AN URBAN MYTH

LIVES IN ‘KUMIKO’
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18

JOBLESS RATE DIPS

SERRA 0-2 IN
LEAGUE PLAY

SAN MATEO COUNTY HAS LOWEST IN CALIFORNIA AT
3.5 PERCENT
STATE PAGE 5

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 186

POST to connect Coastal Trail
Nonprofit buys 21 acres at Pillar Point bluffs, will donate to count
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After more than a decade of working to
preserve the pristine coastal bluff tops
near Pillar Point Harbor, the Peninsula
Open Space Trust announced Thursday it
has purchased another 21 acres that will
be donated to the San Mateo County

Department of Parks.
The El Granada site, located just west of
the Half Moon Bay Airport and north of the
U.S. Air Force Base, is situated between two
parcels previously purchased by POST and
will complete a segment of the popular
California Coastal Trail.
“This is the fulfillment of a decade-long
dream to preserve Pillar Point bluff,” POST

President Walter T. Moore said in a press
release. “This is a spectacular piece of the
California coast and we are thrilled that people can now take an uninterrupted hike on
this property and enjoy the incredible scenic beauty of this place.”
The area is known for spectacular views of
the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve as well as the
Mavericks surf break while serving as criti-

cal habitat for species such as the threatened
California red-legged frog and the endangered San Francisco garter snake, according
to POST.
The nonprofit previously purchased adjacent Pillar Point bluff properties including
119 acres in 2004, 4 acres in 2007 and 17

See POST, Page 22

Leading the
San Bruno
foundation
Community fund created after
2010 PG&E explosion and fire
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The future of the fund dedicated to support San Bruno in the wake of the 2010
PG&E explosion and fire is taking
shape, as Leslie Hatamiya starts to take
action as director of the community
foundation.
Hatamiya, 46, said the San Bruno
Leslie
Community Foundation just signed an
Hatamiya
office lease at 901 Sneath Lane and
hopes to soon have a website up and running, which will
help collect input on how to best allocate the nearly $70
million in restitution money awarded as a result of the disaster.
Hatamiya, who was appointed to her position in February

See LESLIE, Page 31
TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Clockwise from top left: San Mateo County Historical Association curator Dana Neitzel and facilities manager Ed Collins discuss
an interactive display that teaches the differing grips for pitches thrown by baseball pitchers at the‘Let’s Play Ball’exhibit opening
Saturday in Redwood City.A life-size dugout is featured in the semipro wing of the‘Let’s Play Ball’exhibit.It is mocked up to resemble
the dugout at San Mateo’s Fitzgerald Field, where the San Mateo Blues semipro team played for over 50 years. One exhibit
features game-used bats by major league legends Tony Lazzeri, Willie Mays, Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Willie McCovey and Barry
Bonds.A photo from current Carlmont High School head coach Jim Liggett’s personal memorabilia collection of his wife Charlene
and himself at spring training in 1961 when Liggett was a pro prospect in the Baltimore Orioles organization.

A baseball wonderland
‘Let’s Play Ball’ exhibit offers rich 100-year history of San Mateo County baseball
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

As curator of the San Mateo County
Historical Association, Dana Neitzel
doesn’t too much care for adorning her
exhibits with plaques. So, when she

was offered Keith Hernandez’s 1979
National League MVP plaque to showcase in the upcoming “Let’s Play Ball”
exhibit, she opted instead for
Hernandez’s Gold Glove trophy from
the same year.
The trophy is just one gem in a wide

Belmont outlines
accomplishments
City Council reviews priorities
and plans for the coming year
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

array of memorabilia spanning the
past 100 years of San Mateo County
baseball being displayed at the “Let’s
Play Ball” exhibit, opening Saturday
at the San Mateo County History

Revamping the busy Ralston Avenue, updating
Belmont’s General Plan, establishing workforce housing
and creating ordinances to address electronic cigarettes,
Airbnb rentals as well as massage parlors are initiatives
the City Council aims to tackle in the coming fiscal year.
City officials met Wednesday to review the council’s pri-

See PLAY BALL, Page 22

See BELMONT, Page 31

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Never lose your temper with the press or
the public is a major rule of political life.”
— Dame Christabel Pankhurst, English suffragist

