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MICROBUSINESS MENTORS

STRATEGIC PLAN - 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary. 2
Background. 4
SWOT Analysis ... 4
Situation Analysis ... 5
Core Problem.. 5
Goals and Objectives.. 5
The BIG Idea.. 6
Key Public and their Profile... 6
Key Messages . 8
Evaluation Procedure... 11
References. 12

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Introduction
MicroBusiness Mentors is a non-profit organization based in Provo, Utah that specializes in
offering microbusiness mentoring to the Hispanic community in the Provo/Orem area. MBM
focuses on helping people become microentrepreneurs. In this way, participants of the program
have opportunities to start or grow successful business ventures in different areas.
MBM has two key publics: Program participants and business mentors. Participants are
Hispanics from the Provo/Orem area who are interested in learning how to create a business with
$500 or less. Clients seek professional mentorship to assist them and lead them with their
business plans. MBM can attract more participants by using specific tactics that will increase and
maintain the number of program participants.
Business mentors are BYU students from the business school who are willing to train Hispanics
and help them come up with feasible and inexpensive business ideas. Mentors also follow up
throughout the mentoring program to see the progress of participants. MBM can attract more
mentors by creating and adapting tactics that will increase the number of mentors per semester.
The purpose of this strategic plan is to overcome the current challenges that MicroBusiness
Mentors is facing. MBM needs to increase the number of mentors and keep a steady volunteering
force throughout the semester, and if possible throughout the whole year. In addition, MBM
needs to increase the numbers of participants in the mentoring program and keep a steady
attendance until they complete the mentoring sessions.
The strategic plan outlines two goals and four strategies that will help staff and mentors focus on
the activities that will fulfill MBMs mission.
Goals
1. To increase the number of participants in the MBM mentoring program.
2. To increase the numbers of volunteers to expand our business training program among
Hispanics in the Provo/Orem area.
Strategies
1. To develop steady participation in MBMs mentoring program from Hispanics in the
Provo/Orem area through distributing advertising and giving presentations in Hispanic
congregations, ESL schools, and Hispanic businesses and organizations.
2. To maintain commitment from participants during and after the mentoring sessions
through regular personal contact from mentors and influentials.

3. To develop steady volunteering work from BYU business students through distributing
printed materials and making announcements in business classes and on campus, and
through social media.
4. To maintain loyalty from current volunteers through planning organized volunteerappreciation activities
Conclusion
MBM has already a strong reputation of creating microentrepreneurs. It also must keep taking
advantage of the opportunities MBM has to overcome the challenges that keep the organization
away from reaching its goals and objectives. This strategic plan suggests specific strategies with
their respective tactics that will draw the road to fulfill MBMs mission.

BACKGROUND
In Utah Valley, especially in the Provo/Orem area, the Hispanic population is growing at a fast
pace. Unfortunately they do not always have the opportunities, work and education that will
allow them to succeed and to achieve self-sufficiency.The lack of opportunities and proper
education do not let them find jobs that will provide for their families. In consequence, they live
in a situation of unemployment and underemployment, which will make them live in poverty for
the rest of their lives. Further, their children will have to live in the same condition, and it will be
a trait that will be passed on to the next generations.
In response to this situation, a group of people decided to create MicroBusiness Mentors (MBM)
to stop this problem. MBM offers small-business mentoring and microcredit opportunities to the
low-income Hispanic community in the Provo/Orem area so that they can have the chance to
grow, succeed and provide for their families. They will also have the opportunity to achieve selfreliance and financial stability through creating microbusinesses. MBM has already been
successful in its purpose of training, mentoring and funding qualified microentrepreneurs.
SWOT ANALYSIS
Strengths
Mentoring program is free of charge
The classes are taught in Spanish and English
Mentors meet with participants on a one-on-one basis
Mentors are business students from the BYU Business School
MBM has a strong reputation of being successful at business mentoring
MBM has opened a second group in Pleasant Grove, Utah
Weaknesses
MBM does not have enough mentors
Currently, MBM does not have a strategic plan that allows to create key messages to
target publics
MBM has not had any media coverage in the last 2 years
MBM does not have many participants in the program
Opportunities
There are some ESL schools MBM has no contacted yet that could bring more
participants to the program
Exploit Hispanic business contacts for referrals, and follow up
There are more and more Hispanic immigrants each year in the Provo area who have the
desire to be self-sufficient
The city of Provo has the highest rate of hours served per resident in a year: average
151.9 hours per year
The city of Provo is ranked among the top five mid-size cities for volunteer rate
Participation in career fairs to recruit volunteers

