our admissions counselors will be
looking at, even a particular area of
the country or schools, and targeting students who deserve a chance,
who have worked hard and don’t
have the chance to realize a dream
of a Hillsdale education.”
Having access to scholarships,
both need-based and merit-based,
contributes to the classes and allows a greater variety of students
to attend the school.
“We are able to evaluate more
right now, which is a cool thing,”
Papciak said. “We are able to add
to our class, not in a number way,
but in looking at the different types
of applications, the different types
of people who apply. It allows for
more individuals to apply. It’s always good for our students and
our classes for people to come in
and have people represent different ideas.”

Ivy-crowned seniors win Corona Classica

ski, there is also overlap between these
and the important questions that Hillsdale naturally asks.
Koperski has also presented papers
at conferences and has published a book
review in the Eta Sigma Phi publication.
He said that he is honored to be mentioned alongside Benjamins and Ferguson for the award.
“To be mentioned in the same sentence with two people that I have taken
a lot of classes with meant a lot to me,

Emma Vinton
Assistant Editor

The classical studies
crowned three seniors with
Classica, an award which
outstanding senior who is

department
the Corona
honors an
continuing

Benjamins, LaRae Ferguson, and Andrew Koperski received the award at the
Honors Assembly in February.
Associate Professor of Classical
Studies Joseph Garnjobst said because
they had three very strong candidates, it
was necessary to give the award to three
seniors.
“They’ve gone to national conferences and presented some of their scholarship, at least two apiece,” Garnjobst
said. “That is a feather in everyone’s
cap.”
All three of the awardees have quite
different stories about how they came to
the classics.
Benjamins, a history and Latin maLatin before coming to Hillsdale. He
enjoyed it so much that he decided to
major.
“The department was fantastic and
the classes were tremendous, and so I
was hooked straightaway,” he said.
Benjamins, who said his passion

Senior Joshua Benjamins.

Students will soon have another chance to take advantage
of the warm spring weather by
kayaking on Baw Beese Lake.
Campus Health and Recreation will be purchasing three
kayaks and three paddleboards
for student use, using money
from Student Federation.
On set days, the Student Directors of Campus Health and
Recreation, juniors Rachael
Hille and Jeff Meyers, will take
the kayaks and paddleboards
down to the lake. Students can
show up at any point during the
advertised time to use the boats.
“We’re trying to make this
as convenient as possible for
students,” Director of Student
Activities Anthony Manno said.
The advertised times will
start next fall, but if the warm
weather continues to hold,
there’s a possibility they will
begin this semester.
Campus Health and Recreation has been discussing the

(Courtesy of Caroline Green)

(Courtesy of Ferguson)

is for late antiquity and early Christian theology, especially Augustine,
has presented papers at a number of
conferences, including Eta Sigma Phi
conferences. He has won prizes in various national translation conferences in
both Latin and Greek, and is currently
co-translating a 16th-century Latin text
which is set to be published next year.
Garnjobst called Benjamins Hillsdale’s
“most decorated champion.”
Ferguson is both a Greek and Latin
major. She began Greek freshman year,
and picked up Latin afterwards. She

said the department is strong in classical Greek, but her interest is in Koine
Greek also.
“They just have this really infectious
enthusiasm that is really great and is
probably one of the biggest factors in
my decision to go with the classics department,” she said. “It took me a long
time, as Dr. Garnjobst will testify, to
actually decide to be a Greek and Latin
major.”
Ferguson is also a two-time national
champion in Greek translation.
“My favorite thing to do is to compare language apostle Paul uses with

Fed to purchase kayaks and
paddleboards for SAB
Katie Beemer
Collegian Reporter

Senior Andrew Koperski.

Senior LaRae Ferguson.

(Courtesy of Benjamins)

idea of getting the boats since
last September.
“The whole idea came from
needing something else to do
in Hillsdale, something for students to get out and have more
community and really utilize
Lake Baw Beese,” Hille said.
When Campus Health and
Recreation came up with the
idea to purchase the boats, they
hoped this could be another activity that students participated
in.
“That was our hope for this
other way to have something for
students to do,” Hille said. “So
often, people are like: ‘Well,
it’s Hillsdale.’ We don’t always
have a lot to do or a lot of options around here. So, why not
take something that we do have
and give so many more ways to
use it, like how beautiful Lake
Baw Beese is. So, our hope is
to bring more community and
events for students to have fun
and do something a little different than they’re used to.”
Campus Health and Recre-

ation’s goal is to reach out to
students through activities.
“This is the whole point of
our organization, to get kids out
to be active and be outside and
whatnot,” Meyers said.
Meyers has put a tremendous
amount of research into picking
kayaks and paddleboards that
will serve student use and last
for years to come.
“They’re not super fancy
ones. They’re a couple of kayaks from REI, just their standard,” Meyers said. “Not the
lowest level, but like second
level up. The standard paddle
boards we got are also recreational style. Everything we got
had very good reviews.”
All students who participate
are sure to have a fun time.
“They’re just a lot of fun,”
Meyers said. “It’s a good exercise because you can get exercise from paddling with them,
but it’s also a lot of fun to just
lake.”

language of classical Greek authors, especially in regards to moral questions,”
she said.
Koperski is a Latin and history major
who took Latin from an early age. By
the end of high school, he had taken a
lot of Latin and Greek, and so his competency and interest in the languages
prompted him to continue at Hillsdale.
Koperski said that he particularly enjoys studying Virgil.
“He’s a very good poet in that he
likes to ask very tough questions, questions that I think every society needs to
ask itself,” he said. According to Koper-

than anything else,” he said.
All three are deciding on graduate
schools after graduation.
Garnjobst, who crowns the victors
with ivy garlands at graduation, said he
used to scrounge around the houses of
friends and colleagues for ivy before he
began growing it.
“I took the name corona, crown, seriously, and now it’s become a thing,”
he said. “I didn’t know there is a large
street value for crowns, but apparently
there is.”
The three awardees all expressed
their excitement to receive the homemade crowns. Garnjobst, who in the
past has only needed to weave one
crown, now worries that the winter will
hinder ivy growth.
“Now I have to come up with a substantial amount of ivy,” he said.

Mossey goes mad in March
Sarah Albers
Assistant Editor
Mossey Madness has begun.
The event is loosely based
on the annual frenzy of NCAA
March Madness.
Instead of college basketball
teams, some of the greatest authors and thinkers in the Western
tradition will vie for the winning
bracket. Milton, Dostoevsky,
Churchill, Aristotle, and many
others are pitted against one another in the tournament brackets,
to be assisted in their battle for
supremacy by the votes of Hillsdale students, faculty, and staff.
Voting began Monday. Participants will need to visit the
library homepage regularly in
order to check brackets and vote.
The grand prize winner and a
friend will, at the end of the contest, be awarded a tour of Hillsdale’s infamous tunnel system
with Director of Campus Security and Emergency Management
Bill Whorley. The runner-up will
receive a $20 gift card, redeemable at A.J.’s Café and Jitters
Coffee Cart. Third place gets a
$10 gift card.
Library Director Dan Knoch

has submitted a bracket — indeed, he’s already begun voting.
But when asked to reveal his
predicted victor, Knoch refused,
then laughed.
“I don’t know,” Knoch said.
“Should I give that away?”
Public Service Librarian
Brenna Wade was more forthcoming with her own predictions.
self just for fun,” Wade said. “I
had the ‘Chronicles of Narnia’
bracket, with ‘Paradise Lost’
winning.”
A love of books is widely
shared at Hillsdale. The contest
is an opportunity to reach out
to campus in an unconventional
way. Technical Service Librarian
LeAnne Rumler hopes the contest will bring students together
over the books in the brackets.
“I hope that it reaches students,” she said. “It’s fun to have
a little bit of friendly competition.”
When voting, students will
have to factor in not only personal preferences, but the literary
worth of the books in the brackets. Wade said she experienced

own tournament predictions.
“Narnia is very dear to my
heart,” Wade said. “But I felt that
‘Paradise Lost’ was a tad more
literary. But the voting process
will probably end up being very
personal.”
Knoch went a step further,
taking into account the student
following behind Associate Professor of English Justin Jackson.
“The Brothers Karamazov” and
“Notes from Underground,” two
beloved works of Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky, are headto-head in an early bracket. Jackson has endorsed “The Brothers
Karamazov” in the past. He
in his evaluation, Dostoevsky’s
“best” work, though by a narrow
margin.
“I was trying to put myself
into the mindset of the students,”
Knoch said. “Dr. Jackson has
spoken on it and I know that he
campus.”
In the end, only one esteemed
title and author may emerge the
victor.
“May the best book win,”
Wade said.

OPINION
19 March 2015 A4

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Politics matters wherever you are

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the oPinion of the collegian editorial staff
The latest political scandal
involves Illinois Republican
Rep. Aaron Schock using federal and campaign money for lavish personal expenses. He resigned Tuesday, and even those
outside his district should care.
Amidst the daily reports of
Democratic former Secretary
of State Hillary Clinton lying
about her private email use and
Oregon Democratic Gov. John
Kitzhaber resigning over his
it is easy to roll your eyes and
attribute it to the sliminess of
politics. But this is not enough.
-

Netanyahu’s address to Congress
was not intended as an insult or as a
backhanded maneuver, but rather a
passionate
But this year, the conference was conducted in a different way. There was a palpable sense of discomfort.
Many attendees, speakers, and delegates of the AIPAC
Policy Conference were worried about both the White
House response to their conference and the address their
beloved Netanyahu would deliver. And let me tell you, it
But people were also uncomfortable with the fact that Netanyahu had essentially undermined the institution of the
American president by agreeing to speak before Congress
without alerting President Obama’s administration.
The current situation in Israel leaves much to be desired
as terrorist Iran grows closer everyday to the possibility of
becoming a nuclear force. Iran is closing in and encroaching on the Israeli people’s liberties through its support for
random bombings, public terrorist threats against Israel via
Twitter, etc. But if Iran becomes a nuclear power, America’s safety is also threatened. Iran could destroy the democratic Israel, completely destabilize the oil-producing Middle East, and possibly use their nuclear weapons against
America.
Netanyahu’s address to Congress was not intended as an
insult or as a backhanded maneuver, but rather a passionate
attempt to shed light on some major Israeli issues. At the
end of March, American legislators need to decide whether
to impose further sanctions on Iran, ratify a concrete agreement with Iran regarding nuclear activity, or to take military
action against Iran. Iran’s intentions are unknown, which
prompts a desire for safeguards that may prevent the building of a nuclear weapon.
The question on the minds of American legislators is
where to draw the line as the Obama administration negotiates with an enemy of peace. The U.S.-Israeli relationship has never been stronger and it has been carefully constructed through a bipartisan coalition. A majority of the
American public supports Israel and trade between the two
countries is steadily increasing. Congress will hopefully act

Valerie Copan
Student Columnist
I had never been fully cognizant of what was happening in
the church according to the liturgical calendar. My mom tells
me our little, evangelical church
was good about at least remarking on the special holy days or
seasons coming up. Maybe I
simply wasn’t paying attention.
Or maybe nothing ever stuck,

knows community members
will notice if the new city manlarge or a project is bid out too
high — because every dollar
ing toward road improvements.
These citizens care what happens at the local level. If politicians are ever to stop using their
political authority unjustly,
those of us being governed have
to show we care, too.

celebration of Christ’s resurrection.
Many are aware of the magnitude and drama of this time,
but how often do we give it any
more thought than we would
the weather? Søren Kierkegaard
states that Christ’s whole life on
earth was intended solely to have
followers and to make mere admirers impossible. “Christ came
into the world with the purpose
of saving, not instructing it. At
the same time — as is implied in
his saving work — he came to be
the pattern, to leave footprints for
the person who would join him,
who would become a follower.”
Indeed,
Lent
(literally
“springtime”) is meant to cut to
the heart of our complacency; it
is a time when, “out of the darkness of sin’s winter, a repentant,
empowered people emerges.” He
was tested, and if we are serious
about who He is, we will follow
suit.
Valerie Copan is a senior
studying Spanish and art.