This Day in History
Civil rights demonstrators led by the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. began
their third, successful march from
Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.
NASA launched Ranger 9, the last of
the Ranger series of spacecraft sent to
explore the moon.
In 1 5 5 6 , Thomas Cranmer, the former Archbishop of
Canterbury, was burned at the stake for heresy.
In 1 6 8 5 , composer Johann Sebastian Bach was born in
Eisenach, Germany.
In 1 8 0 4 , the French civil code, or the “Code Napoleon” as it
was later called, was adopted.
In 1 9 2 5 , Tennessee Gov. Austin Peay (pee) signed the Butler
Act, which prohibited the teaching of the Theory of Evolution
in public schools. (Tennessee repealed the law in 1967.)
In 1 9 3 5 , Persia officially changed its name to Iran.
In 1945, during World War II, Allied bombers began four days
of raids over Germany.
In 1 9 5 2 , the Moondog Coronation Ball, considered the first
rock and roll concert, took place at Cleveland Arena.
In 1 9 6 0 , about 70 people were killed in Sharpeville, South
Africa, when police fired on black protesters.
In 1 9 6 3 , the Alcatraz federal prison island in San Francisco
Bay was emptied of its last inmates and closed at the order of
Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.
In 1 9 7 2 , the Supreme Court, in Dunn v. Blumstein, ruled that
states may not require at least a year’s residency for voting eligibility.
In 1 9 8 5 , police in Langa, South Africa, opened fire on
blacks marching to mark the 25th anniversary of Sharpeville;
the reported death toll varied between 29 and 43.
In 1 9 9 0 , Namibia became an independent nation as the former colony marked the end of 75 years of South African rule.
Ten y ears ag o : A high school student on the Red Lake Indian
reservation in Minnesota killed five schoolmates, a teacher
and an unarmed guard before taking his own life; Jeff Weise
(wees) had earlier killed his grandfather and his grandfather’s
companion.

1965

Birthdays

Singer Eddie
Money is 66.

Comedian-talk
show host Rosie
O’Donnell is 53.

Rapper Kevin
Federline is 37.

Violinist-conductor Joseph Silverstein is 83. Actress
Kathleen Widdoes is 76. Folk-pop singer/musician Keith
Potger (The Seekers) is 74. Actress Marie-Christine Barrault is
71. Singer-musician Rose Stone (Sly and the Family Stone) is
70. Actor Timothy Dalton is 69. Rock singer-musician Roger
Hodgson (Supertramp) is 65. Rock musician Conrad Lozano
(Los Lobos) is 64. Rhythm-and-blues singer Russell
Thompkins Jr. (The Stylistics) is 64. Comedy writer-performer Brad Hall is 57. Actress Sabrina LeBeauf is 57. Actor
Gary Oldman is 57. Actor Matthew Broderick is 53.

REUTERS

A solar eclipse is viewed by ESA’s Sun-watching Proba-2 minisatellite, using its SWAP imager to capture the Moon passing
in front of the Sun in a near-totality, in this handout image provided by the Royal Observatory of Belgium.

T

he intensity of tornadoes is measured by the Fujita scale.
Tornadoes are rated from category
F1, light damage, to F5, which lifts
houses off their foundations. Storm
researcher Ted Fujita (1920-1998)
developed the scale in 1971.
***
The largest blue whale on record was
110 feet long; equal to the height of an
11-story building.
***
The comic strip “Hi and Lois” was a
spin-off of “Beetle Bailey.” Lois is
Beetle’s sister. Mort Walker (born
1923) created both cartoons.
***
Advertisements for Timex watches in
the 1950s put the watches through “torture tests” to prove that they could
“take a licking and keep on ticking.”
Watches were frozen in an ice cube tray,
strapped to Mickey Mantle’s (19311995) baseball bat and taped to a lobster’s claw.
***
“ It was a pleasure to burn.” Can you
name the novel that starts with that
line? See answer at end.