There are some organizations that can give MBM awards in the future. MBM uses them
to build a much stronger reputation and to have more recognition in the market

Threats
Students might not want to volunteer because they do not have enough time, they are not
interested in the cause, or they do not receive any monetary compensation
Some Hispanic businesses and organizations do not want to collaborate with us to let us
make announces
Prospective participants might not attend the weekly mentoring session because of time
constraints or distance
Participation from clients is not steady because most of them move out of the city, or the
state, or the country
SITUATION ANALYSIS
The Hispanic population is in need of education and job opportunities that will allow them to
provide for their families. They cannot easily access loans from banks or credit unions because
of their lack of credit history in the United States. They might get loans from other financial
institutions, but the interest rate they get charged is very high. Furthermore, their lack of
education only allows them to be underemployed and stops them from finding decent jobs.
MBM wants to help more Hispanics in the Provo/Orem area become self-reliant and achieve
financial stability.
There is a challenge to get the attention of prospective clients who would be interested in
participating in the program. There is also a challenge to get more volunteers who would be
willing to donate their time to find, contact and mentor participants. If these challenges are not
overcome, MBM will not fulfill its purpose. Through mentoring, MBM will train and teach
Hispanics how to begin inexpensive microbusinesses. MBM also needs to locate, attract and
contact those who would participate in the program so that they can receive mentoring and
training in creating a business with just $500 or less.
CORE PROBLEM
MBM must find ways to attract volunteers to join the cause of helping the Hispanic community
in the Provo/Orem area. MBM also has to find ways to attract participants who would accept the
challenge of becoming microentrepreneurs; thus helping themselves to be self-reliant and to
better provide for their families.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Goal 1
To increase the number of participants in the MBM mentoring program.
Objectives
1. Increase the percentage of microcredit loans recipients by 50% in the Provo/Orem area
by December 31, 2013.
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2. Double the participation of Hispanics from the Provo/Orem area in the business training
program by the December 31, 2013.
3. Increase the number of clients referrals by 100% by December 31, 2013.
4. Increase the number of contacts from mentors by 50% by December 31, 2013.
5. Increase the number of class presentations given at ESL schools and other Hispanic
organizations by 50% in the Provo/Orem area by December 31, 2013.
Goal 2
To increase the number of volunteers to expand our business training program among Hispanics
in the Provo/Orem area.
Objectives
1. Retain 80% of the current volunteers by December 31, 2013.
2. Double the current number of total volunteer service hours by December 31, 2013.
3. Increase the number of current volunteers referrals by 100% by December 31, 2013.
4. Increase the number of volunteer recruitment presentations given at BYU business
classes by 100% by December 31, 2013
THE BIG IDEA
The Push You Need for the Business You Want
Explanation: MicroBusiness Mentors will be a social innovator because its strategies and tactics
will meet the social needs and problems that affect the Hispanic community in the Provo/Orem
area. These social problems are underemployment and lack of education. MBM will give the
push people need to become microentrepreneurs through business mentoring and microloans.
KEY PUBLICS AND THEIR PROFILE
1. Hispanic Community in the Provo/Orem area
Self Interests
Desire to become self-reliant and to have economic prosperity
Family safety and happiness through financial stability
Desire to be their own boss
Do not want to be a burden for others
Desire to have enough money to spend on housing, food, clothing and travel
Like to do straight-forward jobs/tasks
Demographics
Include people from Mexico, Central and Latin America
On average, young families with 4 5 children
On average, age between 25 and 44 years old.
A great number hardly speaks English
Most of them lack higher education
Legal status makes difficult to find jobs
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In Utah County, 15.1% does not have access to health coverage