STOP WITH THE ‘SWOLFIES’
You should exercise for your health, not to indulge your vanity
Morgan Delp
Editor-in-Chief
Scrolling through Facebook and Instagram, pictures of pre-made meals and girls
in sports bras staring into smudged gym
mirrors litter my feed. Captions brag about
how far so-and-so has come, how easy it is
to prepare the entire week’s meals ahead of
time, and how with a strong enough mindset,
I, too, can persevere and look like this aspiring body-builder. Oddly enough, I rarely feel
encouragement from or admiration for these
posts. Mostly, I feel sad.
It’s upsetting how many obsess over living a strictly-controlled lifestyle, and it’s
even worse how often people feel the need
to share with everyone else on the Internet.
Not only is this a vain misplacement of our
priorities, but it’s also unhealthy.
cial media, and am especially Instagramobsessed. Am I a victim to vanity in some
of my posts? Yes. Should I spend more time
studying, reading important things, and interacting with real people than I do on social
media? Yes. But I love seeing and posting
pictures of beautiful scenery, friends and
family together, beautiful vacation spots,
funny or inspirational quotes, adorable pups,
and the occasional donut. It is fun to connect with those you don’t see every day, and
world.

demic so wrong is the culture it promotes,
and the consequences it causes. The half-naked gym pics, by men and women alike, are
distasteful, attention-seeking, and inappropriate. They lead to bikini and even undergarment pictures, which are now considered
normal for Instagram, a perceived “private”

The Uses of a
Liberal Arts
Education

became a nation in 1948, America has stood by Israel in
support. Netanyahu’s address to Congress was like a student asking a friendly student for help against a bully in
their class. It wasn’t going around the teacher’s head, rather
just asking for help directly from the friendly student who
helped them out before.
I’m certainly hoping that Congress acts favorably toward Israel. I am hoping to work the AIPAC Conference
again next year so I can awkwardly interact with political

by Forester
Gwendolyn Hodge is a sophomore studying politics and
theater.

legislation. It starts much closer

because I never knew what these those agonizing forty days.
days actually were; as far as I can
But then, in my own life Easremember, these were not devel- ter usually snuck up on me, and I
oped within my church in a way would lament the fact that I had
that had any staying power. (Is been so detached and hadn’t takthe pastor off the hook if I was en much time to think on this seajust vaguely ‘informed’?)
son and its implications. Coming
Lent was one such season home from St. Paul’s Church on
that was announced, followed
by an Ash
remarked,
Wednesday
“that
was
service, but
the
last
time
Many are aware of the we’ll sing
not touched
magnitude
and drama of an ‘Alleluia’
on again. I
always con- this time, but how often until
Eassidered Lent do we give it any more ter.”
How
irrelevant
striking that
thought than we would was to realanyhow.
E v e r y - the weather?
ize! Along
one
knew
those lines,
Lent
was
last year I
a ritual all
sent another
the nominal
friend into
Catholics took part in, using it a frenzy over the fact that I had
as a means to jumpstart a diet been listening to the Easter secthey had been intending to get tion of Handel’s “Messiah” beon anyway; Lent was just the fore Easter. How dare I? Last
added impetus. Lent was a time year, I brushed off her outburst
when people begrudgingly gave with an exasperated sigh, but this
up something, and being driven year? I’ve never so strongly seen
not by joy but by pride and legal- the beauty in this time of waiting
ism, dragged themselves through and fasting and preparing for the

Gwendolyn Hodge
Special to the Collegian

jokes she was telling to be funny or appropriate. Or when
Ben Sasse asked me if I’d ever been to Nebraska and I told
him that, while I had not physically been there, I certainly
felt like I had been since half of my college seems to be
from there.
Luckily, there were no catastrophically embarrassing
moments like one of my past years when I spoke Spanish to
Prime Minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu. (I’ve only
ever taken French, by the way.) Antics aside, working this
conference these past few years has opened up my eyes to
the U.S.-Israel relationship and also given me a passion for
foreign relations.

have to listen to all of President
-

to home.
Irate citizens attend most
Hillsdale City Council meetings, fuming about the condi-

It’s not just for finally getting started on your diet

Stand with
Israel

my inner Hillsdale politics fan girl.
For example, Michelle Bachmann came up to me and
asked for a badge credential and an escort. I asked to see
her ID, said nothing for a good 30 seconds, and then told
her that I liked her eye shadow before scurrying behind my
boss to wait for her badge to print. I met Bill Kristol and
almost asked him why he left Fox News. And there was that
time when Donna Brazile asked me to escort her to a room

apathy toward politicians allows their underhanded behavior to continue undetected. Just
as a child is less likely to nab
a cookie from the cookie jar
when his mom is in the kitchen,
politicians adjust their actions
when they know constituents
are paying attention.
Whether we vote or not, all
politicians make decisions that
impact our lives. Simply shrugging our shoulders and claim-

change that.
Our core curriculum teaches
that being human means participating in the polis. Politics is
a huge part of almost all of the
core classes. Western Heritage
students, moreover, read Aristotle, who argues that man is a
naturally political being.
To curb breaches of power
and deception, we must assume
our rightful roles as political

How I learned to take Lent seriously

The editors welcome Letters to the Editor but reserve the right to
edit submissions for clarity, length, and style. Letters should be 450
words or less and include your name and number. Send submissions
to jbutler@hillsdale.edu before Sunday at 6 p.m.

Considering that a majority of Hillsdale students are interested in current events and politics, if not majoring or
minoring in politics, it’s probably safe to assume that most
students are familiar with the United States’ relationship
with Israel. I know I am familiar with it, but then again, this
is also my fourth year working as an intern for the American
Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference. And

eryone under their governance,
not just those interested in politics majors to be outraged.

McClatchey

social media feed. As the old saying goes,
everything on the Internet is fair game.
Beside the issues of immodesty and
downright annoyance, the entire mindset of
working out and living a healthy lifestyle has
been warped. Everyone with an Instagram
trainer and nutritionist, and it is dangerous.

It’s upsetting how
many obsess over living
a strictly-controlled lifestyle, and it’s even worse
how often people feel the
need to share with everyone else on the Internet.
People think that by rapidly losing weight
— whether by over-exercising, under-eating,
or both — and then posting pictures, they
are mentoring others, who all have different body types and situations. They perceive
the actual health risks they are undergoing
and endorsing. Instead of receiving professional consultation to lose weight or bulk up,
people fall for supplement companies that
troll their pages and take drastic weight-loss
measures.
Instead of exercising and eating right for
the sake of feeling happy and less-stressed,
and for maintaining a healthy body, people
take things to the extreme — working out
for hours for that perfect gym photo and for
Before, we were the Supersized nation. Statistics show that obesity is still a huge prob-

lem, as two-thirds of American adults are
overweight or obese, according to the Food
Research and Action Center. But now, we
have a new problem: The gym rat disease.
According to the National Association of
Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders,
“91 percent of women surveyed on a college
campus had attempted to control their weight
through dieting. 22 percent dieted ‘often’ or
‘always.’ 86 percent report onset of eating
disorder by age 20; 43 percent report onset
between ages of 16 and 20.” Eating disorders
are a real problem on our campus as well,
and I blame partly the social media culture
for this statistic.
Let’s exercise not only to maintain a
to feel good, to take a break from school, to
have fun with friends, and to enjoy time to
ourselves — away from our social media accounts. Let’s eat healthy meals because it’s
important to put good things in our body. It’s
vital to feeling alert, to preventing sickness,
means something different for everyone.
It’s rewarding to realize that you can now
run three miles instead of one, that you can
now beat your friend in racquetball, and
that you feel stronger. These should be our
rewards, not 20 comments of ogglement
promoting more natural, positively-driven,
less-vain, healthy lifestyles, maybe we can
decrease the attitude of eating and over-exercising disorders that plague our campus and
our nation.
them.
Morgan Delp, a member of the tennis
team, is a senior studying history and journalism.

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Our campus needs a bar

Nathan Brand
Special to the Collegian
Walking into a bar earlier this semester, I was pleasantly surwith their spouses. As they got up to leave Broad Street Downtown
Market and Tavern later that night, I walked over to shake hands
and say “hello” in an attempt to be polite. Following a bit of small
talk, I asked the administrators if they would join us in singing
This brief encounter never would have happened on campus.
jokes. I connected with college staff in a way that campus does
not normally facilitate. So how can the college foster this sort of
community? The school needs to open on-campus bar. It would
bring students and faculty together, promote healthy alcohol consumption, and promote community on campus. Imagine Dr. Arnn
asking you “What is the good?” over a glass of scotch.
I will forget about Monday’s biology lecture, but I won’t foralongside college administrators.
The college obviously does not want to encourage alcohol consumption, but college students will drink alcohol for as long as the
earth keeps spinning. So the next best alternative is advocating for
moderate and responsible alcohol consumption and activities, all
while promoting community on-campus.
For all the fun of jazz night at the Underground or karaoke night
most students, and often times someone is required to drive. Re-

moving the need of a car eliminates one of the major risks associated with drinking.
If a bar is located on campus, the risk of DUIs and the dangers
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism estimates more than
3.3 million students between the ages 18 and 24 drive under t h e
away takes the possibility of anyone getting behind the wheel of a
car inebriated away as well.

It would bring students and faculty together, promote healthy alcohol consumption, and promote community on campus.
Imagine Dr. Arnn asking you “What is
the good?” over a glass of scotch.
would be the college’s ability to monitor student alcohol consumption. The college would be more careful than a local bar at making
sure not to over-serve a student. Also, sitting down the bar from a
professor or an administrator provides a bit of positive social pressure to moderate one’s drinking.
Schools from Berkley to Georgetown have on-campus bars,
and school-run pubs are very common in the United Kingdom.
a temporary manner in the past. In 1997, a Delta Sigma Phi representative to Student Federation proposed to start a committee

GOP won’t win with
Rand Paul
His principles are admirable, but too easily
caricatured
Zoe Harness
Special to the Collegian
The Conservative Political Action
Committee (CPAC) annually convenes a hyper-charged conclave of
right leaning (and in my view, rightthinking) activists. This gathering
culminates with the announcement
of CPAC’s straw poll winner. It is
no surprise that Kentucky Sen. Rand
Paul, an idealist candidate proposing sweeping changes, ignites CPAC
since approximately half the attendees are college students. The question
is, after eight years out of the White
bring Republicans back to the presidency in 2016? Sadly, despite my
great personal admiration for Paul, he
has zero chance of winning the nomination, much less the presidency.
While Paul’s ideas are fundamentally correct and aligned with
A m e r i c a ’s
Constitution
and
Founding principles,
he is not a viable candidate.
Rather, he is
the
perfect
straw
man.
Paul’s
stark
positions make
him an easily
lampoon-able,
cartoon-able,
almost writes
itself.
Specific
and principled,
Paul’s
positions are effortlessly misconstrued as extreme
and dangerous. Paul is to the left
vard-professing, “you-didn’t-buildthat”-originating Massachusetts Sen.
Elizabeth Warren is to the right —
stereotypically laughable.
Paul favors completely abolishing
the IRS, the Departments of EducaDevelopment, and Commerce and
hundreds of associated agencies. A
full list of these “must-go” agencies
appeared on March 2, 2010, on dailypaul.com, a pro-Paul website. As far
as the military, Paul wants minimal
budget cuts but is adverse to “boots
on the ground” in all but the direst
circumstances; centrists in both parties therefore consider his foreign
policy position isolationist.
While the intellectual merit of
Paul’s views, both domestic and international, certainly deserves fair
consideration, such fairness is not the
purpose of the overwhelmingly liberal media. Just as Paul’s propositions
are red meat to a CPAC crowd clad
in “Big Government Sucks” t-shirts,
they are alarming anathema to the left
(press included).
Paul’s media interactions have fuadmonished her to “be more objecbrief sampling of Paul’s other press
coverage over the years:
A May 2010 Gawker article entitled “Rand Paul is Even Crazier
Than his Racist and Pro-BP Gaffes

A5 19 March 2015

Suggest,” depicts Paul as “the political-contender version of the mouthbreathing conspiracy theorist with
missing teeth and a torn plastic bag
full of photocopies.” The reference to
BP is when Paul said Obama’s comments about BP after the gulf spill
were “un-American.” Paul is further
described in “his tinfoil hat,” talking
[and his] bizarre and utterly unfounded conspiracy theory about a devilish
highway connecting Mexico City and
Toronto.” This highway, in Paul’s
words, is “aimed at supplanting the
sovereign United States with a multiA 2010 Wall Street Journal article
said Paul nearly self-destructed during his comments “about the constitutionality of the 1964 Civil Rights
treme and, to some point, racist.”
“Paul is a hard-money fanatic
who wants to abolish the Federal
Reserve’s role
in using money
policy to stabilize the economy. That’s the
joke,” observed
Jonathan Chait
in 2013.
In Jan. 2015,
Paul told the
ald Leader that
“Over half the
people on disability are either
anxious or their
back hurts. Join
the club. Who
doesn’t get up
Rand Paul/Wikimedia Commons
a little anxious
for work every
day and their back hurts? Everybody
over 40 has a back pain.”
With just these few examples,
Paul is branded as pro-oil, conspiracy
obsessed, anti-Civil Rights, radical on monetary policy, and against
disabled people. The supporting inminutes of any Google search.
The press will eagerly incorporate
cines, his anti-bureaucracy extremism, and his recent signature on the
Iran letter (another potential pie-inapproval).
The cherry on top is Senator Paul’s
political pedigree; he runs the presidential media gauntlet saddled with
his father’s almost ‘wing-nut’ reputation on his back. Texas Republican
and former Congressman Ron Paul
ran for the GOP nomination twice,
(also once as the Libertarian nominee), and proposed even more radical
solutions than Paul the younger does
son” is a much easier concept for a
TV-entranced, public school-indoctrinated, intellectually lazy public to
embrace than honestly considering
Rand Paul’s proposals. The sad fact is
that the proletariat prefers bread and
circuses. And it hurts Rand Paul. Republicans must look elsewhere if they
2016.
Zoe Harness is a freshman studying speech.

tasked with opening a beer stand located outside of the student
In 2009, Associate Dean of Women Rebekah Dell, who at the
ger Bar” to campus. For one night, SAB converted Curtiss Dining
on campus.” Currently, alcohol is now served at SAB events like
karaoke night and Centralhallapalooza.
The College also already offers a course on the making of beer.
If the college teaches it, it might as well serve it. Along with that,
the bar could give entrepreneurship, marketing, and business students an opportunity to put what they have learned into practice.
Along with the academics of serving alcohol, an on-campus bar
can provide for hands-on vocational training for students interested in bartending.
The location of the bar is very important to its success and the
to be as central as possible. Ideally, the college should convert the
under-used formal lounge in the Grewcock Student Union into a
bar. Or make some minor renovations to the Old Snack Bar and
make it a permanent “Charger Bar.”
of having an on-campus bar, as it would bring students together
from all corners of campus life, similar to the dining hall. Rather
than student-professor tea, students and faculty could mingle over
a glass of wine or a cold beer.