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

March 18 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

14

25

30

33

8

INJOT

CANYEG

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

March 20 Mega Millions
7

50

54

75

61

7
Mega number

March 18 Super Lotto Plus
1

3

12

15

26

6

10

17

19

27

8

9

6

Daily Four
1

Daily three midday
0

19

In the Disney movie “George of the
Jungle” (1997), apes send urgent messages using bongo drums via “bongogram.”
***
Lynda Bird Johnson Robb (born 1944),
the daughter of President Lyndon B.
Johnson (1908-1973) was told to get
off of a San Francisco cable car in 1968
because she was eating an ice cream.
***
Vladimir Zworykin (1889-1982) was
nicknamed “the father of television.”
He invented the iconoscope, a transmitting and receiving system to be used
for a picture tube.
***
The “Kung Fu” hand grip feature was
added to the G.I. Joe Action Figure in
1974.
***
In Greek mythology Chloris, the goddess of flowers, created the first rose
from the beauty of Aphrodite and the
blood of Adonis.
***
Ans wer: “Fahrenheit 451” (1953) by
Ray Bradbury (1920-2012). The book
tak es place in the future society where it
is forbidden to possess book s and all
book s are burned by “firemen.” The
title refers to the temperature at which
paper burns.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 3445200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
47

Powerball

DUELE

***
San Francisco’s first skyscraper was
built in 1889, at the corner of Market
and Kearny streets. The 10-story high
building was the headquarters for the
San Francisco Chronicle.
***
Kathie Lee Gifford (born 1953) had a
dog named Regis, named after Regis
Philbin (born 1931), her former morning show co-host.
***
Followers of feng shui believe that
chrysanthemums bring laughter and
happiness into the home.
***
To convert miles into kilometers, multiply the miles by 1.609347.
***
The ozone layer in the stratosphere
averages about 3 millimeters thick
around the world. The ozone layer
absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation
from the sun.
***
The word aeronautics comes from the
Greek words for “air” and “to sail.”
***
The FBI motto is “Fidelity, Bravery and
Integrity.”
***
One of Scrooge McDuck’s oldest enemies is a crooked saloon operator and
profiteer named Soapy Slick.
***
In a 2002 commercial for Metamucil,
an actor dressed like a park ranger pours
the laxative into Old Faithful geyser to
help it stay regular. The real park officials were not amused; it is not allowed
to put anything into the geyser.
***

5

1

Daily three evening

Mega number

9

5

5

The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second place;
and Hot Shot, No. 3, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:46.66.

Saturday : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph...Becoming southwest 5 to 10 mph
after midnight.
Sunday : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows
around 50. South winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40 percent.
Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in
the lower 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy in the evening then
becoming partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Lows
in the upper 40s.

SAYILE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

-

Print your
answer here:

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: EXERT
ONION
UPROOT
SUDDEN
Answer: He wanted to go out to lunch with his friends
after the marathon, but he — NEEDED TO RUN

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Social worker pleads not guilty to sexual assaults
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A former San Mateo County social worker pleaded not guilty Friday to 30 counts of
having sexual relations with three underage girls who were under his supervision.
Manuel Sedillo, a 38-year-old Santa
Clara man with a wife and child, was
arraigned in San Mateo County Superior
Court and scheduled to face a jury July 20,
according to the District Attorney’s
Office.
Sedillo was working for the county’s
Human Services Agency when he allegedly
assaulted three 16-year-old East Palo Alto
girls who were on his caseload, according
to the District Attorney’s Office.
The charges against him include unlawful sexual intercourse, oral copulation and
sexual penetration with a minor.
Sedillo was assigned to the family of the
first reported victim in 2011 and became

very friendly with her
before beginning a sexual
relationship
between June 21, 2014,
and July 31, 2014.
Sedillo reportedly had
sexual relations with
her at several motels, a
San Mateo County
Manuel Sedillo beach and the Child
Protective
Services
office in East Palo Alto, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
The second victim reported Sedillo, who
was like a father to her, took her to an
upscale San Jose hotel where they had sexual encounters, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Since Sedillo’s arrest last October, a
third victim came forward alleging he sexually assaulted her in his personal and
county-provided cars, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
The third victim, now 21, was 16 and 17

years old at the time she was assaulted by
Sedillo, said Chief Deputy District
Attorney Karen Guidotti.
“Anybody that preys on young girls or
young people are committing despicable
acts and to have a person who is in a position of authority who is supposedly there
to help these girls, and yet betrays them
like this, it’s really unthinkable. It’s hard
to imagine the kind of damage that is done
to these young women when they can’t
trust a person who’s supposed to be helping them,” Guidotti said.
Sedillo began working for the county’s
Human Services Agency in 2006, and was
placed on administrative leave in July
after the first girl came forward. He ultimately resigned from the Children and
Family Services Department just before he
was arrested in October.
A pretrial conference has been scheduled
for June 15 and Sedillo is currently out on
$600,000 bail. A call to his attorney was
not returned.

