“Small Town in Town”

BROOKLAND

WASHINGTON DC

MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION AND
STREETSCAPE STUDY

COMPREHENSIVE REPORT CONTAINING
TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC REALM
EXISTING CONDITION ASSESSMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

FINAL REPORT
MARCH 2007

This report was prepared by David Volkert & Associates, Inc. and Michael Baker Jr., Inc. for the District
Department of Transportation, using funds from the Federal Highway Administration.

2

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

Acknowledgements

District Department of Tansportation (DDOT)
Project Manager:
Sharlene Reed
Ward 5 Transportation Planner
District Department of Transportation
2000 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20009

Consultant Team:

David Volkert & Associates, Inc.
William Carlson
5400 Shawnee Road

2006 ASLA Merit Award

Alexandria, VA 22312
with:

Michael Baker Jr., Inc.
Oliver Boehm, ASLA,RLA,LEED
Bettina D. Irps
3601 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 600
Alexandria, VA 22304

Numerous offices, local associations and individuals
devoted their time to the production of this
document. Project management was provided by
the District Department of Transportation (DDOT).
Sketch of improved 12th Street Neighborhood Retail Area.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

3

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Brookland study was initiated by the Transportation

intellectual legacy. It offers many personalities that range

Planning and Policy Administration (TPPA) section

from strong residential neighborhoods and institutional

of District Department of Transportation (DDOT) to

anchors like Catholic University of America (CUA) to

develop Transportation and Streetscape improvement

vibrant commercial corridors. Like many communities,

recommendations for this area.

it also displays some of the most challenging problems
associated with vehicular movement, pedestrian safety,

DDOT tasked David Volkert & Associates Engineering,

and streetscape aesthetics.

P.C. and Michael Baker Jr., Inc. to conduct the study.
In addition to transportation improvements, the study

The first step in unlocking 12th Street’s potential to

focuses on streetscape design to strengthen and catalyze

the liking of the community’s stakeholders, was the

economic development and vitality of the community.

instigation of an extensive public participation process.

Implementation of this project will complement the

Through a series of meetings, workshops, and community

District’s efforts to support the establishment of lasting,

walks, representatives from the residential and business

comprehensive revitalization initiatives in DC’s traditional

community, neighborhood institutions, elected officials

neighborhood business districts. As such, on behalf of

and agencies had the opportunity to be heard and get

Mayor Anthony A. Williams, the Office of the Deputy Mayor

involved. Collaboration with WMATA, utility companies,

for Planning and Economic Development launched the

Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANC), Brookland

reSTORE DC Initiative in January 2002, which designated

Community Development Corporation (CDC), 12th

12th Street N.E. as one of its “Main Streets”.

Street Main Street, students and faculty from CUA,
and Study/Technical Advisory Committees (SAC/TAC)

Over the course of the analyses, as a result of citizen

provided additional input and aided in the formation of

involvement and input from staff, the study evolved into a

the following study goals:

comprehensive multi-modal transportation planning and
streetscape study. A team of senior urban transportation
and Baker was assembled to undertake the necessary

►Reduce traffic congestion and travel
speeds

tasks. The key objectives of this study were to develop

►Improve parking supply

transportation strategies and streetscape improvements

►Promote pedestrian safety

planners, traffic engineers, and architects from Volkert

to manage various modes of travel, increase the overall
transportation efficiency, and enhance pedestrian and
vehicular safety while improving the overall aesthetics of
the urban environment.
Brookland, located in Northeast DC with 12th Street as
its central corridor, between Michigan and Rhode Island
Avenues, is a neighborhood of rolling hills, with tree-lined

►Reduce impact of truck traffic on
residential neighborhoods
►Enhance transit, bicycle, and pedestrian
access and connectivity
►Improve the public realm, enhance the
sense of place and highlight the unique
character of the community

streets, eclectic architecture, and a rich artistic and

4

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

An extensive review of the existing transportation

the existing utility poles with pedestrian level lighting

infrastructure and streetscape features was conducted

along the 12th Street corridor. Long-term improvements

to develop the basis for identifying current obstacles and

such as medians and curb extensions will take longer

future opportunities for improving mobility and safety in

than 12-24 months to implement. Furthermore, possible

Brookland .

sources of funding were identified and are discussed
in this report to address implementation of the study

The

recommendations

streetscape

for

improvements

are

transportation
a

and

culmination

recommendations.

of

active participation by and input from community

The study team created an interactive project website as

representatives, assistance from staff of DDOT-TPPA,

a tool for the public and agencies to follow the progress,

and the efforts of the study team. Where applicable,

find meeting notices, minutes, and links to relevant District

transportation related recommendations provided the

resources, download draft documents, and provide

basis for public realm improvements; they are organized

comments. This Draft Final Report is also available on the

by sub-districts to allow for context-sensitive design. A set

DC-DDOT website (access through www.ddot.dc.gov)

of recommended streetscape improvements is provided

along with other relevant project and District information.

for each of the seven sub-districts, incorporating an

Upon receipt of further public comments, appropriate

easy-to-use reference system with links to a ‘Streetscape

adjustments will be made to produce the final report.

Elements Library’. This system was developed to enable
the reader to find in-depth and technical information

The following sections provide details of the study

about the recommendations while keeping the central

methodology, analysis, findings, and the recommended

part of the document comprehensible and concise.

improvements.

An

overall

theme

of

‘sustainability’

with

social,

environmental, and economic aspects unifies the
sub-districts without compromising their individuality,
uses, appearance and functionality. Incorporation of
innovative design, such as Low Impact Development
(LID), renewable energy sources, and creative and
efficient use of landscaping are examples of this effort.
The recommendations contained herein shall provide
the District’s agencies, residents, private developers and
other stakeholders with tools to effectively improve the
transportation infrastructure and streetscape design. In
accordance with DDOT time lines, the team identified
short-term improvements for implementation within 1224 months after study completion, such as retrofitting

Sketch of improved 12th Street Neighborhood Residential Area.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

5

MADISON ST NE

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CHILLUM PL NE

20TH ST NE

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31ST ST NE

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SHERIF F RD NE

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21ST ST NE

F ST NE

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48TH ST NE

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HAMLIN ST NE

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24TH ST NE

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MO

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6

N

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11TH ST NE
10TH ST NE

H ST NE

AV

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W PL NE

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W ST NE

OA

8TH ST NE

K ST NE

AN

AV

13TH ST NE

12TH ST NE

ST

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10TH ST NE
9TH ST NE
8TH ST NE

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14
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NE
AL
PL
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FL
OR
ID
AA
M ST NE
VE
NE
L ST NE

2ND ST N

JE R

GEORGIA AVE

SO

NEWT ON ST NE
MONROE ST NE
LAWRENCE ST NE
KEARNY ST NE
JACK SON ST NE
IRVING ST NE

R ST NE

Q ST NE

NEW

16TH ST

18TH ST NE
17TH ST NE

PERRY ST NE

NE

S ST NE

NORTH CAPITOL ST

K ST NW
5TH ST NW

DR

RANDOLPH ST NE
QUINCY ST NE

QUINCY ST NE

NE

U ST NE
T ST NE

1ST ST NE

M ST NW

4TH ST NW

CH

D
KR

V ST NE

P ST NW P ST NE
O ST NW

1ST ST NW

7TH ST NW

BE
A

NE

MA C

T ST NW

4TH ST NE

8TH ST NW

MARION ST NW

4

VE
NA

SHEPHERD ST NE

RITCHIE PL NE

FRANKLIN ST NE
EVARTS ST NE
DOUGLAS ST NE
CHANNING ST NE
3RD ST NE

U ST NW

E ST NW

4A

COR
RD NE

2ND ST NW

4TH ST NW
5TH ST NW

3G

UPSHUR ST NE

TAYLOR ST NE

ST NE

N ST NW

MILITARY RD

OD
HAREWO

PL NW

AVE NW

NW
R ST
NW
5TH ST
6TH ST NW

W ST NW
V ST NW

R ST NW

T NW

C
NM

2ND ST NE

PA RK

WARDE

GE ORGIA

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ST NW

Q ST NW

ST NW
ST NW

HIG

A

WEBSTER ST NE

VARNUM ST NE
UPSHUR ST NE

B r o o k l a n d
5

S ST NW

W

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IRVING ST NW

GIRARD

BRYA NT

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HAL F PL NE

M ST NW
UPSHUR ST NW
TAYLOR ST NW

SA RG

HA
W

13TH ST NE

EMERSON ST NE

CATUR ST NW
CRITTENDE N ST NW
HANAN ST NW
ALLISON ST NW
WEBSTE R ST NW

16TH ST NE

ARRAGUT ST NW
ERSON ST NW

11TH ST NE
12TH ST NE

GALLOW AY ST NE

BR
E

8TH ST NW

RIG G
INGRAHA M ST NW
HAMILTON ST NW
GALLATIN ST NW

4

7TH ST NE

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Brookland’s Location within Washington DC

FITC

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6D
7B
8A
8B

2002 Wards

8C

8

2002 ANC Boundaries
8E

Major Roads
Water
8D

Parks
Source: Government of the District of
Columbia; Citizen Atlas Map Gallery,
prepared by the Office of Planning for DC
GIS, October 1, 2003.

6

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements......................................................2-3
Executive Summary...........................................................4
Table of Contents...............................................................7

1.
2.
3.
4.

Connectivity...................................................26
Context-Sensitive Development..................28
Special Events................................................29
Prospective.....................................................30
Overview of Short- & Long-Term
Recommendations........................................31

7.3
7.4

8.

8.6

Existing Transportation System.....................32

6.

8.7

Multi-Modal Transportation Analysis...........64
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5

8.8

Study Methodology..............................64
Traffic Engineering Analysis................65
Walking Environment...........................76
Bicycling in Brookland.........................78
Public Transit System............................80

Steetscape.....................................................82
Street Lighting & Utility Poles.........................84
Sidewalks........................................................86
Street Furnishings...........................................88
Street Trees.....................................................90
Utility Undergrounding ‘Pros’ & ‘Cons’.........92

Transportation Recommendations for
Monroe & Newton Streets
(Sub-Districts 6-7).........................................130
Public Realm Recommendations for
Monroe & Newton Streets ............................134
8.8.1 Sub-District 6
(Monroe Street Bridge).......................136
8.8.2 Sub-District 7
(Monroe & Newton Streets)................138

8.9 Streetscape Elements Library......................140
8.10 Implementation Strategy.............................154
8.11 Overview: Effective Application of
Streetscape Elements...................................156

Public Realm Existing Conditions..........................82
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6

Short- & Long-Term Recommendations.....101
The Theme: Sustainability............................104
How to use this Manual...............................106
Sub-District Plan............................................108
Transportation Recommendations for 12th
Street (Sub-District 1-5)................................110
Public Realm Recommendations for 12th
Street.............................................................118
8.6.1 Sub-District 1
(Northern Gateway)............................118
8.6.2 Sub-District 2
(Southern Gateway)...........................120
8.6.3 Sub-District 3
(Main Street Core)..............................122
8.6.4 Sub-District 4
(Neigborhood Retail)..........................126
8.6.5 Sub-District 5
(Neighborhood Residential)...............128

5.1.1 Roadway Descriptions
12th Street.............................................34
5.1.2 Roadway Descriptions
Monroe Street.......................................37
5.1.3 Roadway Descriptions
Michigan Avenue.................................40
5.1.4 Observed Roadway Conditions.........45
5.1.5 Existing Traffic Signals..........................48
5.1.6 Existing Traffic Volumes.......................49
5.1.7 Truck Loading/Unloading and
Heavy Vehicles....................................55
5.1.8 Intersection Accident History.............60
5.2

Approach........................................................94
Consideration of 4-Way Stops at
Unsignalized Intersections.............................95
Traffic Calming Measures..............................96
Transportation Recommendations for
Areas not Included in the Public Realm
Study Area......................................................98

Public Realm & Transportation
Recommendations................................................100
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Transportation Existing Conditions........................32
5.1

Transportation Recommendations.........................94
7.1
7.2

Study Area and Report.............................................8
Context, History & Forecast....................................10
Public Participation.................................................17
Vision and Challenges...........................................24
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5

5.

7.

9.
10.

List of Tables and Figures.......................................160
Technical Addendum & References...................165

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

7

1. STUDY AREA & REPORT
Figure 1-1: Map showing Brookland’s Transportation & Public Realm Study Corridors

STUDY AREAS
The Brookland/12th Street Transportation and Streetscape

► Michigan Avenue, N.E.: Approximately 2.3 miles
between North Capitol Street to the west and Eastern
Avenue to the east.

Study focuses on three (3) corridors within the Northeast
quadrant of Washington DC:
► 12th Street, N.E.: Approximately 1.2 miles between
Michigan Avenue to the north and Rhode Island
Avenue at the south.
► Monroe Street, N.E.: Approximately 1.3 miles between
Michigan Avenue to the west and South Dakota
Avenue to the east.

8

While all three corridors have been studied for transportation
related assessments and recommendations, the public
realm study area is limited to 12th Street and adjoining
areas (see figure 1-2), encompassing the following:
► 12th Street between Michigan Avenue to the north
and Rhode Island Avenue to the south.
► Approximately .3 miles of Monroe Street between 7th

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

STUDY AREA & REPORT

and 12th Street, including the Monroe Street Bridge.

Throughout the study process, a series of draft reports

► Two blocks of Newton Street connecting the was released for public review and comment. This
comprehensive draft report combines, expands and
Brookland/CUA Metro Station and 12th Street.
considers comments on three documents:
In order to tailor the recommendations to the existing
and evolving urban fabric, seven sub-districts have been
identified based on their character, predominant use, and

(1)

location within the public realm study area (see chapter (2)
8.4)
(3)

Figure 1-2: Map of
Public Realm Study
Area

Draft Existing Conditions Report, September 2005,
Public Realm Existing Conditions and
Recommendations Draft Report, June 2006, and
Recommendations for Transportation Improvements
Interim Report, June 2006.

The report has five main segments, starting with general
project descriptions, vision and challenges (chapter 14), followed by the ‘Transportation Existing Conditions
Assessment’ (chapter 5),

the ‘Public Realm Existing

Conditions Assessment’ (chapter 6), leading to the
‘Transportation Recommendations’ for areas that are
not part of the public realm study area (chapter 7),
culminating in the ‘Public Realm AND Transportation
Recommendations’ (chapter 8).
The recommendations contained herein shall provide the
District’s planners and stakeholders with tools to effectively
improve the transportation infrastructure and streetscape
design.

Chapter 8 includes conceptual transportation

modifications and design schemes for selected areas,
supplemented by a Streetscape Elements Library. Upon
receipt and incorporation of public comments, the final
report presents the foundation for the project’s next phase,
the production of design and construction documents.
Through continued cooperation among all parties involved,
the formation of public-private partnerships, and support
by existing organizations of the residential and business
communities, the implementation of recommended shortand long-term improvements will come to fruition with the
ultimate goal of establishing a functional, sustainable, and
aesthetically pleasing Brookland environment.

WHAT IS THIS DOCUMENT?

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

9

2. CONTEXT, HISTORY & FORECAST
Brookland

is

located

in

the

Northeast

quadrant of Washington DC, in Ward 5.
Situated near the outer fringes of the District,
the neighborhood strikes a balance between
the suburban communities of Maryland to the
north and the denser, urban neighborhoods
closer to the downtown. It has been described
as an “Urban Village”, with a broad mix of
low to medium density building stock and
good connections to the downtown area
via public transportation and major roads.
These factors, along with growth in demand
for housing in the District, have ensured that
the neighborhood is quickly emerging as a
desirable place to live in.

Figure 2-2: Map of rapid development of the Brookland area ca. 1890.
(Source: The Heritage of CUA. Courtesy of the American Catholic History Research Center and
University Archives, CUA)

Brookland is a late 19th and early 20th century

For most of the 19th century the Brookland area was

neighborhood and was once known as “Little Rome” or

farmland owned by the prominent Middletown, Queen,

“Little Vatican” as clerics and religious men and women

and Brooks families. Brookland takes its name from Colonel

of different orders walked around in their religious robes.

Jehiel Brooks, the early 19th century Marylander whose 150-

It is home to the largest cluster institutions (colleges,

acre farm became the heart of the middle-class community

schools, houses of study, convents, and seminaries)

that exists today.

to be found outside Rome. Among them are Catholic
University of America, the only college in the Unites States
under the direct patronage of the Vatican, the Basilica
of the National Shrine of Immaculate Conception, the
largest Catholic Church in the Western Hemisphere,
and the Franciscan Monastery.

In 1840, the Colonel and his wife Ann Margaret Queen built
an elegant brick Greek revival mansion, which still stands
at 901 Newton Street, N.E., and called it Bellair, meaning
“beautiful air”. The neighborhood’s reputation for clean,
fresh air persisted well into the 20th century.
During the American Civil War, a ring of forts was built on
the outskirts of Washington to defend the city from
the Confederate Army. Two of those forts were
located in the area. First, Fort Slemmer and second,
Fort Bunker Hill on land belonged to the Queen
and Brooks families. Later the Old Soldier’s Home
was constructed to the northwest. The population
of the city itself increased with the expansion of
the federal government.
The Brookland area evolved in the early 1870s,
when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad opened its
western branch line in this area to downtown.

Figure 2-1: Photo of Fort Slemmer during the Civil War.
Now, this area is part of CUA campus. (Source: The Heritage of CUA Courtesy of
the National Archives)

10

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

CONTEXT & HISTORY
Many

wooden

houses

–from

Victorian,

Queen Anne to Craftsman-style bungalows
– attracted government workers, Smithsonian
Institution scientists, and people of many ethnic
backgrounds.
Improved transportation helped make Brookland
an attractive place to live for urban workers.
In addition to the railroad, a second streetcar
line was built along 12th Street by 1912, serving
the

growing

residential

community.

The

streetcar helped establish 12th Street as the
neighborhood’s commercial and civic center.
In 1927, Brookland celebrated the paving of its
Figure 2-3: Aerial photo of the CUA campus and its surrounding institutions ca 1930.
(Source: The Heritage of CUA Courtesy of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate
Conception)

“Main Street”, an improvement that reflected
the increasing availability of automobiles. The
vitality of the Brookland village was made obvious

In 1887, the Catholic Church purchased the adjacent

by the construction of two movie theaters, the Jessie

Middletown estate as the site of the Catholic University

and Newton Theaters on 12th Street. The growth of

of America. The University was established just north of

the Catholic University and other catholic institutions in

the Brooks Mansion. Shortly after the Catholic Church

the area influenced the establishment of St. Anthony’s

bought the site, the heirs of Colonel Jehiel Brooks sold

Catholic Church in 1920s and St. Anthony’s high school in

the adjoining tract of land to suburban developers.

1928, founded by the Benedictine Sisters.

Developers responded to these expansions and built a
new Washington neighborhood beyond the central
city. The former Brooks estate was subdivided into
modest house-lots by developers and the former
Brooks family estate becoming a housing tract called
“Brookland”.
The presence of Catholic University attracted many
other Catholic organizations and institutions to the
area, including Trinity College, established 1897 and
the Franciscan Monastery in 1905. Construction of
the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate
Conception, to be the patron church of the Unites
States, began in 1920. Nearly 60 Catholic institutions
called the neighborhood home by 1940. What began
as an isolated village became a vibrant neighborhood
closely linked to downtown Washington in the early
20th century.
With the construction of Sherwood (1901), University
Heights, and other tracts, a middle-class “streetcar
suburb” developed, and eventually its expansion
southward met Washington’s northward.
Figure 2-4: Photo of National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception with the 329-foot
Knight’s Tower and the main building, the nation’s largest Catholic church.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

11

Kennedy); Senator Edward Brooke, who
represented Massachusetts but was a
graduate of Washington’s elite black
Dunbar High School; poet and educator
Sterling Brown; and entertainer Pearl
Bailey.
By the 1950s, Brookland was a stable
middle-class

community

with

both

black and white residents. As part of
the national freeway program, regional
planners designed a freeway connecting
the Maryland suburbs to downtown
Washington that would run through
Brookland and cut the neighborhood in

Figure 2-5: Photo of the Newton Theater.

two.

A rich African American Heritage resulted from an
expanded African American presence
in the 1930s, adding to the diversity of
Brookland. Brookland had developed into
an integrated neighborhood with many
economic classes and races, a rarity in
Washington. Of particular note are 13
international-style houses designed by
Hilyard Robinson and Howard H. Mackey,
two of Washington’s most prominent
African American architects in the 1930s.
One of their designs is the Ralph Bunche
house, built for the diplomat and Nobel
Peace Prize winner. Many other notable
black

Washingtonians

Wagner,

the

first

were

African

Robert

American

Figure 2-7: Photo of the Newton Theater Building today, occupied by CVS Pharmacy.

cabinet member (Head of the Department
of Housing and Urban Development under President

Several paths were proposed, but they generally
followed the route of the old Baltimore and Ohio
railroad. The Brookland community objected to the
proposed construction. After several years of dispute,
the community defeated the freeway proposal. Finally,
the Red Line of the city’s Metro was built on mostly buried
tracks along the proposed freeway route.
Brookland enjoys an interesting history of civic activism,
including several organizations dedicated to the arts
and natural environment. Most recently it rescued the
Colonel Brook’s mansion, which still stands near the
Brookland Metro Station, a symbol of this community and

Figure 2-6: Picture of the Scott Building and Anderson’s Cottage, U.S. Soldiers’
Home.

12

its heritage.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

CONTEXT & HISTORY

ASSETS
k
The neighborhood’s strategic location in an area with
r
strong institutional anchors like the Catholic University
of America offers the opportunity to emphasize on
and benefit from the unique neighborhood that has
maintained continuity with the past.
The presence of two metro stations –Brookland/CUA and
Rhode Island Avenue, gives Brookland the benefit of
being linked to the rest of the city and region via public
transit.

Anticipated new developments around the

metro stations along with WMATA’s access improvement
plan will increase the presence of retail, office and other
commercial uses, which will bring goods, services and
jobs closer to the community. In addition, small area
plan initiatives from the Office of Planning, planned
improvements of the Metropolitan Branch Trail along the
railroad right-of-way, and the development of the Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center will contribute to the larger
goal of ensuring socioeconomic development in the
neighborhood.
The neighborhood has a designated Main Street - 12th
Street N.E. - that serves as a retail core for its community.
A mix of shops, restaurants, religious institutions and other
services give immediate residents a gathering place.
Currently, much of this activity is focused between two
blocks – from Monroe Street to Otis Street. However,
12th street between Randolph Street and Rhode Island
Avenue has been zoned to allow low to medium
commercial development. As the neighborhood grows
and

transportation

and

streetscape

improvements

are being implemented, a greater concentration of
commercial and community services along this street
will create a vibrant environment for the neighborhood’s
residents and businesses.
One of Brookland’s obvious assets is its park-like setting,
which, if maintained throughout the 12th Street corridor,
will significantly enhance the appeal of the community.
The pedestrian environment in the residential areas is
generally pleasant and walkable, characterized by
wide tree cover over sidewalks, with semi-detached
and attached building types that ensure frequent “front
doors” and “porches” along the streets.

Figure 2-8: Photos of some of Brookland’s assets today.
A “small-town” commercial core, the popular restaurant and bar “Colonel
Brooks’ Tavern”, one of the well maintained and landscaped residential
areas, popular cafe on 12th Street (located within a public realm that would
benefit from sidewalk and landscape improvements).

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

13

DEVELOPMENT FORECAST
NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION

BROOKLAND

The

The

Metropolitan

Washington

growth

of

the

region

is

Council of Governments (MWCOG)

also reflected in the proposed

serves as the national capital region

development

in a number of ways including

adjacent to the Brookland area.

cooperative

future

Figure 2-11 shows projects that are

population, employment and travel

anticipated to begin the planning

conditions in the region.

Based

and permitting process in the District

on the latest forecasts by MWCOG

of Columbia in the near future. As

(Round 6.4 Cooperative Forecast,

part of all approval procedures

November 17, 2004), the Washington

(for developments that are not

metropolitan area is expected to

considered ‘by right’ as stipulated

grow significantly in the next several

by the zoning regulations), District

years.

agencies and commissions review

forecasts

of

The key findings of these

forecasts

include

the

activities

in

and

following

and adjust proposals based on

growth estimates between year

community input, land use and traffic

2000 and 2030:

impact analyses. These agencies
include the District of Columbia

Employment

Office of Planning (DCOP), the local
Area Neighborhood Commissions

► Approximately 1.3 million new
jobs would be added in the
region by 2030 (an increase of
48%).

(ANC’s),

► Of the projected growth in
employment, 48% would occur
in the inner suburbs, 22% in the
central jurisdictions, and 31%
in other jurisdictions.

(BZA), Commission of Fine Arts (CFA),

District

Department

of

of

Columbia

Transportation

(DDOT), Board of Zoning Adjudication
and the National Capitol Planning
Commission (NCPC).

► In the District of Columbia,
employment is expected to
grow by over 18%.
Households
► More than 668,400 households
would be added to the regional
total by 2030 (an increase of
more than 39%).
► Of the projected growth
in households, over 45% is
foreseen in the outer suburbs,
40% in inner suburbs, and
approximately 15% in central
jurisdictions.
► In the District of Columbia, the
total number of households is
expected to increase by over
18%.

14

Figure 2-9:
Comprehensive Plan
“Existing Land Use” Map
for the Brookland Area.
Source: District Office of
Planning.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

CONTEXT & HISTORY

CONCLUSION
The

estimated

growth

for

the

Washington metropolitan region is
considerable and will place greater
demand on the transportation and
streetscape infrastructure, both on
the regional and community level.
Therefore, it becomes even more
critical to encourage use of nonauto modes of transportation. In an
effort to account for the anticipated
growth, the recommendation sections
of this reports discuss provisions for
enhanced pedestrian safety and
accessibility, bicycle facilities, and
intersection improvements with a goal
of achieving a “C” level of service
during peak hours (i.e., creating
some “reserved capacity” today to
accommodate some of the future
growth in travel demand).

Figure 2-10:
Comprehensive Plan
“Generalized Land Use”
Map for the Brookland
Area.
Source: District Office of
Planning.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

15

In a publication distributed by the District Office of

When considering an approximate two-mile radius, the

Planning at a public meeting for the Brookland/CUA Metro

following project should be added:

Station Area Plan project (February 2007), twenty-one (21)
projects with varying statuses (proposed, planned, underr 

Emerson Park

construction, or completed) were identified to potentially 

The Basilica Lofts 

McMillan Sand Infiltration Site 

Fort Totten Park, Phase I and II 

Madeline Gardens 

Former Fairfield Residential Site 

Old Soldiers Home Redevelopment

affect the Brookland area.
The following nine projects are located within a proximate
one-mile radius of the Brookland/CUA Metro station
(please see map below): 

Rhode Island Place 

Luke C. Moore Senior High School

Please contact the District Office of Planning for more 

1386 Bryant Street

detailed information regarding the above mentioned 

Irving Street Conference Center 

Rhode Island Avenue Gateway 

1300 Rhode Island Avenue 

Apartments of Brookland 

YES! Organic Food Market 

New Retail at Rhode Island

RD

MADISON ST NE

S RD

NE

CHILLUM PL NE

EMERSON ST NE

H
E
N
ST
TA

N
ST

D

28TH ST NE
30
TH

31ST ST NE

LN

E

BU

RG

V ST NE

NS

CONIFE

DE

E

N

NE

PL N

R

22ND ST NE

O

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C

RD

N
LI

R RD NE

RD NE

E
AV
S TIA
CO

KE
N

IL

AN
A

FITCH PL NE

DIX ST
NE
BROOKS
ST NE

AMES ST NE

EAST CAPITOL ST

A ST SE

AS

TS
E

B ST SE

C ST SE

C ST SE

Figure 2-11: Map showing 1-mile radius around Brookland/CUA Metro station

16

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

50TH ST NE

E
EN
AV

NE

TA

ST

SO
NE

35
TH

MIN

42ND ST NE

T

14TH PL NE

19TH ST NE

1ST ST NE

7

CLAY PL NE

48TH ST NE

E

44TH ST NE

NE

IA
ST

SE

N

49TH ST NE

PL

CO

Y

HAYES ST NE
HAYES ST NE

T

A
AN

FW

E

AN

CLAY ST NE
BLAINE ST NE

JAY ST NE

N

GR

17TH PL NE

14TH ST NE

C ST SE

BAY ST SE

ST

EA DS ST
NE

A ST SE

INDEPENDENCE AVE SE

TE

MEADE ST NE
LE E ST
NE

SHERIF F RD NE

ST

E ST NE

O

LANE PL NE

NE

S

FO

EAST CAPITOL ST

A ST SE

ST

E
AY

F ST NE

H

LANG PL NE

16TH ST NE

CONSTITUTION AVE NE

M ST NE

E
EN
AV
ND
LA E
N
RY
MA I S T
H ST NE
BE NN
ING R
GALES
D NE
ST N
E

15TH ST NE

C ST SE

C ST NE

NE

Y

F ST NE
E ST NE

A ST NE

CRABTREE RD NE

RD

26TH ST NE

G ST NE

6

T

JA

NE

13TH ST NE

C ST NE

EE
NS
TN
E
TE
NE S S
T
MO
A
RS L ST NE
ES
N
TN E
E

21ST ST NE

H ST NE

D ST NE

LI
VE

QU

DIVISION AVE NE

ME ADOW

EN

E

AV

NE

O R 45 TH
ST
TH
NE
AV
E
NE

NE

BL
A

HICK EY LN NE

W

LN
L R
D NE

T

NCO

R

9TH ST NW

FO

IE

OA

11TH ST NE
10TH ST NE

K ST NE

5TH ST SE

C ST SW

VE

L ST NE

6TH ST NE

C ST SW

NE

AA

I ST NE

1ST ST S

JEFFERSON DR SW
INDEPENDENCE AVE SW

NW

C ST NW

AVE

D ST NW

RID

8TH ST NE

SEY

D ST NW

VI
S

NE

FL
O
M ST NE

2ND ST NE

JE R

10TH ST NW

E ST NW

24TH ST NE

LP
L

1ST ST NE

NEW

5TH ST NW

4TH ST NW

I ST NW
H ST NW

E

E

NE

NORTH CAPITOL ST

1ST ST NW

7TH ST NW

K ST NW

ST

Approximate 1-mile radius
T NE
E
around
Brookland/CUA
Metro
M
O
UN
Station
NE
T
O
A
OK

E
NE
TN
ST
SS

O ST NW

M ST NW

W ST NE

33 RD

W
NE

P ST NW

K ST NW

2

AV

U ST NE
T ST NE

N ST NW

L ST NW

TA

V ST NE

ADAMS ST NE

PL NE

MARION ST NW

R ST NW
Q ST NW

MADISON DR NW

C ST SW

T ST NW

S ST NW
W

8TH ST NW

12TH ST NW

14TH ST NW

13TH ST NW

G ST NW
F ST NW

U ST NW

E

H ST NE

W ST NW
V ST NW

S ST NW

Q ST NW

O

T NE

D
CHAN
RD ST NE

T ST NW

AN

HAMLIN ST NE

4TH ST NW
5TH ST NW

V ST NW

U ST NW

HIG

GIRAR

2ND ST NW

11TH ST NW

W ST NW
V ST NW

C
MIC

ST NW

BRYA NT

OTIS ST NE

RD NE

1

OD
HAREWO

NE
N
E

E

EUCLID ST NW

T NW
IRVING ST

PL NW
NW
R ST
NW
5TH ST
6TH ST NW

GIRARD ST NW

PA RK

RD NW
COLUM BIA

AVE NW

RK
PA
KENYO N ST NW

WARDE

GE ORGIA

NW
RD

E

O

NW
OTIS PL NW

NE

O

E

UR
U
R ST
S T NE

SHEPHERD ST NW
RANDOLPH ST NW
QUINCY ST NW

ES

AV

I

W

A

AI

W

W

VARNUM ST NW
UPSHUR ST NW
TAYLOR ST NW

NT

IO

HA
W

6TH ST
S NE

FARRAGUT ST NW
EMERSON ST NW
DECATUR ST NW
CRITTENDE N ST NW
BUCHANAN ST NW
ALLISON ST NW
WEBSTE R ST NW

H ST NE

GALLOW AY ST NE

BR
E

9TH ST NW

8TH ST NW

13TH ST NW

RIG G
INGRAHA M ST NW
HAMILTON ST NW
GALLATIN ST NW

4

5T
H

MADISON ST NW
LONGFE LLOW ST NW

ST

NICHOLSON ST NW

H ST NE
ST NE

KA
NS
AS
AV
EN
1ST ST NW
W

ONEIDA ST NE

NW

OGLETHORPE ST NW

NE

NW
PL

IR

13 T
H

A
BL

PL
N

SHERIDAN ST NW
RITTENHOUSE ST NW
QUACKENBOS ST NW
PEABODY ST NW

1S
T

TUCKERMAN ST NW

E

impact analyses.

3RD ST NW

Avenue

projects, future development proposals, regulations and

B ST SE

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

3. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
The Brookland Transportation and Streetscape Study

Throughout the study, events were announced and

has relied heavily on public participation, where

advertised in advance using meeting notices, postcards,

community input has formed the basis of the technical

flyers, and website postings to communicate project

recommendations. The public participation process

information and obtain community input.

involves residents, Advisory Neighborhood Commissions
(ANCs), Brookland CDC, 12th Street Main Street, students
and faculties from the Catholic University of America,
business owners and other stakeholders in and around

Community Walk

the study area (see chart below). They have collectively

Approximately 25 attendees, including residents, business

helped the study team define and document the

owners, ANC members and DC agencies’ staff attended

community’s concerns and recommendations.

the walk to identify various transportation and streetscape

KEY PARTICIPANTS & STAKEHOLDERS:













ANC’s
Merchants
Residents
CUA Administration
Trinity Administration
Providence Hospital
Hospital for Sick Children
John Paul II and Basilica
Brookland Main Street
Brookland Community Development
Corporation
District Government Agencies
Federal Government Agencies
WMATA (Washington Metropolitan
Area Transit Authority
PEPCO

Figure 3-1: Photo of Brookland’s community walk participants.

concerns along the 12th Street N.E .corridor on Saturday,
December 9, 2004 (see photos on next page). The walk
started at the Koubek Auditorium (The Catholic University
of America), continued on Monroe Street to 12th Street
N.E. The study team documented existing conditions,
which are shown in photographs throughout the report
and summarized in chapter 5 and 6.
Some of the neighborhood representatives played a
crucial role in engaging the local businesses along the

With the release of this report, the general public has

corridor and soliciting their inputs. This community walk

once again the opportunity to review and comment

also provided an opportunity to distribute the study

upon all study findings and recommendations, and thus

questionnaires to Brookland’s residents, business owners,

continues to play a crucial role in the decision making

and transit riders.

process. To fully engage residents, elected leaders, retail
operators, real estate developers, and other stakeholders,
the study continues to offer various public involvement
opportunities, such as meetings, a community workshop,
and an interactive website (access through www.ddot.
dc.gov).

Community Workshops
As part of the effort to set up a comprehensive
development strategy to integrate 12th Street’s streetscape
with its transportation needs, the study team met with

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

17

members of the community and other stakeholders on the

At each learning station, the public was presented

6th and 10th of November 2004 in the cafeteria of the St.

with the issues/ concerns pertaining to the corridor,

Anthony’s School.

and opportunities for improvements. Visual material

Each day, various transportation and streetscape topics
were presented. The participants were encouraged to walk

depicting the existing conditions of the corridor and
potential changes were put on display.

around, and at their convenience browse information at

In addition, participants had opportunities to interact

various learning stations. These learning stations covered

with the study team in a group setting and on a one-on-

the following topics:

one basis. Discussions with the community focused on

• Streetscape, Public Realm and Public Art,

defining a unique identity and character for the corridor;
use of open space and right-of-way allocation.

• Vehicular Circulation and Parking,
• Transit Services,
• Bicycle and Pedestrian Network, and
• Zoning.

Figure 3-2: Photos of community walk and workshop.

18

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
Ward 5 Transportation Summit

Eckington)

A Ward 5 Transportation Summit was conducted on

• 9th Street Bridge

Saturday, December 11, 2004 to provide residents and

• Farmer’s Market

other attendees with information about ongoing projects
in the Ward 5 area. The public raised their concerns and
gave their opinions based on each project presentation.
These projects include:

Study Advisory Committee (SAC)
To establish continuous communication between the
community and the study team, a Study Advisory

• Brentwood Road N.E. Transportation Study

Committee (SAC) was formed by DDOT. The SAC’s primary

• Brookland Transportation and Streetscape Study

role is to help coordinate a smooth, efficient study process

• North Capitol Street Transportation Study

that is equitable, enjoys broad community participation,
and results in plans and policies that are realistic and

• New York Avenue Study

achievable. Along with community representatives, the

• Traffic Calming Studies (Turkey Thicket and 5th Street,

SAC also consists of members from other District agencies,

South Dakota Avenue, Bryant Street, Okie Street,

private development interests, and local authorities
involved in the following related initiatives:
• Washington
(WMATA)

Metropolitan

transit

Area

enhancement

Transit
plans

Authority’s
along

the

Corridor,
• Pedestrian and bicycle improvement programs,
• Brookland Community Development ,
• Brookland Small Area Planning Initiative,
• 12th Street Main Street Improvements.

Technical Advisory Committees (TAC)
In Spring of 2006, DDOT assembled a Streetscape and
Transportation Technical Advisory Committee to address
specific concerns that arose during the planning process.
Attendees included specialists from various District agencies,
the restoreDC office, WMATA, as well as representatives from
the residential and business community, Brookland CDC, HSC
Pediatric Center, and the Greater Brookland Garden Club.
Draft reports were distributed and posted on the study website
one week prior to the meetings, during which the study team
presented study findings and recommendations. Detailed
information about outstanding technical issues such as those
related to overhead utility wires were provided by PEPCO.
Open discussions and interactive conceptual drafting helped
the study team recognize the need to expand analyses of
certain areas. This comprehensive draft report reflects the
concerns and input collected during the TAC meetings.
Figure 3-3: Photos of community workshop.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

19

The following table lists public comments that were noted during the public involvement process. The
numbers correspond to the locations indicated on figure 3-4 (please see next page).

12th & Monroe Streets- Streetscape

Michigan Avenue - Transportation

Comments

Comments

1

Monroe and Michigan as a Gateway.

1

Bus stop – on N. Capitol Street off Michigan Avenue.

2

Gateway at Monroe Bridge.

2

3

Median/green island in the middle of Monroe St., west of 12th Street
to Michigan Avenue.

Add additional left turn lane from Michigan Avenue to N. Capitol
Street. Currently has one left turn lane – make middle lane an
optional left lane (i.e. through/left).

4

Monroe Street bridge art looks trashy. Replace with stone veneer.

3

Two arrows for turning on Michigan & N.Capitol Streets.

5

Improve bridge treatment at Michigan and Monroe bridges.

4

6

Narrow sidewalk along Monroe Street from 9th to 12th Streets.
Pedestrian feel unsafe with fast cars close to them.

Need Gateway sign (Welcome to Brookland) as entering easterly
onto Michigan Ave from N.Capitol Street.

5

Gateway Signing – Welcome to Brookland.

6

Park Place condominiums: exiting from condos onto Michigan
Avenue & entrance/exit to Park Place is blocked. “Don’t Block the
Box” is needed! And make right turn (exiting Park Place condos)
only during peak hours.

7

Stop sign/light at Park Place.

8

Painted box with entrance & exit box.

9

Traffic speeds coming from Irving Street onto Michigan Avenue need
to slow down. Cars are traveling very fast on Irving with interstate
speeds (40-50 mph) then make the light onto Michigan Avenue
and don’t slow down to lower speeds (25 mph posted speed limit).
Collisions happen here at Irving/Michigan.

7

Public Art at Metro Stations.

8

No bike rack at Metro stop. The old ones are rusted out and served
as seats for groups of kids in the afternoon.

9

Include Newton Street as part of the study.

10 Improve pedestrian access to Brookland Metro Station from Newton
Street.
11 Entrance marker at Newton and 10th Streets.
12 Possible grandstand on metro property.
13 Light at Farmers market.
14 Community garden gateway at northeast corner of 10th and
Michigan Avenue.
15 Tie together Recreation Center and open space at 12th Street/
Michigan Avenue and 10th Street/Michigan Avenue.
16 Park/open space at the northeast corner of 12th Street and Michigan
Avenue. Intersection is dark and needs improvements.
17 Welcome sign/gateway to Brookland Community at 12th Street
and Michigan Ave intersection.
18 Check condition of sidewalk in Perry Street, west of Michigan
Avenue.
19 Otis Street east of 12th Street is dark and feels unsafe.
20 Otis Street west of 12th Street has narrow sidewalk.
21 Town Square at 12th and Newton Streets.
22 Special pavement on 12th Street at the main retail area (Monroe to
Otis Streets).
23 Bulb-outs at the intersection at the main retail area (Monroe to Otis
Streets).
24 Newton Street east of 12th Street has uneven pavements.
25 Need façade treatment guidelines. Grilles make neighborhood
appear dangerous, especially at 12th and Newton Streets.
26 More bike racks along 12th Street, especially in business area.
27 Pedestrian lights on sidewalk to improve pedestrian safety at night.
Context sensitive “neighborhood” type roadway light.
28 HPC pipe for tree base protection in grass strip areas.
29 Grass strip requires maintenance. Unmaintained lawns and planting
areas create problems.
30 Would like to maintain residential atmosphere.
31 Bring 12th Street tree planting within the context of the overall
Brookland urban forestry framework.
32 Trees are sometimes planted too close to utility poles, light poles,
and signage.
33 Provide maximum growing conditions for tree roots including soil
under pavement and increase soil volume in planting beds.
34 A consistently healthy tree stand on both sides along 12th Street.
Make 12th Street very green. Create canopy with large trees.
35 A cohesive streetscape design theme to tie in all of 12th Street.
36 Create retail nodes to attract residents and people from outside the
community.
37 A designated parade- festivity route along 12th St. with electrical
outlets and water system for green spaces.