Nathan Brand is a senior studying economics.

Scott Walker could win for
Republicans
Arielle Mueller
Special to the Collegian
What do Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Scott Walker have
in common? They all changed America. And they didn’t
need a college degree to do it.
On Feb. 12, Democratic
ard Dean deemed GOP frontthe presidency because he
dropped out of college. “The
issue is, how well educated is
BC’s “Morning Joe.” “I worry
about people being president
of the United States not knowing much about the world and
not knowing much about science.”
The current Republican
governor of Wisconsin attended Marquette University
for four years but jumped at
a job opportunity his senior
year, trading his chance for a

Scott Walker/Wikimedia Commons

credits short of earning his B.A. in Political Science.
Presidents aren’t required to have a college degree. But
one. It’s about time we had another. If Walker’s smart, he
may turn this missing credential into an advantage.
The Constitution simply states that to be president, one
must be a natural-born citizen and 35 years old. Arguing
ing as Publius — held experience and virtue as the most
What Walker lacks by not holding a diploma, he makes
up for with real-world experience, good character, practical
knowledge, skills, and proven track record to be a strong
contender should he be chosen as the 2016 GOP nominee.
Publius would endorse Walker.
Walker launched his political career just after leaving
After four re-elections, he spent the next eight years cutting
spending as Milwaukee County Executive. After reforming
a corrupt county government, Walker became Wisconsin’s
educational reforms.

hard work and determination matter.
Walker is not too different from most Americans either. According to the Census Bureau, only 31.7 percent
play these stats to his advantage; he already has.
We say we want our
politicians to be “just like
us.” We like the idea of a
president who rolls up his
sleeves and eats a half-slab
of ribs — an average Joe
ary). But the credentials
of recent American presidents show the contrary to
be true. Experience tells us
that the American people
want a president who is
extraordinary while seeming just ordinary enough.
They are hardly like us.
Just look at the other
ary Clinton has degrees

Jindal graduated from Brown and Oxford. Scott Walker
stands out among this clan of educational overachievers.
entry-level ticket to economic and political success, as well
as an indicator of worth. The America that once prided itself on real-world experience and common sense now depends on the credentials of a slip of paper.
Walker must continue to prove his credibility in other
lack of a degree to his advantage by relating to the majorpresident didn’t come from an elite class of Ivy Leaguers.
In addition to appealing to the average voter, his experience makes him a strong competitor among his peers.
Since 1990, Walker has run in 11 political races — not to
mention a recall election in 2012 — and has won all but
one. If he can articulate a clear agenda, he can turn his
dropout status into an asset as he races for the presidency.
Publius was right that experience and character are the
best presidential prerequisites. When choosing the next
that matter, not just paper credentials.

-

Arielle Mueller is a senior studying
history.

All you need is love?
Jonathan Walker
Special to the Collegian
What if Caleb Bowers (“Our
culture is sexually broken,” March
5, 2015) were to describe, in conlove,” how a wife should treat her
husband? It would look like this:
“Sex becomes a gift to [her] spouse
because [she] express[es] [her]
sexual needs. [She has] removed
[her] needs and act[s] on [his]
alone.” Such a woman would be
unconcerned with her physical and
emotional needs, and devote herself
utterly to her husband’s sexual
pleasure. She would be the “Fifty
Shades of Grey” protagonist, except
married and even more submissive.
But Bowers points to that franchise’s popularity — in particular,
the movie’s release for Valentine’s
Day — as a sign that “our culture
has a disordered conception of the
relationship between love and sexuality.” What gives?

Bowers’ piece is reminiscent
of Edward Sri’s lecture on “Biblical principles for relationships”
last spring. Sri called love “total
tions of the Theology of the Body
on campus boil down to this: In marriage, seek not your own good, but
only someone else’s. Why? Bowers
sets up a dichotomy whereby the alone can be justly concerned with his
own good as well as someone else’s.
Indeed, there is in marriage a common good in procreation, the mutual
support of spouses, and, yes, even in
shared sexual pleasure.
If a man truly wanted to deny his
needs and devote himself wholly to
another’s, then he should marry the

supportive mate, and serve for life
someone who would otherwise be
that he is precisely the opposite of
the sort of man who actually appeals

women say “would make a good
husband”… for someone else. The
across as desperate and servile, and

sertiveness, traits that help to signal
that he can be a capable protector
and provider.
To encourage people not to
seek sexual pleasure in marriage is
particularly naïve, especially when
compared to the hardheadedness of
Paul in 1 Corinthians 7 where he
acknowledges that most people want
sexual pleasure, and thus he encourages them to have it in marriage. As
a great writer once remarked, “There
is no necessary opposition between
sensuality and chastity; every good
marriage, every love affair, that
comes from the heart is beyond this
opposition.”
Jonathan Walker is a third-year
doctoral candidate at the Van Andel
Graduate School for Statesmanship.

CITY NEWS

A6 19 March 2015

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Alternaprint opens April 1

Hillsdale natives return from Chicago to re-locate business
Madeleine Jepsen
Collegian Freelancer

Alternarint, a combined custom screen printing and comic
book store, will open on April
1. Located on North Howell
Street, the screen printing and
custom shirt-design business
will take over the storefront
formerly occupied by Threads,
between The Hunt Club and
Jilly Beans Coffee House.
Andrew and Catie Gibbs,
Alternaprint owners and Hillsdale natives, moved back to the
area in September, and have
been running their eco-friendly
printing business since October. Alternaprint was formerly
located near Chicago, Illinois.
The Gibbses look forward
to running the store in the less
stressful, small-town atmosphere of Hillsdale, where their
decreased workload will leave
more time for detail-oriented
projects.
“In Chicago, we had to be
fast. People are faster there, it’s
just a different way of life, so
we got used to turning things
around quick,” Andrew Gibbs
said. “Here, it’s a lot slower,
more laid back, but I can’t sit
on a job for too long — it drives
me nuts now. So people here
like it because we’re quick.”
Since the business’s re-location to downtown, the Gibbses
decided to take advantage of
the venue’s space by expanding
the business into a combined
printing and comic book shop.
“We decided to move it here,
and bring something new into
the area,” Catie Gibbs said.
“It’s a lot different from every other shop here,” Andrew
Gibbs added. “Hopefully that
stands out.”
The inspiration for adding a
comic book inventory to their
screen printing business came
from experiences while living in Chicago. Comic book
fan Andrew Gibbs noted that
the city contained many comic
book stores.
“In Chicago, it was huge;
there was a comic book shop
everywhere,” Andrew Gibbs
said. “Every little suburb, every neighborhood had a comic
book shop. Moving back here,
the nearest one was like an
hour away.”
Perceiving the potential demand for comic books in Hillsdale, the couple decided to pursue the business concept. They
plan to carry a wide variety of
comics to suit a range of customers’ interests.

Kate Patrick
Assistant Editor
Jeff Buchhop quit the Airport Advisory Committee Monday, because he said he is unable to do his job when council
fails to consult the committee
on airport matters.
He was responding to the
Hillsdale City Council’s Mon-

Alternaprint owners Andrew and Catie Gibbs prepare for the combined printing, comic book, and
children’s toy store’s opening on April 1. The couple used to run a screen printing business in Chicago and
decided to re-locate the shop to North Howell Street. (Madeleine Jepsen/Collegian)

The store already has more
than 100 comic book titles and
will carry issues from several
months back so customers can
catch up on a series. Readers
will be able to custom order

will complement each other.
The storefront inventory will
draw in potential screen printing customers, as well as more
comic book fans. They hope to
begin hosting community-ori-

“Being art people, we didn’t
want to go and buy shelves and
stuff like that, we wanted to
put our touch on everything.”
—Andrew Gibbs

comic books not carried instore, too.
The couple expects that the
comic book inventory and children’s toys and art supplies will
also add to the artistic, community-oriented ambience they
desire for the shop.
“Screen printing and Tshirts are cool and artistic, and
that’s our main business, but
no one’s going to come hang
out in a t-shirt screen printing
shop,” Andrew Gibbs said.
The couple anticipates that
the two facets of their business

ented events soon after opening.
The couple is hard at work
preparing the storefront for
the grand opening on April 1.
In addition to adding colorful
paint to brighten the walls, they
built shelving units to display
the comics.
“Being art people, we didn’t
want to go and buy shelves and
stuff like that, we wanted to put
our touch on everything, so everything in here we’ve built,”
Andrew Gibbs said.
Jane Steward, owner of

Smith’s Flowers and former
head of the Hillsdale Business
Association, said Alternaprint
my.
“Anytime that there’s a new
business that comes in town,
anytime there’s a new store,
that’s going to be viable for our
community,” Steward said.
Based on her work with Alternaprint, Steward predicts a
favorable future for the business.
“I had them print some
sweatshirts for us, and they
did exactly what they said they
were going to do,” Steward
said. “Just knowing there’s another really great shop in town
that has good customer service
and can follow through makes
our town all the better.”
Bill Lundberg, Hayden
Park Fitness/Recreation Director and Assistant Professor of
Sports Studies, also has high
hopes for the business.
Lundberg worked with Alternaprint this fall when he
ordered shirts for the Wild Bill
5K during Hillsdale College’s
homecoming week.
“I think they’re an ideal
business for that kind of thing,”
Lundberg said. “It’s exciting to
see people that are young and
enthusiastic and ready to serve
and help in the community.”

Former teacher cooks up culinary arts club
Morgan Sweeney
Senior Reporter
Nancy Dunlop stood in front
of a group of high school stusteps of making the “Irresistible
Peanut Butter Cookie.”
“Once you’re done, then you
say a prayer and hope that you
did everything right,” Dunlop
said. “But you will do everything right because you’re good
listeners.”
After school on Wednesdays,
the students gather in room 113
at Hillsdale High School for the
culinary arts club Dunlop started last fall. Dunlop taught home
economics classes at Hillsdale
High School and Davis Middle
School for 31 years before the
high school was forced to cut
her department in 2010 due to a
lack of funding.
Dunlop retired, but her desire
to teach remained. Retirement
opened her eyes to how much
she loved teaching when former
students called her to say how
much she meant to them.
“You never realize the impact you have on the kids until
they come back to you or open
up to you,” Dunlop said. “I feel
I can still have that impact —
socially, emotionally, intellectually, preparing them for the real
world — even now. It’s very rewarding for me to know that I
can impact young adults.”
Students in the club say they
enjoy learning new skills from
Dunlop.
“I love it. There’s so much
to do, and you learn so much,”
high school junior Tiffany
Nowak said. “And the stuff that
we cook just comes out amazing. She’s a great teacher.”
Freshman Selena Jimenez
shared similar sentiments.
“It’s my favorite activity at
school,” Jimenez said.
The idea for the group began a year after Dunlop retired
when she started an after-school
sewing club at the high school.

