Thomas Cramer

cramert@uw.edu
History

Interlake History – Fall 2014
The Origins of Western Civilization
This course is an introductory survey of European
history during the middle ages, covering the period from
roughly 250 C.E. to 1455 C.E. It emphasizes three
distinctive features of European civilization that
developed during this period: (1) the gradual emergence
of a distinction between religion and politics; (2)
dramatic changes in the organization of society and
understanding of diversity; (3) changing attitudes
towards gender and sexuality in European society. The
course is intended as an introduction both to the history
of the middle ages in Europe and to the study of history
in general. No previous knowledge of either is
presumed.

Required Books:
The following books are required reading for this course:

Western Civilizations - 3rd Brief
Edition [Text]

Stacey,
Norton
Coffin, et al

039393487X

Perspectives from the Past
Primary Sources in Western
Civilizations (5th Ed.)

Brophy,
Cole, et al

9780393912944

Beowulf: a new verse translation

ed. Heaney Norton

0393320979

The Letters of Abelard and
Heloise

trans. B.
Radice

Penguin
Books

978-0140448993

The Chronicles of the Crusades

Ed. Smith

Penguin

0140449981

Course Packet (Distributed in
Class)

Norton

Your performance in these sessions and participation in general will count towards your final mark. and neglecting to cite the source of a paraphrase. or entire chapters without quotation or attribution. the full instructions for the essay assignments.3 points per day on the 4. Further materials. Late papers including drafts will be penalized . essay). use of an inadequate paraphrase that makes only superficial changes to a text. You must attempt and turn in all graded assignments in order to pass this class. 20% for the final exam. Learning Objectives: In addition to acquiring an understanding of the historical development of western Europe during the middle ages.0 scale. Please be advised that any and all violations of . This penalty is designed to ensure that all students have the same amount of time to complete assignments. unless you have been granted an extension in advance. on a topic chosen from a list of suggested topics). Plagiarism and Academic Integrity According to the American Historical Association. 2) GRADES AND ASSIGNMENTS: Grades will be calculated on the following basis: 10% for the first micro-essay (2-5 pages. assigned topic)." and the borrowing of "distinctive and significant research findings or interpretations" without proper citation. short answer. failure to use quotation marks around borrowed material. Weekends will count as 2 days. Most every class session will be devoted to some source analysis. Course Requirements: 1) SOURCE ANALYSIS SESSIONS: These are a required and essential part of the course and your participation is not optional. 3) To evaluate competing historical arguments using primary source evidence.Class Website and Email: On the class website you will find a copy of the syllabus. and 10% for in-class assignments and participation. Learning how to analyze such sources is an important objective of this course. 4) To appreciate the distance between historical evidence and historians’ interpretations of that evidence. map quiz. 20% for the in-class mid-term on (IDs. and final exam study questions will be posted to the site later in the term. Plagiarism can include verbatim pirating of paragraphs. 2) To construct historical arguments based upon this primary source evidence. The primary form of communicating class updates and assignments will be in-class or over email. These sessions will cover new material that is not covered in the lectures or in the textbook. plagiarism is defined as the appropriation of "the exact wording of another author (or authors) without attribution. students will learn: 1) To analyze primary sources for the historical evidence they can provide. 20% for the second paper (5-7 pages). failure to cite a source. but certain days are marked out for where you will discuss the primary source readings assigned for the week in greater detail than in regular class sessions. pages. and 20% for the final essay (57 pages. including study materials for the midterm.

articulating. Changes will be announced in class or via email. If you have any questions regarding plagiarism or any other issue concerning academic integrity please let me know and I will be glad to help. (CP) http://www.) 9-3 9-8 The Long Shadow of a Dark Age: Course Introduction Achievements of Rome   Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts Text.jstor. 174-81 (Tacitus)  Your workgroup will be assigned a particular reading on the fall of Rome and will be responsible for understanding.  Plutacrch)   9-10 Complete History Research Inventory Assessment for next class period  Essay #1 distributed Topic of Essay #1 Must be submitted for approval to TA on Canvas by 9/8 at 8 PM “Crazy for History”.) Essay #1 submitted online by 8 PM 9-19  . Wineburg. and debating its views in class. 14011414.org/stable/3660360 Please submit two discussion questions of your own to online system by 9/9 at 5 PM 9-15 9-17 The 3rd Century Crisis and the Fall of Rome Creating the Past: Understanding the Fall of Rome Through a Fractured Lens  Perspectives. (See Canvas for full details. Class Schedule (Note: All dates are subject to change if the instructor feels it is the best interests of the educational mission of the course. 156-68 (12 Tablets. 107-31 Perspectives.academic integrity will be prosecuted to the fullest extent possible as specified in the student handbook.