10 4th Street (northbound) onto Michigan Ave (eastbound): remove
“right turn on arrow only” sign at northbound 4th Street onto
Michigan Avenue; make it “No Turn on Red”.
11 During the community walk: noted pedestrian crossing at 7th Street
and Michigan Avenue located dangerously at east leg of Michigan
Ave rather than west leg which has the crosswalk and pedestrian
signal head--Michigan Avenue sightline vertical sight distance issue coming from the east over the bridge.
12 Should show traffic to new Recreation Center (Turkey Thicket). Also
new entrance? Where is it?
13 The new Turkey Thicket Recreation Center opens in spring 2005.
Kids in the neighborhood. Bicyclists and pedestrians need to get
across to 12th Street area. Needs more definition.
14 Safety along 10th Street on the North side of Michigan Avenue
alongside Turkey Thicket Rec Center location. Drugs are sold there
a lot.
15 Truck traffic hitting seams causes vibration and noise on Michigan
Avenue throughout (“post-it” noted near 12th and 13th Streets).
16 Last winter, Michigan Avenue was very dark because no working
street lights between 12th and 13th Streets.
17 AM Michigan Ave (westbound) at Taylor Street: commuters can’t
turn left onto 13th Street; thus turn left onto 14th Street to get to
Shepherd Street to get back onto 13th Street; problem is then on
Shepherd Street-need to discourage traffic from using Shepherd
(AM issue).
18 13th / Michigan / Taylor – crash corner: accidents often 1 per weekend.
19 A curb cut needed at NW corner of Michigan Avenue & Sargent
Road NE.
20 Need curb cut at northwest corner of Michigan Ave and Sargent
Road; bike and handicap issue.
21 13th Place on north side of Michigan Avenue (in triangle between
Upshur/13th Place/Michigan) trees interfere with visibility; remove
trees.
22 South on Michigan Ave turning left on 14th Street going too fast.
23 The intersection of Michigan Avenue and South Dakota has a lot
of accidents. You can see the green light at the next intersection
when going northbound.
24 South Dakota / Michigan – many crashes in non peak hours.
25 NB South Dakota Avenue at Michigan Avenue near side signal and
far side signal seem to not work together.
26 Bike path along Michigan Avenue from Varnum to South Dakota
is clear but after South Dakota (west side of) seems unclear/
disjointed.

38 Planting basket with floral displays hanging from light poles.
39 Maintain the experience between a high green density space
versus a high commercial density space.
40 Make 12th Street more bike friendly with bike lanes.
41 Underground utility lines.
42 Possible logo “Small town in town”.
43 Community has banners; banners could be big part of public art,
and create a sense of place.

20

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Monroe Street - Transportation

12th Street - Transportation

Comments

Comments

1

Please brighter lights Monroe at 7th Streets to 7th & Franklin Streets
NE 20017-1403.

1

Streetscape & Economic Development. How does streetscape help
economic development.

2

When we arrived to the 9th & Monroe Street intersection one resident
(who has worked many years for WMATA – since then retired) notes
that the metro bus station on the north side of 9th Street could
share the station with commuters/vehicles since the buses are
around 20 minutes apart and there aren’t many buses using this
station….may help improve the higher traffic volumes down 10th
Street; maybe the bus station can allow exiting southbound from
the 9th & Monroe Street intersection—hence they’d enter from the
north side of that station and continue through drop-off/pick-up
and exit southbound at 9th/Monroe Streets.

2

Transportation study and infrastructure improvements – clarify
where streetscape is taking place.

3

Ban trucks on 12th Street on the north side of Michigan Avenue;
buses are very loud.

4

Also, there needs to be some rules on siren use of ambulances from
12 midnight – 6 a.m.

5

Get rid of the gingko trees on 12th Street & Perry Street. Replace
with cherry blossoms.

3

Monroe Street from 9th to 12th Street is too narrow for 4 lanes but is
used as 4 lanes. Walking and lighting is poor.

6

4

During community walk, some respondents commented that the
Monroe Street bridge going to 12th Street does not provide
adequate visibility to moving vehicles heading down from the
bridge crest. The group noted a pedestrian crossing (at the west
side of the 8th & Monroe Streets intersection) at the foot of the bridge
and they wished there was a way to slow down vehicle traffic.

12th Street from Michigan to Perry:
Traffic must come up over a hill and includes a curve. Traffic
travels very fast in this area. Traffic is unable to negotiate the curve if
speeding. My car was parked between Otis & Perry and was totally
destroyed by a speeding car that could not negotiate the curve
traveling at 60 mph. * Even rumble strips would help.

7

12th Street between Perry and Otis Streets (east side of 12th Street)
– double parking occurs in front of Day Care facility.

8

Need for a 4 way stop sign at the intersection of 12th & Newton
Streets. It is dangerous for pedestrians as well as motorists – driver
has to come too far into line of traffic before venturing across.
Trucks park at corners which block one’s view.

9

12th Street and Newton Street: horrible, need 3 way stop.
West leg of Newton is one way westbound. Currently, this intersection
is two-way.

5

The Monroe Street bridge needs work.

6

Monroe Street between 12th Street NE and 10th Street NE has very
wide lanes in each direction – there is an opportunity to narrow the
lanes and create wide sidewalks and a tree line/median.

7

Special streetscape & lighting around Brooks Mansion in preparation
of our Historic District.

8

Increase lighting for pedestrians from Metro to Monroe & 10th
Streets (around Mansion).

9

More lighting needed for pedestrians along Monroe Street
between Michigan Ave to 12th Street.

10 Suggest widening sidewalks along Monroe Street from 8th – 12th
Streets.
11 At Monroe Street and 12th Street, westbound Monroe Street looks
like 2 lanes, but it is not 2 lanes as pass across 12th Street. Cars race
the light and are entering 1 lane on the west side of westbound
Monroe Street lanes….Wild West.
12 Monroe & 1300 Monroe Street – cited nonspecific Infrastructure
needs.
13 Please look at Monroe Street from 14th to 18th (heading north east).
There is no stop.
Getting out onto Monroe at 15th Street is always hazardous –
witness the number of accidents at that intersection. Cars & vans
are parked too close to the corners but beyond that the visibility is
very poor for anyone entering the intersection from the south side.
A stop sign would help – every other street with less traffic has stops.
This is critical.
14 15th Street & Monroe Street – can’t see traffic at intersection.
Parking too close to corner. Too much traffic/accidents. Need site
visibility improved.
15 I live at the corner of 15th & Monroe Streets, as reported in the
session this is an extremely hazardous intersection with only a one
way stop sign. Accidents are numerous and deadly. There is no
traffic speed break between the 14th & 18th Street intersection on
Monroe Street.
Traffic lights need to be put somewhere between these streets as
well as a four-way stop sign.
16 On Monroe Street – no crossing guards are located at 18th Street/
Monroe Street as well as 20th and Monroe Streets intersection in
front of Burroughs Elementary School.
17 PM/AM school traffic needs pull off for school traffic- drop
off. Comment from neighbor across the street of Burroughs
Elementary.
18 As a 17 year resident who lives on Monroe Street, I agreed with the
audience member who talked about truck & bus traffic –
illegal use of Monroe Street by buses & trucks coming from South
Dakota Avenue or Michigan Avenue, and this includes TOUR buses
to and from the Shrine, all cause increased noise, dirt in the air,
cracks on home walls.
19 Tour bus – illegal use of Monroe Street & dump trucks & trucks
illegal use.
20 Coming from Maryland (westbound) on Monroe Street – heavy
traffic, fast moving.

10 12th Street speed at Newton and Otis Streets.
11 Sidewalks down 12th Street from Otis to Monroe are very uneven
and poorly patched.
12 During the community walk:
Monroe & 12th Street have heavy bus traffic and perhaps need
improved geometry; noted the buses turning closely along the
curb line (right turn from 12th Street southbound onto Monroe Street
westbound).
Monroe & 12th Street – left turn signal head from Monroe Street
(eastbound) onto 12th Street (northbound); 4th signal head
(bottom) seems to not be in use; the green left arrow phasing
wasn’t observed while we were there nor AM/PM rush hour phasing
(via DDOT Synchro); perhaps this was used in the past or is there if
deemed necessary in the future.
13 12th Street – pedestrian can’t get across Monroe Street – its just
terrible.
14 I definitely would like benches on 12th Street near the businesses.
Make them wavy so can’t sleep on them.
15 Bike rack by CVS on 12th Street – please.
16 Are there any opportunities for public (free or metered) parking off
of 12th Street? For example, land behind CVS.
17 People park their cars beyond the legal limits.
18 More parking at the USPO (United States Post Office) on 12th &
Monroe across the street.
19 Please include 12th Street south of Monroe Street, too.
20 My comments have been repeated and echoed throughout this
meeting. My concerns surround the safety for everyone; specifically
the lack of effective traffic control from Franklin Street up to Monroe
Street on 12th Street. There are no stop signs to slow the speed of
motorists and allow the pedestrians the ability to cross from East to
West. I live on 12th Street and often if I park on the opposite side
of where I live, it takes long moments before I can cross. Then it’s
dangerous to do so. We need more 4-way stop signs.
21 At 12th and Irving Streets, NE, a 4-way stop sign should be
considered. Children cross there going to school.
22 All Way Stop Control (AWSC) needed on 12th Street from Monroe
Street to Franklin Street. Speeds are too fast. Traffic Calming needed. 4 way stops.

Table 3-1: Public Comments

21 Moreover, vibrations from buses and large trucks are ruining our
homes. Monroe Street needs to be redone in terms of surfacing.
22 Streets are falling apart. Paved 1 time in 16 years (1991).

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

21

22

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
Figure 3-4: Map of Public Comments/Specific
Issues
Refer to previous page (Table 3-1 ) for enumerated legend.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

23

4. VISION & CHALLENGES
12th STREET COULD ...
... BE A “MAIN STREET” WITH IMPROVED CONNECTIVITY AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT THAT
ACCOMMODATES ALL MODES OF TRANSPORTATION.
Improved connectivity with areas to the west, which are currently cut of by the Metro- and heavy rail tracks, will benefit the businesses
along 12th Street. Designated Bike routes, bus lanes and enhanced pedestrian crossings may result in increased activity and safety.

Figure 4-1: Photos showing various travel modes (locations vary).

... BE A SAFE, VISUALLY STIMULATING, PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT FOR
RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES PATRONS.
12th Street N.E. can serve as a much-needed gathering place for members of the surrounding neighborhoods and institutions. Given
its commercial zoning, the street can serve the needs of the business community. Variety in businesses and facilities, and a unique
streetscape environment can provide a convenient and memorable retail experience. Creating a context-sensitive public realm
that is unique to Brookland enhances its identity that is derived from the history and visual assets of the neighborhood and institutions.

Figure 4-2: Photos showing public realms that are aesthetically pleasing and serving multiple uses (locations vary).

... SPUR PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENTS AND ECONOMIC GROWTH.
12th Street N.E. can play an important role in the District’s efforts to create stronger neighborhoods. Eventually these recommendations
will lay a framework for public infrastructure investments, which will attract private sector development and spur economic growth.

Figure 4-3: Photos showing how businesses benefit from a vibrant public realm (locations vary).

24

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

VISION AND CHALLENGES
CURRENT ISSUES
Based on assessments of Brookland’s existing conditions, the
following concerns stood out in regards to travel modes and
the surrounding public realm:
Automobile Traffic - Speeding is one of the community’s major
concerns; traffic calming solutions need to be site specific
and business friendly. Many existing traffic signals are in need
of upgrades to comply with the latest standards. Traffic signal
timing adjustments are necessary at several intersections to
improve peak-hour levels of service. At some of the locations
within the study area, pavement markings and traffic signs are

Figure 4-4: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro station’s approach.

faded and need to be replaced.
Bicycles - Currently, there are no bicycle lanes within the
Brookland study area The bicycle racks at the Brookland Metro
station are in need of repair and should be expanded to areas
along 12th Street.
Public Transit - While Brookland is well served by Metro rail and
buses, the bus shelters do not currently have seating available
for passengers.
In general, the quality of the pedestrian environment along
12th Street is insufficient in terms of space, condition and

Figure 4-5: Photo of uneven sidewalks along 12th Street, N.E.

maintenance and does not provide for a pleasing and vibrant
Main Street. Pedestrian access to both Metro stations lacks in
quality and understanding of natural walking paths. The same
holds true for pedestrian links to several institutions, landmarks
and neighborhoods west of the Metropolitan Branch Trail. If the
Main Street is to fully capitalize on its catchment area, which
includes CUA (see Figure 4-14), these linkages will need to be
enhanced.
The Main Street is characterized by uneven sidewalks and trees
that are insensitively pruned to make way for overhead utility
cables. The sidewalks are dimly lit, with light focused on the

Figure 4-6: Photo of pruned trees to accommodate overhead utility
cables.

roadway. Store front signage is uncoordinated and some blocks
south of Monroe Street have large building facades with few
front doors on them, which give the impression of a deserted
street.
Despite the inconsistent quality of the existing pedestrian
environment, the over-all picture for the neighborhood and
its Main Street is positive. Residential property prices are on
the rise, and once recommendations for the public realm
are implemented by various District agencies, Brookland will
become a cohesive, vibrant District neighborhood that benefits
from its own special identity.

Figure 4-7: Photo of street lighting with focus on roadway, dimly lit
sidewalks.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

25

4.1 Connectivity and Reducing Barriers
At the regional level, Brookland may be accessed by Metro, Poor

pedestrian

and is connected by two major roadways – Michigan impediments
Avenue and Rhode Island Avenue, to its north and south public

to

realm

12th

environments
Street’s

are

connectivity.

recommendations

and

severe
While
funding

respectively. While these Avenues offer cars quick access should be focused on 12th Street, ignoring these
to 12th Street and to the neighborhoods, they lack in impediments will limit its role as a Main Street.
convenient and safe pedestrian crossings, and more
importantly, do not adequately announce the beginning
of an important Main Street environment.
The longitudinal orientation of the Metro and heavy rail

* Locations vary.

tracks separates the Brookland community from the nearby
neighborhoods and institutions to the west; pedestrian
access is infrequent and in rundown condition. At Franklin
Street, the bridge across the Metropolitan Bike Trail (MBT) is
used chiefly by vehicles and offers poor lighting levels and
sidewalks.
Another important entryway, the Brookland Metro station,
currently displays a design that focuses on vehicular
circulation rather than natural pedestrian travel ways. It
offers no visible connection or link to Brookland’s commercial

Figure 4-10: Photo of pedestrian bridges for safe and convenient access
over streets and train tracks*.

center that lies just two blocks to the west.

Figure 4-11: Photo of designated bike lanes, secured and enhanced by
bollards, planters, different pavings or colors*.

Figure 4-8: Photo of Michigan Avenue Bridge today, looking west.

Figure 4-12: Photo of public space.
Continuous sidewalks with a minimum width of six feet, pedestrian
refuge and gathering areas, and space for bike racks can create multifunctional and appealing environments*.

Figure 4-9: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station today, looking east
onto Newton Street.

26

Figure 4-13: Photo of entrance gates or markers announcing the
community and commercial district*.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

ENHANCED
CONNECTIVITY

BROOKLAND’S
BARRIERS

VISION AND CHALLENGES

Roadway Barrier
Limited connectivity
between the
Brookland community
and areas to the west,
e.g.:
Catholic University
and
Trinity College.

Metro Station
(Brookland/CUA)

Metro & Heavy Rail
Tracks Barrier

Metro Station (Rhode
Island Avenue)

Roadway Barrier

Create Gateway
10-Minute Walking
Radius (approx.
1/2 mile)
Enhance Access/Gateways
through Bridge Improvements
Commercial Center of 12th Street
(Designated Main Street)

Capitalize on Brookland/
CUA Metro Station: Improve
Pedestrian Access &
Announce Brookland’s
Commercial Center

Enhance Access
& Pedestrian
Travelways from and
to the west & east.

Enhance Access & Safety
through Bridge Improvements
Create Gateway

Figure 4-14: Maps showing Brookland’s vicinity, barriers and enhanced
connectivity.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

27

4.2 Context-Sensitive Development

COMMON GOALS FOR 12TH STREET
IMPROVEMENTS:

►Build on the assets of the
neighborhood, such as the
small town, park-like setting,
eclectic mix of architectural and
streetscape features, and strong
community stewardship.
►Address the challenges the
street faces today, including
insufficient pedestrian safety,
traffic congestions, a lack of
multi-modal transportation
strategies, and the need for
community places.
►Create an open space
framework that recognizes
variations in adjoining uses AND
creates a cohesive character for
the street.
►Create a sense of arrival to the
street at the major points of
entry - to the West, North and
South.
►Develop a visually distinct
character for the Main Street,
derived from the street’s
adjoining areas, to foster a sense
of belonging.

28

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

VISION AND CHALLENGES
4.3 Special Events
The Brookland community is strong and dedicated, one that values
and appreciates the area’s history, assets and challenges. Numerous
neighborhood organizations foster community participation, artistic,
cultural, and environmental awareness. Active residents and business
owners have organized farmers markets and social events such as the
‘House and Garden’ tour.
However, due to the lack of space
in Brookland’s natural center, the
2-block stretch of 12th Street north
of Monroe Street, there is little room
to bring together large groups to
celebrate and display community
efforts. Currently, Brookland has
little means to promote, strengthen
and support the small and micro
business community of 12th Street.
Special

events and specialty programs are ways to advocate,

educate and increase networking opportunities. Community festivals
celebrate city living and showcase the neighborhood’s best features.
Time spent among neighbors encourages stewardship while enjoying
fun-filled, family activities.
Figure 4-16: Photos of Farmers Markets, various cities.

12th Street is capable of hosting such events and supportive
streetscape
furnishings,

elements
open

landscape
accents
in

the

such

space

enhancements

should

be

as

design,
and

considered

recommendations

and

implementation of transportation and
streetscape improvements. 12th Street
between Monroe and Otis Streets
stands out as a potential space for
gatherings due to its wide sidewalk
Figure 4-15: Photos of special
events, various cities.

widths, particularly around the Newton
Street

intersection.

Cooperation

between the District and property
owners is essential prior to undertaking
any improvements.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

29

4.4 Prospective
District’s Small Area Plan update, special attention will
be paid to the vicinity around the Brookland/CUA Metro
Station. The studies will examine accessibility and safety
around the station, development needs and potential,
zoning, and urban design improvements to further
enhance the Brookland community. Information may be
obtained at the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority
(WMATA) and the District Office of Planning.
With this transportation and streetscape study, DDOT
intends to analyze and propose a plan that facilitates
Figure 4-17: Photo of 12th Street displaying a lack of maintenance. Wide sidewalks
offer great improvement potential.

improved movement of all modes of transportation along
the 12th Street corridor and on congruent streets such as
Michigan Avenue and Monroe Street.

The commercial district in Brookland provides for the

The District is committed to making transportation and

basic needs of its customers. The area should be thriving

public realm improvements in the corridor/study area in

given the support expressed by Brookland residents and

order to prioritize transit, pedestrian and bicyclist needs. A

its proximity to large institutions that should theoretically

such, short-term improvements, including planters, striping,

provide a strong customer base. In addition, 12th Street has

and some curb modifications can be accomplished within

become the connecting corridor to the Brentwood Road

the next 12 to 24 months. New sidewalks, re-configurations

Shopping Center that houses Giant and Home Depot.

of intersections, burial of overhead utility wires, road

This development has resulted in significant increases in

widening, and street tree planting are considered long-

pedestrian and vehicular traffic, with 12th Street carrying

term improvements that require longer than 12 to 24

more than 11,000 vehicles per day.

months to be implemented (please refer to the opposite

In order to accommodate and benefit from the increased
traffic, Brookland needs a multi-modal transportation
management

plan

and

a

series

of

streetscape

page and chapter 8.1 for additional and project-specific
examples).
A

preliminary

implementation

strategy

for

the

improvements to strengthen and catalyze its economic

recommended improvements, including a time line,

development and vitality while maintaining the residential

engineering cost estimates, and possible funding sources,

character of some areas along 12th Street.

has been added under chapter 8.10.

Several District initiated and community based initiatives

Unlocking 12th Street’s potential to the liking of the

offer strategies to access funds and the technical

community will require concerted cooperation between

assistance needed

the various District agencies, neighborhood institutions

to successfully implement the

recommended improvements contained in this report.
12th Street has been designated as one of the District’s
Main Street. The Main Street program is administered by
District’s reSTORE DC office and provides assistance in the

and organizations, as well as business and property
owners. The District should soon prepare a framework
plan to affirm repetitive commitments and outline the
short- and long-term commitments.

areas of organization, design, and economic restructuring.
In addition, the 12th Street corridor has been scheduled
for resurfacing in the District’s FY-09 budget, which should
coincide with Brookland’s streetscape improvements.
As part of WMATA’s access improvement plan and the

30

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

VISION AND CHALLENGES
4.5 Overview of Short- and Long-Term Recommendations

The following list is a compilation of project-specific transportation and streetscape
improvements, designated as short- and long-term recommendations to comply with
r

DDOT implementation guidelines and as discussed in the following chapter:

k

Please refer to chapter 8 for detailed descriptions of improvement recommendations.
BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

31

5. TRANSPORTATION EXISTING CONDITIONS
5.1 Existing Transportation System
Figure 5-1: Transportation Study Corridors

32

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Chapter 5 provides a mullti-modal transportation analysis
for the following three (3) study corridors based on the
comprehensive information obtained and described
herein.

►12th Street, N.E.
►Monroe Street, N.E.
►Michigan Avenue, N.E.

The above corridors are shown on Figure 5-1. The first
of the three roadways is 12th Street, N.E. from Michigan
Avenue at the north end to Rhode Island Avenue at the
south end; it spans approximately 1.1 miles. The second
roadway is Monroe Street, N.E. from Michigan Avenue
on the west end to South Dakota Avenue on the east
end; it spans approximately 1.3 miles. The third roadway
is Michigan Avenue, N.E. from North Capitol Street on the
west end to Eastern Avenue on the east end; it spans
approximately 2.3 miles.
The following paragraphs describe the various roadways
and intersections that were included in the study. Graphic
representations accompany these descriptions.

Each

roadway within the study is classified as either a principal
arterial, a minor arterial, a collector, or a local road per
the 2003 Functional Classification Map developed by
DDOT. Descriptions of all intersection approaches within
a block of the intersection are provided.

Common

roadway intersections are located and described under
one corridor for purposes of clarity. Specifically, the 12th
Street and Monroe Street intersection and the 12th Street
and Michigan Avenue intersection are found within the
12th Street corridor description. Similarly, the Michigan
Avenue and Monroe Street intersection is found within
the Michigan Avenue corridor description.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

33

5.1.1 Roadway Descriptions - 12th Street, N.E.
Within the study area, 12th Street is a two-way, two-lane contribute a significant amount of traffic to the Brookland
minor arterial running north-south from Michigan Avenue Study area. East of 12th Street, Franklin Street has one
on the north side to Rhode Island Avenue on the south westbound approach lane and one eastbound receiving
side. 12th Street has parallel parking on the east and west lane. West of 12th Street, Franklin Street has one eastbound
sides of the street. This study corridor has been designated approach lane and two westbound receiving lanes. Right
as a “Main Street” within the District of Columbia. This turn on red is prohibited for southbound 12th Street traffic.
facility has an Average Daily Traffic (ADT) volume in excess
of 11,000 vehicles per day. The width of 12th Street along Through trucks are prohibited on Franklin Street. Franklin
the study corridor varies from 40 to 50 feet from curb to Street has a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph,
curb; the roadway width is 40 feet north of Michigan however, this speed limit is reduced to 15 mph when school
Avenue transitioning to 50 feet crossing Michigan Avenue is in session along both 12th Street and Franklin Street in
continuing towards Perry Street. Between Perry Street and the vicinity of Noyes Elementary. Parking restrictions in the
Otis Street, the roadway width once again transitions from vicinity of the intersection are as follows:
50 feet to 40 feet at the curved midpoint along 12th Street
where it maintains its 40-foot width until Douglas Street. •

Parking is not permitted west of 12th Street, on

The width then reverts from 40 feet to 50 feet from Douglas

either side of Franklin Street.

Street to the Rhode Island Avenue intersection.

Parking is not permitted east of 12th Street, on the
south side of Franklin Street.

Parking along both sides of 12th Street consists of on-street •

On the north side of Franklin Street, east of 12th

parallel parking and parking with meters between Otis

Street, non-residents may park for 2 hours from 7:00

and Monroe Streets. Regulation of the on-street parking

AM to 8:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

varies with respect to time and duration and is typical of •

Adjacent to this intersection along 12th Street, north

the other sections along 12th Street.

of Franklin Street, parking is typically permitted for
non-residents for 2 hours from 7:00 AM to 8:30 PM,

The signalized intersections along 12th Street within the

Monday through Friday.

study corridor are Michigan Avenue, Monroe Street, Franklin •

Adjacent to this intersection along 12th Street,

Street and Rhode Island Avenue as shown on Figure 5-3.

parking along the west side of 12th Street is allowed

Signs prohibiting through trucks over 1 ¼ ton capacity are

for 1 hour from 7:00 AM to 6:30 PM, Monday through

posted on northbound 12th Street at Michigan Avenue

Friday, in the half block south of Franklin Street.

and at Brentwood Road, one block south of Rhode Island •

Parking restrictions were not observed on the east

Avenue; similar truck prohibition signing is located along

side of 12th Street south of Franklin Street.

southbound 12th Street approaching Michigan Avenue. •

Parking is prohibited on both sides of 12th Street in

The posted regulatory speed limit for the 12th Street corridor

the half block north of Franklin Street.

is 25 mph.

12TH STREET AT FRANKLIN STREET, N.E.

12TH STREET AT MONROE STREET, N.E.
At this four-way signalized intersection, both 12th Street and

At this four-way signalized intersection, both 12th Street Monroe Street are two-lane minor arterials. Monroe Street
and Franklin Street are two-way, two-lane minor arterials. begins at Michigan Avenue and continues through South
Franklin Street within the study area terminates at Michigan Dakota Avenue (study terminus). These intersections along
Avenue and continues through Rhode Island Avenue Monroe Street contribute a significant amount of traffic to
(study terminus). These intersections along Franklin Street the Brookland Study area. East of 12th Street, Monroe Street

34

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
has two westbound approach lanes and one eastbound

6:30 PM, from Monday through Friday on the north

receiving lane. West of 12th Street, Monroe Street has one

half of the block closer to Newton Street and on

eastbound approach lane and one westbound receiving

the south half of the block closer to Monroe Street.

lane. Right turn on red is prohibited from 7:00 AM to 7:00 •

One hour parking is permitted along the west side

PM for the southbound 12th Street traffic. In addition, left

of 12th Street, north of Monroe Street, from 9:00 AM

turns are prohibited for the northbound 12th Street traffic

to 6:00 PM, Monday through Friday.

from 7:00 AM to 9:30 AM and from 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM, •

Parking is prohibited on either side of Monroe Street

Monday through Friday.

immediately east of 12th Street.

There is a short mid-block section of no parking

Signs prohibiting through trucks for westbound Monroe

along either side of 12th Street south of Monroe

Street traffic are posted at 15th Street and Monroe Street.

Street at the Post Office.

Signs prohibiting through trucks over 28,000 lbs gross vehicle •

Parking is prohibited along the west side of 12th

weight are posted along eastbound Monroe Street at

Street immediately north of Monroe Street.

Michigan Avenue and Monroe Street. Monroe Street has
a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph. However, the
speed limit is reduced along both Monroe Street and 12th

12TH STREET AT QUINCY STREET, N.E.

Street to 15 mph when the schools (St. Anthony’s and Luke
C. Moore Academy) are in session as indicated by signal At this four-way intersection, 12th Street is a two-lane minor
flashers.

In addition, Fire House Engine Company No. arterial while Quincy Street is a 2 lane local road. Quincy

17 is located along the south side of Monroe Street, just Street has both Michigan Avenue and 14th Street as termini.
east of 12th Street. Parking restrictions in the vicinity of the The Quincy Street approaches to 12th Street are stop sign
intersection are as follows:

controlled; 12th Street is free flowing. Quincy Street as it
approaches 12th Street has one approach lane and one

No Standing or parking is permitted on the north

receiving lane.

side of Monroe Street, east of 12th Street, except

near the 12th Street corner where a loading zone

Through trucks over 1 ¼ ton capacity are prohibited on

allows for loading from 9:30 AM to 4:00 PM, Monday

12th Street as per posted signage at Michigan Avenue

through Saturday.

and Brentwood Road just south of Rhode Island Avenue

On the south side of Monroe Street, east of 12th

where 12th Street feeds into Saratoga Avenue. Whereas

Street, Monroe Street has both unrestricted on-street Quincy Street has no posted signage regarding through

parking and one hour parking from 7:00 AM to

trucks but as it is a local road, through trucks should not

6:30 PM, Monday through Saturday.

be using this road. Quincy Street has a posted speed limit

West of 12th Street along both sides of Monroe

of 25 mph. However, the speed limit is reduced along

Street, non-residents may park for 2 hours from 7:00

westbound Quincy Street to 15 mph when school is in

AM to 8:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

session (Brookland Elementary). Parking restrictions in the

However, in the half block west of the intersection,

vicinity of the intersection are as follows:

the south half of Monroe Street does not allow for
parking on school days from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Quincy Street allows for 1 hour parking from 7:00 AM

Street south of Monroe Street, near the corner of the

to 6:30 PM, Monday through Saturday.

Parking along the west side of 12th Street, north of

No Standing or parking is permitted on the west side

Quincy Street allows for 2 hour parking from 7:00 AM

of 12th Street, south of Monroe Street, from 7:00 AM

to 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

to 6:30 PM, Monday through Saturday.

Parking along the east side of 12th Street, north of

Parking is permitted along the east side of 12th
Monroe Street intersection.

Parking along the east side of 12th Street, south of

One hour parking is permitted along the east side of

Quincy Street allows for 3 hours of parking from 7:00

12th Street, north of Monroe Street, from 9:00 AM to

AM to 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

35

Parking along the west side of 12th Street, south of

of 25 mph, however, the speed limit is reduced along

Quincy Street allows for non-residents to park for 2

Michigan Avenue to 15 mph when school is in session

hours from 7:00 AM to 8:30 PM, Monday through

(Brookland Elementary). Parking restrictions in the vicinity

Friday.

of the intersection are as follows:

However, in the vicinity of Riggs Bank, on the west
side of 12th Street, south of Quincy Street, 30-minute
parking is permitted from 7:00 AM to 6:30 PM,

In the immediate vicinity of this intersection, parking

Parking is prohibited on the west side of 12th Street,

Monday through Friday.

Parking is prohibited on both sides of 12th Street in

is not permitted on Michigan Avenue.

the half block north of Quincy Street.

Parking is prohibited along the north side of Quincy

south of Michigan Avenue.

Street, east of 12th Street.

Non-residents may park for 2 hours from 7:00 AM

south of Michigan Avenue.

to 8:30 PM, Monday through Friday, east of 12th
Street along the south side of Quincy Street and

Street, east of 12th Street, and also on the north side

Parking is prohibited on both sides of 12th Street
from the Michigan Avenue intersection to the mid-

Street.
Parking is prohibited on the south side of Quincy

Parking is allowed on both sides of 12th Street, north
of Michigan Avenue.

west of 12th Street along both sides of Quincy

Parking is allowed on the east side of 12th Street,

block.

Parking is prohibited along eastbound and
westbound Michigan Avenue, west of 12th Street.

of Quincy Street, just west of 12th Street.

12TH STREET AT MICHIGAN AVENUE, N.E.
At this four-way signalized intersection, both 12th Street
and Michigan Avenue are minor arterials. 12th Street is a
two-way, two-lane roadway and Michigan Avenue is a
two-way, four-lane roadway. Michigan Avenue has both
North Capitol Street and Eastern Avenue (at the Maryland
state line) as study termini. Michigan Avenue travels in a
northeast-southwest direction. 12th Street approaches the
Michigan Avenue intersection in single lanes. Michigan
Avenue has two approach lanes and two receiving lanes
on both sides of 12th Street. The left turn for both directions
of travel on Michigan Avenue is prohibited. Right turn on
red is prohibited from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM for the eastbound
Michigan Avenue traffic as well as for the southbound
12th Street traffic. The right turn on red is prohibited for the
northbound 12th Street traffic at all times.
Michigan Avenue does not restrict through trucks.
Michigan Avenue has a posted regulatory speed limit
Figure 5-2: Photo of South Dakota
Avenue and Monroe Street
intersection.

36

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
5.1.2 Roadway Descriptions - Monroe Street, N.E.
Within the study area, Monroe Street is a two-way, two-lane
minor arterial running east-west from Michigan Avenue,
N.E. on the west side to South Dakota Avenue, N.E. on
the east side. Monroe Street has parallel parking on the
south side of the street east of 12th Street to South Dakota
Avenue. It carries an average of over 14,000 vehicles per
day. Both sides of Monroe Street have parallel parking
between 12th and 10th Streets and on the south side only
from 10th Street to Michigan Avenue. However, parking
is prohibited along Monroe Street on the bridge between
8th and 9th Streets. The south side of Monroe Street has
parking meters between 9th and 10th Streets. Signalized
locations within the study corridor along Monroe Street
are: Michigan Avenue, 7th Street, 9th Street, 10th Street,
12th Street, 13th Street, 18th Street, 20th Street, 22nd Street
and South Dakota Avenue, as shown in figure 5-3.
Monroe Street, east of 12th Street is typically 30 feet wide,
i.e., 11 foot westbound and eastbound travel lanes and
an 8-foot parking lane. Westbound Monroe Street at 18th
Street (far side), at 16th Street (near side), and at 14th
Street (near side); has been widened an additional ten
(10) feet to a 40 foot section to create Metro bus pull-outs
and auxiliary lanes to accommodate right turn traffic.
Westbound Monroe Street widens to 40 feet approaching
12th Street and becomes two lanes for turning movements
at 12th Street. West of 12th Street to Michigan Avenue,
Monroe Street widens to 50 feet which presents operational
problems during peak hours of travel when traffic tries to
utilize Monroe Street as a four lane roadway.

MONROE STREET AT SOUTH DAKOTA AVENUE,
N.E.
At this four-way signalized intersection, South Dakota
Avenue is a two-way, four-lane principal arterial while
Monroe Street is a two-way, two-lane minor arterial. South
Dakota Avenue travels in a northwest-southeast direction.
Monroe Street traffic approaches South Dakota Avenue in
single lanes. A horizontal shift of the double yellow centerline
pavement marking occurs along Monroe Street just west
of South Dakota Avenue to introduce a parking lane along
the south side of Monroe Street and to provide for a larger
turning radius for trucks and buses. South Dakota Avenue
has two approach lanes and two receiving lanes on either
side of Monroe Street. Right turn on red is prohibited for
the southbound South Dakota Avenue traffic.
Signs prohibiting through trucks over 28,000 lbs gross vehicle
weight for eastbound Monroe Street traffic are posted at
this intersection. Both South Dakota Avenue and Monroe
Street have a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph.
Parking restrictions in the vicinity of the intersection are as
follows:

Street traffic on both sides of South Dakota Avenue.

In addition, truck prohibition signs for through trucks
over 28,000 lbs gross vehicle weight are posted for the

Parking is permitted for the eastbound Monroe
Street traffic on both sides of South Dakota Avenue.

No standing or parking is permitted along
South Dakota Avenue for both southbound and
northbound traffic from 7:00 AM to 9:30 AM and

Signs prohibiting through trucks for eastbound Monroe
Street traffic are posted at 20th Street and Monroe Street.

Parking is prohibited for the westbound Monroe

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

There are no bus stops at this intersection that would
impact operations at this intersection.

westbound Monroe Street traffic at the Rhode Island
Avenue and Monroe Street intersection. Signs prohibiting
through trucks are posted throughout the Monroe Street
corridor. The posted regulatory speed limit for the Monroe
Street corridor is 25 mph.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

37

38

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-3: Existing
Signalized / Unsignalized
Intersections
BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

39

5.1.3 Roadway Descriptions - Michigan Avenue, N.E.
Within the study area, Michigan Avenue is a minor arterial westbound while two lanes travel eastbound. Typically, the
running northeast-southwest from North Capitol Street on signage does not permit for parking during the commuter
the west end to the Maryland borderline at Eastern Avenue directional peak thereby allowing the travel way to be
on the east end. The average daily traffic volume on reduced to one lane outside of peak periods; however
Michigan Avenue is over 30,000 vehicles. Along the corridor, this does not happen. No parked cars were observed in
Michigan Avenue changes in section. The corridor is a the areas available for off-peak on-street parking. Hence,
two-way, six-lane roadway between North Capitol Street two lanes are available for both the westbound and the
and Monroe Street. Three lanes travel westbound while eastbound traffic.
three lanes travel eastbound. Where the roadway has
six travel lanes, there is typically one designated parking As shown in figure 5-3 the signalized intersections along the
lane in each direction. These parking lanes become travel study corridor are at North Capitol Street, Franklin Street,
lanes that operate during the commuter directional peak. Irving Street, Harewood Road, 4th Street, Monroe Street,
In the AM peak, westbound parking restrictions create an 7th, 10th, 12th, 13th and 14th Streets, Taylor Street, South
additional travel lane permitting three travel lanes to carry Dakota Avenue, Varnum Street/18th Street, Allison Street,
traffic westbound to the DC business districts. In the PM Queens Chapel Terrace, and Eastern Avenue. Roadway
peak, eastbound parking restrictions create an additional widths vary from 40 feet to 50 feet. East of the bridge
travel lane permitting three travel lanes to carry traffic between John McCormack Road and Eastern Avenue,
away from the D.C. business districts. This typical six-lane Michigan Avenue is between 40 and 50 feet wide from curb
roadway only occurs from Franklin Street to Irving Street. to curb. West of the bridge between John McCormack
Here the corridor has 3 lanes in the westbound direction Road and North Capitol Street, Michigan Avenue varies
during the AM peak and 3 lanes in the eastbound direction from 48 feet to 65 feet wide from curb to curb. Along the
during the PM peak. Hence, during the AM peak, the bridge, Michigan Avenue is typically 50 feet wide from
westbound lanes have three lanes open to traffic while the curb to curb. The posted regulatory speed limit for the
eastbound lanes have two lanes open to traffic. Similarly, Michigan Avenue corridor is 25 mph.
during the PM peak, the eastbound lanes have three lanes
open to traffic while the westbound lanes have two lanes
open to traffic. The other portions of this six-lane roadway
are between North Capitol Street and Franklin Street and

MICHIGAN AVENUE
STREET, N.E.

AT

NORTH CAPITOL

between Irving Street and Monroe Street. Along these two
portions of Michigan Avenue, the westbound lanes do not At this signalized intersection, Michigan Avenue is a sixallow for on-street parallel parking at any time while the lane minor arterial while North Capitol Street is a six-lane
eastbound lanes typically do not allow for on-street parallel roadway that is a principal arterial south of Michigan
parking during the PM peak; hence there are always three Avenue and a freeway/ expressway north of Michigan
westbound lanes open to traffic between North Capitol Avenue to the intersection with Fort Drive and Harewood
Street to Franklin Street and from Irving Street to Monroe Road. This is an important intersection that has undergone
a recent reconstruction.

Street.
East of Monroe Street to 7th Street, the roadway changes
to a two-way, five-lane facility having three lanes travel

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT IRVING STREET, N.E.

westbound while two lanes travel eastbound with no
parking permitted on either side of the roadway. From At this three-way signalized intersection, Irving Street is
7th Street eastward to Eastern Avenue, the corridor is a a six-lane divided minor arterial. Irving Street terminates
two-way, four-lane roadway having two lanes travel at Michigan Avenue and continues west into the city.

40

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
Southbound Irving Street has three lanes that feed onto by a median and controlled by a stop sign. North of the
eastbound Michigan Avenue with a channelized right turn intersection, Harewood Road has two lanes with one lane
lane that yields to westbound Michigan Avenue traffic; this traveling northbound and one lane traveling southbound.
lane has a short merge area. Westbound Michigan Avenue Nearing the intersection, the north approach opens up
rtraffic approaches this intersection in three lanes (a right to two through lanes that continue through the Michigan
turn lane, a second lane that can turn right or continue Avenue intersection and two channelized right turn
rstraight, and a third lane that can only continue straight). lanes that is stop sign controlled. The south approach of
The two lanes of traffic turning right to begin westbound Harewood Road is a four-lane roadway with two receiving
Irving Street continue westward adding on a lane to form lanes and two approach lanes. Harewood Road feeds
three lanes.

onto 4th Street at the signalized intersection immediately
south of Michigan Avenue.

Through truck prohibitions occur along Michigan Avenue
and Irving Street. Michigan Ave has a posted regulatory Through truck prohibitions for Michigan Avenue and
speed limit of 25 mph while westbound Irving Street Harewood Road as well as for 4th Street lanes are posted at
has a posted speed limit of 25 mph in the vicinity of the the intersection. Michigan Avenue has a posted regulatory
intersection.

Posted regulatory speed limit signs for speed limit of 25 mph whereas Harewood Road has a

eastbound Irving Street were not observed in the vicinity posted regulatory speed limit of 30 mph north of Michigan
of the intersection. Irving Street was under construction at Avenue and 25 mph south of Michigan Avenue. Parking
the time of this study. Parking restrictions in the vicinity of restrictions in the vicinity of the intersection are as follows:
the intersection are as follows:

k•

Parking is prohibited for westbound traffic for points

6:30 PM, Monday through Friday, along eastbound

west and east of Irving Street.

Michigan Avenue, west of the Harewood Road

Eastbound traffic along Michigan Avenue is three

intersection.

lanes leading up to the intersection and continues

Parking is prohibited along eastbound Michigan

as three lanes east of the intersection; however at

Avenue, east of the Harewood road intersection,

points both west and east of the immediate

and along westbound Michigan Avenue, on both

vicinity of the intersection, no standing or parking is

sides of Harewood Road.

permitted along eastbound Michigan Avenue from

No standing or parking is permitted from 4:00 PM to

Parking is prohibited along Harewood Road north

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday so as to

of Michigan Avenue, in the immediate vicinity of

allow for the PM peak traffic.

the intersection; three hour parking is permitted

Field observations noted that no vehicles use this

along both sides of Harewood Road, north of

available parking lane during the allowable times,

Harewood Road, at locations away from the

hence, the eastbound lanes remain as three lanes.

intersection, from 7:00 AM to 6:30 PM, Monday

Parking is prohibited along westbound and east

through Friday.

bound Michigan Avenue immediately west of Irving

Street.

South of Michigan Avenue along Harewood Road,
parking is prohibited along both sides of Harewood
Road.