Airport advisory
committee member
resigns

Local culinary club teacher Nancy Dunlop gives baking advice to Hillsdale High School juniors Tiffany
Nowak and Alexandria Gomez as assistant Jan Knapp looks on. (Madeleine Jepsen/Collegian)

Once a week, she walked by the
large kitchens that were once
her classroom — kitchens that
had been remodeled only six
tions — and mourn their disuse.
“Last summer, I had a brainstorm, and I said, ‘Start a culinary arts club. Use those kitchens. Find the kids,’” she said.
After receiving the go-ahead
from the school’s administration, Dunlop began collecting
donations and advertising for
the club.
Her church friends donated
dish towels and kitchen utensils, and her brother, who works
for Pioneer Sugar, donated all of
the sugar the club uses.
Next, to spread the word
about its new club, the school
gave daily announcements using its public address system,
and the high school’s business
class created a brochure advertising it.
For funding, Dunlop went
to the Hillsdale County Com-

munity Foundation, from which
kitchens with supplies. Once
she found 10 students to participate, she worked with them
to secure a youth grant from the
foundation.
“It was really good for them.
They had to really sit down and
think,” Dunlop said. “I’d take
notes, type it out, and bring it
back to them. We had to have a
leader, and they all had to sign
it. So we ended up getting both
grants.”
The club met during the lunch
period from October through
December. After the students’
winter break, it began meeting
after school on Wednesdays for
30 minutes. For a few weeks,
the students worked on perfecting the 5-inch round cookie —
hopefully the club’s source of
revenue, once the grant money
dries up.
To keep the club on track,
Dunlop sought advice from her
long-time mentor, former Hill-

sdale High School principal,
Doug Willer. He suggested that
the club make items the business students could sell in the
school’s coffee shop, The Study
Cup, like the 5-inch cookies.
While Dunlop regrets that
home economics, which includes basic cooking and sewing classes, courses on home
planning and architecture, and
early childhood development,
has been cut from the Michigan
high school curriculum, she’s
glad to be back in the classroom.
“This is a dream come true
for me to be able to have this
privilege to be back in this gorgeous facility that the community has paid for,” Dunlop said.

contracts to begin construction
on a taxiway at the Hillsdale
City Airport without consulting
the AAC.
“I decided it was time to
remove myself from the situation,” Buchhop said. “City
council and the airport manager and the committee have to
be on the same page. Advising
the council is what the group
is supposed to do, so if the
council isn’t going to give us
information about things we’re
supposed to advise them on, we
can’t do our job.”
The committee’s purpose
is “appropriately and timely
advising the City Council on
airport matters” and “making
recommendations to the Hillsdale City Council concerning
policies and programs to be put
in place or continued in place
at the Hillsdale City Airport,”
according to the committee’s
resolution.
Buchhop emphasized he
does not oppose the new taxiway project, but he disagrees
with the council approving
the
contract
without
the
airport committee reviewing it.
“ T h e r e
seems to be a
self-imposed
deadline,”
Buchhop told
the Collegian.
“The council
set up this advisory board
and told us
what to do and
how to do it,
and now they
won’t let us do
it.”
Acting City
Manager Doug
Terry said he
believes the
project
will
port and city,
— Jeff
but he conceded council
should have
consulted the
Airport Advisory Committee prior to approving the construction contract.
“Sometimes decisions have
to be made in the best interest
of the city,” Terry said. “It was
my call to move this project
ahead. If there’s any fault to be
laid here, it’s with me. We do
have an engineering contract —
we are ready to proceed.”
Buchhop added he is concerned that the city may not be
complying with Federal Aviation Administration guidelines
in order to receive a $1.4 million federal grant, which will
be awarded to the city once
council approves all three contracts for the taxiway project.
Buchhop declined to comment
on further details of these concerns.
Airport manager James
Scheibner said he believes the
city is complying with FAA
guidelines.
He added the contract between the city of Hillsdale and
Hoffman Brothers Inc. Excavating Contractors of Battle
Creek, Michigan, had to be approved as soon as possible because “if it gets pushed back to
the next start date, then the contractors will go to another contract and another project and
our project will end up costing
more money, and that’s what
we want to avoid.”
“We can’t afford any delays in this contract process,”
Scheibner told council during public comment Monday.
“The state puts pressure on us
to move as quickly as possible.
They’re not going to send us
the next project until this one is
approved.”
In a March 11 email to Terry,
Scheibner explained that “any
delay will push the project start
date to early fall construction,
which brings in too many variables that could cost us.”
Terry said the taxiway project had just received grant
money from the Michigan
Aeronautics Commission under the Michigan Department
of Transportation, but in order

to secure the funds, the city had
to approve the construction contract as soon as possible.
Planning and Development
project manager for MDOT’s
Hopper told Terry in a Feb. 26
email that the city of Hillsdale
“could wait until May 13 … if
the city needs more time” to
make a decision about starting
the taxiway project and securing the state funds.
Terry told the Collegian if the
city waited until May to make
a decision about the project,
then it would have to bid again
for contractors. According to
Scheibner’s March 11 email to
Terry, Hoffman Brothers is one
of the best airport contractors
in the state, and was the lowest
bidder for the taxiway project.
After Scheibner addressed
the council, AAC member Jeff
King reprimanded council for
acting without consulting the
committee.
“What just happened was
out of order,” King said. “Last
month, I expressed concern that
a contract was not exposed to
the Airport Advisory Committee. This time, we were told
there wasn’t time to see it. Both
times I call foul. We can’t make
recommendations if we haven’t
seen it.”
The council did not consult
the committee when transferring ownership of a hangar lease
at the Feb. 16 meeting. The
committee should have been
consulted
on
both occasions,
because that’s
the committee’s
job, King said.
“We’re not
your
enemy,”
King said at the
March 16 meeting. “Our resolution is clear
to advise city
council on airport
matters.
Part of our role
is to help transmit information
to the citizens so
they can understand it. I volunteered to make
positive changes
in the community. I don’t enjoy
reprimanding
council.”
Councilperson
Adam
Stockford
told
Buchhop the committee
— which was
formed in November 2014 —
that he believes
the council will
improve its communication
with the committee about airport matters in the future.
“Any time a new committee
pops up, there are going to be
some growing pains,” Stockford

“Advising the

council is what
the group is
supposed to do,
so if the council
isn’t going to
give us information about
things we’re
supposed to
advise them on,
we can’t do our
job.”

get this all under control. I don’t
want you to get too impatient as
we’re getting our feet wet. The
city manager knows we expect
full transparency between the
committee and city staff. I know
all of us on the council support
the committee.”
Terry apologized to the committee for failing to consult
them on the contract, again citing the interests of the city as
the reason for his decision.
“I can’t extend my apologies
enough,” Terry said. “The decision had to be made, and I made
that decision, especially when
there are millions of dollars at
stake.”
Councilperson Bruce Sharp
shared King’s concern about
council transparency.
“There’s always a sense of
urgency here,” Sharp said, describing council’s process of
approving or rejecting motions.
“We always want to rush something through.”
In other business, Director
of Public Services Keith Richard informed the council of a
$375,000 state grant to reconstruct State Street and install a
sidewalk along State Street to
Lewis Emery Park.
Council also approved redeB-2 to allow multiple tenant
housing and districts B-1 and
B-3 to allow housing and multiple tenant housing — which
opens up more off-campus student housing for Hillsdale College.
Lastly, councilperson Brian
Watkins called for a Public
Safety Committee meeting “as
soon as possible” to discuss
complaints about public burnings in Hillsdale County.

SPORTS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

A7 19 March 2015

Pistol Pete to leave the Charger family

BOX SCORES

Sam Scorzo
Sports Editor

-

coach drill jump shot after jump
shot.

college, agreed.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

he was there for us. He was al-

Baseball
at Maryville (Mo.)
L, 10-7
W, 15-2
W, 11-7
L, 4-3
vs. Alderson-Broaddus
L, 4-2
L, 3-1
at Trevecca Nazarene
L, 8-1
L, 14-5
L, 11-1
W, 5-4
at Lourdes
L, 4-3

Softball
vs. Southern Ind. W, 2-0
vs. Quincy L, 9-5
vs. Indiana (Pa.) L, 5-3
vs. Minn. St. Mankato W, 7-6
vs. West Va. Wesleyan L, 6-2
vs. Dominican (N.Y.)
W, 6-5
L, 8-5
vs. Northern St. L, 3-2
vs. East Stroudsburg W, 9-1
vs. Marian (Ind.) L, 7-2
vs. Southern Conn. St.
W, 4-1
vs. Concordia-St. Paul
W, 5-4

-

MARCH MADNESS
PREDICTIONS

-

-

Nathanael Meadowcroft
Assistant Editor
cially began Tuesday with two play-in games, the maddening part of
March Madness begins today as the round of 64 tips off and college
basketball fans watch their brackets slowly crumble after each upset.
Three professors, two basketball players, and one basketball coach
try to predict who will cut down the nets on April 6 in Indianapolis.

-

thusiasts.

-

-

of the team as a whole that he
-

Kyle Cooper

GOLF TEAM TEES UP FOR SPRING SEASON
Laura Williamson
Collegian Reporter

had the stimulator which is a
-

-

-

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Arizona, Virginia vs.
Duke
Champion: Kentucky

there were some highlights to
-

Teams from all across the

-

to come together. There are just

said.

10th out of 16 teams. Fellow
ther.

-

-

was perfect air temperature, mid

Dr. Justin Jackson

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Wisconsin,
Oklahoma vs. Iowa State
Champion: Kentucky

for the golf team. It was also the
-

-

-

SofTball

-

From A8

-

-

“We tried a lot of differ-

-

-

-

Brian McCauley:

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Wisconsin,
Virginia vs. Iowa State
Champion: Kentucky

Junior Ainsley Ellison at bat in a game over spring break
in Florida. (Photo Courtesy of Michelle Ellison)

Track

Dr. Samuel Webster:

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Arizona, Villanova vs. Iowa State
Champion: Villanova
-

From A1
-

-

Zach Miller:
showed their mettle.

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Arizona, Virginia vs. Duke
Champion: Kentucky

Schipper reached 5.05 me-

-

-

-

-

ship.

-

-

Dr. samuel Negus

-

-

-

Final Four: Kentucky vs. Wisconsin, Villanova vs. Iowa State
Champion: Villanova
-

19 March 2015

Charger Sports

(Photo Courtesy of Dawn Oren)

Baseball goes 3-7 over spring break
EMILY OREN
SHATTERS RECORD
Stevan Bennett
Collegian Freelancer

Bailey Pritchett
Spotlight Editor

Juniors Emily Oren and Kristina Galat running the 3K at
the NCAA Division II nationals. (Photo Courtesy of NCAA)
Winning the Distance Medley
Relay at nationals wasn’t enough knew, ‘Well, I can’t do worse
for junior Emily Oren. She was than that,’” she said. “I look back
determined to win one more and think, ‘Well, that was embarrace— and beat a Division II re- rassing.’ But I needed to get dead
cord while doing it.
last. It kept me humble.”
Last weekend, Oren led the
Head coach Andrew Towne
women’s track team to a second agreed that learning from failure
- is invaluable in running.
sion II national championships.
“The reason we’re successOn Friday night, Oren ran the ful is because we failed at some
last 1600 meter leg of the Dis- point,” he said. “It would be nice
tance Medley Relay that resulted to learn those lessons without
failing, but that rarely happens.”
only two seconds short of a naThe Charger win last weektional record. The next day, Oren end led the track team to its best
ran the fastest 3K since 1985,
beating the national record time tory. Towne acclaims its healthy
by 14 seconds with her time of development to recruiting good
9:16. Her teammate junior Krisrather than solely seeking good
behind her, also beating the na- runners.
tional record along with the third
“I’ve always said we’re going
to be a quality program rather
Although Oren has received than the quantity programs seen
ample praise for her performance at D-I schools,” he said. “Em
last weekend, she never shies came in with a good bit of talent
away from crediting her own vic- and was one of our focal points
tories to her friend and teammate
junior Kristina Galat. In the mid- because she came for Hillsdale’s
dle of the 3K on Saturday, Oren’s academics, not just its track protiredness began to discourage gram.”
her from running her race. In
Oren’s younger sister sophothat moment, she saw Galat pull more Molly Oren originally
away from the group. Knowing agreed to run at Belmont Uniher teammate ran the longer 5K versity in Tennessee, but she
the night before, Oren sped up to transferred to Hillsdale after
Galat and found a second wind.
bleak summer training. The sis“I could not have won the 3K ters are good friends and plan to
without Kristina,” Oren said. run marathons together after they
“When I run with her it feels just graduate.
like a work out.”
“It’s interesting how Emily
Oren ran a different kind of has gotten so much faster while
having different coaches,” Molly
last place in both of her events. said. “She’s not running for her
Without these failures, however, coaches. She’s running for God
Oren doesn’t think she would and because it’s fun. And even
have been able to run as success- though situations change, she
fully as she did last weekend.
can crank out two national cham“Losing at that same track pionships.”