Residents help design new community center
Burlingame officials receive input on facility design; extend dog park pilot program
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Some Burlingame residents would like the
proposed new community center to feature
warm and inviting softly-lit wood tones
with the pronounced character of a modern
civic structure, according to feedback provided during a public meeting.
The roughly 30 people who attended the
Parks and Recreation Commission meeting
Thursday, March 19, gave their opinion
regarding the design of the new building to
architects and city officials, in hopes their
input will shape the future of the new center
located at 850 Burlingame Ave.
Those in attendance were given three

opportunities to vote in favor, and one vote
against, eight examples of potential
designs during the Parks and Recreation
Commission meeting.
A majority of the votes in favor were split
between a warm and inviting template,
which featured a modern structure with softly-lit wood paneling and a civic design,
which also offered modern a building, but
with larger walls of windows.
The least popular option was an expressive, unconventional template design that
featured a more outlandish and creative
approach to building.
Group 4 Architecture, which will help
design the new community center, also
allowed residents to give feedback on the

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proposed layout of the building, and choose
between two alternatives floor plans.
A majority of the differences in the proposals are how the lobby is distributed
across the building and the layout of the
community hall.
The new facility is proposed to be a
35,000-square-foot building spread across

See DESIGN, Page 23

3

Police reports
Not so bright
A woman contacted police when she saw
someone unscrewing the light bulb on
their porch on Town Green Lane in
Foster City before 10:15 p. m.
Wednesday, March 18.

MILLBRAE
Arres t. A man was arrested when he was
found with a concealed firearm, unlawful
paraphernalia and marijuana on the 700
block of Broadway before 9:07 p. m.
Wednesday, March 18.
Burg l ary . A child’s backpack valued at
approximately $20 was stolen from a vehicle on the 100 block of El Paseo before 5:30
a.m. Tuesday, March 17.
Burg l ary . A Sony digital camera was stolen
from a vehicle on the 200 block of El
Camino Real before 9:06 p.m. Monday,
March 16.
Burg l ary . An Apple Macbook laptop was
stolen from a vehicle on the 200 block of El
Camino Real before 9:06 p.m. Monday,
March 16.

FOSTER CITY
Under the i nfluence. A woman wearing a
pink hoodie was arrested when she was seen
throwing objects and spitting and screaming at pedestrians and motorists while under
the influence of a controlled substance and
alcohol on East Hillsdale Boulevard before
2:55 p.m. Thursday, March 19.
In j ury ac c i de n t . An injury collision
involving two juveniles and an adult struck
by a vehicle took place on Beach Park
Boulevard before 8:05 a.m. Thursday, March
19.

4

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Free!

Health &
Wellness Fair

4BUVSEBZ .BSDItBN_QN
Red Morton Community Center
1120 Roosevelt Avenue, Redwood City

Make wellness
your priority!
Meet vendors that help
with every level of your
healthy lifestyle.
Talk to the Pharmacists:
San Mateo County Pharmacists will be
on hand for medication consultation,
advice and blood pressure check.
Mills -Peninsula Heart Smart
Program

Magic Shows
every half hour!
Performed by Doug Jones
of Doug's Happy Magic
Bring your family!
Enter to win tickets to

Monster Jam
April 11@ Levi’s Stadium
and

New Living Expo
April 24-26 @ San Mateo
County Event Center

Goody bags, giveaways
and refreshments!