MICHIGAN AVENUE
N.E.

AT

HAREWOOD ROAD,

At this signalized intersection, Harewood Road is a fourlane minor arterial. This intersection is a four-way signalized

There are no bus stops at this intersection that would
impact operations at this intersection.

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 4TH STREET / BASILICA
DRIVEWAY, N.E.

intersection with right turns from southbound Harewood
Road onto westbound Michigan Avenue being separated At this signalized intersection, 4th Street is a four-lane

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

41

undivided minor arterial while Michigan Avenue is a six- traffic onto Monroe Street is prohibited.
lane undivided minor arterial, east of 4th Street, and a fivelane undivided minor arterial, west of 4th Street. 4th Street Truck prohibitions for through trucks over 28,000 lbs
is a four-lane roadway with two approach lanes and two gross vehicle weight are prohibited from traveling onto
receiving lanes. The Basilica Driveway has one southbound eastbound Monroe Street from Michigan Avenue. In
lane exiting the Basilica grounds and one receiving lane addition, through trucks are prohibited westbound along
entering the Basilica grounds. This intersection is a four-way Monroe Street. Michigan Avenue and Monroe Street
signalized intersection with 4th Street approaching from have a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph. Parking
the south and the Basilica driveway approaching from restrictions in the vicinity of the intersection are as follows:
the north. Traffic from the Basilica can exit in any direction.
As well, traffic may enter from any of the approaches. •

Parking is prohibited along all of the curb lanes at

Northbound 4th Street traffic from wishing to proceed onto

this intersection, except for eastbound Monroe

westbound Michigan Avenue must use the Harewood

Street.

Road intersection.

Parking is prohibited at the mid-block of the west
approach on the north side of Michigan Avenue.

Truck prohibition signing is posted for Michigan Avenue and
4th Street. Michigan Avenue and 4th Street have a posted
vicinity of the intersection are as follows:

MICHIGAN AVENUE
DRIVEWAY, N.E.

Parking is prohibited along the majority of Michigan

At this signalized intersection, 7th Street is a two-lane, two-

Avenue and 4th Street at this intersection.

way undivided collector road. 7th Street approaches this

No standing or parking is permitted from 7:00 AM

intersection from the south. The two westbound lanes

regulatory speed limit of 25 mph. Parking restrictions in the

AT

7THSTREET / CUA

to 9:30 PM and 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM, Monday through transition to three lanes at the mid-block west of the 7th

Friday, along the mid-block area of the eastbound

Street intersection. East of the intersection, Michigan

Michigan Avenue curb lane, east of the 4th Street

Avenue becomes a bridge that crosses over the Metrol

intersection.

and railroad tracks. This bridge is known as the Charles R.

Parking is prohibited at the mid-block of the east

Drew Memorial Bridge. The north side of the intersection

approach on both sides of Michigan Avenue.

is a main entrance to The Catholic University of America
(CUA). This entrance has one receiving lane entering

MICHIGAN AVENUE
N.E.

AT

MONROE STREET,

northbound into the campus and one exiting lane onto
the eastbound or westbound Michigan Avenue. South of
Michigan Avenue, there is a two-lane service road (Bunker
Hill Road) that travels down and easterly, passing under

At this three-way signalized intersection, Monroe Street is a the bridge to the Brookland/CUA Metro station drop off
four-lane divided minor arterial. Westbound Monroe Street point (Past the Pizza Hut).
has one lane of traffic that opens up to two lanes at the
intersection. At the intersection both lanes may continue Through truck prohibitions for Michigan Avenue are posted.
onto westbound Michigan Avenue and the right lane may In addition, there are no bus stops in the immediate vicinity
also turn right onto eastbound Michigan Avenue. Right of the intersection. Michigan Avenue and 7th Street have a
turns on red are prohibited for the westbound Monroe posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph. Parking restrictions
Street traffic. The eastbound Michigan Avenue intersection in the vicinity of the intersection are as follows:
approach has three lanes with the curb lane required to
turn right onto Monroe Street; an exclusive traffic signal •

Parking is prohibited along Michigan Avenue on

phase with a green arrow indication controls this traffic

both sides of 7th Street.

movement. The left turn for westbound Michigan Avenue •

Parking is allowed for both sides of 7th Street traffic

42

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
on the south side of the intersection.

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 10TH STREET, N.E.
At this signalized intersection, 10th Street serves as a twolane, two-way undivided local roadway. West of the
intersection, Michigan Avenue becomes a bridge that
crosses over the Metro and railroad tracks. East of the
intersection, Michigan Avenue continues as a four-lane
roadway. North of the intersection, there is a two-lane, twoway, service road that runs parallel to Michigan Avenue
and travels under the bridge to the Brookland/CUA metro
station. This road is also known as Michigan Avenue and
has a stop sign for eastbound traffic at 10th Street. South
of the intersection, 10th Street provides vehicles access
to the Metro station. Also, northbound 10th Street traffic
wishing to turn right onto eastbound Michigan Avenue
has a channelized right turn lane. This road is Bunker Hill
Road and is a short one-way roadway, one-lane road
that also serves a few residences. This road has a stop sign
before merging onto eastbound Michigan Avenue. At the
intersection, left turns onto 10th Street from westbound

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT SOUTH DAKOTA
AVENUE AND 16THSTREET, N.E.
At this signalized intersection, South Dakota Avenue is a
two-way, four-lane principal arterial. 16th Street serves
the channelized right turn traffic from southbound South
Dakota Avenue onto westbound Michigan Avenue; it has
a stop sign before turning right onto Michigan Avenue. No
signage is present at this intersection to prohibit through
truck traffic. Both Michigan Avenue and South Dakota
Avenue have a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph.
However, the speed limit is reduced along Michigan
Avenue to 15 mph when school is in session (Bunker Hill
Elementary). West of the intersection, the westbound
Michigan Avenue advisory speed is reduced to 20
mph near the curving roadway section at 14th Street.
In addition, a similar advisory speed limit is posted for
eastbound Michigan Avenue traffic through the curved
section of roadway. Parking restrictions in the vicinity of
the intersection are as follows:

Michigan Avenue westbound lanes from 7:00 AM

Michigan Avenue are prohibited.
Through truck prohibitions are posted for Michigan Avenue;
no other through trucks prohibitions were observed at this

through 9:30 AM, Monday through Friday, on both
sides of the intersection.

Parking restrictions in the vicinity of the intersection are as

through 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

Parking is prohibited along this section of Michigan

r

Avenue.

travel lanes between the hours of 7:00 AM and
9:30 AM as well as 4:00 PM and 6:30 PM, Monday
through Friday. Field observations noted that no
or minimal vehicles use these available parking

North of the intersection, parking is prohibited along

lanes during the allowable times, hence, both

10th Street in the vicinity of the intersection.

North of the intersection, 10th Street allows for onstreet parking on both sides of the street away from

roadways typically remain four-lane roadways.

Non-residents may park on both sides of Bunker Hill
Road from 7:00 AM through 8:30 PM, Monday
through Friday.

immediately west of the South Dakota Avenue

Parking is prohibited along 10th Street, south of the
intersection.

Parking is prohibited in the northbound and
southbound curb lanes of 10th Street.

Parking is prohibited in the westbound and
eastbound curb lanes of Michigan Avenue,

the intersection.

No standing or parking is permitted along both the
southbound and northbound South Dakota Avenue

follows:
r•

No standing or parking is permitted along the
Michigan Avenue eastbound lanes from 4:00 PM

intersection for 10th Street. Michigan Avenue and 10th
Street have a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph.

No standing or parking is permitted along the

intersection.

Parking is prohibited along the northbound
curb lane of South Dakota Avenue just south of
the intersection and along the southbound
curb lane of South Dakota Avenue just north of the
intersection.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

43

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 18TH STREET/
VARNUM STREET, N.E.
At this three-way signalized intersection, Michigan
Avenue intersects with 18th Street and Varnum Street.
18th Street is a collector road that terminates at the
intersection and continues south of the intersection.
18th Street serves as a two-way, two-lane roadway
approaching Michigan Avenue. Varnum Street is
a local road that terminates at this intersection and
continues east of the intersection. Varnum Street
serves as a two-way, two-lane roadway. Through truck
prohibition for trucks over 1 ¼ ton capacity is posted
for traffic onto eastbound onto Varnum Street.
Through truck prohibition signage exists for 18th Street.
Both Michigan Avenue and South Dakota Avenue
have a posted regulatory speed limit of 25 mph. West
of the intersection, eastbound Michigan Avenue has
an advisory speed limit of 20 mph for the curving
section between Bunker Hill Road and the 18th Street
/ Varnum Street intersection. Parking restrictions in the
vicinity of the intersection are as follows:

No standing or parking is permitted along the
Michigan Avenue westbound lanes from 7:00
AM through 9:30 AM, Monday through Friday,
on both sides of the intersection.

No standing or parking is permitted along the
Michigan Avenue eastbound lanes from 4:00
PM through 6:30 PM, Monday through Friday.

Parking is prohibited for the southbound lanes
of 18th Street.

2 hour parking is permitted for nonresidents
using the northbound traffic of 18th Street from
7:00 AM through 8:30 PM, Monday through
Friday.

Parking is permitted on both sides of Varnum
Street.

Field observations noted that no or minimal
vehicles use these available parking lanes
during the allowable times, hence, Michigan
Avenue typically remains as a 4 lane roadway.

Parking is prohibited in the westbound and
eastbound curb lanes of Michigan Avenue.

44

Figure 5-4: Photos of Michigan Avenue, 18th and Varnum
Streets intersection.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
5.1.4 Observed Roadway Conditions
The study team conducted extensive field investigations amount of “rutting” which leads to potholes and driver/
to inventory all streets/intersections within the three study rider discomfort.
corridors. This included such key items as roadway surface,
pavement markings, signs, street lights, and traffic signals. The existing signing, (parking signs, turn prohibition signs,
Tables 5-1 though 5-4 provide a summary of the results of speed limit signs, etc.) along the three study corridors was
these field investigations.

mostly in good condition with a few signs along 12th Street
worn to the point of being illegible. Pavement markings

The District’s Pavement Condition Indices (PCI’s) are listed along 12th Street and along Monroe Street were in good
for various segments of each corridor to indicate pavement condition, whereas pavement markings along Michigan
conditions; these ratings indicate the condition of the Avenue are typically worn out and need to be remarked.
existing pavement and range from excellent to poor. In
general, the roadway surfaces along 12th Street were in
good condition. However, the pavement conditions along
Monroe Street and Michigan Avenue show a significant

TABLE 5-1: Condition of 12th Street, N.E. from Michigan Avenue to Rhode Island Avenue
Location

Width1

PAVEMENT
Cond2 Comment

MARKING
Cond3 Comment

SIGN
Cond** Comment

12th Street, NE
Rhode Island AveDouglas St.
Douglas St-Evarts St.

40

88

Good

Good

Good

40

90

Good

Good

Good

Evarts St.-Franklin St.

40

92

Good

Good

Good

Franklin St.-Girard St.

40

70

Good; NW corner:
curb & gutter deteriorating

Worn

Girard St.-Hamlin St.

40

86

Utility patch

Renew crosswalks
and stop bars at
Hamlin St.

Hamlin St.-Irving St.
Irving St.-Jackson St.
Jackson St.-Kearny St.

40
40
40

82
84
90

Good
Utility patches
Good

Kearny St.-Lawrence St.

40

79

Good

Lawrence St.-Monroe St. 40

89

Monroe St.-Newton St.

40

81

Good

Good

Good

Newton St.-Otis St.

40

82

Utility patches

Good

Good

Otis St.-Perry St.

40

76

Good

Good

Good

Perry St.-Quincy St.

50

43;
New

Good

Good

Good

Quincy St.-Randolph St.

50

Good

Good

Good

Randolph St.-Michigan
Ave.

50

Good

Good

Good

45;
New
87;
New

Good

Southbound lanes: Missing
sign on post.

Southbound lanes: 3 faded
signs on separate posts.
Good
Good
Good

Good
High intensity crosswalk all 4 approaches. NB rumble strips.
Rumble strips, stop
bars.

Good

Both northbound & southbound side: missing sign on
post.
Westbound lanes: missing
sign on post & twisted sign.
Southbound lanes: 2 “No
Parking” signs are faded.
Northbound lanes: branches block “No parking..”
sign.
Northbound lanes: branches block “Pedestrian crossing” sign.

Southbound lanes: Missing
sign on post.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

45

TABLE 5-2: Condition of Monroe Street, N.E. from 7th Street South Dakota Avenue
Location

Width1 PAVEMENT
Cond2 Comment

MARKING
Cond3 Comment

SIGN
Cond** Comment

50

88

Good

Good

Good

50
50

81
91

Good
Bridge

Good
Good

Good
Good

9th St.-10th St.

50

78

Rutting WB traffic

10th St.-12th St.

50

51

Cracks

Poor

12th St.-13th St.

30

71

Rutting

Poor

13th St.-14th St.
14th St.-15th St.

30
30

73
61

Rutting
Poor
Rutting, Utility Patches Good

Good
Good

15th St.-16th St.
16th St.-17th St.
Utility Patches
17th St – 18th St
18th St-20th St

30
30
Good
30
30

59
83

Good

67
87

Rutting
Good
Rutting,
Good
Rutting, Utility Patches Good

20th St-22nd St.
22nd St.-South Dakota Ave.

30
30

66
92

Monroe Street, NE
Michigan Ave.-7th
St.
7th St.-8th St.
8th St.-9th St.

Potholes
Good

High intensity crosswalks at 10th St worn.

Poor

Poor

Stop bars at 18th - renew
Stop bars - renew
Stop bars - renew

“Speed limit 15 when flashing”
sign for eastbound traffic faces
sidewalk.
Signal sign for westbound traffic; twisted sign for eastbound
traffic.
Bottom flasher for “15mph
speed limit” sign faces away
from westbound traffic.
“No parking – loading zone”
sign for westbound traffic is
faded.
Westbound lane:”No Parking”
sign is twisted away from view
of traffic.

Good
Good
Good
Good

TABLE 5-3: Condition of Michigan Avenue, N.E. from North Capitol Street to Randolph Street
Location
Michigan Avenue, NE
North Capitol St –
Gentain Ct
Gentain Ct – Franklin St
Franklin St – Irving St
Irving St.-Harewood Rd.
Harewood Rd.-4th St.
4th St.-Monroe St.
Monroe St.-7th St.
7th St.-John McCormack Rd.
John McCormack
Rd.Bunker Hill Rd (W)
Bunker Hill Rd (W) – 9th St
(S)
9th St (S) – 10th St (S)
10th St – Bunker Hill Rd
(M)
Bunker Hill Rd (M) – Perry
St

Width1

PAVEMENT
Cond2 Comment

MARKING
Cond3 Comment

SIGN
Cond**

65

92

Good

Good

Good

60
60
58
58
58

91
81
58
89
85

Good
Good
Good
Worn
Worn

Good
Good
Good
Good
Good

54

86

Good
Rutting
Rutting
Rutting
Rutting
Rutting; Wood utility pole
in the sidewalk along eastbound side.

Worn

Good

47

85

Rutting

Worn

50

95

Rutting

Worn

52

90

Rutting

Worn

52

96

Rutting

Worn

45

86

Rutting

41

79

Rutting

Perry St – Quincy St

40

Quincy St – Randolph St

40

Randolph St – 12th St

40

46

62,
New
88,
New
91,
New

Comment

“No Parking” signage is
faded.
“No Parking” signage is
faded.
Two lanes not
marked
Two lanes not
marked
Two lanes not
marked

“No Parking” sign is twisted
away from view of traffic.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

TABLE 5-4: Condition of Michigan Avenue, N.E. from 12th Street to Eastern Avenue

Width1

PAVEMENT
Cond2 Comment

12th St.-Sheperd St.

40

79

Rutting

Worn

Good

Shepherd St.-13th St.

53

67

Rutting

Worn

Good

13th St.-Taylor st.

52

52

Taylor St.-Sargent Rd.

48

78

Sargent Rd.-13th Place

49

100

13th Place-Upshur st.

48

98

Upshur St.-14th St.

50

94

Rutting
Northwest corner of Sargent Rd needs curb cut
Questionable, perhaps
old rating. Fair
Questionable, perhaps
old rating. Fair
Questionable, perhaps
old rating. Fair

14th st.-16th St.

50

77

16th St.-South Dakota Ave.

42

87

South Dakota Avenue
– Bunker Hill Rd (E)

40

Location

MARKING
SIGN
Cond3 Comment Cond** Comment

Michigan Avenue, NE

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

84

Worn

Good

Bunker Hill Rd. (E)-Varnum St 40

82

Worn

Good

Varnum St.-18th St.

98

Worn

Good

Worn

Good

42

Questionable, perhaps
old rating. Fair

Wood utility pole in the
middle of the sidewalk
along eastbound side.

18th St.-Varnum Pl.

46

98

Varnum Pl.-Webster St.

42

98

Worn

Good

Webster St.-Allison St.

45

98

Worn

Good

98

Worn

Good

98

Worn

Good

Allision St.-Queens Chapel
45
Ter.
Queens Chapel Ter.-Eastern
45
Ave (S)

Faded sign for westbound
traffic
“Bike Route” sign is faded
for westbound traffic

3 faded signs for westbound traffic

Mangled “No Parking..”
sign for westbound traffic

“Bike Route” sign is faded
for eastbound traffic

TABLE NOTES
1
3

Width is measured from curb to curb
Marking Condition Ratings

Excellent:
Good
Fair:
Poor:

New markings
Not new, acceptable
Minor treatments recommended, faded
New marking recommended
(No reflectivity, marking gone, worn)

Pavement Condition Ratings: as per May, 2003 DDOT
Inspections for Pavement Condition Indices (PCI’s)

2

Excellent:
Good:
Fair:
Poor:

86 - 100
76 - 85
36 - 75
0 - 35

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

47

5.1.5 Existing Traffic Signals
The study team inventoried the traffic signals within indications. In general, the traffic signal pole types range
the project limits. There were ten traffic signal locations from combination pendent post (streetlight and traffic
contained or identified by the District of Columbia signal) poles to decorative traffic signal poles to older
Department of Transportation to be included in the study. shorter traffic signal poles. Many locations along Michigan
However, because of commentary received during the Avenue have short mast-arms attached to twenty-foot tall
initial public hearing for this project, four additional locations traffic signal poles (current design standard). One location
were included. The traffic signals typically have LED (Light at 13th and Monroe Streets does not have pedestrian
Emitting Diode) vehicular and pedestrian indication; this signal indications. Table 5-5 identifies each of the traffic
upgrade was part of a District-wide traffic signal program signals and their respective condition.
to enhance visibility and reduce maintenance costs of the
TABLE 5-5: Condition of Existing Traffic Signals
Location
12th St – Rhode Island Ave
12th St – Franklin St
Monroe St – 7th St
Monroe St – 9th St
Monroe St – 10th St
Monroe St – 12th St
Monroe St – 13th St
Monroe St – 14th St
Monroe St – 18th St
Monroe St – 20th St
Monroe St – 22nd St
Monroe St – South Dakota Ave

Michigan Ave – North Capitol St
Michigan Ave – Franklin St
Michigan Ave – Irving St
Michigan Ave – 4th St / Harewood Road / National Shrine
Michigan Ave – Monroe St
Michigan Ave – 7th St / CUA
Michigan Ave – 10th St
Michigan Ave – 12th St
Michigan Ave – 13th St
Michigan Ave – Taylor St
Michigan Ave – 14th St
Michigan Ave – South Dakota Ave
Michigan Ave – Varnum/18th St
Michigan Ave – Allison St / Queens Chapel Terrace

Signals
A, B, F, I
A, B, C, F
A, B, D, F
A, B, D, F
A, B, D, F
A, B, C, D, F
A, B, D, G
A, B, D, F
A, B, C, D, F
A, B, D, F (new)
A, B, D, F
New Signals. Mast arms for northbound & southbound South Dakota
Ave.
D (for Monroe St.), E (for South Dakota).
Intersection Under Construction (on the day of field survey).
Mast arms for all 4 approaches.
A, B, D, H
B, D, H
A, B, C, D, H
B, D (for westbound Michigan Ave), E (for all other approaches).
B, D
A, D, F
A, B, C, D, F
AD-11’s, utility poles, decorative poles.
A, B, J
Mast arms are used for all 4 approaches. B (at southeast and northeast
quadrants).
Westbound Varnum St – left pedestrian signal head (for crossing 18th St) is
misaligned. K, D (for eastbound Michigan), E (for all other approaches).
K, Mast arms for both east and westbound Michigan Ave. Westbound:
mast arm traffic signal head visor damaged.
K

Michigan Ave – Eastern Ave
A:
AD-11’s (a short traffic signal pole)
B:
Traffic signal heads mounted on wood utility poles
C:
Traffic signal heads mounted on decorative poles
D:
2 traffic signal heads per approach
E:
3 traffic signal heads per approach,
F:
Pedestrian signal heads are in use
G:
No pedestrian signal heads are in use
H:
Low hanging pedestrian signal heads
I:
No mast arms; here it would be advisable to implement them.
J:
Span wire used for traffic signal heads
K:
New intersection (new roadway, curb & gutter, traffic and pedestrian signal heads,..)

Note: Only out of the ordinary items are mentioned in the signal findings inventory. If an acceptable standard signal head application
is used, no mention is made of it. For example if standard pendant posts (Streetlight/ Traffic Signal Combination Poles are used then it
would not be mentioned; if “no mast arms” are noted it is because it would be needed at this location. Survey conducted December,
2004.

48

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TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
5.1.6 Existing Traffic Volumes
For each intersection, the movement and number of results in a uniform flow between intersections. Adjustments
vehicles, commonly referred to as a turning movement to traffic volumes and the preparation of projections for
rcount (TMC), is recorded by time of day. Based on 12-hour future year traffic are also based on methodology as
data the highest two-hour periods of volume define the presented in the NCHRP 255.
morning and evening peak periods. These peak periods
typically encompass the highest volumes of the day when Based on a review of the traffic count data for each
commuters are traveling to and from work. Generally, the intersection, the average peak hours in the study area are
AM peak period occurs from 7:00 to 9:00 AM, and the PM 7:45 to 8:45 AM and 4:30 to 5:30 PM. The key intersections
peak period occurs from 4:00 to 6:00 PM.

used in the analyses and the traffic simulation model
appear in Table 5-6. The intersection peak-hour volumes

Traffic volume counts were collected for ten intersections are also shown graphically on Figures 5-5 and 5-6 for the
along the three study corridors. The firm of O. R. George & morning and evening peak hours, respectively. Details of
Associates provided TMC’s for four additional intersections the turning movement counts are contained in Appendix
that were identified during the initial public hearing phase A under separate cover.
of the study. In addition, DDOT and other consultants
conducting studies in the general area collected TMCs
for intersections along the 3 study corridors during the AM
and PM peak periods.

These TMCs supplemented the

TMCs collected by the study team for the initial 10 key
study intersections currently part of this study. This data
provides the information necessary to evaluate existing
traffic conditions and traffic signal operations in the study
area. The counts were recorded during the summer and
fall months of 2004. The supplemental TMCs from O. R.
George & Associates were performed in April 1997, August
of 1997, February of 1998,

and August of 1999. Traffic

counts for the Brentwood Road Study were performed
in February of 2004. The current TMCs were compared to
previous DDOT counts and were found to be consistent
with the other TMCs.
Typically, turning movement counts contain minor variances
in volume from intersection to intersection. Multiple
reasons for these fluctuations exist. However, in general, no
variance should occur for counts performed on the same
day between two intersections that have no mid block
sink/sources for traffic. Raw field TMCs are post-processed
to remove any volume variances. This process is referred
to as count balancing and removes high or low volumes
between intersections. Adjustments to traffic volumes
and the preparation of projections for future year traffic
are based on methodology as presented in the National
Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP 255).
This ‘smoothing’ process to traffic between intersections

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

49

50

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-5: Existing Traffic
Volumes (AM Peak)

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

51

52

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TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-6: Existing Traffic
Volumes (PM Peak)

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

53

TABLE 5-6: Existing AM & PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes
Intersection
12th / Rhode Island (e)
12th / Franklin
12th / Monroe
12th / Quincy
Monroe / 10th
Monroe / 18th (b)
Monroe / S. Dakota
N. Capitol / Michigan
Irving / Michigan
Harewood / Michigan
4th / Michigan (c)
Monroe / Michigan
7th / CUA / Michigan
John McCormack/Michigan
10th / Michigan
12th / Michigan
14th / Michigan (d)
S. Dakota / Michigan
Varnum / 18th / Michigan

Total Traffic*

Trucks

%Trucks

Buses

%Buses

3674(3508)
1761(1793)
1622(1777)
656(863)
1318(1289)
1358(886)
1963(2067)
4981(4899)
3230(3226)
3851(3762))
3591(3544)
3515(3372)
2054(2263)
2339(2233)
2578(2414)
2783(2783)
1680(1784)
3354(3415)
1634(1923)

N/C
73(38)
46(21)
27(13)
N/C
N/C
91(41)
137(59)
N/C
N/C
N/C
N/C
57(15)
N/C
54(19)
50(16)
N/C
74(42)
40(12)

N/C
4.1(2.1)%
2.8(1.2)%
4.1(1.5)%
N/C
N/C
4.6(2.0)%
2.8(1.2)%
N/C
N/C
N/C
N/C
2.8(0.7)%
N/C
2.1(0.8)%
1.8(0.6)%
N/C
2.2(1.2)%
2.4(0.6)%

N/C
71(27)
63(42)
40(26)
N/C
N/C
40(21)
146(78)
N/C
N/C
N/C
N/C
48(44)
N/C
69(55)
40(24)
N/C
51(21)
16(12)

N/C
4.0(1.5)%
3.9(2.4)%
6.1(3.0)%
N/C
N/C
2.0(1.0)%
2.9(1.6)%
N/C
N/C
N/C
N/C
2.3(1.9)%
N/C
2.7(2.3)%
1.4(0.9)%
N/C
1.5(0.6)%
1.0(0.6)%

Counts: AM Peak (PM Peak)
* Total Traffic = Passenger Vehicles + Trucks + Buses
N/C = No classification data available
Unless noted otherwise, counts were performed during the Summer and Fall 2004.
(a) Counts performed by DDOT, 8/31/99
(b) Counts performed by DDOT, 4/17/97
(c) Counts performed by DDOT, 8/14/97
(d) Counts performed by DDOT, 2/10/98
(e) Counts performed by DCI, 2/25/04

54

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
5.1.7 Truck Loading/Unloading and Heavy Vehicles
Recently, DDOT commissioned a study for the development community.

Field investigations have revealed two

of a comprehensive strategy for managing truck traffic and distinctly different types of through truck traffic restriction
deliveries. It is known as the Motor Carrier Management signing (regulatory (white) vs. guide (green) signs).
and Threat Assessment Study. The results of the study,
which was conducted by VOLPE National Transportation These signs should be in compliance with the Manual
Systems Center (VOLPE), can be found on the DDOT web of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). Note that in
page. A synopsis relevant to the Brookland Study follows.

addition to the three study corridors (Michigan Avenue,
Monroe Street and 12th Street), Rhode Island Avenue and

Operational characteristics associated with heavy vehicles South Dakota Avenue in the vicinity of the study area were
differ from automobiles and consequently produce different inventoried for through truck signage. Other local roadway
effects on the traffic flow. Field observations indicate that intersections are not accounted for in the inventory shown
there is a constant flow of truck traffic throughout the on the map.
day. It should be noted that very few deliveries occurred
during peak hour field visits; however, public comments Fort Totten Transfer Station and Concrete Plant are
indicate that truck un-/loading slows traffic along the 12th generators of truck traffic.

They are accessed in several

Street corridor. Delivery trucks often double-park along ways: via John McCormack Road and / or Taylor Street.
storefronts (e.g., CVS Drug Store) to unload or load. This Traffic signal timings and phasing encourages the use of
has been observed on weekends more so than during the northbound South Dakota Avenue via Taylor Street as
week. Double-parked trucks create the loss of a through- a preferred truck route rather than South Dakota Ave /
lane, which leads to build-up and queuing behind the Michigan Avenue. There is not any prohibitive through
trucks. It also causes dangerous weaving patterns as truck signing that discourages such use by trucks destined
vehicles swerve to avoid being delayed behind the truck. for the Transfer Station from using northbound South Dakota
The existing truck regulations are shown on Figure 5-8.

Avenue onto westbound Taylor Street.

12th Street offers some loading zones for delivery trucks Monroe Street receives its fair share of truck traffic as
for the stores and merchants near Monroe and Newton well. Some of it may be from the tourist buses that go
Streets. Double-parking of delivery trucks was observed to the Basilica of the Shrine of the National Shrine of the
near these portions of 12th Street. This not only detracts Immaculate Conception as well as other tourist sectors of
from the drivability of this section but it also makes it the city. Buses are supposed to be waiting at the available
difficult for crossing street traffic to enter or cross 12th Street waiting areas in the Basilica parking lot on the corner of
when the double parking occurs near the corners of the Harewood Road and Michigan Avenue. However, it has
intersections.

been noticed that these buses do idle along and within
the Brookland area.

As per count data, Table 5-6 indicates the breakdown of
the vehicle types at the study intersections. Other available Trucks also use 12th Street from the south end of the study
intersections along the corridor were not included, as the area for access to westbound Franklin Street destined for
data provided did not classify the vehicle types. Of note, Michigan Avenue, North Capitol Street and other areas
the percentages of heavy vehicles (both trucks and buses) of the city even though through trucks are not allowed to
constitute 2% to 10% of the overall intersection traffic during access Franklin Street from 12th Street.
the AM and PM peak travel periods.
Trucks account for 5% of traffic in Washington DC. In
Consistency and thoroughness of signage to allow or addition to the positive benefits of trucks, they also pose
prohibit through trucks or local trucks making deliveries will important traffic management, roadway condition, and
help mitigate the impact of truck traffic within the Brookland security challenges. The noise, exhaust and vibrations

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

55

they generate often contribute to its non-acceptance in study. Most of the restrictions are on residential streets and
residential areas. Safety issues associated with speeding and were enacted as a result of complaints from residents.
traffic violations downgrade their acceptance. Officially Many restrictions are in the high-truck-traffic areas in the
designated truck routes would be of great benefit to the eastern part of the District and predominantly residential
Washington DC area. The District does not currently have areas in the northern part of the District. The truck crash
designated truck routes but over time it has developed data collected by DDOT TSA staff indicate crash data
“de facto” truck routes. North Capitol Street and Rhode from 2000 to 2002. Throughout the city, about 10% of all
Island Avenue are such major “de facto” truck routes. crashes involve trucks yet trucks only represent about 5%
Truck traffic in the District would greatly benefit from the of the total city traffic. As anticipated, the streets with the
logical determination of routes and restrictions. Regional heaviest truck traffic have the highest concentration of
cooperation is needed to avoid restriction mismatches truck traffic. North Capitol Street is the only such street
found between the District and Maryland.

within the study area mentioned in the Volpe Study. The
mapped out accident locations for the District show three

Major truck trip generators found in the study area are locations in the Brookland study area. They are Taylor and
the Catholic University of America area, Fort Totten Trash 12th Street and Michigan Avenue & Eastern Avenue, and
Transfer Station, the Concrete Facility adjacent to the Varnum Street & Eastern Avenue. The first is designated
Fort Totten Transfer Station, the major retail area found on as a high accident location and the second and third
Rhode Island Avenue at the new Home Depot and Giant are designated as priority accident locations. Neither of
locations, and the U.S. Postal General Mail Facility found these locations were shown to have trucks involved in the
at Brentwood Road.

accidents.

In 2003, a perimeter volume count was performed at In the study, several stakeholders’ concerns were
various city border points. Four of these locations were identified. It was noted that the time of day trash haulers
near the Brookland study area and were found to have are allowed to be on the streets is part of the problem.
truck volumes ranked from heaviest to lightest: Rhode Since they cannot begin working until after 7:00 AM, due
Island Avenue, Riggs Road, Queens Chapel Road (i.e. to the noise generated by their vehicles, they contribute to
Michigan Avenue), and Sargent Road. Over 40% of the the morning rush hour traffic congestion and cause further
trucks entering the city enter from the northeast border delays with their frequent stops. The necessity for the Fort
with Maryland, whereas 30% of the trucks exiting the city Totten Transfer Station to remain easily accessible was also
depart from the northeast border with Maryland. While noted.
truck traffic volumes may be small, they disproportionately
impact traffic due to their large size and difficulty in As per the Volpe Study, recommended “preferred truck
maneuvering tight curves and intersections with acute routes” that are in the Brookland study area are Rhode
angles. Also, one should accept that the city experiences Island Avenue, North Capitol Street, and South Dakota
heavy construction related truck traffic, depending on the Avenue. Per the Volpe recommendations, special permits
location of major construction sites at any given time.

exempting trucks that would need to travel off of the
preferred truck routes would be necessary. This would

Information from the Metropolitan Washington Council particularly apply to trash trucks using the Fort Totten
of Governments (MWCOG) was used to generate truck Transfer Station. Resident complaints can best be handled
traffic forecasts for the Brookland traffic analysis zones via improved enforcement of traffic laws (i.e. speeding
(TAZs) for the years 2000-2015. The Volpe study shows that and weight restrictions).
all but one of the 15 to 20 TAZs in the study area were
found to have 0-1500 commercial vehicle trips per day.
Only one TAZ was found to have the next higher grouping
of 1501-3500 commercial vehicle trips per day. Existing
truck restrictions are outlined and mapped in the Volpe

56

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
Key findings of the VOLPE study conducted
for Ward 5:

Truck issues that were brought forth in the VOLPE Study
indicate that truck restrictions and enforcement were

► Ward 5 has significant industrial facilities, which needed along Randolph Street between Bunker Hill Road
generate truck traffic. These facilities include a major and 17th Street (near the South Dakota Ave intersection).
beer distributor (at Queen’s Chapel Terrace) and Problem intersections were also noted to occur along
a solid waste transfer facility (at John McCormack 14th Street at the following 3 intersections: Taylor Street,
Road).

Michigan Avenue, and Webster Street. Cut through truck

► Rhode Island Avenue experiences high volumes of traffic is a problem in the area of Rhode Island Avenue at
truck traffic but little congestion—the road works well Newton Street, Otis Street and Bunker Hill Road.
as a corridor for trucks.
► North Capitol Street experiences high volumes of
truck traffic.
► Eastern Avenue and Randolph Street—at the border
between the District and Maryland—is supposed to
be restricted to trucks, but some trucks still use it.
► Trucks are encouraged to use Taylor Street, but local
residents are unhappy about it.

Figure 5-7: Photo of truck parked
at the 12th and Newton Streets
intersection.

r

k

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

57

58

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-8: Existing Truck
Regulations

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

59

5.1.8 Intersection Accident History
A safety assessment includes the examination of historical

►Large turn volumes,

accident records by location to look for frequency of

►Slippery roadway surface,

accident occurrences. Several factors are quantified, such
as day of week, time of day, type of accident and number
of injuries. This data is cross-referenced with intersection
geometries to develop possible incident conclusions. The
information is also valuable in determining possible safety

►Inadequate roadway lighting,
►Crossing pedestrians,
►Poor visibility of traffic control devices,
►Inadequate signal timing.

improvements.
Using accident data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, Safety improvements should be considered at intersections
2003 obtained from District Department of Transportation, of Michigan Avenue, N.E. at Franklin Street and South
a four-year safety assessment of provided intersections Dakota Avenue. Some of the counter measure possibilities
along the three corridors was performed. The results of in the ITE manual for rear-end collisions include:
the analyses are summarized in Tables 5-7 through 5-9.
The tables show an overall accident summary of the three
intersection as well as day of the week and time of day.

►Consider improving signal phasing and
adjusting yellow and add-red intervals,

Accidents are listed from a summary for all collision types,

►Improve traffic signal visibility,

vehicle-to-vehicle collisions and vehicle to non-vehicle
collisions.

►Remove sight distance obstructions, if
any,

The tables indicate that between 2000 and 2003, the

►Consider prohibiting
movements,

study corridors, with total accidents and total injuries by

intersection with the highest number of incidents was
North Capitol Street and Michigan Avenue, N.E. with
39 total accidents and 26 injuries. This intersection has
been recently improved by DDOT to enhance safety.

certain

turning

►Overlay and/or groove pavement,
►Ensure adequate drainage exists at the
intersection,

intersections of Michigan Avenue and Franklin Street, N.E.

►Install or improve warning signs (e.g.,
“slippery when wet” sign),

with 35 accidents and 24 injuries, and Michigan Avenue

►Improve roadway lighting.

The second and third highest accident locations are the

and South Dakota Avenue, N.E. with 35 accidents and 22
injuries.
Review of the type of accidents at the above three highaccident intersections indicate that over 40 percent of
accidents involved rear-end collisions. The Manual for
Transportation Studies published in 2000 by the Institute of
Transportation Engineers (ITE) includes guidelines defining
the probable cause of various types of accidents and
counter measures for improving safety.
Consistent with the information in that manual, the
probable causes of this type of accident can involve
several possibilities including:

60

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
TABLE 5-7a-d: Accident
Experience along 12th
Street, N.E.

Table 5-7a: Total number of accidents for all collision types.

6
ota u be o cc de ts o
Co s o
ypes
Intersection
Number of Accidents
Number of Accidents by Time of Day
Total
along 12th
by Day of Week
Accidents
Street
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
106
31
16
70
19
39
144
Rhode Island
22
7
5
10
2
13
30
Evarts
6
2
0
5
2
1
8
Franklin
11
6
0
6
3
9
18
Girard
6
0
3
3
0
1
7
Hamlin
2
0
0
2
0
0
2
Irving
3
0
0
2
0
1
3
Jackson
3
0
0
2
1
1
4
Kearney
2
1
0
2
0
1
3
Lawrence
1
2
0
2
0
1
3
Monroe
15
4
2
11
3
3
19
Newton
11
2
1
10
1
3
15
Otis
5
4
1
4
2
2
9
Perry
3
0
0
3
1
0
4
Quincy
4
0
1
2
0
1
4
Randolph
3
2
0
2
3
0
5
Michigan
9
1
3
4
1
2
10

Total
Injuries
105
22
12
7
3
1
1
7
5
6
5
12
4
5
2
6
7

*
*

*

*
*

Table
Accident
frequency
collision
types.
TABLE5-7b:
6B: Accident
Frequency
forfor
All all
Collision
Types
Intersection
Day of Week as %
Time of Day as % of Total Accidents
Total
Total
along 12th
of Total Accidents
Accidents Injuries
Street
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
106
31
16
70
19
39
144
105
*
Rhode Island
21%
23%
31%
14%
11%
33%
30
22
Evarts
6%
6%
0%
7%
11%
3%
8
12
*
Franklin
10%
19%
0%
9%
16%
23%
18
7
*
Girard
6%
0%
19%
4%
0%
3%
7
3
Hamlin
2%
0%
0%
3%
0%
0%
2
1
Irving
3%
0%
0%
3%
0%
3%
3
1
*
Jackson
3%
0%
0%
3%
5%
3%
4
7
Kearney
2%
3%
0%
3%
0%
3%
3
5
Lawrence
1%
6%
0%
3%
0%
3%
3
6
Monroe
14%
13%
13%
16%
16%
8%
19
5
*
Newton
10%
6%
6%
14%
5%
8%
15
12
Otis
5%
13%
6%
6%
11%
5%
9
4
*
Perry
3%
0%
0%
4%
5%
0%
4
5
Quincy
4%
0%
6%
3%
0%
3%
4
2
Randolph
3%
6%
0%
3%
16%
0%
5
6
8%
3%
19%
6%
5%
5%
10
7
Michigan
* Missing data; AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening
(18:30-07:30).

Table 5-7c: Total of vehicle-to-vehicle type collisions.

Left
Turn

Right
Turn

Rear
End

Side
Swipe

Head
On

Parked

Totals

Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Right
Angle

Parked

Head
On

Side
Swipe

Rear
End

Right
Turn

Left
Turn

Right
Angle

TABLE 6C: Total of Vehicle to Vehicle Type Collisions
Distribution of Accident Type by Intersection
Intersection
along 12th
Street
Corridor
Totals
29
5
1
36
25
7
19
Rhode Island
1
3
0
15
7
1
2
Evarts
1
0
0
2
1
1
1
Franklin
3
0
1
8
1
2
1
Girard
4
0
0
0
0
1
1
Hamlin
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Irving
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
Jackson
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
Kearney
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
Lawrence
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
Monroe
1
1
0
4
6
0
5
Newton
3
1
0
1
3
0
4
Otis
2
0
0
1
1
1
1
Perry
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
Quincy
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
Randolph
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
Michigan
1
0
0
2
2
0
0

29
1
1
3
4
1
0
3
2
2
1
3
2
3
0
2
1

5
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

36
15
2
8
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
1
1
0
2
0
2

25
7
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
3
1
1
2
1
2

7
1
1
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

19
2
1
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
5
4
1
0
0
1
0

122
29
6
16
6
2
3
3
3
2
17
12
6
4
4
4
5

Table
Frequency
of vehicle-to-vehicle
type collisions.
TABLE 5-7d:
6D: Frequency
of Vehicle-to-Vehicle
Type Collisions
Side
Swipe

Head
On

Parked

Totals

7
14%
14%
29%
14%
0%
14%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
14%
0%
0%
0%
0%

Rear
End

Head
On

25
28%
4%
4%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
24%
12%
4%
4%
8%
4%
8%

Right
Turn

Side
Swipe

36
42%
6%
22%
0%
0%
0%
0%
3%
0%
11%
3%
3%
0%
6%
0%
6%

Left
Turn

Rear
End

5
1
60%
0%
0%
0%
0% 100%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
20%
0%
20%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Right
Angle

Right
Turn

29
3%
3%
10%
14%
3%
0%
10%
7%
7%
3%
10%
7%
10%
0%
7%
3%

Parked

Left
Turn

Distribution of Accident Type by Intersection

Right
Angle

Intersection
along 12th
Street
Corridor
Totals
Rhode Island
Evarts
Franklin
Girard
Hamlin
Irving
Jackson
Kearney
Lawrence
Monroe
Newton
Otis
Perry
Quincy
Randolph
Michigan

19
11%
3%
5%
17%
5%
19%
5%
67%
5%
50%
11%
0%
0% 100%
0%
67%
0% 100%
26%
6%
21% 25%
5%
33%
0%
75%
0%
0%
5%
50%
0%
20%

10%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
6%
8%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
6%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

52%
33%
50%
0%
0%
0%
0%
33%
0%
24%
8%
17%
0%
50%
0%
40%

24%
17%
6%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
35%
25%
17%
25%
50%
25%
40%

3%
17%
13%
17%
0%
33%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
17%
0%
0%
0%
0%

7%
17%
6%
17%
50%
67%
0%
0%
0%
29%
33%
17%
0%
0%
25%
0%

122
29
6
16
6
2
3
3
3
2
17
12
6
4
4
4
5

AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening (18:30-07:30).