The Hillsdale Chargers baseball team traveled over 1,400
miles over spring break in order to play 10 games against
the Maryville University Saints,
Alderson-Broaddus University
Battlers, and Trevecca Nazarene
University Trojans.
The Chargers split a four game
series with Maryville, dropped
two to Alderson-Broaddus, and
took one of four from Trevecca
to end the trip with a record of
3-7. After a short break the Chargers traveled to Lourdes University last night where they fell to
the Gray Wolves, bringing Hillsdale’s overall record to 4-11.
“The numbers didn’t come
out how we had hoped,” said
head coach Eric Thiesen, “but it
was good to get out and see some
real quality competition.”
The Chargers started off the
trip with a loss to the Saints last
Saturday afternoon. The game
started sour as the Chargers gave
nings, and a late Charger rally
fell short.
Hillsdale’s offense exploded in the second game against
Maryville with 15 runs as the
Chargers beat the Saints 15-2.
Four of the Chargers’ runs
came on home runs by juniors
Luke Ortell and Tad Sobieszczanski.
Senior Shane Armstrong
pitched well, giving up only one
earned run over six innings on 9
hits.
Four extra inning runs gave
game against Maryville on Sunday.
The late Charger runs were
driven in on a pair of singles by
junior Chris McDonald and ju-

nior Connor Bartlett.
The Saints edged out the
Chargers 4-3 in the second game
of Sunday’s doubleheader.
McDonald threw all six innings, giving up four runs, all
earned, on nine hits.
Due to cancellations against
Lemoyne-Owen and Union, the
Chargers headed down to Nashville, where they dropped three
of four against Alderson-Broaddus University.
game 4-2 despite allowing no
earned runs in the contest.
Hillsdale junior Lucas Hamelink gave up eight hits over six
innings, but three Hillsdale errors allowed the Battlers to plate
the four runs needed to win the
game.
Sunday’s second game was
close as well, but the Chargers

fell to the Battlers 3-1.
The game was a pitching duel
between Armstrong and Battler sophomore Randy Dobnak,
but Dobnak’s gained an edge by
avoiding walks, while Armstrong

“We have to stop giving up
free 90s,” Armstrong said. “The
team that gives up fewer free
bases usually wins the game.
The Chargers played doubleheaders against Trevecca Nazarene on both Friday and Saturof the series, but winning the
Trojan senior Michael Purcell
threw a gem in game one, holding the Chargers to one run on
four hits over seven innings as
the Chargers fell 8-1.
Despite playing a game free

Friday’s second game 14-5.
Even in the loss many Hillsdale players looked good at the
plate. Sophomore Ethan Wiskur
went 3-for-4 with an RBI and
two runs scored on the game.
Bartlett went 2-for-3 and scored
a run.
header 11-1 to Trevecca Nazarene.
Hillsdale had no answer to
Trevecca sophomore Bryan
Smith who hurled six innings
hits and eight strikeouts.

lowed the Chargers to stop a six
game skid as they defeated Trevecca 5-4.
“It was a big win. Especially
considering the game before it,”
said Thiesen. “Bouncing back
says a lot about character.”
The win came on the back of
Hillsdale freshman Phil Carey
up one run, which was unearned,
The game ended just after 1
a.m., and the team says that the
week, are taking a toll on the
team.
“We’re exhausted.
A lot
of guys are banged up,” said
Bartlett. “We’ve got some injuries we need to nurse before conference, so we’re taking it easy in
practice today.”
ference play the Chargers lost to
the Lourdes Gray Wolves 4-3.

Junior Chris McDonald slides into third base at a home
game last year. (Photo Courtesy of Jenny Bals)

uted heavily to a three-run third
inning for Lourdes.
The team opens up GLIAC
play this weekend when they travel to Malone for a four game set.

SOFTBALL DOWN BUT NEVER OUT IN FLORIDA
Morgan Delp
Editor-in-Chief

Head softball coach Joe Abraham said his team needed to play
10 games to reach “where they
need to be.” With 14 games out
of the way, the Hillsdale Softball
team is ready to play two toptier NAIA challengers Saturday
in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The
Chargers will face Davenport
University (16-3) and then Cornerstone University (9-3), both
will be the team’s last games before conference play starts.
While going 6-6 last week in
Clermont, Florida, Hillsdale improved its batting and became
accustomed to outdoor play. The
Chargers racked up three wins

where they trailed by three runs
late in the game. Abraham said
the Chargers did not face a weak
team the entire trip.
“As the week went on, the
communication and energy we

ner on second base. The Chargers

Hillsdale came back from a 4-1

weren’t able to score.
“At the bottom of the eighth,
they got a bunt single to put run-

from junior Sarah Klopfer and a

improved,” senior Jessica Day
said in an email.
In addition to serving Southern Indiana (15-1) its only loss
on the season with a 2-0 win on
March 7, one of the Chargers’
most thrilling victories came
March 9 in the form of an international tiebreaker against D-II
powerhouse Minnesota State,
Mankato.
After trailing 4-1 in the sixth
inning, the Chargers came back
to tie it in the seventh. In international tiebreakers, both teams begin the eighth inning with a run-

another pop up, and then a strikeout,” Abraham said. “Then we
got three runs in the top of the
ninth and they got two in the bottom of the ninth, with the winning run on base. So this was a
big win because they’re really
good.”
The trip ended with two wins
from the Chargers on Saturday.
Southern Connecticut State, in
which freshman standout pitcher Danielle Stiene gave up no
earned runs and struck out nine
batters. In the second game,

Brittany Mahan tied the game
in the bottom of the sixth. Solid
defense put the Chargers in position to put sophomore Bekah
Kastning on base and eventually
score in the seventh.
“We came back and got the
win in the bottom of the seventh
with two outs. Everyone was so
focused and really supportive,”
Mahan said in an email. “There
were a lot of great hits in that
game.”
The top hitters of the week
were junior Sarah Grunert (.413,
going 19 for 46), Kastning (.395,

See SOFTBALL A7

Charger Chatter: COACH TOWNE

Andrew Towne is the head
coach of men’s and women’s
cross-country, indoor track and
-

How long have you been at
Hillsdale and how did you get

here?
I came to Hillsdale in the fall
of ’99 as a student. I’m from
just down the road in Pittsford,
which is about 20 minutes from
here. I had no intention of being
here at all. My momma tricked
me into a visit. My momma is a
small but feisty Polish lady, so
we went on the visit. Hillsdale
was totally different than anything I had ever thought it was.
You know from being around
here, sometimes the town thinks
differently about what’s actually going on here. Their perception can be different than what’s
actually happening and I was no
different. I loved it here. I was
years. I will say that I am probably not on the same level as
a coach as I was as an athlete.
I always joke with our kids, I
don’t know that I should have
been at the GLIAC meet at all
just because I wasn’t that great
of an athlete, but I loved my ex-

perience here. I went away for a
year after graduation. I was engaged and my wife was working
in Kalamazoo. So once we got
married we went to live there
for a year. But, I really wanted
to be back and be involved. I
was part time for a year and a
half, which was awesome, and
was really hard because I had to
work another job to be able to
do the things I wanted to trackwise. I ended up here for four
years total. I had some really
great things happen. I got an opportunity at Miami Ohio to be an
assistant coach down there, and
it was Division I and I was curious about that, so I made the really tough decision to go there.
We were down there for two
years. Some things went really
well down there, so I had a lot
of opportunities, one of which
was Hillsdale. And it wasn’t one
I expected at all. I had actually
just come back from another interview at a Division I school

for a head coaching position,
and I got a call from Hillsdale.
chance to come back to Hillsdale, but we felt like this was
what God had for us.
What’s a favorite moment
with the current team?
mind with current kids are what
we did in Louisville with women’s cross-country and what we
did this past weekend in Birmingham, just the collection of
started coaching we weren’t
very good, and we were starting
to get some kids to the NCAA
championships, I remember
looking at these other teams
and they had this entourage of
people, because so many kids
I had my one 400 meter guy and
the one 400 meter girl and that’s

all we had as a program. So to
go to cross-country as a full
team, to go to the indoor national championships with athletes,
and alternates, and coaches, we
had 22 people, that was neat, to
me, to be the kind of program
that I thought we could be but
we weren’t when I started, to
experience that with those kids
that was really neat.
What’s something about you
that people wouldn’t expect,
maybe a hobby?
With cross, indoor, and outdoor,
track occupies a giant part of
my life. The one I always throw
out in recruiting sometimes
and with our kids, they think
they know me, I’ll always say
to them, “If you had a guess at
to, what would you say?” and
I was a math guy here and I’m
a numbers guy and they never
have a guess and sometimes

someone will try and be funny
and they’ll throw out an ’80s
band like I’m old, but probably
my favorite group, of all time,
even to this day, is Weezer. I
don’t know that I’ve had a kid
that wasn’t surprised to hear
that. But, I don’t have a ton of
hobbies. Track is kind of my
hobby. I love to spend time with
my son and my wife, we have
a little boy about to be 6-yearold. He goes to the kindergarten
at the Academy. To have a little
son that is, to everyone who has
ever met him, 90 to 95 percent
exactly like his dad, it gives you
a chance to watch your childhood from a different perspective. I like to spend a lot of time
with him.
croft

-

B1 19 March 2015

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

(Meg Prom/Collegian)

Hillsdale grad combines art and business
David Lippert ’90 showing his work in the Sage
Morgan Delp
Editor-in-Chief
David Lippert ’90 has removed belly fat from Jennifer
Lopez and Britney Spears.
Digitally, that is.
“You’d be surprised how actors really look,” Lippert said.
“I’ve done tattoo removal, and
my sticking out, it’s edited out.
Nothing is real.”
The Hillsdale grad and psychology major has worked in
design since leaving Hillsdale.
ever, “Design Beyond Boundaries,” opens in the Sage Center for
the Arts’ Daughtrey Gallery. The
exhibit will emphasize the entrepreneurial nature of Lippert’s career, debunking the myth that art
students can’t go onto successful
careers, especially in business.
“It was a natural for us to celebrate how he has utilized the
broad experiences of his Hills-

dale liberal arts background to
propel success in the business
sphere,” Professor of Art Sam
Knecht said.
Lippert’s exhibit will highlight different categories of his
work. There will be traditional
oil paintings, which Lippert is
borrowing on loan from private
owners, and which contain a
mix between realism and expressionism. Photography will be included, along with illustrations,
many of which are for children’s
books.
“In painting he thought big,
doing large abstract canvasses
full of dynamic sweep and vibrant color,” Knecht said in an
email. “For Dave, confronting a
big canvas on his easel was like
a general guiding a campaign as
well as the troops slogging it out
pictures he dared to do the unconventional, to look at a subject
in a fresh, attention-grabbing
way. The department still has
a number of his undergraduate
photos in copies in our archives.”
“Design Beyond Boundaries”

will display much of Lippert’s
work in product development.
“A prominent piece of the
exhibit is a documentary,” Lippert said. “It’s a piece on how
you design
a
product from
concept to
delivery. I
shot it for
in
Vietnam.
A
lot of the
footage
was from
a factory,
doing sampling with
the owners
and people
there, and
covering all the
other aspects.”
L i p pert’s start
gan right

out of college, where he graduated as a psychology major with
many art credits. He worked on
shows like “The Wonder Years,”
“Jim Henson’s Dinosaurs,” and
“Roseanne,”
w h e r e
he
met
his wife.
He
also
worked in
pre-production for
the 1995
hit “The
S h a w shank Redemption.”
“I segued into
visual effects,”
Lippert
said. “At
that time,
computers were
David Lippert ’90
not desk(Photo courtesy of David Lippert via davtops. CGI
idlippert.com)
was just

becoming popular, and commerI worked for a boutique in postproduction. Now with Adobe and
desktop computers you can do a
lot with that. The business has
changed.”
Lippert and his wife realized
they didn’t want to raise their
family in Los Angeles, so they
moved back to Lippert’s home
state, Michigan, where Lippert
took over his family’s business
of marketing and sales.
“It was quite an adjustment
period, culturally,” he said.
Lippert innovated and improved the company, including
adding in-house photography to
its repertoire. Four years ago,
Lippert moved all production to
Vietnam.
“I would say that my experience at Hillsdale and the entertainment industry prepared me
for the product development
work I’m currently involved in,”
Lippert said.
According to Lippert’s website, davidlippert.com, Lippert
has done a wide range of promo-

tional work, and specialized in
bag design for those who work
in their vehicles. While Lippert
still continues with personal art,
that is not his primary source of
income.
“Product development is driven by commercial needs, not out
of artistic inspiration. The customer drives me,” he said.
Junior Meg Prom is very excited about Lippert’s exhibit.
She, like Lippert before her, is
studying psychology and art.
“I want to end up doing graphic design of some sort, be it editorial design, illustrative design,
commercial design, or marketing
design,” she said. “It’s cool to see
he’s branched out and been creative in a lot of different ways. It
gives me hope for my future.”
Lippert endorses real-life experiences as the best form of education.
“You can’t get everything
from a book; you have to experience life, have adventure, take
risks,” he said. “I’ve had so many
failures in my life, but all you remember are the successes.”