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

While supplies last. Events subject to change.
For more information visit smdailyjournal.com/healthfair or call 650.344.5200

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

State jobless rate dips to 6.7 percent in February
San Mateo County has lowest in California at 3.5 percent
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California’s
unemployment rate fell for the second
consecutive month since the start of the
year to 6.7 percent in February, a state
agency reported Friday.
California’s unemployment rate continues to vary widely by region. The
San Francisco Bay Area enjoys the
state’s lowest rates with San Mateo
County reporting a 3.5 percent unemployment rate, the lowest county in the
state.
Colusa County had the highest unemployment rate at 22.7 percent.
California added 29,400 jobs last
month for a total gain of 1.8 million
positions since the economic recovery
began in February 2010, according to
the state Employment Development
Department. The last time the unemployment rate was this low was June
2008.
The national unemployment rate also
decreased last month to 5.5 percent.
Eight categories added jobs in

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — The leader of the
California Senate said Friday that he is
traveling to Japan next week and will
miss voting on a $1 billion droughtrelief package he announced a day earlier.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
• U. S. Rep. Jacki e Spei er, DSan Mateo , and five original cosponsors introduced the S t o p
Sel l i ng and Marketi ng to Our
Ki ds E- Ci g are t t e s ( S MOKE)
Act, which would ban companies
from selling and marketing e-cigarettes to children, as well as direct the FDA to establish
common-sense regulations for their safe packaging,
doses and labeling.

CITY GOVERNMENT
•  So uth San Franci s co Parks and Recreati o n
Di recto r Sharo n Ranal s received the Cal i fo rni a
As s o c i at i o n
of
Park
an d
Re c re at i o n
Co mmi s s i o ners and Bo ard Members Outs tandi ng
Pro fes s i o nal Award. This annual award is given out to
one individual, among hundreds of directors in California,
and is chosen by the CAPRCBM

Around the state
REUTERS

Jessica Kolber, right, shakes hands with a job seeker at a job fair in Burbank.
February, with leisure and hospitality
posting the largest increase over the
month, adding 12,600 jobs.
The overall number of people who are
unemployed also fell by 42,000 and is

now less than 1.3 million.
January’s unemployment rate was
revised to 7 percent after the state
reported a gain of 59,100 jobs that
month.

Senate leader to lead 10-day Japan trip, miss drought vote
By Judy Lin

5

Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de
Leon announced that he and two senators will leave next Thursday for a 10day trip to meet with Japanese government officials on transportation, clean
energy and climate change.
Joining de Leon will be Senate
Minority Leader Bob Huff, R-Diamond
Bar, and Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson,

D-Santa Barbara. It’s unclear if the two
senators will miss the vote to fund
water projects.
The trio will travel to various locations at the invitation of the Japanese
government with the goal of promoting understanding and collaboration.
Details of the trip are scheduled to be
released at a later date.

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San Francisco

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Review cites prison guards’
problems with guns and alcohol
SACRAMENTO — California’s corrections department has
a problem with off-duty prison guards brandishing or carrying
firearms while they are intoxicated, the department’s inspector general said Friday.
One correctional officer danced atop a bar while drunkenly
flashing his gun several times at private citizens in the tavern. Another drunken officer pointed a .40 caliber semi-automatic handgun at a citizen’s chest during an argument.
They are two of seven incidents since June 2014 that show
the department needs to automatically and immediately revoke
concealed carry permits for officers caught consuming alcohol
while possessing weapons, the inspector general said.
“Such behavior is not only dangerous to the public but
brings discredit to the department,” Inspector General Robert
Barton wrote in a report that tracks departmental and criminal
investigations of Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation employees.

6

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

LOCAL/STATE

Chief of California schools: ‘It’s
time to stop bashing teachers’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANHATTAN
BEACH

California Superintendent of
Public Instruction Tom Torlakson
is telling the state’s teachers union
that it’s time to stop bashing
teachers and school employees.
Speaking at the California
Federation of Teachers’ annual conference Friday, Torlakson told
teachers that school reformers
“unfairly blame teachers for the

problems
in
public education” and that
“the vast majority
of
Californians are
with us.”
To r l a k s o n
was re-elected
Tom Torlakson in November
with 52 percent
of the vote after facing off wellfunded, reform-minded challenger