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

61

TABLE 5-7e-f: Accident Experience along 12th
Street, N.E.
Table 5-7e: Total of vehicle to non-vehicle type collisions.
Pedestrian

Other*

Totals

4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

8
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
1
1

4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

8
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
1
1

12
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
1
0
0
1
2

Distribtion of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Other*

Totals
Rhode Island
Evarts
Franklin
Girard
Hamlin
Irving
Jackson
Kearney
Lawrence
Monroe
Newton
Otis
Perry
Quincy
Randolph
Michigan

Distribution of Accident Type across
Intersections

Intersection along 12th
Street Corridor

Pedestrian

TABLE 6E: Total of Vehicle to Non Vehicle Type Collisions

TABLE 5-8a-f: Accident Experience along Monroe Street, N.E.
Table 5-8a: Total number of accidents for all collision types.

Table 5-7f: Frequency of vehicle to non-vehicle type
collisions.

100%
50%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
100%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
50%

Totals

8
0%
13%
0%
13%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
13%
25%
13%
0%
0%
13%
13%

Other*

Distribution of Accident Type across
Intersections

Totals
Rhode Island
Evarts
Franklin
Girard
Hamlin
Irving
Jackson
Kearney
Lawrence
Monroe
Newton
Otis
Perry
Quincy
Randolph
Michigan

Pedestrian

Other*

4
25%
25%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
25%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
25%

Intersection along 12th
Street Corridor

Distribtion of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Pedestrian

Table 6F: Frequency of Vehicle to Non-Vehicle Type Collisions

0%
50%
0%
100%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
100%
100%
100%
0%
0%
100%
50%

12
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
1
0
0
1
2

TABLE 7A: Total Number of Accidents for All Collision Types
Intersection
Number of Accidents
Number of Accidents per Time of Day
Total
along Monroe
per Day of Week
Accidents
Street
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
87
40
13
53
22
38
127
Michigan
9
6
0
6
2
7
15
8th
4
1
2
1
1
1
5
9th
7
1
2
1
2
3
8
10th
4
1
0
2
2
1
5
12th
15
4
2
11
3
3
19
13th
4
3
0
4
1
2
7
14th
9
4
4
4
1
4
13
15th
7
1
1
4
1
2
8
16th
2
5
1
3
1
2
7
17th
6
7
0
5
2
6
13
18th
9
1
1
5
2
2
10
22nd
2
2
0
2
0
2
4
S.Dakota
9
4
0
5
4
3
13

Total
Injuries
90
12
3
5
3
5
3
8
11
6
5
10
4
15

Table
5-8b: Accident frequency for all collision types.
TABLE 7B: Accident Frequency for All Collision Types
Intersection
Day of Week as %
Time of Day as % of Total Accidents
Total
along Monroe
of Total Accidents
Accidents
Street
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
87
40
13
53
22
38
127
Michigan
10%
15%
0%
11%
9%
18%
15
8th
5%
3%
15%
2%
5%
3%
5
9th
8%
3%
15%
2%
9%
8%
8
10th
5%
3%
0%
4%
9%
3%
5
12th
17%
10%
15%
21%
14%
8%
19
13th
5%
8%
0%
8%
5%
5%
7
14th
10%
10%
31%
8%
5%
11%
13
15th
8%
3%
8%
8%
5%
5%
8
16th
2%
13%
8%
6%
5%
5%
7
17th
7%
18%
0%
9%
9%
16%
13
18th
10%
3%
8%
9%
9%
5%
10
22nd
2%
5%
0%
4%
0%
5%
4
S.Dakota
10%
10%
0%
9%
18%
8%
13

Total
Injuries
90
12
3
5
3
5
3
8
11
6
5
10
4
15

Other*: Accident type includes: hitting fixed object, ran off
road, backing, non-collision, all other.

AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening (18:3007:30).

Table 5-8e: Total of vehicle to non-vehicle type collisions.

Table 5-8c: Total of vehicle-to-vehicle type collisions.
Right
Angle

Left
Turn

Right
Turn

Rear
End

Side
Swipe

Head
On

Parked

Totals

Parked

Head
On

Side
Swipe

Rear
End

Right
Turn

8
3
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
2

12
1
0
0
0
5
0
1
1
0
2
1
0
1

110
13
4
5
3
17
5
11
8
6
12
9
4
13

Table
5-8d: Frequency of vehicle-to-vehicle type collisions.
TABLE 7D: Frequency of Vehicle-to-Vehicle Type Collisions
Rear
End

Side
Swipe

Head
On

Parked

Totals

Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Right
Turn

Distribution of Accident Type by Intersection

Left
Turn

Intersection
along Monroe
Street
Corridor
Totals
Michigan
8th
9th
10th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
22nd
S.Dakota

Right
Angle

11
2
0
1
0
1
2
2
0
1
1
1
0
0

18
2
2
1
2
6
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
1

Parked

50%
0%
100%
0%
100%
50%
100%
0%
100%
100%
0%
0%
0%

31
6
1
4
0
4
0
6
2
1
1
3
1
2

Head
On

Totals

50%
0%
0%
0%
0%
50%
0%
0%
0%
0%
100%
0%
0%

1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Side
Swipe

Other*

8
13%
0%
13%
0%
13%
13%
25%
0%
13%
13%
0%
0%
0%

8
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
3

Rear
End

Pedestrian

3
33%
0%
0%
0%
0%
33%
0%
0%
0%
0%
33%
0%
0%

Distribtion of Total Accidents by
Accident Type

Other*

Totals
Michigan
8th
9th
10th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
22nd
S.Dakota

Distribution of Accident Type across
Intersections

Intersections along
Monroe Street Corridor

Pedestrian

Table 5-8f: Frequency of vehicle to non-vehicle type
collisions.
TABLE 7F: Frequency of Vehicle to Non-Vehicle Type Collisions

32
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
4
4
9
2
3
4

Right
Turn

11
2
0
1
0
1
2
2
0
1
1
1
0
0

Left
Turn

8
1
0
1
0
1
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0

Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Left
Turn

Totals

3
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

Right
Angle

Other*

8
1
0
1
0
1
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0

TABLE 7C: Total of Vehicle to Vehicle Type Collisions
Distribution of Accident Type by Intersection
Intersection
along Monroe
Street
Corridor
Totals
32
8
1
31
18
8
12
Michigan
0
1
0
6
2
3
1
8th
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
9th
0
0
0
4
1
0
0
10th
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
12th
1
1
0
4
6
0
5
13th
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
14th
3
0
0
6
1
0
1
15th
4
0
0
2
0
1
1
16th
4
1
0
1
0
0
0
17th
9
0
0
1
0
0
2
18th
2
0
0
3
2
1
1
22nd
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
S.Dakota
4
3
0
2
1
2
1

Right
Angle

Pedestrian

3
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

Distribtion of Total Accidents by
Accident Type

Other*

Totals
Michigan
8th
9th
10th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
22nd
S.Dakota

Distribution of Accident Type across
Intersections

Intersections along
Monroe Street Corridor

Pedestrian

TABLE 7E: Total of Vehicle to Non Vehicle Type Collisions

32
0%
0%
0%
0%
3%
6%
9%
13%
13%
28%
6%
9%
13%

8
1
13%
0%
0% 100%
0%
0%
13%
0%
13%
0%
13%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
13%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
38%
0%

31
19%
3%
13%
0%
13%
0%
19%
6%
3%
3%
10%
3%
6%

18
11%
11%
6%
11%
33%
6%
6%
0%
0%
0%
11%
0%
6%

8
38%
0%
0%
0%
0%
13%
0%
13%
0%
0%
13%
0%
25%

12
8%
0%
0%
0%
42%
0%
8%
8%
0%
17%
8%
0%
8%

0%
0%
0%
0%
6%
40%
27%
50%
67%
75%
22%
75%
31%

8%
0%
0%
33%
6%
20%
0%
0%
17%
0%
0%
0%
23%

0%
25%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

46%
25%
80%
0%
24%
0%
55%
25%
17%
8%
33%
25%
15%

15%
50%
20%
67%
35%
20%
9%
0%
0%
0%
22%
0%
8%

23%
0%
0%
0%
0%
20%
0%
13%
0%
0%
11%
0%
15%

8%
0%
0%
0%
29%
0%
9%
13%
0%
17%
11%
0%
8%

110
13
4
5
3
17
5
11
8
6
12
9
4
13

AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening (18:3007:30).

Other*: Accident type includes: hitting fixed object, ran off
road, backing, non-collision, all other.

62

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

TABLE 5-9a-f: Accident Experience along Michigan Avenue,
N.E.
Table 5-9a: Total number of accidents for all collision types.

Table 5-9e: Total of vehicle to non-vehicle type collisions.
Pedestrian

Other*

Totals

24
5
4
1
1
4
2
1
0
2
4
0

8
1
3
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

24
5
4
1
1
4
2
1
0
2
4
0

32
6
7
2
2
4
2
2
0
2
4
1

Distribtion of Total Accidents by
Accident Type

8
1
3
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

24
21%
17%
4%
4%
17%
8%
4%
0%
8%
17%
0%

Totals

AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening (18:3007:30).

8
13%
38%
13%
13%
0%
0%
13%
0%
0%
0%
13%

Other*

Totals
N.Capitol
Franklin
4th
Monroe
10th
Bunker Hill Rd
12th
13th
14th
S.Dakota
Eastern Ave

Pedestrian

177
26
24
11
12
23
1
7
20
14
22
17

Distribtion of Total Accidents by
Accident Type

Intersections along
Michigan Ave
Corridor

Other*

Table 5-9f: Frequency of vehicle to non-vehicle type
collisions.
TABLE 8F: Frequency of Vehicle to Non-Vehicle Type Collisions
Total
Injuries

Pedestrian

Intersection
Day of Week as %
Time of Day as % of Total Accidents
Total
along
of Total Accidents
Accidents
Michigan Ave
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
168
61
26
84
40
79
229
N.Capitol
16%
20%
19%
18%
25%
11%
39
Franklin
15%
15%
15%
5%
28%
20%
35
4th
8%
7%
0%
11%
8%
6%
17
Monroe
5%
10%
0%
7%
5%
9%
15
10th
13%
11%
12%
14%
8%
13%
28
Bunker Hill Rd
1%
3%
0%
4%
0%
1%
4
12th
5%
2%
12%
5%
3%
3%
10
13th
9%
8%
4%
11%
8%
9%
20
14th
7%
5%
4%
10%
3%
6%
15
S.Dakota
16%
13%
27%
11%
13%
18%
35
Eastern Ave
4%
7%
8%
6%
3%
4%
11

Other*

Table
Accident
frequency
for all collision
types.
TABLE5-9b:
8B: Accident
Frequency
for All Collision
Types

Totals
N.Capitol
Franklin
4th
Monroe
10th
Bunker Hill Rd
12th
13th
14th
S.Dakota
Eastern Ave

Distribution of Accident Type
across Intersections

177
26
24
11
12
23
1
7
20
14
22
17

Intersections along
Michigan Ave
Corridor

Pedestrian

TABLE 8E: Total of Vehicle to Non Vehicle Type Collisions

Total
Injuries

Distribution of Accident Type
across Intersections

TABLE 8A: Total Number of Accidents for All Collision Types
Intersection
Number of Accidents
Number of Accidents per Time of Day
Total
along
per Day of Week
Accidents
Michigan Ave
Weekday Weekend AMPeak MIDDay PMPeak Evening
Corridor
Totals
168
61
26
84
40
79
229
N.Capitol
27
12
5
15
10
9
39
Franklin
26
9
4
4
11
16
35
4th
13
4
0
9
3
5
17
Monroe
9
6
0
6
2
7
15
10th
21
7
3
12
3
10
28
Bunker Hill Rd
2
2
0
3
0
1
4
12th
9
1
3
4
1
2
10
13th
15
5
1
9
3
7
20
14th
12
3
1
8
1
5
15
S.Dakota
27
8
7
9
5
14
35
Eastern Ave
7
4
2
5
1
3
11

17%
43%
50%
50%
0%
0%
50%
0%
0%
0%
100%

83%
57%
50%
50%
100%
100%
50%
0%
100%
100%
0%

32
6
7
2
2
4
2
2
0
2
4
1

Other*: Accident type includes: hitting fixed object, ran off
road, backing, non-collision, all other.

Table 5-9c: Total of vehicle-to-vehicle type collisions.

Right
Angle

Left Turn

Right
Turn

Rear End

Side
Swipe

Head On

Parked

Right
Angle

Left Turn

Right
Turn

Rear End

Side
Swipe

Head On

Parked

Totals

yp
Distribution of Accident Type by Intersection Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Intersection
along
Michigan Ave
Corridor
Totals
N.Capitol
Franklin
4th
Monroe
10th
Bunker Hill Rd
12th
13th
14th
S.Dakota
Eastern Ave

33
3
1
2
0
10
0
1
10
2
3
1

20
4
1
1
1
1
0
0
3
2
3
4

1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

73
15
11
5
6
8
0
2
6
7
13
0

34
7
4
5
2
2
1
2
0
0
6
5

18
1
4
2
3
3
0
0
1
1
3
0

11
1
6
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
2
0

33
3
1
2
0
10
0
1
10
2
3
1

20
4
1
1
1
1
0
0
3
2
3
4

1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

73
15
11
5
6
8
0
2
6
7
13
0

34
7
4
5
2
2
1
2
0
0
6
5

18
1
4
2
3
3
0
0
1
1
3
0

11
1
6
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
2
0

190
32
27
15
13
24
1
5
20
13
30
10

Table
5-9d: Frequency of vehicle-to-vehicle type collisions.
TABLE 8D: Frequency of Vehicle-to-Vehicle Type Collisions

47%
41%
33%
46%
33%
0%
40%
30%
54%
43%
0%

22%
15%
33%
15%
8%
100%
40%
0%
0%
20%
50%

3%
15%
13%
23%
13%
0%
0%
5%
8%
10%
0%

Totals

3%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

Parked

13%
4%
7%
8%
4%
0%
0%
15%
15%
10%
40%

Side
Swipe
Head
On

Right
Angle
Left
Turn
9%
4%
13%
0%
42%
0%
20%
50%
15%
10%
10%

Rear
End

11
9%
55%
0%
9%
0%
0%
0%
0%
9%
18%
0%

Right
Turn

18
6%
22%
11%
17%
17%
0%
0%
6%
6%
17%
0%

Parked

Intersection Distribution of Total Accidents by Accident Type

Rear
End
Side
Swipe
Head
On

Right
Angle
Left
Turn
Right
Turn

Intersection Distribution of Accident Type by
along
Michigan Ave
Corridor
Totals
33
20
1
73
34
N.Capitol
9% 20% 100% 21% 21%
Franklin
3% 5% 0% 15% 12%
4th
6% 5% 0%
7% 15%
Monroe
0% 5% 0%
8% 6%
10th
30% 5% 0% 11% 6%
Bunker Hill Rd 0% 0% 0%
0% 3%
12th
3% 0% 0%
3% 6%
13th
30% 15% 0%
8% 0%
14th
6% 10% 0% 10% 0%
S.Dakota
9% 15% 0% 18% 18%
Eastern Ave
3% 20% 0%
0% 15%

3%
22%
0%
8%
0%
0%
0%
0%
8%
7%
0%

190
32
27
15
13
24
1
5
20
13
30
10

AM Peak (07:30-09:30), Midday (09:00-16:00), PM Peak (16:00-18:30), Evening (18:30-07:30).

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

63

5.2 Multi-Modal Transportation Analysis
The transportation analyses for this study consisted of a review of various modes of travel,
including:

Automobile

Walking

Bicycling

Public Transit

The following discuss the study methodology and traffic engineering analysis using traffic
simulation modeling. The resulting intersection service levels during the morning and evening
peak hours are presented in both textual and tabular format.

5.2.1 Study Methodology
The initial phase of this study consisted of a thorough

corridors). Existing intersection lane arrangements,

inventory of existing travel patterns and field observations

traffic signal timing and phasing, and morning and

to document various aspects of the transportation system.

evening peak-hour traffic volumes were coded in

Consistent with the data collected as part of this effort and

the model to assess the existing traffic patterns. This

the associated analyses, the methodology for identifying

model provided estimates of intersection peak-hour

transportation improvements took into account several

levels of service to identify any capacity deficiencies

key factors, including:

that currently exist.
► Traffic Control Devices (i.e., signals, signs and

► Pedestrian Safety, Circulation and Accessibility.

pavement markings). This consisted of an evaluation

These include availability of pedestrian signal heads

of the equipment used for traffic signal operations and

at signalized intersections, condition and continuity

condition of existing signs and pavement markings.

of sidewalks, and existence of curb ramps at
intersections.

► Truck Routes and Regulations. A review of the present
truck regulation and field observations of truck

► Accident History (i.e., total number of accidents and

activity, particularly along the commercial core on

injuries by intersection). Traffic accident data for the

12th Street N.E., were the basis to assess truck access

four-year period between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2003

and circulation.

was obtained from DDOT. As discussed in chapter
5.1.8, this information was studied to determine
the frequency and type of accidents at various
intersections by time of day and day of week.

Based on the above criteria, as well as the available
roadway pavement width for accommodating various

modes of travel, several improvements were identified. It
► Traffic Volumes and Intersection Levels of Service. should be noted that some of the short-term improvements
Using Synchro, a traffic simulation computer software, contained herein may have already been addressed or
a model was developed for the entire roadway implemented by DDOT as part of its on-going maintenance
network (i.e., all key intersections along the three programs.

64

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
5.2.2 Traffic Engineering Analysis
As indicated earlier, a detailed traffic analysis was operate at an average LOS (C) or at a slightly better LOS
conduction for this study. This provided estimates of peak- (B). Even though the eastbound and westbound Franklin
hour levels of service at key intersections.

In addition, Street approaches operate at acceptable LOS during both

signal system timing adjustments were developed to peak periods; there are significant queues on westbound
improve traffic operations (see Appendix B for optimized Franklin Street during the AM peak and on eastbound
timings from Synchro outputs). Furthermore, conceptual Franklin Street during the PM peak. The major movements
intersection improvement alternatives were developed on northbound 12th Street operate near capacity LOS
for public concerns that had been raised regarding traffic (E) and LOS (D) during the AM and PM peak periods
safety and congestions.

respectively, with significant queues on northbound 12th
Street and average queues on southbound 12th Street.

Peak-Hour Levels of
Service
Generally, operation of an intersection is represented
by peak-hour levels if service (LOS). Intersection service
levels range from “A”, representing very low vehicle
delay (good conditions) to “F” describing excessive delay
(failing conditions). In most jurisdictions, including District of
Columbia, a level-of-service “D” or better is considered as
the minimum acceptable operational standard. A more
detailed description of service levels along with selected
Synchro model outputs is included in Appendix B.
r
The following sections discuss operation of individual
intersections during the morning and evening peak hours.

Details are provided in the following table.

TABLE 5-10: 12th Street at Franklin St., N.E. Intersection
Performance
AM PEAK HOUR

PM PEAK HOUR

12th St. at
95
De95 %
DeFranklin St,
V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS %
lay
Q
lay
N.E.
Q
Eastbound,
0.48 17.90 B
8
0.82 34.60 C
22
Franklin St
Westbound,
0.79 29.10 C
20
0.41 19.00 B
8
Franklin St
Northbound,
0.99 68.20 E
20
0.91 46.70 D
18
12th St
Southbound,
0.51 22.10 C
10
0.51 21.10 C
10
12th St
Overall Inter0.99 34.60 C
-0.91 32.40 C
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

figures 5-9 and 5-10 show the overall intersection levels of
service during peak hours. Details of the performance Roadway capacity is not exceeded for any of the
of each intersection such as volume-to-capacity ratio, approaches, however roadway capacity for northbound
average delay per vehicle, approach LOS, and length of 12th Street nears capacity during both peak periods.
queues are presented in tables 5-10 through 5-22. Tables
5-23 and 5-24 show a summary of intersection service
k
levels and over-saturated intersections within the study

12TH STREET AT MONROE STREET, N.E.

corridors. It should be noted that if one or more movement
or approach reaches or exceeds capacity, its failing LOS The intersection of 12th Street and Monroe Street operates
designation affects the overall intersection LOS.

at acceptable LOS (C) during the AM peak period and
LOS (D) during the PM peak period. The major movements

12TH STREET AT FRANKLIN STREET, N.E.

on westbound Monroe Street operate at LOS (C) during
the AM peak period, however eastbound Monroe Street
operates at a lower near capacity LOS (E) during the PM

The intersection of 12th Street and Franklin Street during the peak period. There are significant queues on westbound
r
AM peak operates at an average LOS (C). During the PM Monroe Street during the AM peak period and on
peak period, the intersection operates at LOS (C). The major eastbound Monroe Street during the PM peak period.
movements on Franklin Street during both peak periods

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

65

66

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-9: Existing AM Peak
Hour Levels of Service

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

67

68

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-10: Existing PM Peak
Hour Levels of Service

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

69

The major movements on 12th Street operate at LOS (C) TABLE 5-12: 12th Street at Michigan Avenue, N.E.
during both peak periods. As shown in table 5-11, the Intersection Performance
queues developed for the 12th Street approach are not
significant during either peak period.
TABLE 5-11: 12th Street at Monroe Street, N.E. Intersection
Performance

AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
12th St. at
V/C De- LOS 95 % V/C De- LOS 95 %
Monroe St
lay
Q
lay
Q
N.E.
Eastbound,
0.46 17.20 B
8
0.86 65.40 E
25
Monroe St
Westbound, 0.76 26.90 C
20
0.34 15.30 B
6
Monroe St
Nortbound, 0.50 23.80 C
10
0.66 27.50 C
13
12th St
Southbound, 0.56 24.50 C
11
0.55 24.30 C
11
12th St
Overall Inter- 0.76 23.90 C
-0.86 39.10 D
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
12th St at
95
De95 %
DeMichigan
V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS %
lay
Q
lay
Ave., N.E.
Q
Northbound,
0.44 21.8 C
8
0.63 30.2 C
13
12th St
Southbound,
0.94 47.0 D
27
0.79 36.6 D
17
12th St
Eastbound,
0.28 15.1 B
5
0.79 21.3 C
19
Michigan Ave
Westbound,
0.83 26.6 C
19
0.27 11.9 B
5
Michigan Ave
Overall Inter0.94 29.2 C
-0.79 23.6 C
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane. Roadway capacity for all intersection
movements is not exceeded during either peak period of operation.

MONROE STREET AT SOUTH DAKOTA AVENUE,
N.E.
The intersection of 12th Street at South Dakota Avenue

Roadway capacity is not exceeded for any of the operates at LOS (C) during the AM peak period and at
approaches to the 12th Street and Monroe Street LOS (E) during the PM peak period. The major movements
intersection, however, roadway capacity for eastbound on Monroe Street during the AM peak period operate at
Monroe Street nears capacity during the PM peak acceptable LOS without significant queues, however the
eastbound Monroe Street movement operates at LOS

period.

(F) during PM peak hour with above average queues.
Westbound Monroe Street operates at LOS (C) with below

12TH STREET AT MICHIGAN AVENUE, N.E.

average queues during the PM peak period. The major
movements on South Dakota Avenue operate at LOS (C)

The intersection of 12th Street and Michigan Avenue or better during both the AM and PM peak periods with
operates at LOS (C) during both the AM and PM peak average queues for both movements. Details are provided
periods. Northbound 12th Street operates at LOS (C) during in the following table.
both peak periods with average queues. Southbound 12th
Street operates at LOS (D) during both peak periods with
significant queues during the AM peak period and above
average queues during the PM peak period. Eastbound
Michigan Avenue operates at LOS (B) during the AM peak
period and LOS (C) during the PM peak period with below
average queues for the AM peak period and significant
queues during the PM peak period. Westbound Michigan
Avenue operates at LOS (C) during the AM peak period
and LOS (B) during the PM peak period with significant
queues during the AM peak period and below average
queues during the PM peak period. Details are provided
in the following table.

70

TABLE 5-13: Monroe Street at South Dakota Avenue, N.E.
Intersection Performance
AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
S Dakota
De95 %
De95 %
Ave at Mon- V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
lay
Q
lay
Q
roe St NE
Eastbound,
0.37 14.70 B
2
0.78 210.9 F
14
Monroe St
Westbound,
0.56 41.90 C
7
0.23 27.50 C
4
Monroe St
Southbound,
S Dakota
0.41 18.50 B
7
0.54 21.30 C
10
Ave
Northbound,
S Dakota
0.76 20.70 C
9
0.58 17.70 B
13
Ave
Overall Inter0.76 21.60 C
-0.78 55.10 E
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
As illustrated in table 5-13, roadway capacity for all
intersection movements is not exceeded during either
peak period of operation; however the traffic signal cycle,
phasing and limited green time cause significant vehicle
delay and LOS (F) operations for the eastbound Monroe
Street movement during the PM peak period.

MICHIGAN AVENUE
AVENUE, N.E.

AT

SOUTH DAKOTA

The intersection of Michigan Avenue and South Dakota
Avenue operates at LOS (E) during the AM peak period
and LOS (F) during the PM peak period. The eastbound
Michigan Avenue movements operate at acceptable

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 18TH STREET &
VARNUM STREET, N.E.
The intersection of Michigan Avenue at 18th Street
and Varnum Street operates at LOS (C) during the AM
peak period and at LOS (B) during the PM peak period.
Westbound Varnum Street operates at LOS (D) during both
peak periods with below average to average queues.
Northbound 18th Street operates at LOS (C) during the AM
peak period and at LOS (D) during the PM peak period;
below average queues occur during both peak periods.
The major movements along Michigan Avenue operate
at LOS (A) and (B) during the PM peak period, and at LOS
(B) and (C) during AM peak period. Details are provided
in the following table.

LOS (B) during the AM peak period and LOS (C) during
the PM peak period. There are significant queues for
eastbound Michigan Avenue during the PM peak period.
The westbound Michigan Avenue movement operates at
LOS (C) during the AM peak period and LOS (B) during
the PM peak period.

There are significant queues for

westbound Michigan Avenue during the AM peak period.
The southbound South Dakota Avenue movement
operates at LOS (F) during the AM and PM peak period;
Northbound South Dakota operates at LOS (C) during
both AM and PM peak periods. The South Dakota Avenue
movements do not experience significant queues during
either peak period. Details are provided in the following
table.
TABLE 5-15: Michigan Avenue at South Dakota Avenue,
N.E. Intersection Performance

TABLE 5-14: Michigan Avenue at 18th & Varnum Streets,
N.E. Intersection Performance
r

AM PEAK
AM PEAK HOUR
AM PEAK HOUR
HOUR
Michigan Ave
De95 %
De95 %
V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
at S Dakota NE
lay
Q
lay
Q
Eastbound,
0.36 17.50 B
5
0.86 28.80 C
21
Michigan Ave
95 % Westbound,
0.94 29.00 C
25
0.37 13.40 B
5
Q
Michigan Ave
Southbound, S
0.45 230.1 F
8
0.69 353.0 F
12
Dakota Ave
3
Northbound, S
0.71 24.60 C
13
0.53 22.80 C
9
Dakota Ave
5
Overall Inter0.94 63.20 E
-0.86 100.9 F
-section
2
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
Michigan
Ave at 18th/
De95 %
DeV/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
Varnum St
lay
Q
lay
NE
Westbound,
0.58 47.90 D
6
0.26 40.50 D
Varnum St
Northbound,
0.14 34.20 C
2
0.37 37.90 D
18th St
Southbound,
Michigan
0.73 21.80 C
6
0.37 13.90 B
Ave
Eastbound,
Michigan
0.29 17.10 B
5
0.79 5.30 A
1
Ave
Overall Inter0.73 23.40 C
-0.79 11.10 B
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

Roadway capacity for most movements at the Michigan
Avenue and South Dakota Avenue intersection is not
exceeded, however the traffic signal cycle, phasing and
limited green time cause significant vehicle delay and LOS

Roadway capacity is not exceeded for any movement (F) operations for the southbound South Dakota Avenue
at the intersection of Michigan Avenue at 18th Street & movement during both the AM and PM peak period.
Varnum Street.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

71

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 10TH STREET, N.E.
The intersection of Michigan Avenue and 10th Street
operates near capacity LOS (E) during the AM peak period
and LOS (B) during the PM peak period. The northbound
and southbound 10th Street movements operate at
LOS(C) during both AM and PM peak periods with average
queues. The eastbound Michigan Avenue movement
operates at LOS (A) during the AM peak period and LOS
(B) during the PM peak period. The eastbound Michigan
Avenue movement queues are below average during the
AM peak period and average during the PM peak period.
The westbound Michigan Avenue movement operates
at an over-capacity LOS (F) during the AM peak period
and LOS (B) during the PM peak period, with significant
queues during both peak periods. Details are provided in
the following table.
TABLE 5-16: Michigan Avenue at 10th Street, N.E.
Intersection Performance

the both the AM and PM peak periods. The eastbound
Michigan Avenue movement operates at LOS (A) during
the PM peak period and LOS (C) during the AM peak
period. The queues for eastbound Michigan Avenue are
below average for the AM peak period and are significant
during the PM peak period. The westbound Michigan
Avenue movement operates at LOS (B) during both the
AM and PM peak periods with average queues during the
AM peak period and below average queues during the
PM peak period. The northbound 7th Street movement
operates at LOS (B) during both the AM peak period and
the PM peak period with below average queues. The
southbound CUA Entrance movement operates at LOS
(C) during both the AM peak period and the PM peak
period with below average queues. Details are provided
in the following table.
TABLE 5-17: Michigan Avenue at 7th Street & CUA Entrance,
N.E. Intersection Performance

AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
DeV/C
LOS
lay

AM PEAK HOUR
95 %
DeV/C
LOS
Q
lay

Michigan at
95 %
10th St NE
Q
Northbound,
0.46 31.60 C
6
0.48 30.80 C
5
10th St
Southbound,
0.53 29.50 C
8
0.33 23.20 C
8
10th St
Eastbound,
Michigan
1.12 5.50 A
3
0.89 16.60 B
6
Ave
Westbound,
Michigan
0.80 84.40 F
20
0.30 11.80 B
21
Ave
Overall Inter0.80 59.40 E
-0.89 17.40 B
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

Roadway capacity is exceeded for the westbound
Michigan Avenue movement in the AM peak period.
The intersection operation and lane use for westbound

Michigan at
7th St/CUA
Ent., NE
Eastbound,
Michigan Ave
Westbound,
Michigan Ave
Northbound,
7th St
Southbound,
CUA Driveway
Overall Intersection

V/C

Delay

0.30

PM PEAK HOURS
95 %
V/C
Q

Delay

LOS

95 %
Q

23.50 C

4

0.77

8.30

A

18

0.71

14.50 C

13

0.40

14.90 B

7

0.19

14.50 B

2

0.15

15.00 B

2

0.09

23.30 C

1

0.56

31.80 C

5

0.71

17.10 B

--

0.77

12.80 B

--

LOS

Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

Roadway capacity is not exceeded for any movement
at the intersection of Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/
Entrance to CUA during either the AM or PM peak period.

Michigan Avenue as well as the traffic signal cycle, phasing
and limited green time cause significant vehicle delay and
LOS (F) operations for this movement.

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 7TH STREET/ ENTRANCE
TO CUA
The intersection of Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/ entrance
to Catholic University of America operates at LOS (B) during

72

MICHIGAN AVENUE
STREET, N.E.

AT

NORTH CAPITOL

The intersection of Michigan Avenue and North Capitol
Street operates at LOS (D) during both the AM and PM peak
periods.

The eastbound Michigan Avenue movement

operates at LOS (C) during the AM peak period and LOS
(D) during the PM peak period. Eastbound Michigan

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
Avenue movement has average queues during the AM
peak period and significant queues during the PM peak
kperiod. The westbound Michigan Avenue movement
operates at near capacity LOS (E) during both the AM and
PM peak periods with significant queues during the AM
peak period and significant queues during the PM peak
period. The northbound North Capitol Street movement
operates at LOS (C) during both the AM and PM peak
period with average queues during the AM peak period
and significant queues during the PM peak period.
As shown in table 5-18, the southbound North Capitol
Street movement operates at LOS (C) during the AM peak

MICHIGAN AVENUE
N.E.

AT

MONROE STREET,

The eastbound Michigan Avenue movements operate at
acceptable LOS (B) during the AM peak period and an
over capacity LOS (F) during the PM peak period. There are
significant queues for eastbound Michigan Avenue during
the PM peak period. The westbound Michigan Avenue
movement operates at LOS (E) during the AM peak period
and LOS (A) during the PM peak period. There are significant
queues for westbound Michigan Avenue during the AM
peak period. The northbound Monroe Street movement

operates at LOS (F) during the AM and PM peak period
kperiod and LOS (B) during the PM peak period with slightly with above average queues during the AM peak period
above average queues during the AM peak period and
and below average queues during the PM peak period.
below average queues during the PM peak period.
Details are provided in the following table.
TABLE 5-19: Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street, N.E.
TABLE 5-18: Michigan Avenue at North Capitol Street, N.E. Intersection Performance
Intersection Performance
AM PEAK HOUR
AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
Michigan Ave
De95 %
De95 %
at N. Capitol
V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
lay
Q
lay
Q
St, N.E.
Eastbound,
0.59 32.50 C
9
0.94 42.70 D
20
Michigan Ave
Westbound,
1.34 68.70 E
21
1.36 65.30 E
13
Michigan Ave
Northbound,
0.58 21.30 C
9
0.84 25.60 C
18
N Capitol St
Southbound,
0.75 25.80 C
14
0.36 16.70 B
6
N Capitol St
Overall Inter1.34 39.60 D
-1.36 35.80 D
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

Michigan Ave
at Monroe St.,
N.E.
Eastbound,
Michigan Ave
Westbound,
Michigan Ave
Northbound,
Monroe St
Overall Intersection

V/C

Delay

0.28

PM PEAK HOUR
95 %
V/C
Q

Delay

12.30 B

1

0.74

137.7 F

29

0.72

75.60 E

19

0.31

6.50

A

2

0.69

410.9 F

14

0.27

246.2 F

5

--

--

--

--

--

--

LOS

B

LOS

F

95 %
Q

Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

Roadway capacity is exceeded for the eastbound
Roadway capacity is not exceeded for any of the
intersection movements. The intersection operation and
lane use for westbound Michigan Avenue movement as
well as the traffic signal cycle, phasing and limited green
time cause above-average vehicle delays and the LOS
(D) operations for this movement during both the morning

Michigan Avenue movement in the PM peak period and
for the northbound Monroe Street movement during both
periods. The intersection operation and lane use as well
as the traffic signal cycle, phasing and limited green time
cause significant vehicle delay and LOS (F) operations for
these movements.

and evening peak periods. This service level, however,
meets the minimum operational requirements.
k

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT 4TH STREET, N.E.
The intersection of Michigan Avenue and 4th Street
operates at LOS (F) during the AM peak period and LOS
(E) during the PM peak period. The eastbound Michigan
Avenue movements operate at acceptable LOS (A)

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

73

during the AM peak period and at a near capacity LOS TABLE 5-21: Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road, N.E.
(E) during the PM peak period. The westbound Michigan Intersection Performance
Avenue movement operates at LOS (F) during the AM peak
period and LOS (B) during the PM peak period. There are
significant queues for westbound Michigan Avenue during
the AM peak period. The northbound 4th Street movement
operates at LOS (F) during the PM peak period and LOS
(D) during the AM peak period; the southbound Shrine
entrance/exit approach operates at LOS (C) during the
AM peak period and LOS (B) during the PM peak period.
The 4th Street and Shrine entrance/exit movements do not
experience significant queues during either peak period.
Details are provided in the following table.
TABLE 5-20: Michigan Avenue at 4th Street, N.E. Intersection
Performance
AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOUR
Michigan
De95 %
De95 %
Ave. at 4th St, V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
lay
Q
lay
Q
N.E.
Eastbound,
0.61 6.90 A
1
0.96 72.60 E
2
Michigan Ave
Westbound,
1.15 135.9 F
43
0.51 19.10 B
12
Michigan Ave
Northbound,
0.27 35.20 D
4
0.72 133.3 F
11
4th St
Southbound,
Shrine En0.10 22.20 C
2
0.24 19.00 B
3
trance
Overall Inter1.15 100.3 F
-0.96 63.00 E
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOURS
Michigan
Ave at HareDe95 %
De95 %
V/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
wood Rd,
lay
Q
lay
Q
N.E.
Eastbound,
Michigan
0.70 28.10 C
11
1.16 123.7 F
29
Ave
Westbound,
Michigan
1.03 46.50 D
0
0.47 2.20 A
1
Ave
Southbound,
Harewood
0.51 46.80 D
25
0.41 47.10 D
19
Rd
Northbound,
Harewood
0.75 99.30 F
11
0.40 49.80 D
9
Rd
Overall Inter1.03 47.80 D
-1.16 79.50 E
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95% Q=
Queue in vehicles per lane.

As shown in table 5-21, the eastbound Michigan Avenue
movements operate at acceptable LOS (C) during the AM
peak period and at an over-capacity LOS (F) during the PM
peak period. The westbound Michigan Avenue movement
operates at LOS (D) during the AM peak period and LOS (A)
during the PM peak period. There are significant queues for
eastbound Michigan Avenue during the PM peak period.
The northbound Harewood Road movement operates at
LOS (F) during the AM peak period and LOS (D) during the
PM peak period; southbound Harewood Road operates

at LOS (D) during the both peak periods with significant
Roadway capacity for most movements at the Michigan queues during both peak periods.
Avenue and 4th Street intersection is not exceeded,
however the traffic signal cycle, phasing and limited green Roadway capacity for most movements at the Michigan
time cause significant vehicle delay and LOS (F) operations Avenue and Harewood Road intersection is not exceeded,
for the westbound Michigan Avenue movement during the however the traffic signal cycle, phasing and limited green
AM peak period and Northbound 4th Street during the PM time cause significant vehicle delay and LOS (F) operations
peak period. Roadway capacity for eastbound Michigan for the eastbound Michigan Avenue movement during the
Avenue nears capacity during the PM peak period.
PM peak period and northbound Harewood Road during
the AM peak period.

MICHIGAN AVENUE
N.E.

AT

HAREWOOD ROAD,
MICHIGAN AVENUE AT IRVING STREET, N.E.

The intersection of Michigan Avenue and Harewood Road The intersection of Michigan Avenue and Irving Street
operates at LOS (D) during the AM peak period and LOS operates at LOS (A) during the AM peak period and
(E) during the PM peak period.
LOS (B) during the PM peak period. Southbound Irving
Street operates at LOS (C) during both peak periods with

74

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
below average queues during the AM peak period and As illustrated in table 5-23, some of the intersections are
average queues during the PM peak period. Eastbound operating at over-saturated conditions (i.e., level-of-service
Michigan Avenue operates at LOS (A) during the AM above “D”). These intersections were further analyzed with
peak period and LOS (C) during the PM peak period with optimized traffic signal timing plans and possibly inclusion
below average queues for both peak periods. Westbound of vehicle detectors to achieve improved service levels.
Michigan Avenue operates at LOS (A) during both peak The results are shown in table 5-24.
periods with below average queues during the both peak
periods. Details are provided in the following table.
TABLE 5-24: Over-Saturated Intersections
TABLE 5-22: Michigan Avenue at Irving Street, N.E.
Intersection Performance
AM PEAK HOUR
PM PEAK HOURS
Michigan
De95 %
De95 %
Ave. at IrV/C
LOS
V/C
LOS
lay
Q
lay
Q
ving St, N.E.
Eastbound,
Michigan
0.32 7.90 A
5
0.50
C
8
Ave
Westbound,
Michigan
0.70 2.60 A
1
0.44 8.90 A
4
Ave
Southbound,
0.30
C
4
0.64
C
12
Irving St
Overall Inter0.70 9.20 A
-0.64 18.5 B
-section
Notes: V/C= Volume /Capacity, Delay=Delay in seconds, 95%
Q= Queue in vehicles per lane. Red font indicates failing intersection approach or intersection

Intersection
AM
PEAK
Monroe St at South
Dakota Ave, N.E.
Michigan Ave at
South Dakota Ave,
N.E.
Michigan Ave at
Monroe St, N.E.
Michigan Ave at
Harewood Rd, N.E.

Level of Service
PM
COMMENTS
PEAK

C

E

C/C with retiming

E

F

C/C with retiming

B

F

D

E

B/A with retiming &
actuation
D/D with retiming &
actuation

rRoadway capacity is not exceeded for any movement
at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and Irving Street
during either the AM or PM peak period.

Franklin St / 12th
St

Monroe St / 12th
St

Quincy St / 12th
St *

Monroe St /
S.Dakota

N.Capitol / Michigan

Irving / Michigan
Ave

Harewood /
Michigan

4th St / Michigan
Ave

Monroe St /
Michigan

7th St / CUA /
Michigan Ave

10th St /
Michigan Ave

12th St /
Michigan Ave

S.Dakota Ave /
Michigan Ave

Varnum / 18th /
Michigan Ave

TABLE 5-23: Summary of Intersection Service Level

AM Overall LOS
Approach LOS
Eastbound
Westbound
Northbound
Southbound

C

C

*

C

D

A

D

F

F

B

E

C

E

C

B
C
E
C

B
C
C
C

C
B
A
A

B
D
C
B

C
E
C
C

A
A
-C

C
D
F
D

A
F
D
C

B
E
F
--

C
B
B
C

A
F
C
C

B
C
C
D

B
C
C
F

B
D
C
C

PM Overall LOS
Approach LOS
Eastbound
Westbound
Northbound
Southbound

C

D

*

E

D

B

F

E

F

B

B

C

F

B

C
B
D
C

E
B
C
C

C
C
A
A

F
C
B
C

D
E
C
B

F
A
-C

E
A
D
D

C
B
F
B

F
A
F
--

B
B
B
C

B
B
C
C

C
B
C
D

C
B
C
F

A
D
D
B

A: Intersection Level of Service

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

75

5.2.3 Walking Environment
Land use and public transit services influence pedestrian the west leg of Michigan Avenue.
movements

throughout

the

Brookland

community.