‘A once-in-a-lifetime exhibit’
Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo united again at Detroit Institute of Arts
Evan Carter
Web Editor
Less than six months after
art to help pay down city debt,
the Detroit Institute of Arts has
opened a major exhibit on Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo.
The exhibit, which
opened on Sunday and
will show through July,
took DIA Adjunct Curator of Contemporary Art
Mark Rosenthal three
years to put together,
using original to-scale
mural sketches by Rivera already at the DIA
along with around 50
drawings and paintings
on loan from private
and public collections
in the United States and
Mexico.
Since the sketches
of the Rivera Murals on
display in the exhibit
are so fragile, this is the

in its hometown.”
“The popularity is going to be
through the roof,” said volunteer
docent Harriet Brown.
The exhibit follows Rivera
and Kahlo’s year in Detroit, during which Rivera designed and
painted the DIA’s now famous
“American Industry Murals.” Although a banner year for Rivera,
this time was potentially even
more important for Kahlo, who

publically displayed in
30 years.
Lisa Rezin, Director
of Group Reservations
at the DIA, called it a
“once-in-a-lifetime” exhibit.
“When a museum
has a major work of
art, like having the Ri- Frida Kahlo
vera Murals — and I’m (Photo courtesy of the DIA)
talking any museum
— there’s a feeling that
they want to celebrate it, they had a failed pregnancy while siwant to bring attention to it,” multaneously coming into her
Rosenthal said. “People come own as an artist.
Although Rivera was the
from all over the world to see it,
but it becomes taken for granted more acclaimed of the two art-

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ists during their time in
Detroit, in many ways
Kahlo is attracting
more attention in the
exhibit.
“Frida will be the
star; she’s always the
star because of her personality,”
Rosenthal
said.
Before coming to
Detroit, one art critic
called Kahlo
a “dabbler,”
but after the
year in Detroit Kahlo
began gaining
fame
apart
from
her husband.
Even today,
Kahlo’s work
is popular.
portion
of
the
exhibit
focuses
on
(Photo courtesy of DIA)
Rivera and Diego Rivera
Kahlo’s lives
before coming to Detroit. This part
of the exhibit includes
a painting by Rivera
called “Emillio Zapato,” which comes from
a mural Rivera created before painting his
March 21
murals at the DIA. Al4th Annual Liberal Arts Jazz Festival
though the “American
Featured Concert: The Hillcats with
Industry Murals” are
the Festival Guest Artists
Rivera’s most famous
Markel Auditorium
murals, he painted nu8 p.m.
merous others.
Besides the Hillcats, performances and
The section also has
clinics will take place throughout the
art by Kahlo. Her paintday in the Sage Center for the Arts and
ing “Frida Kahlo and Diego RiHoward Music Building by various
vera” is noteworthy: in this work,
College Jazz Ensembles.
Kahlo seems very small next to
her husband, who holds promiMarch 21 – April 3
nently displayed painting tools.
Design Beyond Boundaries: David Lip
In this painting Kahlo makes
pert
the artistic choice of showing
Daughtrey Gallery
her husband as an artist and not
David Lippert ’80, president of
showing herself as one too.
AutoExec, Inc., exhibits an array of
The next portion of the exhibit
personal and commercial work ranging
covers Rivera and Kahlo’s time
from photography and illustration to
in Detroit.
product design and beyond.
This section includes the original to-scale sketches of the mural panels that Rivera referenced
when creating his frescos. Some
sketches didn’t make it into the
mural, such as one featuring
manufacturing and beets (Michigan’s original industries, according to Rivera) that was replaced

Things

by a painting of a
baby after Kahlo’s
failed pregnancy.
Rosenthal
called the sketches the cornerstone
of the exhibit.
The next portion of the exhibit
focuses on Rivera
and Kahlo’s lives
after they left Detroit. In this section of the exhibit,
the emphasis is
more on Kahlo’s
growth as an artist.
A number of
Kahlo’s paintings
are distraught and
cover traumatic
subjects.
Her
painting “A Few
Small Nips,” for
example, depicts
a naked women
covered in bleeding wounds. But
Kahlo’s growth

as an artist is also depicted in her
painting “Double-Portrait of Diego and I,” in which she shows
herself to be one with Rivera instead of small and separate as she
had in her earlier painting.
Although the exhibit is unique
to Detroit, people around the art
world in the United States and
Mexico are taking notice of the
exhibit.
cant the exhibition is, particularly in Mexico where many of
the works came from, among the
knew that the Detroit year was
extraordinary and they realized
that nobody had ever focused on
it,” Rosenthal said.
Not only has an exhibit like
this never been done before at
another institution, but since
Rivera’s murals and the accompanying to-scale sketches of the
murals can’t travel, the exhibit
couldn’t happen at any other art
musuem.

See DIA Rivera B2

To do and see This
week
March 21
David Lippert: Artist’s Reception
Daughtrey Gallery
2-4 p.m.
March 22
Hillsdale Arts Chorale
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
2251 W Bacon Road
3 p.m.
The Hillsdale Arts Chorale’s a capella
concert, entitled “Flower of Beauty,”
will feature compositions with texts
drawn from the love poems of the great
poets.

(Compiled by Andrew Egger)

ARTS
19 March 2015 B2

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

‘House of Cards’ season 3: Cheap melodrama

IN FOCUS
(Photo courtesy of Tom
Novelly)

Tom
Novelly

The beauty of
brunch and the
serenity of that old piano
Sundays are beautifully ritualistic at Hillsdale College. After
waking up early, dressing in their
nicest clothes and partaking in
worship, students meander over
for brunch at the Knorr Dining
Room. As you walk to your seat
with a huge plate of food, you
can hear snippets of conversation at each passing table, all remarkably similar. The mealtime
discussion is focused on looming papers, massive required
readings, or a busy extracurricular schedule that is just a sunset
away. Yet everyone is calm. I’ve
Then I realized it has something
to do with that old piano in the
corner.
I have never been a fervent
lover of classical music. As a
child I never played an instrument, and the music in my house
was a mixture of Sinatra, country,
and classic rock. Classical music
was something I had never appreciated until I came to Hillsdale
College.
I remember as a freshman sitting down in the dining hall dreading the massive amount of work
that I had procrastinated on, and
feeling overwhelmingly hopeless. Then in the background, I
heard a cover of “You’ve Got a
Friend in Me” from “Toy Story” playing on that old piano. I
couldn’t hold back my smile. My
mood changed immediately. I
started bobbing along to the tune
as I ate my breakfast, knowing
that the work would get done and
that it was all going to be okay.
The music at brunch became
a weekly solace for me. The accompaniment of covers from
movies and classical scores
from famous composers really
helped me set a happy tone for a
long workday ahead. The music
birthed more than just a lifting
up the spirit and motivation for
the mounds of Western Heritage
reading, it piqued my curiosity.
As I was studying throughout
the week, I found myself listening to various classical playlists
on the internet to focus, and to
relax. The playlists containing famous pieces from the greats such
as Beethoven, Bach, and Haydn
along with movie scores, and
covers made the work manageable. What started off as a casual
musing has since become a habit.

I am by no means an expert in
this genre of music, I don’t know
about the amazing formulations
of harmonies and notes that it
took to make it, but I appreciate
it regardless. I am amazed that a
piece sculpted by man can uplift
emotion and soothe the soul in an
almost spiritual way.
The morning music has been a
part of Hillsdale College brunch
since the fall of 1988, when the
CEO of Saga, Tim Morrison,
brought it as a tradition from another college he had worked at.
That same year they began hiring students as players, giving
students of various playing styles
the opportunity to practice and
perform in a peaceful environment. The hired student performers play every Sunday brunch at
the college except for Easter and
Mother’s Day when they are not
on campus. The realization that
my fellow classmate is playing those peaceful tunes during
brunch also adds to my solace.
The student playing that cover
of “You’ve Got a Friend in Me”
that lifted me up as a freshman
was also my freshman neighbor
in Simpson. As I sat there worrying about my assignments and
how I would adapt to college, I
realized that he is going through
the same things as me. However,
while I was eating brunch, he
was banging away at the keys
with a smile and was playing
music to make us all feel better.I
am brought to peace at the sight
of a student, going through the
same academic rigor as all of us,
playing music for the comfort of
everyone.
So this Sunday, as you go
through that familiar routine and
worried about all the hurdles that
the week will throw at you, take
a minute and pause. Listen to the
music, nod along, and let it lift
you up. Perhaps when you walk
out of the dining hall with more
comfort in taking on those huge
assignments, you can walk over
to your familiar classmate at that
old piano and put a dollar in their
tip jar, for making your day just a
little brighter.

It won’t be a wedding, but
the women of Sigma Alpha Iota
music fraternity will have “something old, something new” for
campus at their spring concert 8
p.m. on March 27 in McNamara
Rehearsal Hall. The women will
perform popular and traditional
songs with members of men’s
music fraternities Phi Mu Alpha
and Mu Alpha.
Acts will range from solo renditions and duets to a last act sung
by every member of SAI and arranged by junior Faith Liu, who
is serving as program director, or
songmistress, for the concert.
“The idea is to juxtapose more
classic works with new material,” Liu said. “For instance,
taking a pop song and turning it
into a string quartet, or taking an
old song and covering it in a new
way.”
Popular artists featured include Fleet Foxes, Kelly Clarkson, Pat Benatar, and Evanescence, alongside classical,
traditional, and original compositions.
The concert’s theme changes

every year. Liu says that the
theme is chosen to encompass a
wide variety of acts while keeping the audience interested.
“We try to pay tribute to our
dignity as musicians while staying really fun,” she said. ‘I’ve
always been interested by the
continuity and diversity within
the musical tradition.”
SAI’s faculty adviser, Assistant Professor of Music Renée
Clark, teaches music history, and
Liu says that her ability to combine classical and modern forms
of music in her classes was an inspiration in planning the concert.
Each number will be conceived by a member of SAI, but
they often collaborate with other
student musicians. Many numbers will be performed by large
groups with diverse instrumentation.
Mu Alphans senior Addison
Stumpf and junior Walker Mulley will be co-master of ceremonies.
“That in itself will be a riot!”
Liu said.
“I’m really excited about it
and it’s going to be a fantastic
concert and all the acts are wonderful,” Stumpf said. “Everyone
should come.”

DIA RIveRA
From B1
The reaction to the exhibit has
been very positive in the media.
Rosenthal described local media
coverage as “tremendous.” Additionally, the exhibit has been
covered nationally in publications like the Washington Post
and Wall Street Journal.

The “House of Cards” has
fallen.
Spoiler alert: season three is
boring. The brilliant and thrilling
plot twists that earned this Netflix political drama so much fame
since its release in February 2013
are gone.
Much of the show’s popularity hinged on its its ability to
highlight the extent of Frank Underwood’s ill-intentioned, conniving, and manipulative nature
yet simultaneously make you
hope he gets what he wants — a
classic case of rooting for the bad
guy.
As he rises from his position
as the U.S. House of Representatives majority whip to President
two seasons, audiences are enthralled by how he controls so
many moving parts at once as he
climbs the White House ladder.
Season three leaves previously dazzled viewers disappointed.
of character inconsistencies. Lost
were the terribly beautiful moments of political intrigue, only
to be replaced by second-rate

The DIA’s Exhibit “Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit”
will remain open until July 12.
More information on musuem
times and ticket information is
available at dia.org.

character drama and even worse
relationship drama,” senior Andy
Reuss said. “Perhaps the greatest
sin of all was that the season was
boring. Any surprise came from
disgust for the unnecessary sexuality rather than genuine astonishment at a plot twist. Unfortunately, ‘House of Cards’ fell prey
to the bane of modern entertainment: cheap melodrama.”
Plot developments hooked
captivating them with how complex yet methodical was Frank
Underwood’s rise to the government’s helm. Even when everything appeared to be in shambles,
he guided the ship past every
obstacle. And the show’s writers
carefully chose when to reveal
his hand at every turn.
This season, however, it
seems that Underwood is more
often surprised by plot developments than viewers are. The only
aspect he seems to still have a
handle on is who is sleeping with
whom. But even that is unusually
boring, because the answer is the
same every time: the person with
whom the character should least
be having sex with.
three dashes hopes of it matching
the quality of one and two. While

season two begins with Underwood killing one of the show’s
main characters by pushing her
in front of a moving metro train,
three struggles to get rolling as
we watch Underwood urinate
on his father’s grave and former
chief-of-staff, Doug Stamper, obsess over the absence of Rachel
Posner and struggle with a nagging alcohol problem after a lifethreatening injury. If season three
cut down Doug’s airtime by half,
it would already by better.
Another character disapUnderwood. From her immature
insistence on receiving the job
of United Nations ambassador
despite the Senate’s rejection of
her appointment, to her refusal to
attend the Iowa victory party, she
lets viewers down.
What previously made her
character so magnetic was her
ability to be just as rational and
shrewd as her husband. Ironically, now that she begins her ascension to power, she decreases in
respectability and strength — the
very traits she seeks.
“It’s sad that the last show
ends and you think Hillary Clinton may actually be better than
Claire,” senior Bailey Pritchett
said. “At least Hilary was effec-

tive; Claire was an awful UN ambassador.”
The underlying problem of
season three is its reliance on appealing to viewers’ lust for sex
of calculated schemes. For example, season one’s major conbetween budding political journalist Zoe Barnes and Frank Underwood. It was an ideal blend of
sex and sensibility.
Now, viewers watch chiefof-staff Remy Danton passively
desire former lover and newlymarried presidential candidate
Jackie Sharp. A scene where he
speeding and not having idenheartstrings when he tells Sharp
the situation highlighted a void in
his life, but it fails. His feelings
seem forced, and he vacillates
so long about how to improve
his life that viewers get tired of
watching him (and just about every other character, too.)
As Claire walks out the White
House door to end the season,
so do many of the show’s loyal
viewers, who are just as disgusted with what Frank’s “House of
Cards” has become.