Psychographics
Value family relationships
Like to go on short vacations
Most men started working while being teenagers
Hispanic students have a more difficult time staying in school and graduating from
school than other racial or ethnic groups
Influentials
Religious leaders who know about the benefits of MBM
People who have attended the program
People who already started a microbusiness
Friends who are familiar with the mission of MBM
Relationship with organization
Hispanics have the necessity of having businesses and job opportunities that will allow them to
become self-sufficient. They require business mentoring. Most institutions that will offer a
similar training like this will charge high rates, which Hispanics cannot afford. They need a highquality business training that is affordable or free of charge.
2. Volunteers
Self Interests
Like to feel good about themselves
Volunteer for school credit or internship
Desire to learn new skills
Desire to learn more about microcredit and microfinance
Desire to keep up with their Spanish skills
Some want to go to graduate school to study MBAs, MPAs, Law School, etc
Demographics
Most volunteers are young students between 22 and 26 years old
Most of them served LDS missions in Latin American countries
There are more than 197,000 volunteers in Provo
They study business management, accounting, finance, entrepreneurship, etc
Psychographics
Value social work and charitable purposes
Volunteers are happy and loyal
Personal satisfaction of doing something worthwhile
Social involvement
Religious beliefs encourage charity and service
Participation in the community

Influentials
BYU professors of social entrepreneurship
Current and former mentors
People in BYU clubs
Relationship with organization
MBM provides opportunities to learn more about the microfinance worlds while fulfilling the
noble task of serving the community. Volunteers can receive class credit for working with MBM,
can improve their Spanish language skills, and can create strong human relationships with their
clients.
KEY MESSAGES
1. Hispanic Community in the Provo/Orem area
Primary Message: You can be financially stable by doing something you are good at and like
Secondary Messages:
MBM will give you business ideas based on your skills, hobbies and past experience
People have most success in business when they do something that involves their
experience and abilities
Self-reliance can be achieved by selling a product or service you know
You can achieve finance stability by working from home
Primary Message: You can start a business with just $500 or less
Secondary Message:
Creating and setting up your own business is not as difficult as you think
MBM will provide training and tools to create feasible and inexpensive business ideas
Instead of buying other things, you can start your business with $500
Strategy #1
To develop steady participation in MBMs mentoring program from Hispanics in the
Provo/Orem area through distributing advertising and giving presentations in Hispanic
congregations, ESL schools, and Hispanic businesses and organizations.
Tactics
Create materials, such as flyers, brochures and pamphlets that show what the program
will do for them and the benefits of participating in the program
Place materials in 3 new ESL schools located in the Provo/Orem area
Place materials in Hispanic businesses throughout Provo/Orem and Pleasant Grove
Place the materials created in major organizations such as El Centro Hispano, Nomen
Global and other ESL schools from the Provo/Orem area
Develop a presentation for ESL schools and at El Centro Hispano
Develop a presentation for LDS Hispanic wards
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Update the content of the organizations website and publish a Spanish version
Hold a fireside once per semester where mentors can explain the program to a large
audience
Update the announcements on the organizations website

Strategy #2
To maintain commitment from participants during and after the mentoring sessions through
regular personal contact from mentors and influentials.
Tactics
Interview participants during the sessions to ask about their progress and business plans
Post interviews on the organizations website
Follow up progress with each participant at least once a week by phone or by email
Ask for referrals from each client
Notify religious leaders about the progress of the members of their congregations who
attend the mentoring sessions
Hold a graduation and dinner appreciation ceremony
Show testimonials from other participants
Follow up with participant after the business is running
Provide pens with the organizations logo
Provide some snacks during each mentoring session
Provide a feedback questionnaire to participants at the end of the mentoring program
Keep up-to-date the client data base
Send a greeting card if client is not seen for x-numbers of weeks
2. Volunteers
Primary Message: Be a business mentor and make a difference in the life of a new entrepreneur
Secondary Message:
There are great benefits of doing volunteer work. MBM can help you achieve personal
fulfillment and achieve more cultural awareness while doing a fun work
Volunteers can build the same relationships they did when they served as LDS
missionaries among Hispanics while contributing with their welfare
Volunteers receive real-life experience while they learn more about the microfinance
world
Volunteers can create a strong volunteer background and real-life experience to apply for
graduate school
Volunteers can hone their Spanish business skills by being a mentor at MBM