Hence, the nearby bus stops, metro stations, schools, and It should be noted that not all of the intersections shown
stores generate increased pedestrian traffic. This section in the table were part of the initial data collection for this
describes pedestrian movements and counts, availability study. When available, additional intersections, footnoted
of pedestrian crossing signals, and historical accident by a letter, were included to supplement the pedestrian
data for the three study corridors with emphasis on the counts conducted for this study.
intersections.
The

current

east-west

and

north-south

pedestrian

movements at each intersection for the AM peak (7:00-

GENERAL FIELD OBSERVATIONS

9:00) and the PM peak (4:00-6:00) are shown in table 525. In the table, east-west indicates that the pedestrian Pedestrian movements in the study area do not appear to
is crossing the intersection in the east-west direction. Thus impact vehicular traffic. However, pedestrian movements
at Monroe Street and 12th Street, the east-west direction are greatly impacted by vehicular traffic. Causes for
would be crossing 12th Street and the north-south direction restricted movements at many intersections include (1)
would be crossing Monroe Street. For intersections along heavy vehicular traffic along Michigan Avenue and 12th
Michigan Avenue, which runs diagonally across Brookland, Street, (2) wide vehicular right-of-ways along Michigan
the north-south direction is assumed to be crossing Avenue, and (3) lack of signal timing for pedestrian
Michigan Avenue. At Michigan/18th/Varnum however, crossings at locations were pedestrian indications are not
the east-west direction would be for crossing 18th Street present.
and the east leg of Michigan Avenue, whereas the northsouth direction would be for crossing Varnum Street and There are some locations where advance pedestrian

TABLE 5-25: Existing Pedestrian Volumes
Intersection / Pedestrians

AM Peak
East-West
43
12
22
65
18
84
5
31
9
34

PM Peak
East-West
9
11
47
58
23
22
7
18
6
72

AM Peak
North-South
49
27
3
68
36
47
4
22
14
145

PM Peak
North-South
5
18
5
77
51
16
4
18
28
17

12th/Rhode Island/Saratoga (e)
12th/Franklin
12th/Hamlin (a)
12th/Monroe
12th/Quincy
Monroe/18th (b)
Monroe/S.Dakota
Michigan/N.Capitol
Michigan/4th & Nat.Shrine (c)
Michigan/7th & CUA
Michigan/JohnMcCormack
Michigan/10th St
24
17
6
16
Michigan/12th
28
11
23
21
Michigan/14th (d)
15
11
7
10
Michigan/South Dakota
11
25
9
7
Michigan/Varnum&18th
3
4
24
74
10th/Taylor (f)
8
5
14
12
10th/Monroe (f)
44
40
63
17
12th/Taylor (f)
2
7
4
10
Puerto Rico / 7th / Taylor (f)
4
0
9
9
8th/Taylor (f)
1
1
3
2
Unless noted otherwise, counts were performed during the Summer and Fall of 2004.
(a) Counts performed by DDOT, 8/31/99
(d) Counts performed by DDOT, 2/10/98
(b) Counts performed by DDOT, 4/17/97
(e) Counts performed by DCI, 2/25/04
c) Counts performed by DDOT, 8/14/97
(f) Counts performed by O.R.George & Associates, June 2004

76

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

Notes
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
2-way stop
Traffic Signal
2-way stop
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
1-way north
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
Traffic Signal
2-way stop

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
warning crossing signing is blocked by trees. Currently, all observed at the Newton Street intersection, a location with
pedestrian signal heads that are in use are of the type many pedestrian/vehicle conflicts with a great number of
that flash “WALK” or “DON’T WALK”. Newer “countdown” crossings near the CVS Drug Store and other stores. The
pedestrian signal heads that indicate the timing that is absence of a traffic signal may cause vehicular traffic not
needed to cross the intersection have not been found to yield to pedestrians. A flexible pedestrian bollard was
in these corridors. This type of indicator is typically useful placed at the north leg of the intersection to heighten
for long crossings where the vehicles have a wide section awareness to the pedestrians crossing at this intersection,
of roadway that might prove difficult for the pedestrian thereby, reminding drivers that it is DC law to “yield to
to cross, especially when there is no median. These pedestrians in the crosswalk” with or without a traffic
pedestrian signal indications can prove helpful as the signal. Within a few months, the temporary bollard was
pedestrians can gain the information of the time left to damaged extensively by the driving public and has not
cross the street if they are arriving at the crossing near the been reinstalled. Rhode Island Avenue and 12th Street has
end of their available time. Most of the crossings along a significant number of pedestrians during the morning
the three corridors would benefit from such “countdown” peak hour destined for the Rhode Island Avenue Metro
pedestrian signal heads, especially Michigan Avenue with Station. The largest number of pedestrian movements for
its typically wide intersections, 12th Street with its moderate both the AM and PM peak occurs at the Monroe Street
pedestrian volumes, and Monroe Street intersections intersection.
r
near schools such as St. Anthony’s, Burroughs Elementary,
and Brookland Elementary. (Please refer to Table 5-5 for
additional information regarding vehicular and pedestrian

The Monroe Street corridor was seen to

traffic signals).

exhibit moderate volumes with large AM peak movements
at the 18th Street intersection due to the Burroughs

Pedestrian activity declines after dark on both weekdays Elementary School pedestrian movements. Crossing guards
and weekends, which is expected for a residentially were not observed at the nearby school intersections at
oriented neighborhood. However, based on comments 18th and 20th Streets. The Michigan Avenue and 7th Street,
received from various stakeholders, a lack of safety, mostly N.E. intersection has significant pedestrian volume crossing
attributed to deficient sidewalk lighting, may contribute to to the Catholic University and its dormitory at the corner of
the intersection. The Brookland Metro station with access

this pattern.

near 9th Street and John McCormack Drive is a significant
While the crosswalks are generally in good condition, there generator of pedestrian traffic. In addition, pedestrians
are some locations where pavement markings are worn or have access to both sides of the Monroe Street Bridge
eradicated as a result of construction. Various intersections over the Metro and railroad tracks between 8th and 9th
do not have “curb-cuts” or do not comply with recent ADA Streets.
standards. Throughout the study area, wooden utility poles
are placed within the sidewalk area, affecting accessibility
of pedestrians, bicyclists, or individuals with disabilities.

Michigan Avenue:

The pedestrian activity

along this corridor is concentrated near the Catholic
University of America area as well as near the Brookland

CORRIDOR-SPECIFIC FIELD OBSERVATIONS

Metro station. In addition, the 18th Street and Varnum
Street intersection has significant pedestrian activity during
PM peak period. Pedestrians also have access to the north

12th Street

side of the Michigan Avenue Bridge over the Metro and
was observed to have moderate railroad tracks. Public comments noted that pedestrians

pedestrian traffic with the focus of pedestrian traffic avoid to use that sidewalk as speeding bicyclists often
occurring between the Monroe Street and Michigan conflict with pedestrians.
Avenue intersections. The heaviest pedestrian traffic was

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

77

5.2.4 Bicycling in Brookland
The proposed Metropolitan Branch Trail (MBT) is

The trail will then pass under the Michigan

a part of the Potomac National Heritage Trail

Avenue Bridge abutment and continue over

network and passes through the Brookland study

to cross Monroe Street.

area. The planned 8-mile trail connecting Union
Station and downtown Washington with Silver

Chapters 8.7 and 8.8. recommend the

Spring, Maryland is proposed to be constructed

implementation of bike lanes for the study

using different classes (types) of bike trails, on-

area’s Monroe Street and Bridge ti facilitate the

road bicycle lanes, pathways adjacent to

District’s planned bicycle route. Infrastructure

roadways, and off-road trails through existing

and streetscape improvements should calm

and proposed parklands. Some sections will

traffic and increase pedestrianan dbicycle

include sidewalks for pedestrians. The trail’s path

safety around the bridge approach areas,

parallels the Metro’s Red Line through northeast

which have blind spots created by the

Washington. An extensive study has been

vertical crest of the bridge. The added bike

conducted and details the various features of

lanes will improve brookland connectivity to

the trail and its alignment options at Monroe

the trail and areas to west and enahance

Street as well as the bridge options that are
proposed for the Rhode Island Avenue Metro
Station location. Figure 5-11 shows the location
of existing and proposed bicycle facilities within
the study area.
The Metropolitan Branch Trail also includes
a segment that will connect at Fort Totten to
the Anacostia Tributaries Trail System in West
Hyattsville, Maryland, and a connection to the
National Mall. The MBT will be an important
transportation route providing direct access
to seven of Metro’s Red Line stations and
connecting to the Washington area’s trail
network at the Capital Crescent Trail and the
East Coast Greenway.
The District Department of Transportation (DDOT)
is now finalizing the concept plan for the 7 miles
of the trail within District boundaries. The study
can be found on the DDOT website.
Of note, the trail has already been constructed
as a sidepath (concurrent pedestrian and
bicyclist) route along John McCormack Road,
adjacent to Catholic University between the
Fort Totten transfer station and the sitting park
near the Brookland/CUA Metro Station.

78

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-11: Existing & Proposed
Bike Facilities

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

79

5.2.5 Public Transit System
The Brookland area is well served by public
transportation. The Brookland/CUA and
Rhode Island Avenue Metro stations along
the red line provide local and regional mass
transit service for commuters, residents,
employees, students, and visitors. The rail
service is supplemented by several metro
bus lines. Figure 5-12 shows the location of
the stations and the bus routes within the
study area.
Representatives

of

the

Washington

Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA)
have been actively involved in this study
and are aware of community concerns
regarding pedestrian accessibility, signage,
and bicycle parking at the metro stations.
As part of WMATA’s 2007 Station Access
Improvement Plan and the District’s Small
Area Plan Update for the Brookland Metro
Station, improvements addressing these
concerns will tie into the recommendations
contained herein.

80

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

TRANSPORTATION - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 5-12: Existing Public
Transportation (MetroRail /MetroBus)

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

81

6. PUBLIC REALM EXISTING CONDITIONS
6.1 Streetscape
The “public realm” is defined as “the publicly owned and

12th Street is a designated Main Street between Michigan

controlled spaces between buildings—and the elements

and Rhode Island Avenues, focusing on the two-block

that define it.” The condition of the public realm will help

area between Otis Street to the north and Monroe Street

determine whether the goal of creating a multi-modal,

to the south. The northern end of 12th Street (intersection

pedestrian-friendly, transit oriented mixed-use corridor is

of 12th Street and Michigan Avenue), is an important

realized.

intersection -currently enhanced by a community

The public right-of-way, defined by the buildings, consist
of two broad streetscape elements — sidewalks and
roadways. Both of them may cater to bicyclists, creating a
challenge for transportation planners to provide functional
and safe routes for all modes of transportation.
The term “streetscape” refers to the character of the
public realm, including pedestrian, bicycle, vehicular,
and transit right-of-ways. Sidewalks, benches, lighting,
bicycle racks, bollards/safety posts, bus shelters, and
other amenities are elements of the streetscape.

garden- that has potential to be a Northern Gateway.
Similarly, the southern end of the corridor (intersection
of 12th Street and Rhode Island Avenue), connecting
the neighborhood to the Rhode Island Metro Station, is
considered Brookland’s Southern Gateway.
The two-block stretch along 12th Street between Monroe
and Otis Streets is currently a 100% corner, which offers
the community, residents and students from surrounding
universities and schools diverse commercial activities. It
also acts as a Central Gateway to the corridor due to
its close proximity to the Brookland/CUA Metro station

The following chapters include an inventory and analysis

and other bus routes. The stretch of Monroe Street

of the streetscape components as they relate to both

connecting the Monroe Street Bridge and the 9th Street

transportation and the public realm within the study area.

access point of the Brookland/CUA Metro Station with

Figure 6-1 shows the general public realm study area that

12th Street is emerging as a retail corridor. Monroe Street

includes the following roadways:

is also a prominent connection across the railroad tracks
integrating communities and institutions from the West
and East.

►12th Street between Michigan Avenue
to the north and Rhode Island Avenue
to the south (approximately 1.2 miles).
►Approximately .3 miles of Monroe Street

The remaining blocks along 12th Street, Segment A
and Segment B, are generally residential in nature with
commercial land use interspersed.
The public realm existing condition assessment includes
comments and concerns raised during the public meetings

between 7th and 12th Street, including

and community walks. They have been examined and

the Monroe Street Bridge.

documented through additional field reconnaissance by

►Two blocks of Newton Street connecting
the Brookland/CUA Metro Station and

the study team. As such, chapter 6.6 contains a discussion
about the undergrounding of overhead utility wires,
which is followed by the ‘recommendations’ section of
the report (chapters 7 and 8).

12th Street.

82

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

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Segment A: Mixed Use
Segment B: Predominantly
residential use in northern part
with developing commercial
uses; mixed use in southern
portion.

Figure 6-1: Public Realm Study Area

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83

6.2 Street Lighting & Utility Poles
As many residents, business owners, and 12th Street employees
noted at the public meetings, nighttime lighting and safety are
major concerns along 12th Street. Typical cobra-head style
lights provide the majority of night lighting within the 12th Street
corridor. These lights are typically mounted on overhead utility
poles as shown in the photographs (opposite page). Cobrahead lights are typical highway-type lights, with an extended
arm and a head fixture that looks like a snake or cobra. Along
12th Street, they are approximately 25 feet tall. This type of light
is primarily designed to illuminate the roadway, with very little
of the light emitted from the cobras spilling onto the sidewalks.
Thus, the existing roadway lighting does very little to illuminate
the pedestrian environment and generally lacks character
and warmth. In some areas, roadway lights are mounted on
only one side of the street. Pedestrian-scale pole lighting does
not exist along 12th Street. Exacerbating the problem, some
existing lamps are missing or out within the cobra head pole
lights, resulting in under-lit areas. The map to the right shows
the location of existing cobra-head pole lights. Light coverage,
represented in yellow concentric circles, is estimated based on
the fixture type, pole height, and pole spacing.
There is very little “spill-lighting” along 12th Street. Spill lighting
is the lighting that projects onto a street from inside a nearby
restaurant or business, or from their signs. Since most retail stores
close after dark and many buildings remain vacant, spill lighting
is not abundant. The south side of the 12th Street where there is
less commercial activities is extremely dark. In addition, trees
sometimes conflict with the tall roadway pole lights and further
reduce the amount of light illuminating pedestrian areas.
Insufficient lighting reinforces the lingering perception that 12th
Street is an unsafe place, which impacts local businesses along
the corridor. The poorly lit streets deter many residents from
walking 12th Street during evening times.
Legend

Light Mounted on
Utility Pole

Utility Pole

Hydrant

84

Figure 6-2: Map of street lighting & utility poles - existing conditions.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 6-3: Photo of existing roadway lighting mounted on a utility pole.

Figure 6-6: Photo of hydrants, mostly located on the corner of an
intersection.

Figure 6-7: Photo of varying distance between light fixtures and trees.

Figure 6-4: Photo of existing cobra type roadway lighting with 25’-30’ in
height.

Figure 6-5: Photo of existing lighting that focuses on the roadway.

Figure 6-8: Photo of roadway lights on east side of 12th Street between
Kearny Street to Rhode Island Avenue.

Figure 6-9: Photo showing lack of pedestrian lighting throughout 12th
Street.

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85

6.3 Sidewalks
SIDEWALK MATERIALS
The majority of the sidewalk materials along 12th Street is concrete
and its condition varies from poor to good. Some sidewalks consist
of either concrete or concrete with brick accent bands, which
is often found at intersection corners in the commercial areas.
The following sidewalk issues have been expressed by residents
at the public meetings/community walks and observed by the
study team: sidewalks in disrepair; uneven pavements; careless
patching with inappropriate materials (asphalt); and cracking
or buckling due from tree roots (see photos next page).
SIDEWALK WIDTHS
Sidewalk widths along 12th Street vary from approximately five to
fifteen feet, except at some intersection corners where sidewalks
are much larger. Inconsistent sidewalk widths and the inability
to comfortably walk along the 12th Street corridor is a concern
within the community. Some of the narrowest sections have tree
boxes, street pole lights, and poorly located bus shelters that
further reduce the walking zone for pedestrian circulation. The
legend and map identify narrow (less than 6’), standard (6’-10’),
and wide (more than 10’) sidewalks. Along 12th Street, most of
the sidewalks are considered “standard”, approximately 20%
are considered “narrow”, and the remaining sidewalks, usually
at intersection corners, are considered “wide”.
CURBS, GUTTERS AND RAMPS
Curb and gutter materials and combinations vary throughout
12th Street. Curbs are typically constructed of granite or
concrete, gutters are made of concrete. Concrete curbs are
usually found along the corridor, and concrete gutters with
granite curbs are usually found along the southern portion of
the corridor connecting to Rhode Island Avenue. As with the
sidewalks, the curb and gutter conditions differ by block, and
lack consistent materials and designs. Community comments
have revealed several curb, gutter, and curb ramp issues, such
as curbs in disrepair, sinking and uneven pavements and poor
drainage along some roadways. Several of the intersections
along the corridor have substandard single corner curb or ADA
ramps, which misdirect users into the intersection instead of
safely across street. Other issues involve street pole lights and
newspaper boxes that physically intrude into the curb ramp
area, and instances at intersections where curb ramps are
missing completely.

86

Figure 6-10: Map of sidewalks - existing conditions.

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Figure 6-11: Photo of concrete sidewalk, Brookland’s standard.

Figure 6-15: Photo of sidewalk, partially interrupted by tree planting
areas.

Figure 6-12: Photo of concrete curbing, some showing signs of
wear and tear.

Figure 6-16: Photo of granite curbing in good condition.

Figure 6-13: Photo of various sidewalk treatments and materials.

Figure 6-17: Photo of ADA ramp, many do not meet current
accessibility standards.

Figure 6-14: Photo of concrete pavement, generally in good
condition but uneven pavement exists.

Figure 6-18: Photo of cracking concrete sidewalk.

Legend

Narrow Sidewalk
(Less than 6’)

Standard Sidewalk
(6’ - 8’)

Wide Sidewalk
(More than 8’)

Pedestrian
Crossing

Uneven Pavement

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6.4 Street Furnishings
STREET FURNISHINGS
12th Street furnishings, as shown in figure 6-19, are either
non-existent or randomly located, and, with the exception
of trash receptacles, much of what exists is in disrepair.
Materials for these elements vary from one part of the
corridor to the other. Bicycle racks along 12th Street are
present, but only in a few locations. They are the inverted
“U” type, painted black. There are no benches along the
corridor. Overall, there is no unified design for the style,
materials, color, or location of street furnishings within the
public realm.
TRASH RECEPTACLES
Although there appears to be an adequate number of
trash receptacles along most parts of 12th Street, some
littering is still present on the sidewalks, in tree boxes,
around bus shelters and along curbs and gutters. Trash
receptacles are DC standard brown wrought iron frames
with hinged doors; they are durable and in satisfactory
condition. Trash receptacles are found next to bus stops/
shelters, at street corners, and occasionally mid-block.
Additional trash receptacles could be located near fast
food/carry-out restaurants, convenience stores, and
liquor stores.
BUS SHELTERS
Bus shelters are present at certain places within the
corridor; however, some are either not clean or not well
maintained. Shelters are located on the sidewalk or in the
special area where pedestrians can easily access them.

Legend

Bus Shelter

Bus Stop

Mail Box

Bike Rack

Trash Receptacle
Public Phone

88

Figure 6-19: Map of furnishings - existing conditions.

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PUBLIC REALM - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 6-20: Photo of bus shelter located at intersection of Quincy and
12th Streets in front of St. Anthony’s Church.

Figure 6-21: Photo of trash receptacles, located throughout the
corridor.

Figure 6-24: Photo of bus stop, located on every other block. Several bus
stops lack trash receptacles.

Figure 6-22: Photo of parking meters, located in the neighborhood retail
area. Approximately half of them do not work.

Figure 6-25: Photo of mail boxes, located in several areas along the
corridor.

Figure 6-23: Photo showing lack of benches along 12th Street.

Figure 6-26: Photo of damaged bike rack along 12th Street. Lack of racks
causes bikes to be locked on random poles and parking meters.

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89

6.5 Street Trees
Most street trees along 12th Street are growing in a grass strip between the
sidewalk and the roadway curb. At several commercial locations, trees
are growing in planters or tree pits surrounded by concrete sidewalk. The
existing grass strip provides a contiguous planting area for tree roots. In
some parts, residents have extended their private gardens into the grass
strip and beautified the immediate surroundings by introducing plantings,
stones, and garden artifacts. In other cases, unmowed and eroded
grassy areas create an unpleasant appearance, which becomes a host
for garbage, debris, and waste matter.
The grass strip increases the impermeable surface of the public right-ofway, thereby increasing the on-site water holding capacity of the site.
In general, the existing soil is extremely compacted and lacks organic
compounds. Compaction of soil and lack of organics is a main reason
for the decay and potential death of urban trees because of the inability
to take in oxygen and minerals.
In commercial areas, tree pits replace the grass strip and low growing
trees as well as shade trees are planted under utility wires. Shade trees
provide overhead canopy but conflict with overhead wires, while low
growing trees avoid the overhead wire conflict but present a potential
visual obstruction for storefronts.
The building setback from the roadway creates open spaces for gardens
in private property. This open space, in combinations with the grass strip,
creates a semi-suburban feel for an urban corridor. Trees growing in
private property, when combined with trees in the public right of way,
create an enclosed feeling and may branch out over the sidewalk and
the roadway reducing the urban heat island effect.
Legend

Mature Specimen Tree
These trees provide a
physical presence and
may have a phycological
effect when seen from
far away. They may slow
down vehicular traffic, esp.
when aligned in rows, and
create a distinct separation
between pedestrian and
Healthy Tree
These trees have adapted
well to the urban
environment. They are
generally ten to twenty
years old and are not in
conflict with overhead
utility wires. In many
cases they are planted in
rows of four to five within
a block and provide a
Surviving Tree
These trees appear healthy
and may live ten to twenty
years if surrounding
conditions remain the
same. They have survived
despite the conflict with
overhead utility wires.
Necessary tree pruning
by utility companies or
residents have created a
“bonsai” growth pattern

90

Young Healthy Tree
Growing under Overhead
Wires
These trees appear healthy,
but are growing under
overhead wires. They are
expected to grow taller
than the height of the
overhead utility wires,
eventually causing a
conflict, which will require
future pruning or the
Fruit Bearing Ginkgo Tree
These trees produce an
odorous fruit that stains
a surface and creates an
unpleasant appearance

Decaying Tree
These trees show clear
signs of decay and will
not recover. Some large
trees may be a liability and
should be removed as
soon as possible

Dead Tree
These trees show no sign
of life and are a liability

Figure 6-27: Map of street trees - existing conditions.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT

Figure 6-28: Photo showing lack of defined
tree canopy or hierarchy along the 12th Street
corridor.

Figure 6-32: Photo showing conflict between
trees and overhead utility wires along the east
side and some parts of the 12th Street’s west
side.

Figure 6-29: Photo of metal guards, they are not
uniform and sometimes broken.

Figure 6-33: Photo of the “green strip” between
sidewalk and curb line.
They create a unique residential atmosphere
and are assets when maintained properly,
but a nuisance if weeds and grasses are
uncontrolled.

Figure 6-36: Photo of trees not in conflict with
overhead utility wires are generally in good
health.

Figure 6-37: Photo of flowering trees along 12th
Street.
Trees reaching a maximum height of
approximately 20 feet are sometimes planted
under overhead utility wires. They are acceptable
but must be pruned to prevent line of sight conflict
from roadway to storefronts, signage, etc.

Figure 6-30: Photo of container plantings in the
retail area, generally maintained by property
owners.

Figure 6-34: Photo of the ‘Brookland Tree’ at the
Northern Gateway.
There are several specimen trees on the
12th Street which create an overhead
canopy over the roadway and define
the space for pedestrians and vehicles.

Figure 6-31: Photo of dead and decaying trees,
unsightly and a liability.

Figure 6-35: Photo of sidewalk clearance
compromised by tree plantings and overgrown
hedges.

Figure 6-38: Photo of female Ginkgo tree. Some
people dislike to the odor and fruits.

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91

6.6 Utility Undergrounding ‘Pros’ & ‘Cons’
Most of 12th Street is overwhelmed by unsightly utility wires relocation or burial.
and accessories. During this streetscape and transportation
study the community has voiced concerns regarding the
negative impact overhead wires have on safety, trees and
appearance. As a result, DDOT assembled a Technical
Advisory Committee representing utility companies and
the appropriate agencies to discuss the possibility of
undergrounding. Undergrounding is the process of burying
overhead power, telephone and cable lines and removing
the utility poles which currently hold them.
Putting the utility wires underground serves many purposes.
Some are purely aesthetic, some affect the system
reliability, and others provide financial benefits.

Securing funding for putting the utility lines along public
ways underground and eliminating the utility poles calls for
a public-private partnership. There are several means for
providing that funding, including collecting a prescribed
surcharge on the cost of delivering their services. Other
means of funding include bond issues and assessments
to Business Improvement Districts. Significant savings
can be achieved if the road is under construction and
undergrounding is performed at the same time.
The cost of connecting a property to the underground
cabling is usually borne by the property’s owner. In some
projects, multiple property owners join together to contract

Utility wire undergrounding and relocation projects are for the necessary private-property work; this makes it more
expensive. Communities would have to convince their efficient for the contractor and sometimes yields cost
local officials and utility companies of the benefits of wire savings for each property owner.

SIDE VIEW

Figure 6-40: Sketch of short-term recommendation to increase pedestrian lighting
and improve aesthetics of utility poles.

PLANT TREES BETWEEN LIGHTS

EXISTING COBRA LIGHT

~30’

~20’

OPTION:
ADD PEDESTRIAN LIGHTS
BELOW THE 20’ WIRES AT
~ 16’ ABOVE GROUND.

~16’

Figure 6-40 displays the short-term alternative for improving
12th Street public realm with regards to lighting and utility
wires.
The existing and deteriorated wooden utility poles can be
replaced with steel lighting poles that can adapt DDOT’s
decorative pendant pole and accommodate additional

FRONT VIEW

stress brought on to the pole from the overhead utility
wires.

COBRA LIGHT
ADDED PEDESTRIAN
LIGHTS

In addition to providing street lighting (30’ feet above
ground), these strengthened poles could be retrofitted
with pedestrian lights (two per pole, aligning parallel to the
sidewalk about 16’ above ground) to better illuminate the

Curb

92

sidewalks.

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PUBLIC REALM - EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT
‘PROS’ OF RELOCATING UTILITIES
Aesthetics
The appearance of an area can be greatly improved by
reducing the visual clutter of utility wires. Undergrounding
rutility wires allows communities to highlight their unique
rbeauty without a maze of poles and wires in the way.
Without overhead utilities, communities can more readily
rundertake improvement projects such as sidewalk widening

‘CONS’ OF RELOCATING UTILITIES

Cost
Undergrounding existing utility lines is very expensive.
Cost estimates range as high as $1 million per mile just
for the power lines. Undergrounding telephone and
cable-television lines adds to the cost.
Disruption streets have to be excavated and conduit

and tree planting without having to snake around poles or

installed,

trim vegetation to make way for power lines.

planned street reconstruction can minimize added

Reduced Maintenance
Falling tree limbs, high winds, heavy snows, and vehicle

although

pairing

undergrounding

with

inconvenience. Undergrounding on private property
sometimes entails digging trenches in lawns or
gardens.

accidents are just a few of the things that frequently cause
utility disruptions by destroying overhead lines. Burying lines
eliminates weather-related power outages and provides

Repair

more reliable service to subscribers.
It is generally acknowledged that while failures are less
Trees
Utility lines force unnecessary, unhealthy and improper pruning
of trees solely at the discretion of the power company. This
also contributes to the aesthetic issues surrounding overhead
lines.
Efficiency

frequent with underground cables, the average time
and cost to troubleshoot and repair each failure that
does occur is significantly higher. Estimates exist, which
suggest that the repair time is about 1.6 times longer
and the cost can be as much as four times higher. The
impact of repair can also be aggravated if it necessitates
tearing up the road.

Underground cables can use larger conductors resulting in
less energy loss.
Safety and Community Health

Visible Equipment
While undergrounding would eliminate all above

Burying lines eliminates fire hazards, accidents, and safety

ground lines, there would still be some equipment such

risks from power outages due to downed lines. Relocation

as transformers that would have to be located above

also reduces possible health risks from electromagnetic

ground on concrete pads. There would also be some

radiation and improves road safety by removing or reducing

major feeders coming in to the neighborhood that

the chance of motorists striking poles.

would have to remain overhead.

Economic Development
Many revitalization experts agree that investing in improving
the appearance of traditional commercial areas is one of the
best ways to attract new business and stimulate economic
development. Beauty benefits business, and minimizing the
visual impact of utilities can be a major strategy to beautify

Trees
The process of undergrounding utilities on tree-lined
streets may damage the roots and therefore threaten
the survival of the existing tree canopy.

and revitalize an area. In addition, property values increase
when utility poles do not interfere with views.

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93

7. TRANSPORTATION RECOMMENDATIONS
7.1 Approach
The transportation improvement recommendations were developed based on the existing conditions assessment
and traffic engineering analyses. Draft recommendations were reviewed by and discussed with District agencies and
Brookland’s stakeholders to be further refined by the study team. The results are presented in two chapters:

CHAPTER 7. TRANSPORTATION
RECOMMENDATIONS

CHAPTER 8. PUBLIC REALM &
TRANSPORTATION RECOMMENDATIONS

Chapter 7 addresses community concerns regarding Chapter 8 describes both transportation and public realm
traffic control and speeding, including considerations of related improvements for the same study areas as they are
four-way stop control and traffic calming options as means interdependent and derived from each other. Contained
of reducing speeds. It also contains recommendations for herein are lists of short- and long term improvements as
corridor sections that are outside the public realm study well as conceptual plans of recommendations for the 12th
area such as Michigan Avenue.

Street and Monroe Street corridors.

Figure 7-1: Photo of a Metrobus serving the
Brookland community.

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TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

7.2 Consideration of 4-Way Stops at Unsignalized Intersections
The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) N.E. Table 7-1 shows the location of these intersections
sets forth standards and criteria for the implementation and traffic volumes on side-street approaches. As can be
of multi-way stop control at unsignalized intersections. seen in the table, the existing traffic volumes are only a
These criteria, along with an engineering study, should be fraction of those required by the MUTCD.
considered to determine whether multi-way stop control
is warranted. The MUTCD requires that the combined Should DDOT-TPPA and the City, at their discretion elect to
vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle volume entering the install 4-way stop control at some or all of these intersections
intersection from the minor street approaches (total of as a way to reduce travel speeds and as a traffic calming
both approaches) average at least 200 per hour for any measure, a follow-up operational evaluation should be
eight (8) hours on a typical weekday.

performed (i.e., within 12 to 24 months) to assess resulting

As the basis for the analysis, traffic volumes were obtained at impact on safety, traffic volumes (and possible diversions
five (5) unsignalized intersections along 12th Street, N.E. and to nearby streets), and travel speeds.
three (3) unsignalized intersections along Monroe Street,

TABLE 7-1: Side Street Approach Volumes

12TH STREET, N.E. CORRIDOR
Intersections
12th Street, N.E. @ Hamlin Street, N.E.

Highest volumes, entering the intersections from side streets, for any 8 hours of an average day
54
48
40
36
35
33
28
24

12th Street, N.E. @ Irving Street, N.E.

63

51

37

32

30

29

28

26

12th Street, N.E. @ Jackson Street, N.E.

43

35

33

30

27

26

24

23

12th Street, N.E. @ Newton Street, N.E.

70

57

56

43

70*

70*

70*

70*

12th Street, N.E. @ Otis Street, N.E.

181
158
155
130
* : Assumed worst-case scenario

181*

181*

181*

181*

MONROE STREET, N.E. CORRIDOR
Intersections
Monroe Street, N.E. @ 15th Street, N.E.

Highest volumes, entering the intersections from side streets, for any 8 hours of an average day
26
24
22
20
20
20
15
12

Monroe Street, N.E. @ 16th Street, N.E.

39

34

29

29

26

19

17

15

Monroe Street, N.E. @ 17th Street, N.E.

46

37

28

27

26

24

23

23

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7.3 Traffic Calming Measures
To assess travel speeds, the traffic data collection included
radar speed studies along 12th and Monroe Streets, N.E.
The 85th percentile speed is considered the speed at or
below which 85 percent of drivers travel. The results of this
speed study are summarized in table 7-2.

Northbound

Southbound

12th Street, N.E.

34 MPH

34 MPH

Monroe Street, N.E.

►Bulb-outs shorten the crossing distance
for pedestrians.
►Extensions of curb lines can slow down
vehicles due to narrowing the roadway
cross-section and shortening turning radii
at corners of the intersection.

TABLE 7-2: 85th Percentile Speeds

CORRIDOR

ADVANTAGES OF BULB-OUTS:

Eastbound

Westbound

►Bulb-outs provide larger sidewalk and
planting areas that can be used for
unique streetscape features.

37 MPH

38 MPH

►Bulb-outs can be constructed or
retrofitted to accommodate Low Impact
Development (LID) techniques as part of
a sustainable stormwater management
program (Please refer to chapter 8.9
STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY for more details).

Various traffic calming devices and techniques were taken
into consideration to reduce travel speeds along 12th and
Monroe Streets, N.E.

BULB-OUTS:
Bulb-outs (also known as curb extensions) can be installed
at intersections to shorten pedestrian crossing distances,
define location of on-street parking spaces, reduce travel
speeds, and provide additional space for streetscape
features. This can be achieved without affecting the
number of parking spaces that currently exist. Bulb-outs, in
combination with other modifications are recommended
at several intersections within the study area. Figure 7-3
shows a typical layout for a bulb-out. They can be painted
initially as short-term improvements and subsequently
constructed when necessary engineering design has been
completed. The specific dimensions (i.e., radius, width,
size, etc.) may vary from one location to another based
on prevailing conditions. As shown in the figure, the curb is
typically extended by 8 feet (width of parking lane).
Bulb-outs offer many advantages and disadvantages. A
summary of the ‘pros’ and ‘cons’ associated with bulb-outs
is listed as follows:

Figure 7-2: Photo of bulb-out/curb extension.

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TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
Figure 7-3: Typical layout of bulb-outs

r
r

DISADVANTAGES OF BULB-OUTS:
►Bulb-outs may present difficulties for large
vehicles that are turning adjacent to the
bulb-out. Therefore, each location at
which bulb-outs are proposed must be
carefully designed to accommodate
the geometric requirements of large
vehicles.
►Extensions of curbs line may have a
negative impact on drainage (i.e., runoff
of rain water). Appropriate drainage
design features have been employed in
the past to address this issue, including
the previously mentioned Low Impact
Development (LID) techniques as part of
a sustainable stormwater management
program.

Any disadvantages associated with bulb-outs can
be addressed with specific are engineering design
approaches.
A review of the existing conditions indicates that some
roadway spaces along 12th and Monroe Streets, N.E.
may be better utilized through re-striping. Currently, these
two roadways are wider than required for two-way singlelane operations, which creates an opportunity to narrow
the travel lanes as a way to reduce speeds or provide
designated bicycle lanes. These are discussed in greater
detail under the following improvement sections.

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97

7.4 Transportation Recommendations for Corridors not included in
the Public Realm Study Area
The Brookland Transportation and Streetscape Study The short and long-term improvement recommendations
included the Michigan Avenue, N.E. corridor from its are considered from a corridor-wide perspective and from a
intersection with North Capitol Street, N.E. easterly to the specific intersection point of view. These recommendations
DC/ Maryland State line. Michigan Avenue, N.E., as stated in take into account the community concerns in addition to
the ‘Existing Conditions Report’, is a multi-lane thoroughfare engineering analyses. The recommendations are based on
between the District and the State of Maryland.

the improvements to both pedestrian safety and vehicular
operations.

The Michigan Avenue, N.E. corridor serves as the north
boundary of Brookland and is, therefore, the northern
limit of the study. However, due to the presence of
the National Shrine and the campus of The Catholic
University of America adjacent to Michigan Avenue, N.E.,
transportation issues related to pedestrian (student) safety
as well as connectivity of different modes of travel have
been incorporated into the Brookland study process.
In response to community concerns regarding speeding
along Michigan Avenue, N.E., the Metropolitan Police
Department (MPD) has installed video speed cameras for
both directions of travel along Michigan Avenue, N.E. near
Trinity College to address this problem.
Resurfacing plans for Michigan Avenue, N.E. from 12th
Street, N.E. to 14th Street, N.E. were recently completed.

MICHIGAN AVENUE, N.E. AT NORTH CAPITOL
STREET, N.E.
The key intersection of Michigan Avenue, N.E. and North
Capitol Street, N.E., the only high accident intersection
in the study area, was improved by DDOT in 2004/2005
as part of the rehabilitation of North Capitol Street, N.E.
The improvements consisted of new traffic signals with
adjustments to the timing and phasing as well as minor
geometric improvements to the Michigan Avenue, N.E.
approaches to North Capitol Street, N.E. New sidewalks
and ADA compliant curb ramps were constructed at all
four corners of the intersection.

MICHIGAN AVENUE, N.E.
PARK PLACE APARTMENTS

AT

ENTRANCE

TO

These plans included repairs to any physical defects This intersection is currently unsignalized. At times during
and installation of new DDOT ADA ramps, signing and peak hours, vehicles entering or exiting the apartment
pavement markings, including high visibility crosswalks at complex experience difficulties due to long vehicle
12th Street, N.E.

queues on Michigan Avenue, N.E. There is an existing “Do

Not Block Driveway” sign on the westbound approach of
The section of Michigan Avenue, N.E. from 18th Street, Michigan Avenue, N.E. to discourage drivers from blocking
N.E./Varnum Place, N.E. to Eastern Avenue, N.E. has the entrance during heavy traffic volume conditions. As
been recently reconstructed by DDOT with new concrete a short-term improvement, it is recommended that a
pavement and traffic signals. Geometric improvements “stop” sign be installed on the southbound approach to
were also implemented for the key study intersection of regulate vehicular movements (i.e., for vehicles exiting
18th Street, N.E./Varnum Place, N.E. The intersections the apartment complex to turn right or left on Michigan
along this section of Michigan Avenue, N.E. were included Avenue, N.E.). In addition, the pavement markings for
in the operational analysis and were found to operate that approach (e.g., turn arrows, stop bar, etc.) should
at acceptable service levels during both morning and be re-striped to better define the intersection. It should be
evening peak periods. Therefore, additional improvements noted, however, that these improvements may have to
for this section of Michigan Avenue, N.E. are not proposed be initiated and implemented by the property owner(s)
in this report since the pavement markings as well as other since they appear to be outside DDOT’s right-of-way.
physical features are new.

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TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
As a long-term solution, considerations should be given to

movements can be accommodated at one

providing an alternate access facility for this apartment

intersection. While this option may restrict certain

complex to improve the overall access and circulation

movements and direct access to and from

for the residents. Furthermore, a separate traffic signal

some of the adjacent roadways, it may improve

warrant analysis should be performed to determine

the overall safety for pedestrians, bicyclists and

whether or not the warrants for installation of a traffic

vehicles.

signal are satisfied at this intersection.

MICHIGAN AVENUE AT JOHN MCCORMACK
MICHIGAN AVENUE, N.E. AT 13TH STREET/ ROAD
rTAYLOR STREET, N.E.

This intersection along Michigan Avenue is currently

Currently, this signalized location operates as three unsignalized and is located at the west-end of the
intersections in one, with two traffic signal controllers. Charles R. Drew Memorial Bridge. John McCormack
The operation consists of concurrent/redundant signal Road was formerly a two-way roadway, however the
timing intervals which accommodate various through current operation is one-way northbound for the first
and turning movements. During field observations, it was portion north of Michigan Avenue. Southbound vehicles
noted that, at some point during the signal cycle, the still try to exit John McCormack Road onto Michigan
westbound approach on Michigan Avenue receives Avenue.
a green signal indication at Taylor while the signal
immediately to the west at 13th Street has a red signal. A short-term improvement is to provide improved signage
rThe segment of Michigan Avenue between these two (Do Not Enter – R5-1 sign) informing those southbound
intersections is very short - only sufficient to store one drivers that they must enter Catholic University or turn
vehicle in each of the two lanes. The short distance around and continue north. A long-term improvement
between these two intersections and what appears to would be to geometrically preclude this southbound
be conflicting signal indications may compromise traffic movement by extending the curb to control access.
safety.

HSC PEDIATRIC CENTER

While the signal timings were updated in the summer of
2005, which resulted in considerably fewer complaints
from the public, it is recommended that the signal
phasing schemes and timing plans be continually reevaluated with appropriate adjustments made as a shortterm improvement. Given the complexity of the traffic
operations and the close proximity of the intersections,
long-term improvements that should be considered
could include one or a combination of the following:
1)

r
2)

During the conduct of this study and development of
recommendations, the study team received a request
from HSC Pediatric Center to consider (1) installation of
signs on key nearby streets directing visitors to the hospital,
(2) evaluation of parking regulations on surrounding
streets that present challenges for visitors and employees
of the hospital (currently on-street parking is limited to
two hours), and (3) installation of additional street lights
to improve night-time illumination within the area.

Install an additional traffic signal controller (i.e., to
have a total of three controllers – one for each

HSC Pediatric Center is located at 1731 Bunker Hill Road,

intersection) and operate them in a coordinated

N.E., east of Michigan Avenue, and outside the study

system.

area. While DDOT may choose to evaluate the requested

Install vehicle detectors such that the intersections items, it should be noted that the hospital is well served
can operate in a semi- or fully-actuated mode. by existing shuttle busses from and to the Brookland and
option has the potential to increase the Ft. Totten Metro stations. The shuttle service begins at

This
overall
3)

capacity and reduce congestion.

6:15 AM at Ft. Totten and ends at 7:15 PM at HSC with

Reconfiguration of the three intersections through

headways ranging anywhere from approximately 20

geometric modifications such that various

minutes to 30 minutes.