My spring break on Vicodin and Tarantino
Landon Peterson
Special to the Collegian
#SB2K15 — that’s right,
Spring Break, baby! Cancun?
PCB? The Bahamas? Wherever
you went, I am sure it was great.
I mean, these are the times when
memories are made, right? The
beach, friends, no worries for an
entire week: it all makes for what
can only be an unforgettable
time…
Well, I certainly had an unforgettable week as well.
Unfortunately for me, it was
a week I would probably rather
forget. Four wisdom teeth extracted on Tuesday, swelling
cheeks, and a limited supply of
Vicodin all made for a week of
ice packs (bags of frozen peas
strapped to my face), time in bed,
and a bunch of movies. In commemoration of this experience,
I decided to review three of the
many movies that I watched over
break: “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp
Fiction,” and “Jackie Brown.”
An astute observer would recog-

Tom Novelly is a sophomore
from Nashville, Tennessee, ma- Tarantino. In chronological orjoring in politics and minoring in
brief reviews. Bear in mind that
journalism.

SAI bringing new and old
Chris McCaffery
Student Columnist

Macaela Bennett
City News Editor

pain medication, and note that,
in true Hillsdale fashion, I atenjoyed each of these movies tremendously, all of which are currently available for your viewing
necessary: I highly suggest you
go watch the movies in light of
what I have to say. Just don’t
watch them with your mother.
“Reservoir Dogs”: Harvey
Keitel, Tim Roth, Chris Penn,
Steve Buscemi, Lawrence Tierney, Michael Madsen
In Tarantino’s directorial de-

but he tackles an age-old question: is there honor among
thieves? More importantly, he
asks hard questions about human relationships, justice, and
the interaction of human codes
of morality. He does this through
rich and witty dialogue, incisive character development and
a high-strung plot that leaves as
many questions as it answers. For
you asking questions and “Reservoir Dogs” left me asking great
questions. High Points: Classic
Tarantino dialogue. The nuanced
jargon of the thieves proves both
entertaining and essential as
Tarantino raises forceful moral
dilemmas through profanity-riddled quips and nervous thievery
lingo. The characters are developed wonderfully, as each seems
to offer a notion of relationship
and a moral code. The interaction of these codes of morality

had only minor qualms regarding
some of the acting. Conclusion:
and I would have to agree with
the consensus. “Reservoir Dogs”
deals with a lot, asks hard questions and leaves the viewer shaking his or her head with a slightly
disgusted smile.
Grade: A“Pulp Fiction”: John Travolta,
Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth,
Amanda Plummer, Maria de Medeiros, Ving Rhames, Eric Stoltz,
Rosanna Arquette, Christopher
Walken, Bruce Willis
The disjointed narrative of
“Pulp Fiction,” even more extreme than that of Tarantino’s
way. It seems at times circular,
while at other times completely

haphazard, leaving the viewer
to wonder which way is up by
fect. Although “Pulp Fiction” is
an eclectic blend of dark humor,
violence, profanity and real human struggle, I was able to see
beyond the grotesque violence
to something of fragmented substance. High Points: In addition
to tantalizing dialogue, Tarantino’s screenplay is once again
structurally ingenious. Bizarrely,
after a bunch of (Vicodin-aided)
consideration, it became clear to
me how the script tells us something, whisks us somewhere else,
skips around and doubles back
gether. Travolta, Jackson and the
rest of the Tarantino stalwart create the perfectly mixed barrage
of 70’s LA, 50’s noir and modern
fragmentary dilemma, producing
cutting-edge even to this day.
Conclusion: A couple of important notes. First, I need to watch
this movie again to draw out
more of the many nuances in dialogue, imagery, themes, etc., all
of which are very much in play in
creating a moral thrust to be left
considering. Second, critiquing
of all time was a more intimidating task than I originally considered. Finally, “Pulp Fiction” has
phenomenal entertainment value,
well worth your time if you can
sit through it. I took marks for off
for so many Jungian interpretations and the fact that it took me
quite a while to write this saynothing review.
Grade: B+/B
“Jackie Brown”: Pam Grier,
Samuel L. Jackson, Robert Forster, Bridget Fonda, Michael Keaton, Robert De Niro
parts notably from the violence
of his prior two hits. In “Jackie
Brown,” the dialogue takes cen-

ter stage. As you might expect, it
is both riddled with profanity and
ironically literate, with the characters communicating in hilarious back and forth gabs of anything and everything. The central
dilemma that faces Jackie Brown
in her attempts to escape her
own form of poverty, but she is
portrayed in a neo-noir manner,
highlighting her cool intelligence
and sex appeal. Along with the
hilarious prattle of Jackson and
De Niro and the strangely astute
bail-bondsmen portrayed by Forster, the characters are played to
a T. High Points: One critic says
Jackson’s Ordelle Robbie has
“murder in his eyes and funk poetry on his lips,” which does his
character a tremendous amount
of justice. He is pure entertainment. While posing some important questions regarding the stasis of moral life and man’s ability
to rationalize any sort of action,
the movie entertains to the very
end. Conclusion: Many mistake
the slow moving and relatively
linear narrative in Jackie Brown
for a departure from classic Tarantino screenplay, I think not. It
delivers an incredibly entertaining tale of misfortune and moral
ambiguity that pulls the viewer in
many directions at the same time.
could have been hit harder and
more comprehensively and the
story would carry more weight.
Grade: B
There you have it, my take on
I really did enjoy each of these
and don’t like them, watch them
again with bags of frozen peas
strapped to your face after having
taken a couple of Vicodin!
Landon Peterson is a senior
studying English from Willmar,
Minnesota.

Hillsdale hosts liberal arts jazz festival
Kelsey Drapkin
Senior Reporter
The fourth annual Liberal
Arts Jazz Festival will be held at
Hillsdale College on Saturday,
March 21, in McNamara Recital
Hall and Markel Auditorium.
Jazz combinations and master-class-style clinics will occur
throughout the day featuring
students from Hillsdale College,
Albion College, Olivet College,
local high schools, and a performance from the faculty jazz ensemble, the Hillcats.
The jazz festival began four
years ago as an opportunity for
students in smaller schools to
gain performance experience.
“We were going to jazz festivals at bigger schools like the
University of Michigan, but there
was a different attitude towards
music,” Professor of Music Chris
McCourry, the head of the developing jazz program at Hillsdale,
said in a previous interview with

the Collegian. “For students at
Hillsdale, jazz is incorporated
into their life of studying. So we
came up with the festival idea,
and it has really been working
well.”
Junior Gianna Marchese, a
vocalist for the Hillsdale College
big band, echoed McCourry’s
liberal arts festival.
“These kids are liberal arts
kids,” Marchese said. “It’s not
just ‘I went to school for jazz, and
that’s how I’m going to be performing it.’ It’s more our speed.
It’s really cool to have a setting
where we liberal arts kids can be
in a performance area because
the people who perform jazz in
college don’t get to perform that
often, so having more and more
opportunities to be performing is
a really good thing.”
This festival provides students with an unique opportunity not only to perform, but
also to be critiqued by jazz professionals including trumpeter
Vince DiMartino, trombonist

Chris Smith, and vocalist Sunny
Wilkinson, artist in residence at
Hillsdale.
Wilkinson has been performing jazz for over 40 years and is
known around the world for her
wide range of skills. Wilkinson has enjoyed working with
Hillsdale students, assisting the
growth of the jazz program at
Hillsdale.
“Every student brings something different to the table,”
Wilkinson said. “Their enthusiasm when they see how creative
this art form is and how in their
own way they can build into it
and deepen their own experience
in music and life in general.”
Wilkinson said she is excited
about working on the festival
again this year, having assisted
with it the past two years. She
said she enjoys both performing
with groups and working with
students.
“I am a twofold sort of gal,”
Wilkinson explained. “I love performing with the faculty group.
They’re all wonderful musicians

and lovely people, so making
music with them is a delight. But
I have to say that my new great
passion is working with the students. ... There’s a really talented
group of very bright students at
Hillsdale, and I just have a great
time turning them on to the nuances and the subtleties of jazz
music.”
Marchese said that students
have the opportunity to experience these nuances and subtleties
through listening to other bands
performing. She also said that
a lot of learning in jazz comes
through listening.
“You just get to listen to other
bands perform, and the biggest
part of jazz is listening to other
things because that’s how you
learn,” Marchese said. “You borrow and trade, and that’s just how
jazz develops.”
All performances and clinics
throughout the day are open to
the public beginning at 10 a.m.
and concluding with the Hillcats
at 8 p.m.

Spotlight

B3 19 March 2015

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Cole’s Blocks: 300 and counting

gram and Facebook now, and
I’ve partnered with my grandpa
and my mom.”
He has also taken himself out
of the production aspect of the
business, his grandfather and
mother taking over those operations. Benzing was happy to be

Kelsey Drapkin
Senior Reporter

Junior Cole Benzing stumbled upon a business idea. last
summer that is proving to be
extremely successful.
Benzing’s grandfather started
a business about three years ago
creating wooden templates for
electric guitars, sending them
off to companies like Gibson
and Fender. Benzing helped his
grandfather with the marketing
aspect of the business.
“I noticed that there was a lot
of scrap because he just doesn’t
use all of it and the standards
are pretty high for these tem-

Benzing has sold
approximately 300
blocks through
word of mouth.
plates,” Benzing explained. “I
was looking online and stumbled upon these cutting boards.
It’s easy to do, and I can use the
scraps to do it.”
Professor of Marketing Susan King became familiar with
Benzing’s idea after he took
the ‘How to Start and Manage
a Small Business’ seminar last
semester.
“Due to the extreme scrutiny
in the selection of wood used
to produce the guitar bodies,
are not used,” King explained.
“In an effort to re-purpose this
wood, Cole began using it in
the production of the boards. By
manufacturing green, handmade, and organic products, this
product has the ability to appeal

What started as wood scraps developed into a business
for junior Cole Benzing, who makes hand-crafted cutting
boards. (Photo courtesy of Cole Benzing)
market.”
decided to start a company of
his own selling recycled, allnatural, organic, handmade cutting boards almost on a whim.
With the time and resources at
his disposal for very little cost,
he took a “why not” attitude and
went for it.
“We have two cornerstone
principles: a commitment to
being unique and a dedication to providing value to our
customers,” Benzing’s website
explains. “We believe uniqueness cultivates a culture that
promotes progress and diversity. That’s why every board is
hand-stamped and individually
numbered.”
The unique nature of the
boards is evident in each one
produced.
“The artistry of the boards is
what appealed to me personally,” King said. “The fact that he
uses food-grade mineral oil and
ish the boards adds to its charm.

Due to the unique nature of this
product, I have encouraged Cole
to seriously consider expanding
this business following graduation.”
Benzing has sold approximately 300 blocks through word
of mouth and placement in local
boutiques. Sass in Adrian, MI,
features only Michigan-made
goods. Benzing said placement
in the store increased the knowledge in his community about his
business and sparked support
for his product.
“The community has been
very receptive, very helpful,”
Benzing said. “They offer a lot
of feedback.”
When Benzing returned to
school after winter break, he
began focusing more on the
marketing aspect of the business.
“Over Christmas break, I
kind of hit a stand still,” Benzing explained. “But ever since
I’ve been back at Hillsdale, I’ve
started a website, I’m on Insta-

Looking forward, Benzing doesn’t expect to continue
intense work with the business
after he graduates. He is passing the reigns to his grandfather
and mother to do with the business what they want.
The team is currently looking to expand production and
get placement in bigger-named
stores like Williams-Sonoma
and Field and Stream. They
need to work out details of production and supply before they
get into a bigger market.
“It’s kind of hard to keep up
with demand because there’s
not very many of us working on
it,” Benzing said. “Right now,
they’re trying to build up and
inventory, create some connections with different stores, and
see if they can keep up with
demand.”
Overall, Benzing is very
worked out. Initially looking
to make a little extra money on
the side to help defray miscellaneous college costs, Benzing
has created a viable business
that has great potential.
“I had the resources; I had
the time during the summer,”
Benzing said. “I’ve been pouring a lot more time into it, and
it’s been really rewarding. I
wanted to do something on my
own. I don’t have anything to
lose. For the amount of work
I’ve put into it, it’s been very
successful. I’d say there’s a lot
more room for growth.”