THE DAILY JOURNAL

M

embers of the S an
Mateo -Fo s ter Ci ty
El ementary Scho o l
Di s tri ct community are invited
to attend meetings next week
focused on hiring the next superMarshall Tuck. The race drew intendent.
Open forums will be held
national attention, highlighting
tensions within the Democratic Tuesday, March 24, at Co l l eg e
Party on the topic of school Park El ementary Scho o l and
B o wdi t c h Mi ddl e S c h o o l ,
reform.
Nearly 500 teachers were in Wednesday, March 25 to meet repfrom
Haz ard,
attendance at the conference resentatives
Friday, hoping to bring attention Yo ung & Attea, the firm hired to
to issues including extending select the replacement for retiring
Cy n t h i a
Proposition 30, the temporary tax S up e ri n t e n de n t
increases to help restore school Si mms .
The meetings will begin at 6:30
funding cuts made during the recesp.m. College Park Elementary is
sion.
located at 715 Indian Ave. in San
Mateo. Bowditch Middle School is
located at 1415 Tarpon St. in
Foster City.
to maintain and expand access to
The district is also allowing
higher education for California’s members of the community to
students,” Michael Cohen, chair voice their opinion about the next
of the awards committee and direc- superintendent by participating in
tor of the Department of Finance an online survey at www.ecrasursaid in a statement.
vey.com/.SMFC.
CSU’s Monterey Bay campus
***
and Hartnell College were recogThe Burl i ng ame Li o ns Cl ub
nized for their accelerated bache- is hosting its seventh annual
lor’s degree in computer science spelling bee competition on
and information technology; 60 Wednesday, March 25 at the
students enrolled in the program Li o n s Hal l , located at 990
have been awarded full scholar- Burlingame Ave.
ships.
The event, which will feature the
21 best spellers from seven of
The victim was not a student. Burlingame’s public and Catholic
His name and age were not elementary school fourth- and
released. The San Jose Police fifth-grade classes, will begin at 4
Department is investigating. No p.m. It is free to the public.
other details were released Friday
***
afternoon.
The S e quo i a Un i o n Hi g h
The school canceled classes.
Scho o l Di s tri ct is hosting a

Fourteen winners of $50M college innovation awards named
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — A California
State University campus offering a
three-year bachelor’s degree in
computer science to mostly underprivileged students was among the
14 institutions named as winners
Friday of Gov. Jerry Brown’s $50
million Awards for Innovation in
Higher Education.
The 14 colleges were among
52 from across the state that
applied for a slice of the prize

Man’s body found in
California high school pool
SAN JOSE — A man’s body was
found in a swimming pool at a
Northern California high school.
Authorities say they responded

money, which Brown designed to
encourage higher education
institutions to undertake creative
and cost-effective ways to get
more students to earn degrees in
less time.
Five colleges named the top
scorers will get $5 million each to
continue their work; five others
will receive $3 million and the
remaining four will get $2.5 million.
“The innovations we are celebrating today are already helping

Around the Bay
to an emergency call shortly
before 9 a.m. Friday reporting a
body in Piedmont High School’s
outdoor pool in San Jose.

youth heart screening event at
S e quo i a Hi g h S c h o o l in
Redwood City on Sunday, March
22.
Nearly 1,000 students from the
high school district are expected
to attend the free event at 1201
Brewster Ave. in Redwood City.
The event focuses on teens from
age 13 to 19 years old who may be
susceptible to undetected cardiac
abnormalities.
***
The S an Carl o s S c h o o l
Di s tri ct will host meetings for
charter renewals of Whi te Oaks
El e me n t ary S c h o o l , Te rra
Li nda Mi ddl e Scho o l , Bri ttan
Acres El ementary Scho o l and
Arundel El ementary Scho o l .
The meetings will take place
Thursday, March 26, at the district
office at 4 p.m. The offices are
located at 1200 Industrial Road,
Unit 9B in San Carlos.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by education reporter Austin Walsh. You can
contact him at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105
or at austin@smdailyjournal.com.

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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

7

Fracking: U.S. tightens rules for chemical disclosure
By Matthew Daly and Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration said Friday it is requiring companies
that drill for oil and natural gas on federal
lands to disclose chemicals used in
hydraulic fracturing, the first major federal
regulation of the controversial drilling
technique that has sparked an ongoing
boom in natural gas production but raised
widespread concerns about possible groundwater contamination.
A rule to take effect in June also updates
requirements for well construction and disposal of water and other fluids used in fracking, as the drilling method is more commonly known.
The rule has been under consideration for
more than three years, drawing criticism
from the oil and gas industry and environmental groups alike. The industry fears federal regulation could duplicate efforts by
states and hinder the drilling boom, while