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99

8. PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION RECOMMENDATIONS
This chapter contains both transportation and
public realm recommendations for the public
realm study area that includes 12th Street between
Michigan Avenue to the north and Rhode Island
Avenue to the south, and Monroe Street between
8th and 12th Streets (see map to the left and on
page 108).

Short-and long-term improvements and the overall
theme for the 12th Street corridor are identified in
sections 8.1. and 8.2. A guide on how to use the
manual and streetscape elements library follows
on page 106 and introduces the sub-district plan
as an organizational tool for developing and
presenting the recommendations.

The streetscape recommendations stand in direct
correlation to the recommended transportation
improvements with the overall goal of improving
pedestrian safety and traffic flow, mitigating traffic
impact, promoting multi-modal transportation
management and enhancing Brookland’s public
spaces.

The recommendations have been analyzed
carefully to ensure practicality, functionality and
successful implementation. They are based on the
community’s and specialists’ input and are derived
from a consensus-building process between all
parties involved.

Figure 8: Map of public realm and
transportation study area.

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8.1 List of Short- & Long-Term Recommendations
The following list identifies recommendations that are associated with the overall Brookland community. As shown, the
specific modes of transportation that will be improved are noted (e.g., P: Pedestrians, M: Motor Vehicles, etc.).

TRANSPORTATION RELATED
SHORT-TERM RECOMMENDATIONS
►MAINTENANCE of pavement markings.
[P,B, M]
►Provide consistent truck prohibition signs
for the Brookland area. Currently, there
are different types of signs in use. This
effort will help mitigate the impact of truck
traffic within the Brookland community
(the District currently uses white signs for
regulation and green signs as guides for
trucks traffic). [M]
►Encourage local businesses to utilize
smaller trucks, if possible, for delivery
of supplies and materials. This would
minimize visual impacts of truck activity,
curb space requirements, and impact
on sight distance at intersections. [M]
►Install pavement markings along onstreet parking spaces to better define
parking areas and adjacent travel lanes.
[M]

STREETSCAPE RELATED
SHORT-TERM RECOMMENDATIONS
►SIGNAGE (replacement of deteriorated
or non-reflective signs, community
signage in designated areas, entrance
markers). [B,M,P]
►MAINTENANCE of all public realm
elements, including landscaping. [P]
►REPLACEMENT
OF
DETERIORATED
SIDEWALKS TO IMPROVE SAFETY IN THE
INTERIM. [P]
►CURBING (where absent or broken). [P]
►LIGHTING (Replacement of existing
wooden utility poles and installation
of pedestrian-level lighting along 12th
Street to enhance safety – use of twin
tear-drop fixtures.) [P]

►Provide additional designated loading
zones within the 12th Street, N.E. corridor
to facilitate delivery services for area
businesses. [M]
►Install updated traffic signal timing
with appropriate phasing adjustments
reflecting current traffic conditions to
improve traffic operations. [M]
►TRAFFIC CALMING (rumble strips)
Travel Modes Improved: P: Pedestrians (Walking), B: Bicyclists, PT: Public
Transportation, M: Motor Vehicles

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101

safe pedestrian crossings, a painted or landscaped

TRANSPORTATION RELATED
LONG-TERM RECOMMENDATIONS

median; widths vary by location.

► CAR SHARING: In an effort to promote “car sharing”,
considerations should be given to expanding the
Zipcar/Flexcar program within Brookland area. This
study has identified additional Zipcar/Flexcar parking
spaces along Monroe Street near the entrance to
the Metro Station. [M]

► NORTHERN GATEWAY: Due to the complexity of the
traffic operations and safety issues at the intersections
of Michigan Avenue, N.E. at 12th Street, N.E. and
at Randolph Street, N.E., it is recommended that
this location be studied in greater detail to identify
feasible re-configuration alternatives. A possible
conceptual layout for intersection improvements is
included in chapter 8.5. [P, M, B]

► TRUCK PROHIBITION SIGNS: Provide consistent truck
prohibition signs for the Brookland area. Currently,
there are different types of signs in use. This effort
► TRAFFIC SIGNALS: The existing traffic signals should be

will help mitigate the impact of truck traffic within

upgraded to conform with the latest DDOT design

the Brookland community (the District currently uses

guidelines and practices, as well as those contained

white signs for regulation and green signs as guides

in the 2003 edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic

for truck traffic). [M]

Control Devices (MUTCD). Signal modifications are
necessary at virtually all signalized intersections
within the study area with the exception of Michigan
Avenue, N.E. from 18th/Varnum Street, N.E. to
Eastern Avenue, N.E. In addition, pedestrian phasing
and pedestrian signal heads should be added at
signalized intersections where they do not currently

► SMALL TRUCKS: Encourage local businesses to utilize
smaller trucks, if possible, for delivery of supplies and
materials. This would minimize visual impacts of truck
activity, curb space requirements, and impact on
sight distance at intersections. [M]

exist. [M]
► LOADING ZONES: Provide additional designated
► TIMING/PHASING: Install updated traffic signal timing
with appropriate phasing adjustments to reflect

loading zones within the 12th Street, N.E. corridor to
facilitate delivery services for area businesses. [M]

current traffic conditions while improving traffic
operations. [M]

► PAVEMENT MARKINGS: Install pavement markings
along on-street parking spaces to better define

► INTERSECTION & ROADWAY MODIFICATIONS: In line

parking areas and adjacent travel lanes. [M]

with the public realm improvements, provide clearly
marked parking, bike and vehicular travel lanes,

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
add trash receptacles where necessary. [P]

STREETSCAPE RELATED
LONG-TERM RECOMMENDATIONS

► BRIDGE IMPROVEMENTS: Widen sidewalks, add bike
lanes and provide buffer between vehicular and
pedestrian travel lanes using landscaping, light
fixtures and furniture. [B,M,P,PT]
► MULTI-SPACE PARKING: Install multi-space parking
meters along the commercial areas of 12th Street,
coordinating the spacing with light poles and trees.
[M]
► LANDSCAPING: Plant a selection of flowering trees
and understory plantings along 12th and Monroe
Streets to define the public realm. Install landscaping
within the median on 12th Street, south of Michigan
Avenue. [B,M,P,PT]
► PUBLIC

ART/ENTRANCE

MARKERS:

Create

and

install larger public art and/or entrance markers in
cooperation with the community. [B,M,P,PT]
► LID: As part of the resurfacing project, incorporate
Low Impact Development Techniques along curb
and gutter and bioretention cells within landscaped
areas. [B,M,P,PT]

k
► UNDERGROUNDING OF UTILITY LINES. [B,M,P,PT]
► LIGHTING: Install new decorative roadway and
pedestrian level lights to provide higher levels of
illumination and beautify the streetscape. [P]
► INTERSECTION MODIFICATIONS: In line with the
transportation improvements, provide safe
pedestrian crossings and more green space around
intersections. This may include bulb-outs and

► DISCUSS THE FOLLOWING ITEMS WITH WASHINGTON
METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY (WMATA),
AND, IF APPLICABLE, WITH THE DISTRICT OFFICE OF
PLANNING [B,P,PT]:
+ INSTALLATION OF APPROPRIATE DIRECTIONAL SIGNS
(way finding) at the Brookland/CUA metro station to
guide transit riders who want to reach key destinations
and area attractions such as the Catholic University
of America, the National Shrine, and Trinity College.
[P, PT]

stamped concrete crosswalks. [P]
k

► WALKWAYS: Install new exposed aggregate
concrete sidewalks along 12th and Monroe
Streets and add sidewalks along Newton Street to

+ NEW AND EXPANDED BIKE RACKS, and preferably
bicycle lockers, are needed at the Brookland Metro
station. The existing bike racks are deteriorated and
not properly used. [B]

provide pedestrian-friendly Metro station access.
Incorporate sidewalk accents where appropriate
and desired by the community. [P]
► ADA RAMPS: Install or upgrade ADA ramps to
accommodate persons with disabilities to meet
current DDOT design standards, which adhere to
ADA guidelines. [P]
► FURNISHING ZONE: Install new curb and cutter and
permeable walkable surface treatments; place
decorative street furnishings in the furnishing zone,
including seating, bicycle racks, and bollards, and

+ ACCESS: Community representatives have requested
that WMATA review pedestrian accessibility to the
metro station and make appropriate improvements to
enhance safety and facilitate access from adjacent
neighborhoods, especially along Newton Street, N.E.
(pedestrian gateway to Brookland from the Metro
Station). [P, PT]
+ BUS SHELTERS: There is a number of existing bus
shelters within the Brookland area. These are standard
WMATA shelters and do not have include seating
for passengers. It would be desirable to replace
the shelters with “decorative” models including
appropriate seating. [PT]

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103

8.2 The Theme: Sustainability
Transportation

and

streetscape

projects

offer

great

opportunities to incorporate sustainable design techniques as
part of new construction or via retrofitting of certain streetscape
and infrastructure elements. Ideas for innovative design such
as Low Impact Development (LID), renewable energy sources,
and efficient use of landscaping, were well received by both
DDOT and the Brookland community, which is known for its
encouragement of environmentally sound applications.
In response, a set of recommendations was developed that
would reflect the ‘nature’ of this unique neighborhood. By
enhancing the streetscape in an environmentally sensitive
manner, creating appealing public spaces and vibrant
commercial areas, it is the study’s goal to encourage the
stakeholders’ stewardship of the public realm and build a
socially responsible, enjoyable, sustainable, and economically
viable neighborhood.

FIVE UNIFYING STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS
While most recommendations
ns are specific to sub-districts (see
chapter 8.3), the following five streetscape elements have
e the
been identified to reflect the
theme by addressing the social,
environmental and economic dimensions of sustainability. If
applied contiguously along the entire length of the 12th Street
study area, these elements can tie the corridor’s different zones
and uses together and create an aesthetically pleasing, safe
and vibrant Main Street.
1. Sidewalks: Exposed Aggregate Concrete

2. Brick Gutter and Granite Curb

3. Teardrop Roadway & Pedestrian Level
Lighting

4. Tree Planting

5. Style of Furnishings (seating, trash
receptacles, bike racks, bollards)
through

The icons (e.g.

) refer to the detailed description of

the elements in the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (chapter
8.9); the library’s content is summarized in figure 8-2.

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S O C I A L
RESPONSIBILITY
Social sustainability is related to how we make choices
that affect other humans in our “global community” - the Earth.
Social sustainability is focused on the development of
programs and processes that promote social interaction and
cultural enrichment. It emphasizes protecting the vulnerable,
respecting social diversity and ensuring that we all put priority
on social investments and services that create the basic
framework for society. It lowers the cost of working together,
facilitates cooperation, and also relates to more basic needs
of happiness, safety, freedom, dignity and affection.
Systematic community participation, a strong civil
society, including government, commonly shared
values, rules and resources, and equal
rights promote social sustainability.

SUSTAINABILITY
“Sustainable
development
is a process which enables all
people to realize their potential
and improve their quality of life
in ways which protect and
enhance the Earth’s life
support systems.” Forum
for the Future

ECONOMIC
SUSTAINABILITY
Economic sustainability is maintenance of capital,
...”the amount one can consume during a period
and still be as well off at the end of the period”.*
Economics values things in money terms, and has difficulties
valuing natural resources (water, land, air, minerals, ecosystem
services), intangible, intergenerational, and especially common
access resources, such as air. Therefore, economic policy
needs to use anticipation and the precautionary principle.
In practice, community planning should retain dollars
in the local economy, save energy, attract jobs
and development, reduce pollution and traffic
congestion and conserve open space.

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105

8.3 How to Use this Manual
THE SUB-DISTRICT PLAN

PUBLIC REALM SPECIFICS

In order to organize the recommendations in the most The public realm recommendations are mostly based
context-sensitive manner, the study area has been divided on

necessary

improvements

to

the

transportation

into the following seven sub-districts that represent areas infrastructure. While the transportation recommendations
with distinctive functions and character (see map on next are described in word
page spread):

1. NORTHERN GATEWAY
2. SOUTHERN GATEWAY
3. THE MAIN STREET’S “CORE”
4. NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL
5. NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTIAL
6. MONROE STREET BRIDGE
7. MONROE STREET

and displayed in conceptual

plans (figures 8-7, 8-8, 12a&b, 8-41a&b), the streetscape
recommendations are demonstrated though a variety of
photographs, drawings and conceptual plans.
In addition to the five unifying elements, which are
recommended for the entire length of the 12th Street
study

area,

the

study

team

proposes

sub-district

specific streetscape elements that are tailored to the
respective needs, character and use of the area. The
recommendations represent a selection of all streetscape

The study area for both the transportation and public realm
analysis has been divided into two corridors:

1.

2.

12TH STREET (SUB-DISTRICT 1-5)

elements listed in figure 8-2.
While it is crucial to build on the individual strengths
and address the challenges of each sub-district, it is the
comprehensive planning strategy that will tie the districts

The transportation and public realm
recommendations can be found in
chapter 8.5 and 8.6 respectively.

together to achieve the overall goal of promoting 12th

MONROE & NEWTON STREETS (SUBDISTRICTS 6 -7)

the scope of this study and requires the continued

The transportation and public realm
recommendations can be found in
chapter 8.7 and 8.8 respectively.

106

Street as a Main Street.
This planning strategy and implementation will go beyond
dedication and involvement of the Brookland residents
and businesses.

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

Each sub-district is described on one page spread, supported by a photo of the existing condition. The recommended
improvements are depicted in sections and sketches. Written recommendations are made in bullet-point format, using
an easy-to-use reference system: Each icon represents a category of streetscape elements (see below) that is listed in
the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9). The library contains more detailed descriptions of recommended and alternative elements. As stated in the previous chapter, the five unifying elements are recommended for all sub-districts.
Figure 8-2: Streetscape Elements Library
& Reference System

Example:

Q: “This icon is listed in subdistricts 6 and 7. What does it mean
and where can I get more information?”
A: “

represents the element ‘multimodal travelways’, more specifically,
‘designated bike lanes’.

According to DDOT’s planned ‘signed
bicycle route’, sub-districts 3 and 4 are
the only portions of the public realm
study area that are recommended to
have bike lanes. To find more information, locate the detailed description
of the recommended bike lane in the
STREETSCAPE LIBRARY (chapter 8.9)
using the alphabetic order of the
icons.
And remember, all icons/streetscape
elements that are proposed in each subdistrict are specific to the area and
in addition to the five unifying elements.
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107

8.4. Sub-District Plan

Figure 8-3: Sub-District
Map

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
SUB-DISTRICT:

1. NORTHERN GATEWAY
2. SOUTHERN GATEWAY

3. THE MAIN STREET’S “CORE”
(Primary Commercial District)

4. NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL
(Secondary Commercial District)

5. NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTIAL

6. MONROE STREET BRIDGE
7. MONROE & NEWTON STREETS*

APPROACH:
Develop two distinct gateways to the north and the
south of 12th Street. These gateways will signal entry to
the Main Street. Michigan Avenue and Rhode Island
Avenue are natural points of entry to 12th Street.

Current zoning allows for significant commercial
development on 12th Street, between Monroe and
Otis Streets. It is therefore the focus of the Main Street
program’s commercial revitalization activities. It has
great potential due to its close proximity to the Metro
station and Monroe Street, both of which are important
links to a wide customer base.

These areas have some retail activities, geared to the
needs of the immediate residents. They have grown
and become more popular in recent years and could
be enhanced to provide a more pleasant place for
the community to shop and gather.

Areas that are primarily residential in character should
subscribe to the over-all aesthetic and continuity of
the tree-lined Main Street while ensuring that residents
have privacy.

The Monroe Street Bridge, Monroe Street, and Newton
Street in Brookland Metro Station’s proximity are important
transitional places to 12th Street, where the physical
environment should offer a qualitative pedestrian
experience and announce the Brookland community
to travelers coming from the west. They should also be
identified for infrastructure improvements.

*) The lighter colored areas of Sub-District 7 are not part of the original study area. The portion of Newton Street
connecting the Brookland Metro Station and 12th Street, and the western bridge approach area on Monroe Street
were added in the final stages of the study to address arising concerns about connectivity and comprehensiveness.

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109

8.5 Transportation Recommendations for 12th Street (Sub-District 1-5)

Figure 8-4: Photo of 12th Street, N.E. looking north.

Within the study area, 12th Street, N.E. is a two-lane, two-way minor arterial running
north-south from Michigan Avenue to Rhode Island Avenue.
The recommended improvements for this corridor are described by sub-district,
starting with both gateways (Sub-Districts 1 and 2), followed by the commercial,
mixed use and residential areas of 12th Street (Sub-Districts 3, 4, and 5).
Conceptual plans of proposed and alternative improvements for the Northern
Gateway (figures 8-7 and 8-8) and 12th Street (figures 8-12a and 8-12b) tag onto
the written descriptions.
Chapter 8.6 continues with recommendations specific to the corridor’s public
realm.
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SUB-DISTRICT 1

SUB-DISTRICT 2

MICHIGAN AVENUE, RANDOLPH AND 12TH STREETS
(Refer to chapter 8.6.1 for this Northern Gateway’s public
realm recommendations)

12TH STREET @ RHODE ISLAND AVENUE
(Refer to chapter 8.6.2 for this Sorthern Gateway’s public
realm recommendations)

Michigan Avenue, N.E. in this area is forty feet wide with This intersection serves as the southern gateway to the
two travel lanes in each direction. The eastbound and Brookland community and operates at very good service
westbound left-turn movements on Michigan Avenue, levels during morning and evening peak hours (LOS A).
N.E. are currently prohibited. Eastbound vehicles desiring Therefore, transportation related modifications are not
to travel northbound on 12th Street, N.E. turn right onto recommended at this time.
eastbound Randolph Street, N.E. and then turn left on to
the northbound lanes of 12th Street, N.E.

However, community members have expressed concerns
that Rhode Island Avenue, N.E. between 10th and 13th

In an effort to accommodate various movements and Streets experiences long queues in the eastbound
improve the operation and safety of these intersections, direction. Drivers feel that recent traffic signal re-timing
a reconfiguration concept with two alternatives was may have resulted in longer queues. In addition, longer
developed as a long-term improvement:

-Alternative 1Modifications to enhance the existing
intersection scheme.

green times may be needed along Rhode Island Avenue
during off-peak periods. To address these concerns, it will
be beneficial for DDOT staff to conduct a field review
of this area to determine whether appropriate timing
adjustments are required.

The intersection improvements are shown in figure 8-7.
Specific features of this concept include:
► Designating Randolph Street, N.E. as one-way
eastbound between Michigan Avenue, N.E. and
12th Street, N.E.
► Reducing width of Randolph Street, N.E. from 30 feet
to 20 feet.
► Enlarging the triangular island on the south side of the
intersection to create an opportunity for enhanced
streetscape elements for this Brookland gateway.
► Providing parking along eastbound Randolph Street,
N.E. in front of the retail store.

-Alternative 2Reconfiguration to a 2-lane urban
roundabout.

Figure 8-5: Photo of Sub-District 2 looking north into 12th
Street.

A second alternative shown in figure 8-8 consists of
reconfiguring the intersection with a two-lane urban
roundabout. While analysis of this roundabout indicates
that good levels of service can be achieved during both
morning and evening peak periods, this alternative may be
less desirable than alternative 1 due to its possible impact
on several existing buildings (i.e., roundabouts typically
require considerable space often requiring acquisition of
additional right-of-way).

Figure 8-6: Photo of Sub-District 1, view of westbound
Randolph Street at 12th Street.

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111

Figure 8-7: Conceptual Plan of Proposed Improvements at Michigan Avenue, N.E. at 12th and Randolph Streets
(Alternative 1)

112

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
Figure 8-8 Conceptual Plan of Proposed Improvements at Michigan Avenue, N.E. at 12th and Randolph Streets
(Alternative 2)

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113

SUB-DISTRICTS 3-5

SUB-DISTRICT 3

12TH STREET BETWEEN PERRY & DOUGLAS STREETS
(Refer to chapter 8.6.3-8.6.5 for public realm
recommendations)

12TH STREET’S ‘CORE’
(Refer to chapter 8.6.3 for the public realm
recommendations)

The width of 12th Street, N.E. is 40 feet between Rhode

12th Street, N.E. @ Newton Street, N.E.:

Island Avenue, N.E. and Perry Street, N.E. By re-striping the
lanes, it is possible to provide a two-foot-wide painted

► Consider providing a designated “Loading Zone” to

median in this area while maintaining eight feet for parking

accommodate truck delivery. One possibility would

and two 11-foot travel lanes. These recommendations

be an area on the north side of Newton Street, N.E. just

will not affect the number and location of parking or the

west of 12th Street, N.E. During the field observations

traffic-carrying capacity of 12th Street, N.E. The narrowing

there was a large delivery truck parked on the west

of travel lanes from 12 feet to 11 feet is expected to result

side of 12th Street, N.E. (i.e., southbound lane) within

in somewhat lower travel speeds and therefore improve

the no-parking zone, which obstructed the view of

pedestrian safety.

drivers traveling eastbound on Newton Street, N.E.

There are existing “rumble strips” on the north and south
approaches of 12th Street, N.E. to Lawrence Street, N.E.
adjacent to the Saint Anthony’s church; these traffic

► Bulb-outs should be considered for all corners of this
intersection.

calming devices should be maintained. Additional rumble
strips should be considered for the northbound approach
north of Hamlin Street, N.E. and the southbound approach
north of Irving Street, N.E.

► The vacant lot east of the intersection on the north
side of Newton Street, N.E. (behind CVS) may be a
possible area for providing off-street parking spaces.
However, the size and ownership information is
needed to assess this possibility.

12th Street, N.E. at Otis Street, N.E.
► Bulb-outs should be considered for all corners of this
intersection.

► An existing driveway located just north of the
intersection on the west side of 12th Street, N.E. is not
being utilized and, therefore, should be closed. The
property at this location has other access facilities
and will not be adversely affected.

Figure 8-9: Photo of the 12th and Franklin Street
intersection.

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SUB-DISTRICT 3

SUB-DISTRICT 4

12TH STREET’S ‘CORE’
(Refer to chapter 8.6.3 for the public realm
recommendations)

12TH STREET BETWEEN RANDOLPH & PERRY STREETS
(Refer to chapter 8.6.1 and 8.5.4 for the public realm
recommendations)

Similarly to creating a painted median between Rhode
Island Avenue, N.E. and Perry Street, N.E., the section of 12th
Street, N.E. from Perry Street, N.E. to Randolph Street, N.E.,
which is 50 feet wide, can be re-striped to provide a tenfoot-wide median in addition to parking and travel lanes.
As shown in chapter 8.6.1, public realm recommendations
for this median involve the planting of trees to provide an
appealing and shaded area at the corridor’s entrance.
12th Street, N.E. at Quincy Street, N.E.:
► The parking lot located on the east side of 12th
Street, N.E. just south of Quincy Street, N.E. is
currently underutilized. This lot, which is adjacent to
Intergenerational Child and Adult Daycare (Brookland
Senior Daycare Center), may present a possibility for
providing additional off-street parking.
► Bulb-outs should be considered for all corners of 12th
Street, N.E. at Quincy Street, N.E.

Figure 8-10: Photos of the Main Street ‘Core’.
Starting from above:
Northwest corner of 12th and Monroe Streets, northeast
corner of 12th and Monroe Streets, vacant lot on west
side of 12th Street.
Figure 8-11: Photo of westbound Randolph Street, N.E. at
12th Street, N.E.

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Figure 8-12a: Conceptual Plan of 12th Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

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Figure 8-12b: Conceptual Plan of 12th Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

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8.6 Public Realm Recommendations for 12th Street (Sub-District 1-5)
8.6.1 SUB-DISTRICT 1: NORTHERN GATEWAY

Figure 8-13: Map of Sub-District 1

Figure 8-15: Public Art/Entrance Markers, Northern Gateway.
There are endless possibilities for public art, signage, and entrance markers. Shown above starting
upper left corner: District wayfinding signage as part of the citywide sign system, freestanding
wall displaying history, banner, solar fountain, unique planter, entrance gate/archway.

Figure 8-14: Photo of 12th Street and Michigan Avenue intersection.

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The intersection of 12th Street and Michigan Avenue

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

could become a place of concentrated retail and
pedestrian activity as well as a gateway node that signals

Pavement Accent in sidewalk and plaza.

the beginning of the Main Street. The traffic island at the

Landscaped garden area with integrated seating
facilities (in cooperation with the Garden Club’s
landscape work). Landscaped median on 12th Street.

intersection could become a plaza, incorporating the
Garden Club’s landscape work along with a public art
component that reflects the institutional and cultural

Custom crosswalks for better visibility.

heritage of the area. Thus a synthesis of the most
important contextual influences for 12th Street could

District’s Wayfinding signage and banners
announcing the Main Street.

be created – its “green” neighborhood, its academic
and religious institutions, and former residents of

Entrance Marker/Public Art (e.g. sculpture, entrance
gate or monumental markers, significant planters with
plants of varied seasonal interest).

significance. Different materials and patterns for the
plaza, crosswalks, bus stops and generous pedestrian
spaces will augment this synthesis.

Innovative forms of energy sources for street lighting
such as solar fountain/art.

Due to its considerable width, the recommended

Integration of Low Impact Development for
stormwater management.

transportation improvements for the first two blocks of
12th Street include a 10 feet wide median that may be
planted with trees, shrubs and flowers to beautify and
announce the entrance in to Brookland. Additional
landscaping will act as natural buffer for car emissions
and reduce the heat island effect by providing shade
of paved areas.

Additional elements requiring the business/residential community’s involvement:
• Custom “Brookland” signage mounted in a visible
manner.
• Custom planter boxes to enhance the storefronts.
Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) for detailed
descriptions of the recommended streetscape elements.

Banner arms and optional
aluminum banner to
encourage seasonal
activities.

Double sided signageway finding and
community garden
information.

C2
A1

D3

D1

I

I

Crosswalk Thermoplastic
markings.

H

Community garden design to be determined
by community.

M

ic

hi

ga

n

Av

en

N

Randolph Street

12th

Stree

t

G

D2

H

Crosswalk
optionConcrete
pavement.

E1

ue

C2
Alternating placement of lightscombination teardrop roadway/
pedestrian lights and pedestrian lights.

Figure 8-16: Conceptual Design of the Gateway’s recommended improvements.

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119

8.6.2 SUB-DISTRICT 2: SOUTHERN GATEWAY

Figure 8-17: Map Sub-District 2

Figure 8-18: Public Art/Entrance Markers, Southern Gateway.
Examples for public art, signage, and entrance markers, shown here from the left: District wayfinding signage
as part of the citywide sign system, entrance gate/window, water fountain with dog dish, clock, sculpture.

Figure 8-19: Photo of 12th Street and Rhode Island Avenue intersection.

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This intersection could become a place for a gateway
element that frames the entry to 12th Street from
Rhode Island Avenue. Since there is no high intensity
retail activity at the intersection, the gateway element
should make explicit references to the Main Street
or the neighborhood, so that it is distinguished from
the other streets, which meet Rhode Island Avenue.
The gateway element should include landscape
features, which will reinforce the “green” quality of the
neighborhood.
Custom paving or stamping on crosswalks and in the
intersection should be used to highlight these features
and increase pedestrian activity.
In the long-term, new roadway- and pedestrian
lights, in combination with a mature tree canopy and
wayfinding signage, will further frame the corridor and
attract visitors.

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):
Significant understory landscaping and planters to
draw attention to the tree-lined Main Street entrance.
Custom crosswalks and bulb-outs for better visibility
and increased pedestrian safety.
District’s Wayfinding signage and banners
announcing the Main Street.
Entrance Marker/Public Art (e.g. entrance gate)
Innovative forms of energy sources for street lighting
such as solar fountain/art.
Integration of Low Impact Development for
stormwater management.
Additional elements requiring the business/residential community’s involvement:
• Custom “Brookland” signage mounted in a visible
manner
Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) for detailed
descriptions of the recommended streetscape elements.

Figure 8-20: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 2.

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121

8.6.3 SUB-DISTRICT 3: THE MAIN STREET “CORE”

Figure 8-21: Map of Sub-District 3

Figure 8-22: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for
Sub-District 3.

Figure 8-23: Photo of 12th Street North of Monroe Street.

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Figure 8-24b: Conceptual design of the recommended long-term improvements for
Sub-District 3, 12th Street between Otis and Newton Streets.

Figure 8-24a: Photomontage
for Sub-District 3, east side
of 12th Street between Otis
and Newton Streets.

Otis Street

H

I

C2

H

A2

Crosswalk - Thermoplastic
markings.

I

D2

Encourage business community to
utilize and maintain planter box for
seasonal effect.

C2

Alternating placement of lightscombination teardrop roadway/
pedestrian lights and pedestrian lights.

D1

A1

r

E2

Furnishing
zone near
pedestrian
lights.

E1

I

D3

C2

Banner arms and optional
aluminum banner to encourage
seasonal activities.

Permeable pavers
over continuous root
zone.

A1
M2

12th Street

G

N
J

News stand

H

Crosswalk option - Concrete
pavement

E1

E2

D1

D3

Potential community
space

Newton Street

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123

Figure 8-25b: Conceptual design of the recommended long-term improvements
for Sub-District 3, 12th Street between Newton and Monroe Streets.

Newton Street

C2

I
H

H
L
C2

Figure 8-25a: Photomontage for
Sub-District 3, east side of 12th
Street between Newton and Monroe
Streets.

Paving markers create a
human sundial - an interactive
public art piece that creates a
sense of place and a defined
seating area/plaza.

Alternating placement
of combination teardrop
roadway/pedestrian lights and
pedestrian lights.

D1
A1
A1
D2
12th Street

E2
E1

Encourage business community
to utilize and maintain planter
box for seasonal effect.

Furnishing
zone near
pedestrian or
combination
lights.

M2

M2

Bioretention Cell landscaped stormwater
planters to sustainably
manage stormwater runoff.

G
I

C2

Banner arms and
optional aluminum
banner to encourage
seasonal marketing.

M2
D3

F2

Permeable pavers
over continuous root
zone.

N

Monroe Street

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
r12th Street is characterized by a higher level of

zone of the sidewalk should be paved with permeable unit

commercial uses, as per current zoning, from Monroe

pavers, to compliment the sidewalk concrete and to extend

Street to Otis Street. This area forms the “Core” of 12th

the usable area for pedestrians. This combination will give

Street and lies just North of the intersection with Monroe

the core a seamless visual connection across the roadway,

Street, which is a major crossing over the Metropolitan

tying together the edges of the street.

Branch Trail.

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

In many ways, this is the part of the corridor where the

Paving treatments for furnishing zone and accents for
walkway zone in places of significance.

Street’s identity as an “Urban Arbor Walk” can be best
reinforced. It is the culmination of two spatial sequences,

Landscaping to compliment tree plantings
and accentuate (not block) storefronts.
Continuous underground tree trench.

one from the Northern Gateway and the other from
the Monroe Street bridge, both of which will bring
significant pedestrian traffic to the stores, restaurants

Multi-space parking meters to benefit visitor turnaround and increase revenue.

and other services of the core. At the intersection with
Monroe Street it is anchored by a church, at Newton
Street by the CVS store, located in the old Newton

Custom crosswalks for better visibility and bulb-outs to
decrease pedestrian crossing distance and increase
landscaping.

Theater building, and two blocks west of it is a major
transit connection - the Brookland/CUA Metro Station.

District’s Wayfinding signage and banners on every
light pole to set the ‘core’ apart from adjacent areas.

The recommendations for the core calls for a line of
flowering trees, such as the Ivory Silk Japanese Tree

Public news stand and public art, preferable at the
intersection of 12th Street and Newton Street.

Lilac, planted at 40 to 45-feet intervals. They will edge
the sidewalk, along with the existing trees, to give the
street a distinctive hue. When seen with the storefronts

Urban bioretention cells, east side between Monroe
and Newton Streets; possible LID pilot project under
care of the garden club.

and building facades, this vibrant landscaped street
edge will offer the core a unique sense of place.
The core should be designed for a higher level of
pedestrian traffic, with adequate levels of lighting,

Additional elements requiring the business/residential community’s involvement: Custom planters to enhance the
storefronts and sidewalks.

customized seating and other furnishings. The furnishing

Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) for detailed
descriptions of the recommended streetscape elements.

Figure 8-26: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 3.
Long-Term Short-Term
Recommendation Recommendation
Combination of new
teardrop roadway and
pedestrian lights after
undergrounding of utility
wires.

Replacement of
wooden utility poles
with steel lighting poles
that can adapt DDOT’s
decorative pendant and
accommodate existing
overhead utility wires.
Installation of pedestrian
lights to strengthened
steel poles (two per pole,
aligning parallel to the
sidewalk about 16’ above
ground).

Sidewalk (varies)

Furnishing
Zone

Parking Lane (8’)

Travel Lane (11’)

Painted
Median (2’)

Travel Lane (11’)

Parking Lane (8’)

Furnishing
Zone

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Sidewalk (varies)

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8.6.4 SUB-DISTRICT 4: NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL AREAS

Figure 8-27: Map of Sub-District 4

Figure 8-28: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for
Sub-District 4.

Figure 8-29: Photo of 12th Street’s neighborhood retail area.

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Over the past few years these originally residential

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

neighborhoods have emerged to secondary retail
Extended sidewalks and incoporated accents in
areas of wide public right-of ways to promote
ownership and use of cafe-style establishments.

areas of the 12th Street corridor. An eclectic mix of
services and retail is offered on many of the townhouses’
first floors.

Landscaping to compliment flowering trees and
provide shaded areas for placement of street
furniture.

Most of the sidewalks have considerable width,
along with a wide strip of either public right-of-way
or private property between the sidewalk and the

Multi-space parking meters to benefit visitor turnaround and increase revenue.

building line. These areas offer great improvement
potential, however, any new construction, planting

Custom crosswalks for better visibility and bulb-outs to
decrease pedestrian crossing distance and increase
landscaping around intersections where parking is
prohibited.

and maintenance requires the collaboration of the
property owners, the District’s agencies and tenants.
The community envisions a rather quiet setting, where

Banners on every other light pole to differ from the
‘core’ retail area.

residents and patrons can gather to enjoy the unique
character of this area.

Integration of Low Impact Development for
stormwater management.

Furniture, outdoor cafes, and maintained landcaping
and planters could significantly enhance the walking
rand retail experience. Trees should be selected to
provide shade in the summer while not blocking the

Additional elements requiring the business/residential community’s involvement: Custom planters to enhance the
storefronts and sidewalk.

window displays of the commercial establishments.

Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) for detailed
descriptions of the recommended streetscape elements.

Figure 8-30: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 4.

Long-Term Short-Term
Recommendation Recommendation
Combination of new
teardrop roadway and
pedestrian lights after
undergrounding of utility
wires.

Replacement of
wooden utility poles
with steel lighting poles
that can adapt DDOT’s
decorative pendant and
accommodate existing
overhead utility wires.
Installation of pedestrian
lights to strengthened
steel poles (two per pole,
aligning parallel to the
sidewalk about 16’ above
ground).

Sidewalk (varies) Furnishing Parking Lane (8’)
Zone

Travel Lane (11’)

Painted
Median (2’)

Travel Lane (11’)

Parking Lane (8’) Furnishing
Zone

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Sidewalk (varies)

127

8.6.5 SUB-DISTRICT 5: NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTIAL AREAS

Figure 8-31: Map of Sub-District 5

Figure 8-32: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for
Sub-District 5.

Figure 8-33: Photo of 12th Street’s residential area.

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
Just like the previously mentioned sub-districts, the

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

neighborhood residential areas along 12th Street offer
a variety of streetscapes in terms of sidewalk widths,
the condition and types of trees and landscaping, the

Understory landscaping to compliment the existing
green areas of the residential properties and to
promote ownership.

topography of the residential properties and, finally, in
terms of architecture and density.
The recommendations for these areas have one
common goal: “Enhance what is already there.”
These neighborhoods have slowly grown since the
1880s and thus represent important features and
architectural details that require a delicate treatment
of the adjoining public realm. If possible, the existing

Custom crosswalks for better visibility and bulb-outs
(fewer than in retail areas) to decrease pedestrian
crossing distance and increase landscaping around
intersections where parking is prohibited.
Integration of Low Impact Development for
stormwater management.
Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) for detailed
descriptions of the recommended streetscape elements.

mature and healthy trees should be protected while
the proposed trees (additional or replacements) are
recommended to be flowering species, preferable a
selection that adds color during all four seasons.
The planting should be site specific, taking into account
rthe surrounding structures, planting strip widths, and
the overhead wires. Should the overhead wires not be
buried in the near future, additional pedestrian lighting
should be installed to increase pedestrian safety. Please
refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (chapter 8.9) for a
variety of low growing trees that will not interfere with
Figure 8-34: Photo of a 12th Street residential
area with varying topography.

overhead wires and therefore provide an attractive
alternative.

Long-Term Short-Term
Recommendation Recommendation
Combination of new
teardrop roadway
and pedestrian
lights after
undergrounding of
utility wires.

Replacement of
wooden utility
poles with steel
lighting poles that
can adapt DDOT’s
decorative pendant
and accommodate
existing overhead
utility wires.
Installation of
pedestrian lights to
strengthened steel
poles (two per pole,
aligning parallel to the
sidewalk about 16’
above ground).

Setback (varies)

Sidewalk
(varies)

Furnishing Parking Lane (8’)
Zone

Travel Lane (11’)

Painted
Travel Lane (11’)
Median (2’)

Parking Lane (8’) Furnishing
Zone

Sidewalk
(varies)

Setback (varies)

Figure 8-35: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 5.

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129

8.7 Transportation Recommendations for Monroe Street &
Newton Street/Brookland Metro Station (Sub-Districts 6-7)
SUB-DISTRICTS 6 & 7
MONROE STREET & BRIDGE
(Refer to chapters 8.8 for the public realm recommendations)
Within the study area, Monroe Street is a two-way, two-lane N.E. and 12th Street, N.E.. The bridge will be highlighted by
minor arterial running east-west from Michigan Avenue, pulblic realm improvements, please refert to chapter 8.8.
N.E. to South Dakota Avenue, N.E.

for details.

Monroe Street, N.E. provides vehicular, pedestrian, and The

recommendations

achieve

several

objectives

bicycle access to the Brookland/CUA Metro station including a potential reduction in travel speeds, enhanced
and is one of the main points of entry to the Brookloand pedestrian/bicycle safety and connectivity, and provision
community and the commercial area of 12th Street.

for additional parking. It should be noted that design of the
bulb-outs should take into account the fact that Monroe

Figures 8-41a and b show the recommended improvements Street at 9th Street, N.E. is the access point to the Metro
along Monroe Street, N.E. between Michigan Avenue, station for buses (i.e., via 9th Street, N.E.).

Key features of transportation related
improvements include:
► Bicycle lane in each direction.
► Provision for Zipcar/Flexcar parking
spaces.
► Bulb-outs at the intersection of Monroe
Street, N.E. and 9th Street, N.E.

Figure 8-36: Photo of Monroe and 9th Streets intersection.

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SUB-DISTRICT 7
NEWTON STREET BETWEEN BROOKLAND/CUA METRO
STATION & 12TH STREET,
WESTERN MONROE STREET BRIDGE APPROACH
(Refer to chapter 8.8 for the public realm
recommendations)

This area of Newton Street, N.E. provides a direct connection
to the Brookland/CUA Metro station.

Figure 8-37: Photo of Newton Street looking west towards
the Brookland/CUA Metro Station.

Field surveys indicate that sidewalk improvements are
necessary to accommodate both pedestrians and
bicycles and lead transit riders and visitors toward the 12th
Street’s commercial core.
Results of failing to provide sidewalks in tune with natural
pathways can be seen in pictures to the right.
Community representatives have requested that WMATA
review pedestrian accessibility to this metro station and Figure 8-38: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station parking
make appropriate improvements to enhance safety and lot looking east towards the Brookland neighborhood.
facilitate access from adjacent neighborhoods. This effort
will be accompanied by the planned Small Area Plan
update of the station’s vicinity, initiated by the District
Office of Planning.

Figure 8-39: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station parking
lot looking east onto Newton Street.

Figure 8-40: Photo of eastbound Newton Street from
Brookland/CUA Metro Station.
Street on the right hand side leads to Monroe Street.

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Figure 8-41a: Conceptual Plan of Monroe Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

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Figure 8-41b: Conceptual Plan of Monroe Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

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133

8.8 Public Realm Recommendations for Monroe Street & Newton
Street/Brookland Metro Station (Sub-Districts 6-7)
SUB-DISTRICT 6: MONROE STREET BRIDGE

Site lighting incorporated in bridge fencing.

Extended walking surface and physical separation between traffic lanes
and sidewalks enhance pedestrian areas.

Figure 8-42:
Context plan &
section displaying
some long-term
recommendations for
Sub-District 6.

Extended Sidewalk & Furnishing
Zone (varies)

Bike Lane (5’)

Travel Lane (11’)

Painted
Median (2’)

Travel Lane (11’)

Bike Lane (5’)

Extended Sidewalk & Furnishing
Zone (varies)

SUB-DISTRICT 7: MONROE STREET & NEWTON STREET/METRO AREA

Long-Term Short-Term
Recommendation Recommendation
Combination of new
teardrop roadway
and pedestrian
lights after
undergrounding of
utility wires.

Replacement of
wooden utility
poles with steel
lighting poles that
can adapt DDOT’s
decorative pendant
and accommodate
existing overhead
utility wires.
Installation of
pedestrian lights to
strengthened steel
poles (two per pole,
aligning parallel to
the sidewalk about
16’ above ground).

Figure 8-43: Context
plan & section
displaying some
recommended
improvements for
Sub-District 7.

134

Setback (varies)

Sidewalk/ Parking Lane/
Furnishing Zipcar Spaces
Zone (varies)
(8’)

Bike
Lane
(5’)

Travel Lane (12’) Painted
Median
(2’)

Travel Lane (12’)

Bike
Lane
(5’)

Parking Lane/
Zipcar Spaces
(8’)

Sidewalk/
Furnishing
Zone (varies)

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

Setback (varies)

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

FIgure 44: Examples of bridge railings.

The bridge across the train tracks and Metropolitan

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

Branch Trail (MBT) should become an appropriate
transition to the tree-lined environment of 12th Street. The
50 feet width of the right-of-way allows for modifications
that could benefit both pedestrians and bicyclist while
maintaining the two-way two-lane vehicular traffic: Bike
lanes will facilitate the planned District’s ‘signed bicycle
route’. The bridge fence should be custom designed and

Custom designed bridge railing that may
incorporate innovative lighting techniques.
Entrance markers/public art as part of the bridge
design.
Boardwalk extensions to sidewalk with integrated
planter boxes/landscape strip.

complimented by sidewalk extensions that are defined
by vegetation, lighting and other integrated elements.