UFO
From B4
clusion: 87 eyewitnesses were
mistaken, and had seen only
“swamp gas.”
Skepticism of this explanation, as well as others offered,
emerged immediately and
remains to this day.
“It was my considerate
opinion that Dr. Hynek had
his mind made up as to what
he ever reached the City of
Hillsdale,” Van Horn said in
a May 26, 1966 Collegian
article. “I also observed that
his main line of questioning was relative only to that
Gas Theory.”
Kohn also said that
subsequent testing of the arb
revealed high levels of radiation, boron, and destruction of
microscopic plant and animal
life.
Evans also remains skeptical of both the swamp gas
explanation.
“Dr. Hynek came to
Hillsdale and I think he just
wanted to get rid of us,” she
said. “Hynek was pressured
to play it down. Makes you
wonder if there’s some kind
of cover-up.”
She also doubts it was a
prank.
“Some people said it could
have been frat guys pulling a
prank,” Evans said. “But they
were way too busy drinking
to do something like that.
“It was a UFO. I’m convinced to this day that’s what
it was.”
-

cial explanation.
“I don’t believe it had
anything to do with swamp
gas. This was just slow, huge.
Swamp gas would never be
bright. It was like looking
into 20 spotlights,” Hess said.
“They’ll never convince me
it was swamp gas. I just truly
felt it was a UFO. I have no
knowledge as to what it was,
no speculation as to what it
could have been.”
Even Hynek himself
would come to downplay
his explanation, according to
subsequent reports in Project
Blue Book. “I emphasize,”
he said, “I cannot prove in
a court of law that these are
the full explanations of these
sightings.”
But the impact was much
greater on a personal level
for those who saw the UFO
“It was the most unusual
thing that happened to me in
college. And it was very interesting,” Evans, who hadn’t
even considered the possibility of UFOs being real before
seeing one herself, said. “I
didn’t realize how unusual it
was or interesting until much
later. You grow up and look
back and say, ‘holy moly, did
that really happen?
The incident has also stuck
with Hess, despite the intervening years.
“It’s just one of those
things you never forget even
as your memory fails,” he
said.

Sunny Wilkinson, and all that jazz
Madeleine Jepsen
Collegian Reporter
Jazz vocalists and piano accompaniment echo through the
Howard Music Building as artist
in residence Sunny Wilkinson
instructs students in the master
class.
Wilkinson, who started her
relationship with Hillsdale College three years ago, gives voice
lessons for vocalists involved in
jazz combos, and also instructs
monthly master classes. The
master class provides a setting
for musical formation in which
several singers present prepared
pieces in front of Wilkinson,
who instructs them in front of a
small audience.
Wilkinson’s relationship with
music dates back to her childhood. As a young girl, she was
cians in her family.
“My family was very musical,” Wilkinson said. “My
daddy was a Methodist minister
and my mom was the choir
director. We always sang, in
home and at church together, so
there was a lot of music going
on when I grew up.”
Her love of music led her to
train under various vocal teachers and pursue a degree in choral education at Arizona State
University, shortly before she

voice study.”
Sophomore Amelia Stieren,
who sang in the last master
class, described the process as
helpful for both the vocalists
and the audience.

As a Grammy
nominated artist,
Wilkinson has
released four solo
records.

Grammy nominee and artist in residence Sunny Wilkinson periodically teaches a
vocal jazz master class. (Photo Courtesy of Sunny Wilkinson)
began her career as a performing artist and vocal teacher.
“I was driven by passion
and talent, and I did have some
talent, but I was mostly driven
by just the love of it and the
passion of it. There was nothing else for me to do, really.”
Wilkinson said.
As a Grammy-nominated

artist, Wilkinson has released
four solo records, as well as
performed in many guest-artist
appearances. She also sings at
various events, most recently
with the Jackson Symphony Orchestra and at a concert at Texas
Tech University.
For Wilkinson, managing a
busy schedule as both a per-

former and a teacher is well
worth it.
“I love the process of developing the vocal instrument
itself,” she said. “The most
beautiful thing about the process
is the discovery that the students
themselves go through, that
they can have a journey of selfdiscovery through the pursuit of

“The singer sings, and then
Sunny goes through and breaks
down the song and gives tips.
Everybody watches, so even
if you’re not singing, you still
learn a lot because you learn
from the other person,” Stieren
said.
Her students, such as
freshman Giannina Imperial,
describe Wilkinson’s teaching
style as slightly unusual, but
very effective.
“It’s very hands-on. First
she’ll listen to you sing, then
she’ll ask you to do sort of unorthodox things. She’ll maybe
ask you to gussy up against a
door to feel free, or put your
hands on her stomach to feel
how she breathes,” Imperial
said. “She makes it so that even

if you are not totally into the
singing lingo, she explains it so
that you can feel what’s going
on in your head and in your
throat. It’s really helpful.”
In addition to her work at
Hillsdale College, Wilkinson
also serves as an artist in residence at University of Michigan, and taught voice lessons
when she lived in Los Angeles.
Wilkinson tries to improve
her students vocal abilities to
allow them to truly engage in
the music.
“I go in and roll up my
sleeves. Initially, I am a diagnostician. In other words, I
want to hear the person sing for
with that instrument,” Wilkinson said. “Then, my journey
is to balance the voice, but my
true philosophy and goal is the
pursuit of freedom in the voice.
We want to be free to sing the
ideas that we have for the rest of
our life.”
Wilkinson thoroughly enjoys
her work with the students and
faculty.
“I think the music faculty at
Hillsdale College is superb in
their skills and their collegiality,” Wilkinson said. “It is an
absolute joy to be involved with
them, really, and I enjoy every
aspect of it.”

BLACK&WHITECHIC
KAT TORRES, SOPHOMORE
Describe your fashion sense.

What is your most embarrassing item of clothing?

What is your biggest fashion pet peeve?

What is your favorite item of clothing?

Who inspires your wardrobe?
Hailey Morgan/Collegian

B4 19 March 2015

Spotlight
www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Tastes of Life: From
restaurant to shelter
Josh Paladino
Collegian Reporter

In 1966, Hillsdale had its own close encounter
Jack Butler
Opinions Editor
The night of Monday, March
21, 1966 was pretty typical for
the McIntyre Hall residents—
until the UFO appeared.
At about 10:30 p.m., according to an eyewitness account
written by Gidget Kohn three
days later, dozens of girls and
other witnesses — 87 total —
began to watch an “intense
silver-white light.” The event
was later described in Project

“It’s one of those
things that runs your
hair up on the back of
your head just thinking about it.”
Blue Book, the United States
Air Force’s decades-long investigation of UFO sightings nationwide as “football-shaped.”
The room of Josephine Evans
’69 had one of the best views of
the object; many girls crowded
into it to watch.
“We suddenly spotted what
appeared to be this strange light
in the arb,” Evans said. “It was
odd the way the lights were, but
it was also weird the way [the
UFO] traveled.”
“There was a glow around
it and the lights appeared to
be pulsating,” Kohn’s account
added. “The glow was gone and
there were three lights which
were yellow-white…then the
middle light turned red and

A newspaper clipping from the 1966 sighting.
then the one on the left. [We]
watched for about 10 minutes
and then the object seemed to
move up and then to the right
and left very slightly.”
As the object appeared to
move closer to the dorm, the
girls decided to call Hillsdale
Civil Defense Director Buck
Van Horn.
As the girls, trapped in the
dorm by curfew, along with
dorm moms and Van Horn, kept
watching the object, it continued to behave bizarrely, moving
of varying colors, intensities,
and sequences.
“It is not really necessary to
describe all the movements,”
say that it moved like nothing
earthly and Mr. Van Horn was
seeing it too.”
Meanwhile, around the

same time, Harold Hess, then a
a midnight to 8 p.m. shift with
his partner, Jerry Wise, checking lots on Carlton Road, near
where today the CVS pharmacy
stands. But something quickly
caught their eyes, even though
Hess said it was about a mile
away.
“Then, over by the college,
we saw a real brilliant light in
the sky at a low altitude,” Hess
said. “You couldn’t look at it, it
was so bright.”
Hess and Wise drove over
to the arboretum, where they
discovered the mysterious unsource of the blinding light.
“It wasn’t a chopper. There
was no humming. I took my
weapon out. Jerry told me to put
it back,” Hess said. “‘Whatever
it is, I don’t think it’ll bother it

one bit what you’ve got at your
side,’ Jerry told me.”
Then, Hess said, the light
split, and went in two different directions. The action had
physical effects on the object’s
surroundings.
“We got into our patrol car
and we couldn’t transmit. We
just got static,” Hess said.
“It’s one of those things that
runs your hair up on the back of
your head just thinking about
it.”
After that, the lights disappeared from close view. Some
of the girls continued to watch
the night sky almost longingly
as it faded off into the east.
“We continued to watch for
our friend, for in a sense it had
become our friend, and a few
minutes later we were rewarded
by a strange new light on the
horizon that hadn’t been there
before—a bluish whitish greenish light,” Kohn wrote. But
at about 5:10 a.m., the object
That was only the beginning of the saga of the Hillsdale
UFO. Several nearby areas —
such as Ann Arbor and Dexter
— reported sightings around
the same time, making the
Hillsdale UFO part of a national
story. So Dr. Allen J. Hynek,
consultant to Project Blue Book
and professor at Northwestern
University, came to Hillsdale to
investigate. But after interviewing many key eyewitnesses,
including Evans, Hess, and Van
Horn, he reached a simple con-

See UFO, B3

Although Tastes of Life went
out of business due to the minimum wage increase last year,
the Life Challenge ministry has
repurposed the building as a
new women’s shelter.
Life Challenge, an addiction
rehabilitation center in Hillsdale, provides a spiritual, social,
and professional foundation for
program residents to reenter into
society. Unlike state programs,
Life Challenge is a Christian organization. The shelter opened
in late February and has the
capacity for eleven women and
their children.
Pastor Jason Mekelburg of
College Baptist Church supports Life Challenge by speaking at its chapel service and inviting recovering addicts in the
program to share their testimony
at College Baptist.
“It gives us a faith based option for addictions recovery.
There are other state programs,
but one that is Scripture based,
as a pastor, I am happy to be
able to recommend.”
Janine Livernois, the women’s director for Life Challenge,
addressed the unique perspective this organization takes on
drug rehabilitation.
“We understand that these are
individuals, and we understand
that we can’t force religious beliefs on anybody, but we present the opportunity for them to
change and we believe in the
power of God,” she said.
Life Challenge allows these
individuals time to grow in faith
and fully recover. Whereas state
programs are 30 to 90 days long,
Life Challenge has a different
approach.
“It’s an individual growth, not
even being able to put a timeline
on it,” Livernois said.
The rehabilitation lasts 12
months and in some cases residents are invited and even encouraged to stay longer if necessary.
In one case, Dan, a graduate

of the program, was invited to
“He’s paying rent for a room
and we’re helping him so he
can get his GED when he’s
completely done with us,” said
Men’s Director Tim Ritchey.
Life Challenge does not
throw its graduates back into society empty handed. The workers are dedicated to equipping
these men with valuable skills
to get them back into the workforce.
Many of the men coming
into Life Challenge have many
skills. They have knowledge in
valuable trades and Life Challenge gives them the opportunity to use that knowledge.
“We’ve got people who are
sales reps, construction, mechanical, maintenance,” Ritchey
said.
The trials these residents have
gone through are unbearable.
“I know I’d still be using,
I don’t know if I’d be dead or
not because I was to a point in
my life where I had lost a lot
of trust, a lot of friends, a lot of
relationships and I didn’t know
how I was going to gain that
I’d failed everyone and failed
myself. I tried ending my life,
and it didn’t work, and it was at
that moment I knew in my heart
that God had something else for
me.”
Livernois lost her husband 16
years ago. After that traumatic
event she came to know Christ
and for the next 15 years she
opened up her home to women
who needed help in the community.
Perrysburg, Ohio for 15 years
before his family left him and
his career slipped away because
of drugs and alcohol. He came
to Life Challenge in 2013 and
one year to the day later he became the men’s director. His life
is evidence of the effectiveness
and determination of this organization.
“It’s been a blessing,” David
said. “God brought me here for
a reason.”