You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission. ix-189 (End at Line 1888) Please be sure to bring any reading notes or other materials for our discussion Please submit two discussion questions of your own design by 9/30 at 5 PM. 169-74 Perspectives. 174-78 Life of Charlemagne selections [CP]  Text.9-22 If an Empire Falls in the Forest (The Fall. . You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission. Romans. ix-189 (End at Line 1888)  Please be sure to bring any reading notes or other materials for our discussion  Please submit two discussion questions of your own design by 9/28 at 5 PM.400-600 9-29 SOURCE ANALYSIS SESSION Beowulf: Something good this way comes 10-1 SOURCE ANALYSIS SESSION (Read) Beowulf. 178-81 FILM: “The Outlaw” (Útlaginn) directed by Ágúst Guðmundsson 10-13 SOURCE ANALYSIS  Please post two discussion questions of your own design by 6 PM 10/12.  and the Successors of Empire . 195-6.  Area of Expertise Must Be Selected and submitted to Canvas by end of day    Beowulf: All good things 10-6 The Carolingian World: Keep your Friends Close 10-8 The Blood-feud of the Vikings  (Read) Beowulf. cont)  Text. 215-221 9-24 Barbarians.  Text. 131-155  Text. 157-64.

SESSION: Útlaginn (The Outlaw 10-15 The Collapse of the Carolingian Empire 10-20 Peer Review 10-22 Midterm Examination 10-27 Paths Not Taken: Byzantium. 193-96  Letters of Gregory and Henry [CP] 10-29 The Ottonian Empire  and the Reform of the Church: Before Church and State 11-3 Draft of Essay #2 due online by 5 PM 10/17 . 183-93 Essay #2 Due Online by 6 PM 10/31  Text. 164-69 “Pact of Umar” [CP] Selections from the Qu'ran [CP]    Text. Islam and the Mediterranean World   11-5 The Investiture Conflict: The Snows of Canossa Between Gregory and Henry: The Beginning Bring two hard copies of essay #2 to class  Bring exam book to class  Text.You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission.

Abelard and Heloise.  Inquisition Records [CP]  Text. 218-229 Aquinas Summa Theologica. Law and Love 11-17 SOURCE ANALYSIS SESSION: The Letters of Abelard and Heloise 11-19 Arguing with the Best: Defining Your Point 11-24 The Twelfth Century Renaissance: Heretics and Jews. lviii-lxxxiv for an introduction) Please submit two discussion questions of your own to online system by 6 PM 11/16. Homosexuality and Women 11-26 The Black Death and Its Impact on Late Medieval Europe 12-1 The Written Word: Manuscript and Medieval Textual Studies 12-3 Peer Review #2 12-8 The Call to the     Abelard and Heloise. 44-89 Please submit two discussion questions of your own to online system by 6 PM 11/18. You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission. Nov 30 Please bring two hard copies of essay #3 to class In-class exercise (see online instructions and course pack) . 3-43 (I also strongly recommend you read pp. [CP] 11-12 The Twelfth Century  Renaissance: Scholasticism. You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission. 237-244    Draft of Essay #3 Due Online by 8 PM. Text.

xi-xxxi.     Text.Crusade: Source Analysis 12-10 SOURCE ANALYSIS SESSION: The Chronicles of the Crusades 12-15 Wives and Witches: Women in Late Medieval Society 12-17 Myth of the Renaissance 1-5 Heresy Trial of Margery Kempe 1-7 Defining Ourselves in the Past 1-12 End of a Dark Age: Course Review 1-14 Final Exam   Chronicles of the Crusades. 8 PM. 2-89 Please write two discussion questions of your own creation on the course website by 12-9. 287-307 . You must also respond by the end of the day of class to at least one submission. 256-63 Essay #3 Due Online by Dec 19 at 8 PM In-class debate (See Canvas for Instructions) Text.