Designated bike lanes.

The ends of the bridge should be anchored by public

District’s Wayfinding signage and metal banners
announcing the transition to 12th Street.

art. Both the entrance markers and railings could either
be made of stone or metal like many traditional bridges
in Washington DC or display a more contemporary and

Innovative forms of energy sources for bridge
lighting incorporated in the bridge design.

unique nature, incorporating innovative lighting schemes
to create a powerful impact. Added signage and
highlighted pavements could help alleviate vehicular,

Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) forr
detailed descriptions of the recommended streetscape
elements.

pedestrian and bicycle safety hazards at the blind ends
on both sides of the bridge.

Monroe Street is a crucial link for pedestrians, between

the District Office of Planning’s Small Area Plan update

12th Street and areas west of the Monroe Street Bridge,

and WMATA’s 2007 Access Station Plan will include the

the Brookland Metro stop and the restaurants and art

community to improve the design and function of this

galleries on 10th Street. The sidewalk on the northern

area.

edge of the street is, however, too narrow for convenient
access, with poor lighting and inconveniently located

Special Streetscape Elements (in addition to A1-E4, page 104):

utility poles.

Understory plantings to compliment flowering trees.

While the bike lanes from the bridge should be continued

Designated bike lanes.

to the intersection of Monroe and 12th Streets, the sidewalk
extensions will be replaced with alternating parking lanes
and bulb-outs, which create spaces for trees and signage
and provide for a safer street crossing.
The link to the Brookland/CUA Metro Station through 9th
Street, and Newton Street from the station to 12th Street
require contiguous sidewalks that recognize natural
pedestrian paths, and wayfinding signs to direct transit
users to Brookland’s commercial district. Initiatives of

Bus stops
Bulb-outs for to break up parking areas,
accommodate landscaping, and to shield
pedestrians from traffic lanes.
Metal banners announcing the transition to 12th
Street.
Please refer to the STREETSCAPE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (CHAPTER 8.9) forr
detailed descriptions of the recommended streetscape
elements.

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135

8.8.1 SUB-DISTRICT 6: MONROE STREET BRIDGE

Figure 8-45: Map of Sub-District 6

Figure 8-46: Photomontage displaying some of the recommended
improvements for Sub-District 6.

Figure 8-47: Photo of Monroe Street Bridge looking east.

136

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

Bridge fencing to
be part of gateway
into Brookland.

A1
K1

Widen sidewalks, install
planters and plant trees
to separate traffic from
pedestrian zone and
buildings.

K2

Monroe Street

Paving - Concrete

K1
A1

A1
C2

Boardwalk to widen pedestrian
zone on bridge (Short-term
recommendation: paint roadway).
Roadway Lighting

D2

I
D3
D1

F1
C2

L
H

Paving - Concrete

K1

Traffic calming short-term
recommendation - paint
roadway.

Crosswalk option - Concrete
pavement.

Lighting
incorporated in
bridge fencing

Permeable pavers over
continuous root zone.

Tree Planting to provide an entry
feature at the intersection of
Monroe and 9th St. (Coordinate
landscaping with WMATA)
Pedestrian Lighting

Space reserved for public art.

Provide an improved entrance
to Metro.

I
t

9th Stree

E3

I

E1

H

Way finding and ZIP Car
signage.

E2
A2
D1

Tree Planting to provide an entry
feature at the intersection of
Monroe and 9th St.

Designated ZIP Car parking lane.

G
F1

N
Figure 8-48: Conceptual design of the
recommended improvements for SubDistricts 6 and 7.

H

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

D1

D2

137

8.8.2 SUB-DISTRICT 7: MONROE STREET & NEWTON STREET/BROOKLAND
METRO STATION

Figure 8-49: Map of Sub-District 7

Figure 8-50 : Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for
Sub-District 7.

Figure 8-51: Photo of Monroe Street looking east towards 12th Street.

138

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

r

Figure 8-52: Photo of butterfly.

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139

8.9 Streetscape Elements Library
The right selection of streetscape elements can ensure that individual buildings and
their surrounding spaces reinforce and enhance the community’s character. It can
create an environment that has benefits for users, developers and local government
alike:
1. Businesses benefit from the increased satisfaction of their patrons and employees
and the added prestige that well-designed Main Streets command.
2. Everyday users and residents benefit from access to a better quality environment
and an enhanced range of public amenities.
3. State, local and regional authorities benefit through the creation of an economically
and socially viable environment which can provide a further catalyst to adjoining
areas.
This chapter serves as the reference to the recommended streetscape elements in the
sub-district discussions (chapter 8.6 and 8.8). Each icon (e.g.
) represents a group
of streetscape elements that includes one recommended and several alternative
streetscape items. They are as follows:

Figure 8-53: Diagram of Sidewalk Zones.

Example:
You found this icon as one of the
suggested unifying streetscape
elements in the public realm
recommendations (Chapters 8.6 and
8.8).
Now locate the detailed description
of the recommended pedestrian street
light on the following pages using
the alphabetic order of the icons.

Figure 8-54: Streetscape Elements Library content & icon
chart.

140

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PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: SIDEWALK

A1

ITEM: PAVINGS
Purpose

Sidewalks should provide for convenient, safe, and accessible pedestrian traffic while adding an element to the streetscape that -space permittingallows for public gathering places, street furniture, and public art. Materials should be weather-resistant, economically feasible, and easy to maintain.
The design should take into consideration maximum widths, the architecture, styles and colors of the adjacent buildings and infrastructure, stormwater
management, and the location or incorporation of landscape strips, island or planters and street furnishings.
Application
Sidewalks are installed between the building or right-of-way line and the curb, preferably with a landscape strip replacing either the entire length along
the curb or a portion, in which case different materials are recommended between the landscaped areas to signal the distinction between walking
and landscape/furnishing zones, and, ideally, to allow for permeable surfaces as part of the stormwater management.
Accessible curb ramps provide persons with disabilities, and other pedestrians with push carts or strollers, a safe means of access to crosswalks. Curb
cut ramps shall be provided at all curbed intersections where sidewalks and trails are present in accordance with ADA and DDOT standards.

WALKING ZONE
Option One (Recommended): Exposed Aggregate Concrete Pavement (a)
Exposed aggregate concrete could add to the symbolic natural character of Brookland by providing a
consistent visual connection along the changing uses and neighborhoods of 12th Street.

a

Design Standards:
► Color: varies
► Thickness: 3”
► Furnishing/Planting Zone: A continuous planting strip in residential areas and permeable unit pavers in
mixed-use and commercial areas, to complement the color and finish of adjacent walkway and spill
out zones. The extend of permeability will be decided on a project-by -project basis.
► Technical Specifications: For more information, refer to the DDOT Design & Engineering Manual.

Option Two (Alternative): Poured in Place Concrete (b)
Like many sidewalks within the District, the pedestrian paths along 12th Street may be finished per District’s
standards, with poured-in-place concrete. Panel size and other treatments are at the discretion of the designer
and DDOT authorities.

b

Design Standards:
► Color: Grey (buff)
► Thickness: 4” (DC Standard)
► Score Line: 2 foot grid
► Furnishing/Planting Zone: Permeable unit pavers, to complement the color and finish of adjacent
walkway and spill out zones. The extend of permeability will be decided on a project-by -project
basis.
► Technical Specifications: For more information, refer to the DDOT Design & Engineering Manual.

FURNISHING ZONE
The following options are walkable surfaces that enhance sidewalk aesthetics while balancing the negative
impacts of surrounding impermeable surfaces and thus contributing to a more sustainable stormwater
management plan, natural irrigation for landscaping and healthier trees due to undisturbed underground tree
trenches. Some areas may become uneven as roots may shift pavers over time.

Option One (Recommended for the Main Street ‘Core’): Block Pavers on Granular Base (c)

c

Block pavers on a granular base allow for an undisturbed underground tree trench (refer to D3 for details).

Option Two (Recommended for the Neighborhood Retail Area): Cobblestones on Granular Base 9d)
Cobblestones on a granular base ensure increased permeability and allow for an undisturbed underground
tree trench (refer to D3 for details).

d
Figure 8-55: Streetscape Elements Library
- A1 photos, various cities.

NOTE: Please refer to M2 for incorporating innovative design such as Low Impact Design techniques. In
residential areas a landscape strip replaces the furnishing zone, which provides maximum benefits in terms of
drainage/stormwater management, tree health, and -if maintained properly- aesthetics.

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141

ELEMENT: SIDEWALK

A2

ITEM: ACCENTS
Purpose

Decorative pavement accents can create interest and add to the uniqueness of the place by incorporating special motives that are representative
of the community.
Application
Decorative pavement, brick or metal accents can be added during or after the construction of new sidewalks and near street intersections.

General Design Guide
Sidewalk accents or “special items” can be incorporated though
various techniques, materials, shapes and sizes.
The most economical way is to utilizes the material that is being
used for the sidewalk, e.g. imprinting motives into a poured-in-place
concrete sidewalk or choosing different colored or engraved bricks
for a brick sidewalk.
The use of stones, glazed tiles or metal seals and elements is more
costly but can add special and colorful accents and even engage
the pedestrians. Areas designated as gathering places (e.g. at
intersections or wide right-of-ways), may be paved with block pavers
on a poured-in-place concrete base.
It is recommended that the community is involved in the design and
selection of sidewalk art to ensure that the character and interests
of the neighborhood are reflected.
All designs shall comply with ADA guidelines, be flush with the
sidewalk and not hinder a smooth walking experience. DDOT and
other applicable agencies shall approve the final design, cost and
construction details.
Figure 8-56: Streetscape Elements
Library - A2 photos of sidewalk accents,
various cities.

ELEMENT: SIDEWALK/ROAD TRANSITION

ITEM: CURBS & GUTTERS

B

Purpose
Curbs define the transition between the roadway and sidewalk. Gutters convey stormwater to inlets.
Application
Curbs and gutters should be located at the edge of the roadway and/or sidewalk.

Option One (Recommended): Brick Gutter with Standard or Granite Curb (a)
► Option One (concrete curb) or granite curb can be combined with a brick gutter that measures up
to two feet in width. This option offers a significant yet cost-effective visual improvement. As part of
the recommended low impact development, a trench drain for stormwater management should be
incorporated.
Option Two (Alternative): Standard Curb (b)

a

b

Design Standards:
► Material / Curb: Concrete
► Material / Base: Base, subbase, and subgrade for sidewalks and curb shall be compacted as per
current DDOT specifications.
► Length: Uniform sections, approximately 10 feet in length, no section shall be less than 6 feet.
► Aggregate material shall extend under curb a minimum distance of 6 inches beyond back of curb.
► Thickness: Aggregate under curb shall be in excess of depth of gutter face or a minimum of 4 inches,
whichever is greater.
► Curb Height: 6 inches for roadways
► Gutter Width: 2 feet wide (Standard)
Option Three (Alternative): Mountable Curb (c)
Mountable curbs allow vehicles to leave the roadway and drive into a clear zone, in emergencies only. In
locations where a mountable curb is required, it should be 4” high.
Design Standards:
► Material / Gutter: Concrete
► Material / Base: Base, subbase, and subgrade for sidewalks and curb shall be compacted as per
current DDOT specifications.
► Dimensions are same as above (Standard Curb), except that Mountable Curbs and Gutters DDOT
Standards apply.

c

142

Figure 8-57: Streetscape Elements
Library - B photos of sidewalks &
gutters, various locations.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: LIGHTING

ITEM: SHORT-TERM IMPROVEMENTS

C1

Purpose & Application:
Light fixtures enhance nighttime visibility and help promote vehicular and pedestrian safety. Pedestrian lights (usually 16’ above ground) are not
recommended for intersection lighting, Decorative, area and/or security lighting fixtures are appropriate at walkways and entrances to ensure
pedestrian safety and visibility. Roadway fixtures should be installed at least 25’ above ground for adequate roadway safety; unnecessary light
intrusion to nearby buildings should be avoided, The use of full cut off lenses is required. All fixtures should respect a human scale and comply with DDOT
standards. Upward scatter or night sky pollution should be avoided through suitable product selection.
C1 qnd C2 specify similar lighting schemes with (C1) and without (C2) overhead utility wires.
Both recommended lighting options (1 & 2) represent short-term alternatives that were
discussed with DDOT staff and Technical Advisory Committees for improving 12th Street
public realm with regards to lighting and utility wires. While the undergrounding of utility wires
remains as a long-term goal, the interim solution should focus on improving the appearance
and increasing the lighting levels of pedestrian walkways. Therefore, it is recommended
to replace the existing deteriorated wooden utility poles with steel lighting poles that can
adapt DDOT’s decorative pendant pole and accommodate additional stress brought on
to the pole from the overhead utility wires. In addition to providing street lighting (30’ feet
above ground), these strengthened poles could be retrofitted with pedestrian lights (two
per pole, aligning parallel to the sidewalk about 16’ above ground) to better illuminate the
sidewalks. Depending on the land use and activity levels, intervals of added pedestrian
lights can be in-/or decreased, alternating with Option 2.
Option One: Combination of Decorative Teardrop Pendant Street Light with Twin
Pedestrian Level Lights and Overhead Utility Wires.
Option 1

Option Two: Decorative Teardrop Pendant Street Light (here shown as Intersection Light)
Design Standards for both options:
► Mounting Height: DC Standard;
Typically:
Teardrop Pendant Street Light: 30’ above ground
Twin Pedestrian Level Light: 16’ above ground
► Spacing: Approximately 40’ O.C. for Pedestrian Level Lights; 80’ O.C. for Vehicular
Street Lights.
► Light Color: DC Standard
► Illumination: Refer to District of Columbia Streetlight Grand Plan
► Poles: New steel poles shall be constructed per DC standard to accommodate
additional load of the utility wires and twin pedestrian lights, Black (Federal Chip #
27038).
► If regulated parking is enforced, light pole spacing shall be coordinated with parking
meters.

Option 2

Figure 8-58: Sreetscape
Elements Library - C1
drawings of combination
and roadway lights.

Option Three (Alternative): Decorative Teardrop Pendant Street Light and Twin
Pedestrian Level Lights attached to Existing Wooden Poles.

ELEMENT: LIGHTING

ITEM: LONG-TERM IMPROVEMENTS

C2

Purpose & Application; Please refer to C1.

Figure 8-59:
Sreetscape
Elements
Library -C2
drawings/photo
of combination,
roadway &
pedestrian lights.

r

Options 1-3 are recommended as long-term improvements that require the burial of all utility
wires. The teardrop pendant (Option 2) is a DC Standard light; in order to follow the lighting
scheme of the short-term lighting alternative, its design series could be extended to include
a combination of street and pedestrian lights (Option 1) and a separate twin teardrop
pedestrian lights (Option 3; two per pole, aligning parallel to the sidewalk about 16’ above
ground). Depending on the land use, activity levels, and location of intersections, the three
options should be alternated to provide the most effective and appealing illumination for
all travel modes.
Option One: Combination of Decorative Teardrop Pendant Street Light with Twin
Pedestrian Level Lights.
Option Two: Decorative Teardrop Pendant Street Light (here shown as Intersection Light)

Option 1

Option Three: Decorative Twin Teardrop Pendant Pedestrian Light

Option 3

r

Option 2

Design Standards- General:
► Mounting Height: DC Standard;
Typically:
Teardrop Pendant Street Light: 30’ above ground
Twin Pedestrian Level Light: 16’ above ground
► Spacing: Approximately 40’ O.C. for Pedestrian Level Lights; 80’ O.C. for Vehicular
Street Lights.
► Light Color: DC Standard
► Illumination: Refer to District of Columbia Streetlight Grand Plan
► Poles: DC Standard, Black (Federal Chip # 27038)
NOTE: Please refer to M1 for incorporating innovative design such as supplying street lights
with renewable energy.

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143

ELEMENT: LANDSCAPING

D1

ITEM: TREES
Purpose

Healthy urban trees promote safety, health and tranquility. They raise the value of real estate and enhance attractiveness of commercial areas. By
providing shade, purifying the air, reducing wind, glare, reflection and noise, and helping with the infiltration of stormwater, street trees moderate the
environment of urban areas. Street trees provide an excellent wildlife habitat when combined with surrounding vegetation. They will also complement
the scale of the right-of-way, strengthen the line of sight, and create a coherent appearance. Planting for ceremonial access can be used along the
roadway, to define the edge of the street. Appropriate street trees under overhead utilities define the street edge, and maintain the natural habitat of
the tree while not conflicting with utility services.
Application
All plant selection, design, and separation distances for trees shall be in accordance with the District’s Urban Forestry Standards. Trees planted under
overhead utilities shall be from the ornamental kind.
Plant Selection:
Shade Trees

The selection of suitable tree species is diverse
enough to allow for mixed planting.

Flowering Trees

► Liberty American Elm (Ulmus americana
‘Liberatus’)
► Princeton American Elm (Ulmus
americana ‘Princeton’)
► Willow Oak (Quercus phellos)
► London Planetree ‘Bloodgood’ (Platanus
x acerifolia ‘Bloodgood’)
► Black Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica)

► Kwansan Cherry (Prunus serrulata kwanzan)
► Ivory Silk Japanese Tree Lilac (Syringa reticulata
‘Ivory Silk’)
► Star Magnolia, Tree Form (Magnolia stellata)
► Sargent Cherry ‘Spire’ (Prununs sargentii ‘Spire’)

Design Standards:
Noninvasive
Disease resistant
Tolerate urban conditions
Require minimal maintenance
Tolerate high wind and flood conditions
Create visual seasonal interest
Have naturally high branching habit
Provide good wildlife habitat
Planting size (shade tree: min. 3.5” caliper
Planting size (ornamental tree: min. 2.0”
caliper
► Pedestrian Clearance: 8’ to lowest
branch










Healthy urban trees help mitigate the aesthetic
impact of overhead utilities.

Sargent Cherry

Star Magnolia

Ceremonial access can be created through
parallel lines of planting.

Kwansan Cherry

Ivory Silk Japanese Tree Lilac

Example of a landscaped median, Old Town Alexandria.

Landscaping Practices:
Good general landscaping practices increase the ecological value of a site and add visual interest, whilst
decreasing stormwater runoff and heat island effect.
All landscapes change, grow and evolve in a process of accession. By sensitively working with these natural
dynamics, good landscaping can provide economic, efficient and visual satisfaction.
High branching trees help avoid potential
interference with street traffic and nearby
buildings but require the burying of overhead
utilities.

Figure 8-60: Streetscape Elements Library
-D1, photos of planting and tree options,
various locations.

144

Designing plantings that foster biodiversity should be a consideration for any streetscape improvement
project. With the increasing loss of open space, providing wildlife habitat and wildlife corridors in the
landscaping around buildings is increasingly important ecologically. Small pockets of songbird habitat and
patches of tall-grass prairie around buildings are helping to stem the decline of many threatened animals
- from birds to butterflies.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: LANDSCAPING

D2

ITEM: UNDERSTORY PLANTINGS
Purpose

Understory plantings can include ornamental grasses, groundcover, shrubs, and perennials. Such plantings add aesthetic value to the streetscape,
reduce stormwater runoff, and provide visual and physical barriers for pedestrians and motorists. Understory plantings can also help create a
neighborhood identity.
Application
Landscape areas between street trees should be located between the curb and the sidewalk. A carriage way maximizes planting space while
allowing for car doors to open. All planting designs shall be in accordance with the DDOT Design & Engineering Manual.
Option One (Recommended for residential areas): Standard Turf Planting

r

Lawn areas provide a clean and developed appearance in dedicated areas requiring maintenance. Refer to
DDOT Specification Standards for lawn seeding.

Option 1

Sustainable Turf Maintenance Guidelines:
► Water in early mornings so less water will be lost though evaporation
► Avoid watering in the evening as the damp conditions will encourage disease development
► Water deeply to moisten the whole root zone, but infrequently, to limit disease and help build deeper
roots
► Topdress with compost in the spring and/or fall, after core aeration, to improve soil structure and provide
a wide range of nutrients and microorganisms
► Use lime or calcium carbonate to help restore lawn nutrients commonly lost during peak rainfall periods
► No more than one third of the grass height should be removed. Properly cut lawns encourage deep root
development, help reduce weeds and improve lawn resistance to drought stress
► Mow lawns regularly. Keeping mower blades sharp is crucial. Ragged cutting encourages disease and
browning
Option Two (Recommended for commercial and transitional areas): Combination of the following:



Option 2

Groundcover, flowers, and low growing grasses with up 16” in height
Low growing shrubs and low to medium height grasses with up 24” in height
Medium height grasses and medium height shrubs with up 30” in height
Tall grasses and large shrubs with up 36” in height

The example (see photo) shows how landscaping can create an attractive traffic barrier while ensuring and enhancing
storefront visibility.
Option Three (Recommended for commercial areas): Planting boxes, edging and tree guards
Planting boxes, raised planter edge and/or metal railings hold the soil, mulch and plants in place and maximize
the sidewalk and furnishing area between the trees. They can also direct pedestrian travel paths, prevent soil
compaction, and help define a space. Planter edging is effective if roots are above grade. Metal tree guards
(see photo) are usually made of galvanized metal steel painted and primed. ADA accessibility between planters
must be provided.

Option 3

Figure 8-61: Streetscape Elements
Library -D2, photos of understory
plantings.

ELEMENT: LANDSCAPING

ITEM: CONTINUOUS UNDERGROUND TREE TRENCH

D3

Purpose
Many street trees exist in conditions hazardous to their survival, including poor soils with inadequate drainage, damage by heavy truck traffic, pollution
and vandalism. In addition, competition for underground growing space is a concern in dense urban areas where pavement and underground
utilities take increasingly large amounts of room. Correct street tree planting methods offer the best solution to street tree survival. Different surfaces
require different subsurface treatments as the water infiltration changes, which, in turn determines the measures that must be taken for an efficient and
environmentally friendly stormwater management plan. The illustrations below show how the recommended paving methods (see A1) and subsurface
treatments in the planting/furnishing zones allow for a continuous underground tree trench, creating a greater area for root growth and the sharing of
resources between individual street trees Please refer to DDOT standards for more technical specifications.
NOTE: Please refer to M2 for
incorporating innovative
design such as Low Impact
Development techniques.

Continuous
underground tree
trench.

Figure 8-62 a,b: Streetscape Elements Library -D3, photo & diagram of surface treatment and underground tree trench.

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145

ELEMENT: FURNISHING

ITEM: SEATING

E1

Purpose

Fixed seating or benches provide a resting place for pedestrians.
Application
Benches will be installed along highly visible and utilized sections of 12th Street, including but not limited to transit stops, critical intersections and on
sidewalks with wide furnishing zones.
Option One (Recommended): Traditional Style

Traditional Style Bench

‘Steelsites’ Series Picnic Table

Design Standards:
► Dimensions: 6’ length with center arm places at equal intervals.
► Metal Components: All fabricated metal components are steel shotblasted, etched, phosphatized, preheated,
and electrostatically powder-coated with Triglycidyl Isocyanurate TGIC polyester powder coatings. The coating
shall be a rust inhibitor with an UV and flake resistant topcoat finish of thermosetting polyester powder.
► Slats: Slats should be either metal or reinforced recycled plastic (40%-100%), UV resistant, rot resistant, and
easily cleaned. They shall be approved by DDOT.
► Color: Black for all metal components
► Placement: Two feet from the curb (District Standard)
Option Two (Alternative for public gathering places in the ‘core’): ‘Steelsites Series’ Bench and Picnic Table
Areas along 12th Street that could be transformed into larger public gathering places could accommodate picnic
tables such the following:
Design Standards:
► Dimensions: Overall: 69’ w x 69’ l, Table: top 30’ h x 69’ l, Seats: 18’ w 69’ l. Slat width 2’
► Metal Components: All fabricated metal components are steel shotblasted, etched, phosphatized, preheated,
and electrostatically powder-coated with Triglycidyl Isocyanurate TGIC polyester powder coatings.
► Slats: Scrolled steel slats are formed from 1/4” x 1-1/2” solid steel bars; steel slats are welded to cross members
of 1-7/8” diameter tubular steel legs
► Color: Black for all metal components
► Placement: Two feet from the curb (District Standard) or within appropriate setting of a larger open space
that does not obstruct the walking path clearance.
Other: All other designs shall be in accordance with District standards and approved by DDOT and applicable
agencies.
Figure 8-63: Streetscape Elements
Library -E1, photos of benches, various
locations.

ELEMENT: FURNISHING

ITEM: TRASH RECEPTACLES

E2

Purpose

Trash receptacles and ash urns shall be provided at highly visible and utilized locations.
Application
At locations where people are expected to congregate and/or a high volume of trash is expected to be generated.

Option One (Recommended): ‘Ironsites’ SD-42 Trash Receptacle
Most of the old trash receptacles along 12th Street have recenlty been replaced with this version. It is recommended
to maintain a consistency by using this style fur future additions or replacements.

‘Ironsites’ SD-42 Trash receptacle

Design Standards:
► Capacity: 42-gallon (159 liters)
► Door: Standard side-door-opening with dome lid receptacle limits what can be placed into it.
► Lid: Formed dome lid attached to frame
► Trash Receptacle: Standard tapered formed riveted lid, optional S-2ASD formed dome with stainless steel
ashtray and D2-32 formed dome with self-closing door
► Placement: Minimum 2’ from curb.
► Color: Black topcoat with Thermosetting polyester powder coat
► Optional custom plaques or decals: Steel plaques in various sizes and pressure sensitive vinyl outdoor decals,
affixed to plaques
Option Two (Alternative): ‘Plainwell’ Trash Receptacle

‘Plainwell‘ Trash receptacle
Figure 8-64: Streetscape Elements
Library -E2, photos of trash
receptacles.

146

Design Standards:
► Capacity: 35-gallon (132 liters)
► Lid: Cable attached black top lid
► Trash Receptacle: Standard tapered formed riveted lid, optional S-2ASD formed dome with stainless steel
ashtray and D2-32 formed dome with self-closing door
► Placement: Minimum 2’ from curb.
► Color: Black topcoat with Thermosetting polyester powder coat
► Optional custom plaques or decals: Steel plaques in various sizes and pressure sensitive vinyl outdoor decals,
affixed to plaques.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: FURNISHING

E3

ITEM: BIKE RACKS
Purpose

High security bike racks allow cyclists to lock bikes with most bike locks. Where required or space permits, multiple bike racks shall be provided along
pedestrian walkways. Frequent and well sited placement encourages bike trips.
Application
At visible and prominent ‘destination’ locations preferably adjacent to building entrances. Not blocking entrances or inhibiting pedestrian flow.
Option One (Recommended): Inverted U-Shaped Posts

Standard: U shaped Posts

Design Standard:
► Spacing: Each rung shall be placed 30 inches apart
► Distance from Curb: Minimum of 2 feet
► Length: 21 inches or 30 inches
► Material: 2.0” schedule 40 steel pipe
► Capacity: 2 bicycles
► Mounting: Embedded
► Finish: Hot-dipped galvanized; Rubber coated (optional); Thermoplastic powder coat (optional);
► Color: Black or custom, as approved by DDOT
Option Two (Recommended where tree guards are not installed): The X-Type

c Table

Bike racks as part of the tree pit
protection
Figure 8-65: Streetscape Elements
Library -E3, photos of bike racks,
various locations.

Design Standard:
► Placement: Around street trees, where space is permissible
► Height: A 4’x4’ footprint is 2’-6”above ground
► Material: 1 1/2 “ or 2.0” schedule 40 steel pipe
► Capacity: 3-4 bicycles, three sides of the tree pit
► Mounting: Available with flanges that accomodate three drive screws, or without flanges to be sunk into
concrete footings.
► Finish: Standard black powder coat, per DDOT standards
► Color: Black or custom, as approved by DDOT

ELEMENT: FURNISHING

ITEM: SAFETY POSTS/BOLLARDS

nd applicable
Purpose

E4

Safety posts may be installed for the safety of pedestrians and cyclists and definition of spaces. Where required and determined by DDOT, the posts
shall be removable to allow the passage of emergency vehicles. Bollards may be connected with chains to demarcate green areas or edges of public
spaces. Where appropriate, posts should be designed to provide seating.
Application
Safety posts shall be installed (permanent or removable) in the commercial areas along public rights-of-way and sidewalks, usually 2’ from the curb.
Option One (Recommended for commercial areas to divide vehicular and pedestrian traffic and
define and illuminate public spaces): Bollards with lighting features (a & b).
Design Standards for ‘Annapolis Smart Bollard’ (a):
► Dimensions: 2’-9” high, Diameter: 6”
► Material: Structural Steel (Tube), Aluminum Casting (Top)
► Finish: PangardII Powdercoat, custom colors available
► Solar Lighting Components: Encapsulated in patented domed polycarbonate housing,
Light Output Effective Intensity: ~2 candela, Minimum Autonomy: 150 hours, Min. Equivalent
peak Sun Hours to Maintain Min. Autonomy: 3 hours, Illumination Technology: 16 White LEDs,
Lifespan of LEDs: up to 100,000 hours (see landscapeforms.com for more details)

a)
b)

Design Standards for contemporary bollard (b):
► Dimensions: 3’-3” high, Diameter: 6”
► Material: Stainless steel, heavy duty
► Lamp Enclosure: Machined stainless steel top housing assembly removable in one piece for
relamping. Secured by three-socket head stainless steel screws threaded onto stainless steel
inserts. Clear 3.16” thick borosilicate glass with passivated stainless steel cone reflector and
top down light reflector. Fully gasketed using high temperature silicone rubber O-rings.
► Color/Finish: #4 stainles steel
Option Two (Alternative): Granite (c)
Design Standards:
► Dimensions: Cubical: 3’ tall, 1’ wide base; Spherical: 2’ tall, 2’ diameter; Cylindrical: 3’tall, 1’
diameter
► Material: Granite (material shall be vandal resistant and require minimal maintenance)

d)
c)
a) Removable ‘Annapolis Smart Bollard’ with
integrated solar powered lighting and LED technology
(source: landscapeforms) b) Contemporary bollard
with lighting feature, c) granite bollard, d) traditional
bollard.

Option Three (Alternative): Traditional Bollard (d)
Design Standards:
► Dimensions: 3’-3” high, Base: 10”
► Material: Ductile iron ASTM A536, Class 80-55-06
► Color/Finish: Standard powder coated color: semi-gloss black, color coating shall be either
polyester or polyester TGIC powder finish.
Figure 8-66: Streetscape Elements Library -E4, photos of bollards.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

147

ELEMENT: PAVING / MULTI-MODAL TRAVELWAYS

ITEM: DESIGNATED BIKE LANES

F1

Purpose

The District aims to increase bike ridership to supplement other transit options. The DC Master plan increases the number of bike lanes on city roads. To
ensure maximum usage of this transportation option, bike lanes and transition zones on city streets should be clearly marked with distinctive materials
and colors to stress the safety of bikers.
Application
12th Street varies in width from 40 to 50 feet. Based on experiences in many North American cities, the ideal minimum street width to accommodate
bikes lanes was established at 44 feet. However, in Brookland, options to adjust the 40 feet street width could be explored as part of the streetscape
improvement implementation. Otherwise, on those sections narrower than 44’ wide that are recommended for bicycle travel, the District may post
special signs that indicate the street is a designated bike route, but would not use any pavement markings. The following examples describe options
for the location, materials, and colors of designated bike lanes. The common goal is to provide the highest degree of separation between vehicular
and bicycle traffic and awareness of one another.

Option One (Recommended): Epoxy Coating
Unless it becomes cost prohibitive, bike lanes, intersections and transition zones from bike
lanes to intersections should be demarcated by partial epoxy coated surfaces and dashed
lines to warn bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers about the areas of conflict.
Design Standards:
► Color: Blue
► Material:
► Epoxy binder should be dressed with calcined bauxite (Polished Stone Vale 70+) to
provide excellent durability and skid resistance in both wet and dry weather. The
level of skid resistance depends on the type of surface dressing aggregate.
► Tyre grip consists of a 2-component epoxy resin based binder and aggregate
applied to the surface of the binder while still in a liquid state : (1) a mixture of epoxy
resin, modified with suitable oils to improve flow characteristics. (2) an amine based
cure agent and suitable non-reactive dilutent extenders to modify c o m p o u n d
properties.
► The aggregate is applied to the surface of the binder while uncured and depending
on the choice of aggregate provides the required color, texture and skis resistance
properties. The binder may be pigmaneted to enhance the color effect of the
finished product.
Option Two (Alternative): Pavers and Phycial Separation Elements
Ideally, bicycle lanes are separated from both the vehicular and the pedestrian traffic.
12th Street could provide this kind of separation only along the 50 feet wide street sections
North of Otis Street and South of Douglas Street. Here, the separated bike lanes could
accomodate a safe transition to connecting streets and sidewalks.
Option Three (Alternative): White Bike Lines
As the diagram shows, white lines can mark bike lanes in the most economical way. The
minimum widths for vehicular traffic lanes and parking need to be considered. All bike
lanes shall comply with DDOT guidelines.

Figure 8-67: Streetscape
Elements Library -F1,
photos/sketch of bike
lanes, various locations.
Recommended widths for parking, bike lanes and
verhicular traffic for a 44’ (50’) wide street.

ELEMENT: PAVING / MULTI-MODAL TRAVELWAYS

ITEM: BUS STOP PAD - INTEGRALLY COLORED CONCRETE

F2

Purpose
Where buses make stops, a concrete pad is required to accommodate the additional weight of the buses and to counter the vibrations they cause
on the sidewalk.
Application
The concrete for bus stop pads should be integrally colored to closely match the asphalt paved surface in the adjoining lanes and to hide oil and other
leaked fluid stains.

Figure 8-68: Streetscape Elements Library
-F2, photo of bus stop pad, Washington DC.

148

Design Standards:
► Color: dark grey (closest color to match asphalt in adjoining lanes)
► Dimensions: Minimum Length should be per DDOT Standards; Minimum Width should match lane
width; Jointing: Minimum Width of 6”.
► Replacement/Rehabilittions: DDOT must approve samples for integrally colored concrete.
► Material:
► Pigment: ASTM C 979, synthetic mineral-oxide pigments or colored waterreducing admixtures.
► Color: stable, free of carbon black, non-fading, and resistant to lime and other
alkalis.
► Jointing: Suitable precast concrete separator should be used between bus stop
pad and adjoining asphalt lanes.
► Expansion joints in concrete should be placed at appropriate intervals.
► Technical Specifications: For more information, refer to the DDOT Design & Engineering Standards.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: PARKING

ITEM: MULTI-SPACE PARKING
Purpose

G

The multi-space parking system has proven to accommodate more cars, be more convenient for drivers, and to generate more revenue.
Application
The implementation of this system will be beneficial for the commercial area of 12th Street.
Multispace Parking (Recommended for commercial areas)
Solar-powered multispace parking machines - the same technology installed along M Street in Georgetown- is
recommended for 12th Street to benefit business patrons and the District’s and thus the community’s revenue. With
this proven system, a motorist parking in the designated stretch on a given block no longer will have a single meter.
Instead, the driver will walk to the machine in the middle of that block, pay with coins or a credit card, and then return
to the car and place the receipt on the dashboard.

r

Figure 8-69: Streetscape Elements Library -G,
photo of solar-powered multispace parking
meter.

ELEMENT: PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

ITEM: CROSSINGS & BULB-OUTS
Purpose

H

Pedestrian crossings should be located where sight distances for both pedestrians and motorists are adequate to allow for safe crossings, and for
vehicles to observe other motorists entering the roadway at un-signalized intersections. High visibility intersections promote pedestrian safety and
should be used extensively.
Application
Marked crosswalks should be provided when sidewalks cross roadways such as driveways, parking lot entrances, roads, etc. Crosswalks should not be
constructed with a different material than the rest of the street unless it is durable and will not have joints or cracks that interfere with pedestrian and
bicycle safety; uneven materials like cobblestones should be avoided. All crosswalks shall be in compliance with current ADA standards.

Crosswalk Option One (Recommended): Stamped Poured-in-Place Concrete
The use of decorative (stamped and/or colored) concrete in roadway pavements alerts pedestrians and
motorists of the crossing, making for safer pedestrian/vehicle intersections.
Many colors and textures are available to enhance the appearance of a concrete surface, often providing
a cost-effective simulation of natural stone, brick, or other materials. Integrally colored concrete is made
by adding mineral oxide pigments to concretes made with Portland cement. The concrete aggregates,
particularly fine aggregate, must be carefully selected to enhance the color effect. The concrete crosswalks,
while more expensive, are cost-effective because they last longer. Color, materials, and techiniques shall
comply with DDOT Standards, taking into consideration difficulties such as slippery surfaces that were
experienced with some recent designs.

Crosswalk Option Two (Alternative): Thermoplastic Markings
Design Standards:
► Color & Material: Per DDOT Standards
► Length: Entire length of roadway
► Width: 10’

Above: Stamped concrete sidewalk,
Washington DC; Thermoplastic marking
crosswalk, Philadelphia.
Below: Bulb-outs in commercial and
residential areas, various locations.

r

Bulb-Outs/Curb Extensions
Curb extensions are intended to improve pedestrian safety by shortening crossing distances, calming
traffic, and providing more visible crossing points for pedestrians. Curb bulbs refer to locations where the
sidewalk area is extended into the street. This treatment can occur mid-block, but is most commonly used at
intersections. In addition, the curb extensions leave space for transit buses to pull to the side of the roadway
out of the travel lanes rather than on the edge of the travel lane to load and unload passengers.
Higher-visibility ladder or concrete crosswalks can supplement the curb extensions (see above). Strong yellowgreen pedestrian crossing warning signs and new “Yield to Pedestrians, $100 to $500 Fine for Violations” signs
can further enforce pedestrian safety.
Despite the benefits for pedestrian safety, curb bulbs generally impede on bike lanes. Therefore, a careful
examination of the curb bulb locations and rerouting of bike lanes is necessary.

Figure 8-70: Streetscape Elements Library -H,
photos of crosswalks & bulb-outs.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

149

ELEMENT: SIGNAGE

ITEM: WAY FINDING & ALUMINUM BANNERS
Purpose

I

Signage improves pedestrian and vehicular orientation and movement. It also adds visual interest and character to the streetscape. Signage should
be simple, legible, properly scaled to fit its surroundings and accessible to all. Signage placed at key locations helps to orient visitors, highlights transit
options, open space and other destinations.
Application
At visible, continuous locations along 12th Street to provide orientation and improve overall site ‘identity’.
“DC Wayfinding” Signage
Wayfinding signage shall be installed at visible locations along 12th Street
to direct visitors toward building entrances, public spaces, attractions,
and/or parking facilities. Material, color and texture shall comply with
District Standards. Educational signs that engage residents and visitors are
attractive streetscape elements highlighting the community’s history and
attractions.
Street Sign Attachments

a

c

b

The attachments shall be integrated with the standard District street signs
and installed on the street light posts to enhance the neighborhood identity
and create a sense of place. The design of the attachment varies as desired
by the community but shall comply with DDOT design standards.

Permanent Aluminum Banners

d

e

f

a) DC Wayfinding Signage, b) DC Heritage Trail
Sign, c) Wayfinding Sign, d) Design of Street Sign
Attachment, e) Aluminum Banner, f) Temporary
Fabric Banner, g) Street Sign Attachment,
Washington DC.

Permanent banners increase the positive image, enhance identity and
add to the vibrancy of the public right-of-way. The choice of a lasting
material is crucial to a well maitained and positive appearance. Therefore,
the district discouraged the use of fabric banners (except for temporary
events, see below). Permanent banners need to be coordinated with the
existing signage and may only be installed in the absence of street sign
attachments to prevent crowding of utility poles.
Temporary Banners
Temporary banners may advertise events, upon DDOT approval. Funding
and removal of the banners shall be the sole responsibility of local Main
Streets, BIDs, and /or local businesses. Material, color and texture shall
comply with District Standards.

Figure 8-71: Streetscape Elements Library -I, photos
of signs & banners, various locations.

g

J

ELEMENT: PUBLIC INFORMATION

ITEM: NEWS STAND
Purpose

News Stands can combine unsightly arrangements of newspaper boxes and provide an opportunity for the community to post notices and distribute
neighborhood information. This may foster a sense of community and ownership, which has positive effects on the maintenance of the public
spaces.
Application
A news stand may be installed on public or private property with the consent of the owner, given that the sidewalk is not encroached upon.

The placement of a news stand is recommended for areas that naturally
attract large community crowds, such as the intersection of Monroe and
12th Streets.
Design Standard
The design, material, and location is subject to DDOT approval. A service
and maintenance schedule needs to be determined prior to installation.

Figure 8-72: Streetscape Elements Library -J,
photos of news stands, various locations.

150

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

hat naturally
Monroe and

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: BRIDGE

K1

ITEM: RAILINGS
Purpose

Attention should be paid to the treatment of railings. Railings can incorporate other fixtures, such as lights, banners, neighborhood totems, at the
discretion of the designer and in consultation with DDOT.
Application
Specific designs for railings should be created by the designer but must adhere to DDOT standards for safety and crash test requirements.

Types (depending on road classification):
► Integrated metal railing with Light Posts
► Railing sections mounted on concrete/
masonry parapet walls
► Concrete railings integrated with parapet
walls to provide vertical surfaces for public
art and integrated seating
► Independent, open-designed railings (not
mounted on parapet walls) to allow an
unimpeded view of the surroundings.

NOTE: Please refer to M1 for incorporating innovative
design such as supplying street lights and railings with
renewable energy.

Figure 8-73: Streetscape
Elements Library -K1, photos of
bridge railings, various locations.

ELEMENT: BRIDGE

K2

ITEM: ENTRANCE MARKERS
Purpose

Entrance markers on bridges have a significant impact on the introduction to the neighborhood. They represent a form of public art and may be
designed in cooperation with the community.
Application
Entrance markers are usually placed on both sides at the beginning and end of the bridge.

Design Guide:
As part of the bridge/railing design, entrance markers are subject to DDOT
approval and shall comply with all applicable codes and regulations. They can
vary in material and color but should be designed is a way that is compatible with
the anticipated multi-modal use of the bridge, the light fixtures, planters and curb
barriers.