Strategy #1
To develop steady volunteering work from BYU business students through distributing printed
materials and making announcements in business classes and on campus, and through social
media.
Tactics
Create materials, such as flyers, brochures and pamphlets that show what the program
will do for them and the benefits of volunteering for the program
Place the materials created throughout the TNRB and in other areas on campus
Develop a five-minute presentation to be delivered during business classes to recruit
volunteers
Have a booth at the Wilkinson Center with materials to hand in
Create a Facebook page with pictures of clients and volunteers so current volunteers can
refer to their friends
Create a YouTube video introducing MBM to recruit volunteers
Create a semester calendar detailing all the activities that will be done
On business class presentations, include pictures of volunteers showing their work on
slide shows
Have a booth at a career fair where we can hand-in materials and talk about the program
Place advertising in 3 BYU volunteer organizations by March 31, 2013
Strategy #2
To maintain loyalty from current volunteers through planning organized volunteer-appreciation
activities
Tactics
Hold volunteer parties twice per semester
Send an appreciation letter once per semester
Have opportunities to discuss the volunteer experience they have
Interview volunteers about their mentoring experience
Post the interviews on the organizations website
Upload volunteers bios along with their picture
Write recommendation letters from Warner Woodworth
Give volunteers awards, such as the most inspirational, the most enthusiastic, the
one who visited more wards, etc
Receive feedback and suggestions through emails
Send cards or messages for personal achievements, such as birthdays, graduation,
promotions, etc
Train volunteers once per semester

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EVALUATION PROCEDURE
Objective: Increase the percentage of microcredit loans recipients by 50% in the Provo/Orem
area by December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of loans recipients given between December 31, 2012 and
December 31, 2013.
Objective: Double the participation of Hispanics from the Provo/Orem area in the business
training program by the December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of total participants between December 31, 2012 and
December 31, 2013.
Objective: Increase the number of clients referrals by 100% by December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of participants who came from clients referrals between
December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Increase the number of contacts from mentors by 50% by December 31, 2013
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of contacts from mentors between December 31, 2012
and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Increase the number of class presentations given at ESL schools and other Hispanic
organizations by 50% in the Provo/Orem area by December 31, 2013
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of class presentations give at ESL schools and other
Hispanic organizations between December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Retain 80% of the current volunteers by December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of class presentations give at ESL schools and other
Hispanic organizations between December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Double the current number of total volunteer service hours by December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of total volunteer service hours between December 31,
2012 and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Increase the number of current volunteers referrals by 100% by December 31, 2013.
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of total volunteers referrals between December 31, 2012
and December 31, 2013.
Objective: Increase the number of volunteer recruitment presentations given at BYU business
classes by 100% by December 31, 2013
Evaluation tool: Compare the number of volunteer recruitment presentations between December
31, 2012 and December 31, 2013.

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REFERENCES
EdcUTAH (2010).Utah County.
Davidson, L. & Lee, J (2010, July). Hispanics, other ethnic groups in Utah often lack health
insurance, Census shows. Deseret News.
Community Action Partnership of Utah (2011).Annual report on poverty in Utah 2010.
Pew Hispanic Center (2012). Utah County, Utah. Retrieved Sep 12, 2012, from
http://www.pewhispanic.org/states/county/49049/
United States Census Bureau (2010).U.S. Department of Commerce.State and County quick
facts. Retrieved Sep 12, 2012, from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/49/49049.html
United Way of Utah County (2012).Utah County community assessment 2011.
Volunteering in America (2010). Retrieved Sep 12, 2012, from
http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/

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