Addition: Metal Curb Barrier
As the District enhances multi-modal transportation throughout the region, a
right-of way will increasingly be shared among its users, including vehicles, bikers,
pedestrians and/or transit. Along corridors where pedestrians and bikers travel on
sidewalks or paths adjacent to fast moving vehicular traffic (e.g. Monroe Street
Bridge), curb barriers cab be installed to separate the types of lanes to ensure
safety and comfort for all users. An independent, low railing can also be used in
special locations such as the on greenways, where views are desirable, alongside
medians and where space does not exist for a wide wall section.

Figure 8-74: Streetscape Elements
Library -K2, photos of bridge
entrance markers, various
locations.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

151

ELEMENT: PUBLIC ART

ITEM: ENTRANCE MARKERS & SPECIAL FEATURES
Purpose

L

Public art is an important element of the streetscape and should reflect the community’s history, assets and interests. The focus can be on the art itself
or, as preferred by many Brookland community members, public art can be designed and incorporated to enhance and emphasize the surrounding,
such as buildings and landscaping.
Application
Public art can be part of virtually any streetscape element or it may be designed as a separate, free-standing structure. Below are several examples
of public art. Each one was created with input from the community, applicable agencies and donors. This selection of public art shall serve as an
inspiration for the Brookland neighborhood, DDOT and artists to help in the creation of their own public art.

Figure 8-75: Streetscape Elements Library-L,
photos of entrance markers & public art, various
locations. Note the human sundial in right corner
as recommended in figure 8-25b.

ELEMENT: POSSIBILITIES FOR INNOVATIVE DESIGN

ITEM: RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR STREET LIGHTING

M1

Purpose
Renewable “green” energy, compared to conventional forms of power, has no or little adverse environmental impacts, and its use reduces dependence
on current power sources. Many local governments, including the District, have increased funding and support for innovative and sustainable
development practices. Streetscape improvement projects offer great opportunities to incorporate innovative design ideas in the construction process.
Below are examples of how alternative energy sources can enhance the streetscape while reducing energy and maintenance costs. By displaying
information about the respective technologies, their efficiency and operation, these site elements may engage and educate the community.
Application
Renewable energy sources can be applied to all streetscape elements that require energy for operation, including but not limited to vehicular and
pedestrian lighting, parking meters, fountains, and illuminated signage and public art.
Public “Solar” Art & Streetscape Applications with Interactive
Components:

a

The Idea: Combining the efficient and independent use of solar
energy/LED for street lighting with public art and community
involvement.

e

b

c

g

Example (a): The three columns to the left contain 27 solar modules
with an output of 1.965 Watts, resulting in a PV production of 800
kWh per year. Assuming an average illumination of 12 hours,
the 54 blue lights (48 Watt) require 210 kWh per year. Thus, this
art structure produces three times as much energy as required
for its illumination and the surplus can be fed into an utility grid
and/or used to supply other streetscape elements.

f

i

d

152

The Application: Photovoltaic (PV) cells are devices that
convert solar radiation into electricity. These systems can be
built as unique and appealing structures as the examples
to the left demonstrate. In lieu of traditional public art and
lighting techniques, structures like these could supply energy
to streetscape elements (lighting, parking meters etc.) while
displaying the progressive and creative character of the
Brookland community. Monitoring “Scoreboards” can be
attached to the PV structure and/or single light posts, showing
the energy production/consumption in Watts, the batterystored energy, the number of elements fed by this structure and
potentially the cost saved by using this form of energy.

h

Opportunities: This concept can be expanded to include and
accommodate the community’s and district’s ideas and visions.
The public display of information could be supplemented by
loading stations for electrical devices such as cell phones or
notebooks.

Figure 8-76: Streetscape Elements Library -M1, photos of solar powered art & lighting, various locations.
a) solar powered vertical markers, b) rotating and lit solar sculpture ‘solar-ikosaeder’, c) solar sculpture, d) fiberwave art,
e) LED lit city sign, f) LED edge-illuminated pedestrian crossing, stop & street name signs, g) solar powered street lights ,
h) solar flashing beacon installed on existing sign post, i) self-contained lighting device with ‘energycache’ technology
for decorative or traffic flow purposes.
Sources: solarserver.de/solarmagazin/artikelmaerz2004.html, robertlipinsky.com, roadpro.ca

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
ELEMENT: POSSIBILITIES FOR INNOVATIVE DESIGN

ITEM: LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID)

M2

Purpose
Low Impact Development (LID) is an innovative stormwater management approach with a basic principle that is modeled after nature: manage
rainfall at the source using uniformly distributed decentralized micro-scale controls. LID’s goal is to mimic a site’s pre-development hydrology by using
design techiniques that infiltrate, filter, store, evaporate, and detain runoff closest to its source.
Application
Instead of conveying, managing, and treating stormwater in large, costly end-of-pipe facilities located at the bottom of drainage areas, LID addresses
stormwater through small, cost-effective landscape features, known as Integrated Management Practices (IMPs). Almost all components of the urban
environment have the potential to serve as an IMP. This includes not only open space, but also rooftops, streetscapes, parking lots, sidewalks, and
medians. LID is a versatile approach that can be applied to new developments, urban retrofits, and redevelopment/revitalization projects. Below are
four examples recommended to be part of Brookland’s streetscape improvements.

Permeable Pavers / Infiltration Practice:
Permeable paver block systems are concrete blocks with spaces or gaps between them
allowing stormwater to flow through and into an underground stone storage area. They can
be used to treat roadway runoff as well as runoff from sidewalk areas. Permeable pavers
encourage stormwater infiltration into subsurface gravel subbase and soils, filter and traps
pollutants improving the quality of runoff and of the receiving waterway, and may provide
significant underground stormwater storage if sufficient subbase depth is provided.
► Maintenance: Requires sweeping on shoulder areas to prevent road debris from clogging
pavers.

a
Street Trees:
Street trees create a strong visual framework for urban areas and can be used to help create
identities for neighborhoods and commercial areas. Planting areas help break up large
expanses of pavement, increase permeable surfaces and reduce stormwater runoff. Tree
canopy intercepts rainfall, allowing water to evaporate into the atmosphere, and reducing the
amount of runoff generated by storm events. In instances where pervious surfaces surround the
trees, root zone uptake also diminishes stormwater generation and removes pollutants. Healthy
urban tree canopies reduce peak storm runoff.
► Effectiveness: Healthy urban tree canopies are estimated to reduce urban runoff volume
by 4 to 8% and peak runoff by 10 to 20%.
► Maintenance: Requires occasional pruning and fertilization

b

Bioretention Cell/ Landscape Infiltration Device:

with Interactive

Bioretention cells are small scale soil and plant-based devices that remove pollutants and
control runoff volume and peak rates through a variety of physical, biological, and chemical
treatment processes. They can contribute to neighborhood and roadway beautification, habitat
creation, and the reduction of heat island effects and can potentially reduce maintenance
costs for existing stormwater infrastructure.

ent use of solarr
nd community

► Effectiveness: Bioretention cells effectively treat the “first flush” of stormwater, and
remove between 75 and 95% of several common urban pollutants.

devices that
ystems can be
the examples
public art and
supply energy
ers etc.) while
aracter of the
ards” can be
posts, showing
, the batterys structure and
nergy.

Tree Box Filter/ Concrete-Enclosed Infiltration Device:

c

7 solar modules
oduction of 800
on of 12 hours,
year. Thus, this
rgy as required
o an utility grid
ts.

Tree box filters enhance commercial, industrial and residential areas by providing a growing
medium for small trees or large shrubs. These can be used in conjunction with street trees to
create a strong visual presence. Tree box filters are concrete boxes filled with bioretention soil
installed below grade at the curb line and located upstream of a standard curb inlet to reduce
runoff volume, reduce peak discharge rate, improve water quality for small, frequently-occuring
storms and potentially reduce maintenance costs for existing stormwater infrastructure. For low
or moderate flows, stormwater enters through the tree box’s inlet, filters through the soil, and
exits through an underdrain in to the storm drain. For high flows, stormwater bypasses the tree
box filter of full and flows directly to the downstream curb inlet.
► Effectiveness: Tree box filters effectively treat the “first flush” of stormwater, treat over
90% of the annual runoff volume, and remove between 75 and 95% of several common
urban pollutants.
► Maintenance: Requires removal of trash and debris from the inlet. Plants and media
may have to be replaced after a long time period.
The above LID techniques can be applied as follows:
► They can be located in medians or on periphery of road systems as offline or online
stormwater systems.
► Facilities can be incorporated into streetscape design and tree boxes.
► They can be located in grass strips or other landscape areas.

to include and
eas and visions.
plemented by
cell phones orr

d

Figure 8-77: Streetscape Elements Library -M2, photos of LID techniques, various locations.
a) Permeable pavers used in a perking lot/plaza and parking lane, b) Street trees create a visual
frame, provide shade, aid in stormwater management and absorb emissions, c) Stormwater planter
showing landscaping with planter wall, sand set concrete pavers/parking egress zone, curb cut with
ornamental trench grate, Portland, d) retention cell/path of stormwater.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

153

8.10 Implementation Strategy, Schedule & Cost Estimates
In

an

effort

to

ensure

implementation

of

the

Consistent with the results of the field inventory performed

recommended improvements in a timely and effective

as part of this study, there are a number of intersections

manner, a strategy was developed including steps in

at which existing traffic signals should be upgraded (e.g.,

the implementation process, costs associated with the

signal heads mounted on wood utility pole, AD-11’s style

proposed short- and long-term improvements, and a

installations on short poles, etc). The cost associated with

tentative schedule.

such upgrades represents a considerable part of the
overall cost estimate (i.e., 19 locations at a total cost of
nearly $4,000,000). The signalized intersections include the

Implementation Strategy

following:

The next steps for implementing the improvements for

1.

the Brookland community are envisioned to involve the

2.

Michigan Avenue at Irving Street, N.E.

3.

Michigan Avenue at 4th Street, N.E./ Harewood Road/ National
Shrine

4.

Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street, N.E.

5.

Michigan Avenue at 7th Street, N.E./ CUA

6.

Michigan Avenue at 10th Street, N.E.

7.

Michigan Avenue at 12th Street, N.E.

8.

Michigan Avenue at Taylor Street, N.E.

following:
1.

A public meeting to present the final study
recommendations,

2.

Validation of cost estimates for both transportation and
streetscape improvements,

3.

Preparation of preliminary engineering plans,
architectural drawings, and bid documents,

4.

Project advertisement and receipt, evaluation, and
approval of bids,

5.

Construction activities, inspection, and preparation of
as-built plans.

Estimated Costs and Funding Sources
Details of estimated costs for the transportation and
streetscape improvement elements of the study are

Michigan Avenue at Franklin Street, N.E.

9.

Michigan Avenue at 14th Street, N.E.

10.

12th Street at Rhode Island Avenue, N.E.

11.

12th Street at Franklin Street, N.E.

12.

Monroe Street at 7th Street, N.E.

13.

Monroe Street at 9th Street, N.E.

14.

Monroe Street at 10th Street, N.E.

15.

Monroe Street at 12th Street, N.E.

16.

Monroe Street at 13th Street, N.E.

17.

Monroe Street at 14th Street, N.E.

18.

Monroe Street at 18th Street, N.E.

19.

Monroe Street at 22nd Street, N.E.

Schedule

shown in tables 8.1 and 8.2, respectively. As can be seen,

This

the total implementation costs (both short- and long-term)

improvements with regards to implementation schedule.

are:

The

IMPROVEMENTS
A. Transportation (see table 8-1)
B. Streetscape (see table 8-2)
Overall Total Costs

Total Cost
$9,325,660.50
$3,760,925.50
$13,086,586.00

study has identified three (3) categories of
categories,

discussed

in

more

detail

below,

include maintenance activities, short- and long-term
improvements.
1.

Maintenance Activities

These activities, which include such things as sidewalk
In general, a number of the recommended short-term
improvements may be implemented using DDOT’s
operating and maintenance budget. The long-range
improvements, on the other hand, require allocation of
project funding. Grant opportunities that can be used
to fund part or all of the implementation costs include
Neighborhood Investment Funds (NIF), Urban Forestry
Grant Funds for Landscape Elements, and Transportation

maintenance, resurfacing, installation of ADA ramps and
multi-space parking meters, loading zone designations,
upgrading truck prohibition signs and traffic signal
timing, are typically performed as part of DDOT’s routine
maintenance efforts. Due to the limited scope of work
associated with these efforts, they may be completed in
the near-term timetable.
2.

Short-Term Improvements

Enhancement Funds.

154

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS

As shown in tables 8.1 and 8.2, the short-term transportation

design activities within one (1) and two (2) years, followed

and some of the streetscape improvements have relatively

by completion of construction within a two( 2) to three

low costs associated with them and are expected to

(3) year window, the full implementation of the study

be implemented within twenty four (24) months of final

recommendations can take place within five (5) to seven

approval by the District.

(7) years.

3.

It should be noted that currently, DDOT’s Infrastructure

Long-Term Improvements

Project Management Administration (IPMA) has a

The implementation of long-term improvements depends

design engineering firm completing improvement plans

upon availability and allocation of required funding.

in accordance with this study document. Therefore, it is

Assuming approval of grant applications and the District’s

anticipated for construction to begin in 2008.

allocation of funds within two (2) years, engineering
Table 8-1: Cost Estimates - Transportation Improvements

Corridors
Michigan Avenue, N.E.

12th Street, N.E.

Improvements

Units

*Utility Pole-Mounted Luminaire

L.F. of Sidewalk

--

2,600

Rumble Strips

L.F.

--

2,500

**Pavement Markings - 4”

L.F.

--

***Pavement Markings - 12”

L.F.

--

Monroe Street, N.E.
Unit Cost

Estimate Cost

4,000

$75.00

$495,000.00

--

$6.50

$16,250.00

9,800

9,500

$1.40

$27,020.00

4,500

2,700

$6.50

Short-Term

$46,800.00

Sub-Total

$585,070.00

Long-Term
Physical Bulb-outs

L.F. of C & G

--

1,100

280

$90.00

$124,200.00

*Roadway & Pedestrian-Scale Lighting

L.F. of Sidewalk

--

12,000

4,000

$225.00

$3,600,000.00

Upgrade Traffic Signal

EA

9

2

8

$200,000.00

$3,800,000.00

Sub-Total

$7,524,200.00
TOTAL COST

$8,109,270.00

Contingency (15%):

$1,216,390.50

TOTAL

$9,325,660.50

*) Further engineering design required to determine number, location and type of luminaires.
**) Thermoplastic Pavement Markings, Includes X-Walks, Painted Bulb-Outs, Re-Striping for Bike Lane, Parking Lane
***) Thermoplastic Pavement Markings, Includes Painted Medians

Monroe
Avenue,
N.E.

k

12,000

16,896

30

10

40

30

4

46

SF

SF

SF

EA

EA

EA

EA

EA

EA

Unit Price

800.00

10,000.00

108.00

10.00

25.00

25.00

1,300.00

1,000.00

500.00

800.00

15,000.00

539.00

Total Price
(average) 169,600.00

20,000.00

405,540.00 1,013,760.00 300,000.00 422,400.00 39,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 24,000.00 60,000.00

Signage

Cobblestone for
Furniture Zone

101,376

SY

Bridge Railing

Accent
Pavement

3,755

EA

Bollards

Sidewalk
Pavement
(Exposed
Aggregate
Concrete)

2

EA

Bicycle
Racks

Lawn-Sod

212

Unit

Trash
Receptacles

Bioretention Cell
(LID)

Quantity

Benches

Trees (incl. soil)

12th
Street,
N.E.

Streetscape
Improvements

k

Furniture

Entrance Marker
& Art

Table 8-2: Cost Estimates - Streetscape Improvements*

24,794.00

Quantity

36

704

25,344

1,200

6,336

8

8

20

10

2

2

14

Unit

EA

SY

SF

SF

SF

EA

EA

EA

EA

EA

EA

EA

25.00

1,300.00

1,000.00

500.00

800.00

15,000.00

70,000.00

158,400.00 10,400.00

8,000.00

10,000.00

8,000.00

Unit Price

800.00

108.00

10.00

25.00

Total Price
(average)

28,800.00

76,032.00

253,440.00

30,000.00

TOTAL/IMPROVEMENT
TOTAL COST

198,400.00

20,000.00

586.00

30,000.00 140,000.00

8,204.00

481,572.00 1,267,200.00 330,000.00 580,800.00 49,400.00 18,000.00 30,000.00 32,000.00 90,000.00 140,000.00

32,998.00

$3,270,370.00

Contingency (15%)

490,555.5

TOTAL

3,760,925.5

*) Aside from replacement of deteriorated signs , furnishings and sidewalks, which are considered part of DDOT’s maintenance activities, the above table incudes long-term recommendations only.
Note for both tables: Lengths and areas used for calculation of the corridor improvements are based on their respective and approximate study areas. Lighting is calculated only for the public realm
study area.

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

155

8.11 Overview: Effective Application of Streetscape Elements
This chapter presents a short and general overview of how streetscape elements can be applied most effectively
and what kind of installations should be avoided. The terms “DO” and “DON’T” are used for easy identification and
comparison.

DO
PARKING

SIDEWALKS

Break up surface
parking with
vegetation and
planting

Parking
different

SIGNAGE

look

quite

Respect
pedestrians desired
routes or direct
pedestrians on a
particular path

without

cars.

lots

Clear

paths

Use clearly
located and
properly scaled
signs

encourage

Vegetation creates interest

pedestrian

and can be tailored to suit

provide easy orientation to

different seasons and/or

popular destinations.

activity

LANDSCAPING

and

parking zones.

Carefully

consider

positioning

of

relation

other

to

the

signs

Utilize planting as
a buffer and to
provide aesthetic
appeal to a
location

in •

street

Noisy

and

unappealing

features can be screened

furniture and utilities.

through

Analyze signage from the

creates

differing perspectives of

edge

vehicles and pedestrians.

uses.

planting
a

that

boundary

between

or

differing

DON’T
PARKING

SIDEWALKS

Provide large
expanses of asphalt

Fail to understand
pedestrian and
vehicular circulation
around your site

Allow utilities and
street furniture
to confuse and
obscure signage

Large parking lots increase
heat

island

contribute

effects,
to

and

increased

surface runoff and detract
from site aesthetics.

Confusing

layouts

SIGNAGE

and

Signage

should

be

LANDSCAPING

Allow plants to
degrade and
detract from your
site
clear •

Regular maintenance and

indirect routes to destinations

and every effort should be

planting the correct location

lead to user frustration, and

made to avoid cluttering the

and species are essential to

streetscape degradation.

sidewalk needlessly.

the developed environment.

Consider simplifying signage
through a common style to
create a unified identity for a
particular development

156

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
Figure 8-78: Graphic, Application of streetscape elements.

DO
FURNITURE

Invest in high
quality and
durable street
furniture

ACCESS & LAYOUT

LIGHTING

MULTI-MODAL/
SAFETY

Consider layout
hierarchy for high
visibility features
throughout the site

Consider
appropriately
scaled lighting,
spaced at regular
intervals

Utilize warning and
safety devices in
paving to increase
pedestrian and
vehicular safety

This is particularly important •

Provide clear access to

in high use locations which

building entrances

will inevitably require more •
maintenance.

Place

Pedestrian

lighting

Changes

utilitarian

should not compete with

and

elements such as dumpsters,

vehicular ‘street’ lighting,

highlighted

emergency

and

in

direction

grade
can

be

through

the

service

it should complement it

creative use of paving

entrances away from high

and seek to illuminate dark

and/or landscaping.

visibility areas.

corners and key pedestrian

Examples include the use

intersections.

of tactile American with

Invest in properly shielded

Disabilities Act (ADA) curb

lights to prevent upward

cut ramps and ‘Tyregrip’

light ‘spill’ pollution.

high friction surfacing.

DON’T
FURNITURE

ACCESS & LAYOUT

Provide street
furniture in locations
that people won’t
use or fail to invest
in good quality
elements

Locate building
entrances in hidden
and inaccessible
locations

Trash needs to be collected
regularly
cleaned.

and

trash

cans

Overflowing or ill

sited receptacles are a health
problem.

For

a

site

to

LIGHTING

Forget to illuminate Confuse the
pedestrian areas
sidewalk and the
roadway
• Cars are equipped with

function

effectively

vehicular

and

pedestrian

access

must

MULTI-MODAL/
SAFETY

lights, yet often still have the •

Confusion leads to public

most well lit public space

endangerment,

available only to them.

and makes the environment

Site lighting should

problematic for users.

function together and provide

sufficient

clear

provide

illumination

unobstructed

to create a safe place for

sight line and/or path to

pedestrians and vehicular

destinations.

traffic.

and

accidents

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157

Figure 8-79: Photo of southeast corner of 12th and Newton Streets.

FACADES AS THE COMPLEMENTING FACTOR
TO THE STREETSCAPE ENVIRONMENT
This study does not entail recommendations for storefront
improvements. However, in the interest of presenting
a comprehensive analysis of 12th Street’s vision and
challenges,

this page spread offers an overview

of

storefront aspects and lists current conditions and
potential adjustments that may be addressed in the future
to improve Brookland’s curb appeal:
In addition to streetscape elements such as landscaping,
sidewalks and furniture, storefronts play an important role
in the appearance of a community.

NE has distinctively unique residential and commercial
building typologies. There are a number of institutional
buildings as well as other services that contribute to the
street’s special diverse character. The assorted building
types are spread along the corridor with the greatest
concentration of commercial activity located within two
blocks, between Otis Street to the North and Monroe
Street to the South. Many of the mixed-use buildings are
typically located on the corners.
Many communities adopt storefront guidelines to achieve
a strong, unified facade.

However, it is the planning

team’s impression that the Brookland community does not
wish for a unified facade. It is the colorful uniqueness of

The varieties of building typologies have an impact on

the place that makes 12th Street special; its assets should

the overall character of the Main Street - especially their

be enhanced rather than unified.

façade, which helps define the public realm and the

page presents general findings of the current storefront

streetscape. Most important are the storefronts of the

conditions and things to consider for potential facade

commercial buildings that include display windows, front

improvement.

doors, signage and lighting.

available but require the involvement and contribution

Facade

Therefore the next

improvement

of the business community.
Unlike other Main Streets in DC, the ‘face’ of 12th Street,

158

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

programs

are

PUBLIC REALM & TRANSPORTATION - RECOMMENDATIONS
This chapter presents a
streetscape

elements

short overview of how
can

be

applied

most

THINGS TO CONSIDER FOR FUTURE
FACADE IMPROVEMENTS:

effectively and what kind of installations should be avoided.
• Reveal the architectural uniqueness of buildings.
FACADE
In addition to streetscape elements such as landscaping, sidewalks and furniture, storefronts play an
important role in the appearance of a community.

• Ensure the prosperity of businesses by offering a distinct
retail atmosphere.
• Enhance the visual diversity, while maintaining some
consistency.

Unlike other Main Streets in DC, the ‘face’ of 12th Street
NE has distinctively unique residential and commercial building typologies. There are a number of institutional buildings as well as other services that contribute
to the special diverse character of 12th Street NE. The
assorted building types are spread along the corridor
with the greatest concentration of commercial activity

• Maximize the size of display windows.
• Use a frieze/ sign band using creative signage, lighting
and awnings.
• Attractive storefronts will contribute to the experience
of customers and pedestrians.

located within two blocks, between Otis (to the North)
and Monroe Street (to the South). Many of the mixeduse buildings are typically located on the corners.

EXISTING FACADE CONDITIONS
• Buildings that were originally residential are currently
occupied by commercial establishments.
• There is generally poor visibility of the display area due
to the lack of transparency created by inadequate
window size.
• Some signage is lacking strong graphic character and
seems to be temporary.
• Paint on the façade shows signs of fading and peeling
due to weather conditions.
• The colors do not complement the color of the larger
building or other buildings on the block.
• The metal bars and solid roll-down grates that are
commonly found on the facades along 12th Street
communicate that there is a possible problem of crime
in the neighborhood. Experience has shown that these
grates do not minimize theft or vandalism.

Figure 8-80: Examples of 12th Street storefronts.

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159

9. LIST OF TABLES & FIGURES
TABLES
Table 3-1: Public Comments

21

TABLE 5-1: Condition of 12th Street, N.E. from Michigan Avenue to Rhode Island Avenue 45
TABLE 5-2: Condition of Monroe Street, N.E. from 7th Street South Dakota Avenue 46
TABLE 5-3: Condition of Michigan Avenue, N.E. from North Capitol Street to Randolph Street
TABLE 5-4: Condition of Michigan Avenue, N.E. from 12th Street to Eastern Avenue
TABLE 5-5: Condition of Existing Traffic Signals

46

47

48

TABLE 5-6: Existing AM & PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes 54
TABLE 5-7a-d: Accident Experience along 12th Street, N.E.

61

TABLE 5-7e-f: Accident Experience along 12th Street, N.E.

62

TABLE 5-8a-f: Accident Experience along Monroe Street, N.E. 62
TABLE 5-9a-f: Accident Experience along Michigan Avenue, N.E.

63

TABLE 5-10: 12th Street at Franklin St., N.E. Intersection Performance 65
TABLE 5-11: 12th Street at Monroe Street, N.E. Intersection Performance
TABLE 5-12: 12th Street at Michigan Avenue, N.E.

70

Intersection Performance

70

TABLE 5-13: Monroe Street at South Dakota Avenue, N.E. Intersection Performance

70

TABLE 5-14: Michigan Avenue at 18th & Varnum Streets, N.E. Intersection Performance

71

TABLE 5-15: Michigan Avenue at South Dakota Avenue, N.E. Intersection Performance

71

TABLE 5-16: Michigan Avenue at 10th Street, N.E.

Intersection Performance

72

TABLE 5-17: Michigan Avenue at 7th Street & CUA Entrance, N.E. Intersection Performance
TABLE 5-18: Michigan Avenue at North Capitol Street, N.E. Intersection Performance
TABLE 5-19: Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street, N.E. Intersection Performance

72

73

73

TABLE 5-20: Michigan Avenue at 4th Street, N.E. Intersection Performance 74
TABLE 5-21: Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road, N.E. Intersection Performance 74
TABLE 5-22: Michigan Avenue at Irving Street, N.E. Intersection Performance
TABLE 5-23: Summary of Intersection Service Level

75

75

TABLE 5-24: Over-Saturated Intersections 75
TABLE 5-25: Existing Pedestrian Volumes 76
TABLE 7-1: Side Street Approach Volumes
TABLE 7-2: 85th Percentile Speeds

95

96

TABLE 8-1: Cost Estimates - Transportation Improvements

154

TABLE 8-2: Cost Estimates - Streetscape Improvements

154

160

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ADDENDUM

FIGURES
Sketch of improved 12th Street Neighborhood Retail Area.
Brookland’s Location within Washington DC

3

6

Sketch of improved 12th Street Neighborhood Residential Area.

5

Figure 1-1: Map showing Brookland’s Transportation & Public Realm Study Corridors
Figure 1-2: Map of Public Realm Study Area

8

9

Figure 2-1: Photo of Fort Slemmer during the Civil War. 10
Figure 2-2: Map of rapid development of the Brookland area ca. 1890.

10

Figure 2-3: Aerial photo of the CUA campus and its surrounding institutions ca 1930.
Figure 2-4: Photo of National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

11

11

Figure 2-5: Photo of the Newton Theater. 12
Figure 2-6: Picture of the Scott Building and Anderson’s Cottage, U.S. Soldiers’ Home.

12

Figure 2-7: Photo of the Newton Theater Building today, occupied by CVS Pharmacy.

12

Figure 2-8: Photos of some of Brookland’s assets today.

13

Figure 2-9: Comprehensive Plan “Existing Land Use” Map for the Brookland Area. 14
Figure 2-10: Comprehensive Plan “Generalized Land Use” Map for the Brookland Area. 15
Figure 2-11: Map showing 1- mile radius around Brookland/CUA Metro station
Figure 3-1: Photo of Brookland’s community walk participants.

16

17

Figure 3-2: Photos of community walk and workshop. 18
Figure 3-3: Photos of community workshop.

19

Figure 3-4: Map of Public Comments/Specific Issues

23

Figure 4-1: Photos showing various travel modes.

24

Figure 4-2: Photos showing public realms that are aesthetically pleasing and serving multiple uses.

24

Figure 4-3: Photos showing how businesses benefit from a a vibrant public realm. 24
Figure 4-4: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro station’s approach.

25

Figure 4-5: Photo of uneven sidewalks along 12th Street, N.E. 25
Figure 4-6: Photo of pruned trees to accommodate overhead utility cables.

25

Figure 4-7: Photo of street lighting with focus on roadway, dimly lit sidewalks.

25

Figure 4-8: Photo of Michigan Avenue Bridge today, looking west.

26

Figure 4-9: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station today, looking east onto Newton Street.
Figure 4-10: Photo of pedestrian bridges .

Figure 4-11: Photo of designated bike lanes, bollards, planters, different pavings or colors.
Figure 4-12: Photo of public space.

26

26
26

26

Figure 4-13: Photo of entrance gates or markers announcing the community and commercial district. 26
Figure 4-14: Maps showing Brookland’s vicinity, barriers and enhanced connectivity.
Figure 4-15: Photos of special events, various cities.

27

29

Figure 4-16: Photos of Farmers Markets, various cities. 29
Figure 4-17: Photo of 12th Street displaying a lack of maintenance. 30
Figure 5-1: Transportation Study Corridors

32

Figure 5-2: Photo of South Dakota Avenue and Monroe Street intersection.
Figure 5-3: Existing Signalized / Unsignalized Intersections

Figure 5-4: Photo of Michigan Avenue, 18th and Varnum Streets intersection.
Figure 5-5: Existing Traffic Volumes (AM Peak)

51

Figure 5-6: Existing Traffic Volumes (PM Peak)

53

Figure 5-7: Photo of truck parked at the 12th and Newton Streets intersection.
Figure 5-8: Existing Truck Regulations

36

39
44

57

59

Figure 5-9: Existing AM Peak Hour Levels of Service

67

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

161

9. LIST OF TABLES & FIGURES (CONT.)
Figure 5-10: Existing PM Peak Hour Levels of Service
Figure 5-11: Existing & Proposed Bike Facilities

69

79

Figure 5-12: Existing Public Transportation (MetroRail /MetroBus)
Figure 6-1: Public Realm Study Area

81

83

Figure 6-2: Map of street lighting & utility poles - existing conditions. 84
Figure 6-3: Photo of existing roadway lighting mounted on a utility pole.

85

Figure 6-4: Photo of existing cobra type roadway lighting with 25’-30’ in height.
Figure 6-5: Photo of existing lighting that focuses on the roadway.

85

Figure 6-6: Photo of hydrants, mostly located on the corner of an intersection.
Figure 6-7: Photo of varying distance between light fixtures and trees.
Figure 6-8: Photo of roadway lights on east side of 12th Street.

85

85

85

Figure 6-9: Photo showing lack of pedestrian lighting throughout 12th Street.
Figure 6-10: Map of sidewalks - existing conditions.

85

85

86

Figure 6-11: Photo of concrete sidewalk, Brookland’s standard.

87

Figure 6-12: Photo of concrete curbing, some showing signs of wear and tear.
Figure 6-13: Photo of various sidewalk treatments and materials.

87

87

Figure 6-14: Photo of concrete pavement, generally in good condition but uneven pavement exists. 87
Figure 6-15: Photo of sidewalk, partially interrupted by tree planting areas. 87
Figure 6-16: Photo of granite curbing in good condition.

87

Figure 6-17: Photo of ADA ramp, many do not meet current accessibility standards.
Figure 6-18: Photo of cracking concrete sidewalk.

87

Figure 6-19: Map of furnishings - existing conditions.

88

Figure 6-20: Photo of bus shelter located at intersection of Quincy and 12th Streets.
Figure 6-21: Photo of trash receptacles, located throughout the corridor.

89

89

Figure 6-22: Photo of parking meters, located in the neighborhood retail area.
Figure 6-23: Photo showing lack of benches along 12th Street.

87

89

89

Figure 6-24: Photo of bus stop, located on every other block. Several bus stops lack trash receptacles. 89
Figure 6-25: Photo of mail boxes, located in several areas along the corridor.

89

Figure 6-26: Photo of damaged bike rack along 12th Street. 89
Figure 6-27: Map of street trees - existing conditions.

90

Figure 6-28: Photo showing lack of defined tree canopy or hierarchy along the 12th Street corridor.

91

Figure 6-29: Photo of metal guards, they are not uniform and sometimes broken. 91
Figure 6-30: Photo of container plantings in the retail area, generally maintained by property owners. 91
Figure 6-31: Photo of dead and decaying trees, unsightly and a liability.

91

Figure 6-32: Photo showing conflict between trees and overhead utility wires.
Figure 6-33: Photo of the “green strip” between sidewalk and curb line.

91

Figure 6-34: Photo of the ‘Brookland Tree’ at the Northern Gateway.

91

91

Figure 6-35: Photo of sidewalk clearance compromised by tree plantings and overgrown hedges.

91

Figure 6-36: Photo of trees not in conflict with overhead utility wires are generally in good health.

91

Figure 6-37: Photo of flowering trees along 12th Street.

91

Figure 6-38: Photo of female Ginkgo tree. 91
Figure 6-39: Photo of 12th Street between Monroe and Newton Streets.

92

Figure 6-40: Sketch of short-term recommendation to increase pedestrian lighting.

92

Figure 7-1: Photo of a Metrobus serving the Brookland community. 94
Figure 7-2: Photo of bulb-out/curb extension
Figure 7-3: Typical layout of bulb-outs

96

97

Figure 8: Map of public realm and transportation study area.

100

FOLD-OUT: CONCEPTUAL PLAN FOR 12 STREET & MONROE STREET (printed separately on 11”x17” paper)
TH

Figure 8-1: Sustainability, Values, Goals & Components.

100 A-B

105

Figure 8-2: Streetscape Elements Library & Reference System 107
Figure 8-3: Sub-District Map 108

162

BROOKLAND - MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION & STREETSCAPE STUDY

ADDENDUM

Figure 8-4: Photo of 12th Street, N.E. looking north.

110

Figure 8-5: Photo of Sub-District 2 looking north into 12th Street.

111

Figure 8-6: Photo of Sub-District 1, view of westbound Randolph Street at 12th Street.

111

Figure 8-7: Conceptual Plan of Proposed Improvements at Michigan Avenue, N.E. at 12th and Randolph Streets (Alternative 1)

112

Figure 8-8 Conceptual Plan of Proposed Improvements at Michigan Avenue, N.E. at 12th and Randolph Streets (Alternative 2)

113

Figure 8-9: Photo of the 12th and Franklin Street intersection. 114
Figure 8-10: Photos of the Main Street ‘Core’.

115

Figure 8-11: Photo of westbound Randolph Street, N.E. at 12th Street, N.E. 115
Figure 8-12a: Conceptual Plan of 12th Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

116

Figure 8-12b: Conceptual Plan of 12th Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

17

Figure 8-13: Map of Sub-District 1

118

Figure 8-14: Photo of 12th Street and Michigan Avenue intersection.
Figure 8-15: Public Art/Entrance Markers, Northern Gateway.

118

118

Figure 8-16: Conceptual Design of the Gateway’s recommended improvements. 119
Figure 8-17: Map Sub-District 2

120

Figure 8-18: Public Art/Entrance Markers, Southern Gateway.

120

Figure 8-19: Photo of 12th Street and Rhode Island Avenue intersection.

120

Figure 8-20: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 2.

121

Figure 8-21: Map of Sub-District 3 122
Figure 8-22: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 3.
Figure 8-23: Photo of 12th Street North of Monroe Street.

122

122

Figure 8-24a: Photomontage for Sub-District 3, east side of 12th Street between Otis and Newton Streets.

123

Figure 8-24b: Conceptual design of the recommended long-term improvements for Sub-District 3, 12th Street between Otis and Newton
Streets.

123

Figure 8-25a: Photomontage for Sub-District 3, east side of 12th Street between Newton and Monroe Streets.

124

Figure 8-25b: Conceptual design of the recommended long-term improvements for Sub-District 3, 12th Street between Newton and
Monroe Streets.

124

Figure 8-26: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 3.

125

Figure 8-27: Map of Sub-District 4 126
Figure 8-28: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 4.

126

Figure 8-29: Photo of 12th Street’s neighborhood retail area. 126
Figure 8-30: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 4.
Figure 8-31: Map of Sub-District 5

127

128

Figure 8-32: Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 5.
Figure 8-33: Photo of 12th Street’s residential area.

128

128

Figure 8-34: Photo of a 12th Street residential area with varying topography.

129

Figure 8-35: Section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 5.
Figure 8-36: Photo of Monroe and 9th Streets intersection.

129

130

Figure 8-37: Photo of Newton Street looking west towards the Brookland/CUA Metro Station.
Figure 8-38: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station parking lot looking east.

131

131

Figure 8-39: Photo of Brookland/CUA Metro Station parking lot looking east onto Newton Street.
Figure 8-40: Photo of eastbound Newton Street from Brookland/CUA Metro Station.

131

131

Figure 8-41a: Conceptual Plan of Monroe Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

132

Figure 8-41b: Conceptual Plan of Monroe Street, N.E. Corridor Transportation Improvements.

133

Figure 8-42: Context plan & section displaying some long-term recommendations for Sub-District 6.

134

Figure 8-43: Context plan & section displaying some recommended improvements for Sub-District 7.

134

FIgure 44: Examples of bridge railings.
Figure 8-45: Map of Sub-District 6

135

136

Figure 8-46: Photomontage displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 6.
Figure 8-47: Photo of Monroe Street Bridge looking east.

136

136

Figure 8-48: Conceptual design of the recommended improvements for Sub-Districts 6 and 7. 137

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163

9. LIST OF TABLES & FIGURES (CONT.)
Figure 8-49: Map of Sub-District 7

138

Figure 8-50 : Sketch displaying some of the recommended improvements for Sub-District 7.
Figure 8-51: Photo of Monroe Street looking east towards 12th Street.
Figure 8-52: Photo of butterfly.

138

138

139

Figure 8-53: Diagram of Sidewalk Zones. 140
Figure 8-54: Streetscape Elements Library content & icon chart.

140

Figure 8-55: Streetscape Elements Library - A1 photos, various cities. 141
Figure 8-56: Streetscape Elements Library - A2 photos of sidewalk accents, various cities. 142
Figure 8-57: Streetscape Elements Library - B photos of sidewalks & gutters, various locations.

142

Figure 8-58: Sreetscape Elements Library - C1 drawings of combination and roadway lights.

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Figure 8-59: Sreetscape Elements Library -C2 drawings/photo of combination, roadway & pedestrian lights. 143
Figure 8-60: Streetscape Elements Library -D1, photos of planting and tree options, various locations.
Figure 8-61: Streetscape Elements Library -D2, photos of understory plantings.

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Figure 8-62 a,b: Streetscape Elements Library -D3, photo & diagram of surface treatment and underground tree trench.
Figure 8-63: Streetscape Elements Library -E1, photos of benches, various locations.

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Figure 8-64: Streetscape Elements Library -E2, photos of trash receptacles. 146
Figure 8-65: Streetscape Elements Library -E3, photos of bike racks, various locations.
Figure 8-66: Streetscape Elements Library -E4, photos of bollards.

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Figure 8-67: Streetscape Elements Library -F1, photos/sketch of bike lanes, various locations.
Figure 8-68: Streetscape Elements Library -F2, photo of bus stop pad, Washington DC.

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Figure 8-69: Streetscape Elements Library -G, photo of solar-powered multispace parking meter.
Figure 8-70: Streetscape Elements Library -H, photos of crosswalks & bulb-outs.

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Figure 8-71: Streetscape Elements Library -I, photos of signs & banners, various locations. 150
Figure 8-72: Streetscape Elements Library -J, photos of news stands, various locations.

150

Figure 8-73: Streetscape Elements Library -K1, photos of bridge railings, various locations.

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Figure 8-74: Streetscape Elements Library -K2, photos of bridge entrance markers, various locations.

151

Figure 8-75: Streetscape Elements Library -L, photos of entrance markers & public art, various locations.

152

Figure 8-76: Streetscape Elements Library -M1, photos of solar powered art & lighting, various locations.

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Figure 8-77: Streetscape Elements Library -M2, photos of LID techniques, various locations.
Figure 8-78: Graphic, Application of Streetscape Elements.

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Figure 8-79: Photo of southeast corner of 12th and Newton Streets. 158
Figure 8-80: Examples of 12th Street storefronts. 159

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ADDENDUM

10. TECHNICAL ADDENDUM & REFERENCES
TECHNICAL APPENDICES

SOURCES

PLEASE REFER TO THE TECHNICAL APPENDICES UNDER
SEPARATE COVER FOR THE FOLLOWING CONTENT:

Unless noted otherwise within the text and alongside
graphics, the content of this report -including photographs,
drawings, and other graphics- was produced by Michael
Baker Jr., Inc. and Volkert and Associates, Inc. Staff from
various District agencies, including DDOT and the Office of
Planning, provided input throughout the study. Literature
references include:

Appendix A
Intersection Turning Movement Counts.
Appendix B
Service Level Descriptions & Selected Synchro Output.
Appendix C
Consideration of Utility Undergrounding.

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD),
2003 Edition
A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets,
American Association of State Highway and Transportation
Officials, 2001
Highway Capacity Manual (HCM), Transportation Research
Council, Transportation Research Board, 2000
Highway Capacity Software (HSC+), Transportation
Research Council, Transportation Research Board, 2000
Synchro 6 and SimTraffic 6, Traffic Simulation Models,
Trafficware, 2003
aaSIDRA, Akcelik & Associates Pty Ltd, 2000

Additional information was obtained through discussion
with and study participation of the following organizations
and individuals:

ANC’s
Merchants
Residents
CUA Administration
Trinity Administration
Providence Hospital
Hospital for Sick Children
John Paul II and Basilica
Brookland Main Street
Brookland Community Development Corporation
District Government Agencies
Federal Government Agencies
WMATA (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
PEPCO

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165

Dis tric t Department of T rans portation
(DDOT )
2000 14 th S treet, NW
W as hington, DC 20009

Mic hael B aker J r. Inc
3601 E is enhower Avenue
S uite 600
Alexandria, V A 22304

V olkert & As s oc iates , Inc .
5400 S hawnee R oad
S uite 301
Alexandria, V A 22312