some environmental groups worry that
lenient rules could allow unsafe drilling
techniques to pollute groundwater.
Reaction to the rule was immediate. An
industry group announced it was filing a
lawsuit to block the regulaion and the
Republican chairman of the Senate
Environment and Public Works Committee
announced legislation to keep fracking regulations under state management.
The final rule hews closely to a draft that
has lingered since the Obama administration proposed it in May 2013. The rule
relies on an online database used by at least
16 states to track the chemicals used in
fracking operations. The website,
FracFocus.org, was formed by industry and
intergovernmental groups in 2011 and
allows users to gather well-specific data on
tens of thousands of drilling sites across the
country.
Companies will have to disclose the
chemicals they use within 30 days of the
fracking operation.

Fracking involves pumping huge volumes of water, sand and chemicals underground to split
open rocks to allow oil and gas to flow.

States to test ways to send food stamp recipients to work
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — New federal grants will
help 10 states test programs to help food
stamp recipients find jobs, from using
career coaches to quicker training courses to
mental health assistance.
The grants, announced Friday in Georgia
by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, come
as the Republican Congress is exploring
ways to cut the program, which cost $74

billion last year — twice its cost in 2008.
Some in the GOP have proposed stricter
work requirements as a way to do that. But
the Obama administration sees better worker training as an alternative to cuts or
stricter work requirements.
Vilsack said the grants will help USDA
identify what works and what doesn’t in
terms of getting people to work.
The food stamp program has long been
the center of political wrangling in
Washington, with elective officials debating it virtually endlessly. Republicans for

the most part have called it a government
give-away and have worked historically to
rein it in, if not eliminate it. Many
Democrats, particularly those in the party’s
liberal wing, have steadfastly fought cuts to
the program, calling it an essential element
of the federal government’s safety net for
the poor.
Washington provides the money for food
stamps, now called the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP. But
it is administered by the states, with regulations varying from state to state.

State bills would limit access to officer body camera videos
By Ryan J. Foley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IOWA CITY, Iowa — State legislators
around the country are pushing to make it
much harder for the public to obtain police
officer body camera videos, undermining
their promise as a tool people can use to
hold law enforcement accountable.
Lawmakers in at least 15 states have

introduced bills to exempt video recordings
of police encounters with citizens from
state public records laws, or to limit what
can be made public.
Their stated motive: preserving the privacy of people being videotaped, and saving
considerable time and money that would
need to be spent on public information
requests as the technology quickly becomes
widely used.

Advocates for open government and civil
rights are alarmed.
Police departments nationwide are already
spending millions to outfit officers with
cameras and archive the results. In this latest clash between the people’s right to
know and government authority, the
responsibility to record encounters, retain
copies and decide what to make public mostly rests with the same police.

Around the nation
FBI asks for patience in black
man’s hanging in Mississippi
PORT GIBSON, Miss. — An FBI agent
appealed for patience Friday after a black man
was found hanging from a tree in
Mississippi, saying 30 federal, state and
local agents were working intensively to
determine whether he was killed or committed
suicide.
“Everybody wants answers and wants them
quickly. We understand that,” FBI Special
Agent Don Alway told a crowd outside the
Claiborne County Courthouse. “We are
going to hold off on coming to any conclusions until the facts take us to a definitive
answer.”
The county coroner confirmed that the man
found hanging from a white sheet Thursday
was Otis Byrd, an ex-convict reported missing by his family more than two weeks ago.
Byrd lived just 200 yards from the spot where
his body was found, in a wooded area off a dirt
road that ran behind his house.
Alway said investigators are interviewing
Byrd’s family and friends and searching his
rental home and a storage unit for clues, and
will not reveal any evidence along the way.

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Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Boehner off to Israel;
Netanyahu’s ties to
Obama hit new low
By Deb Riechmann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — House Speaker John
Boehner is heading to Israel as already
strained relations between the White
House and newly re-elected Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hit a new
low this week.
On the surface, the Republican leader’s
announcement Friday that he’ll visit Israel
looks like a jab at the White House.
But a congressional aide insisted that
Boehner’s trip — during the two-week congressional recess that begins March 30 —
was planned before new rifts developed
over Netanyahu’s address to Congress and
the prime minister’s remarks this week
about the peace process. The aide spoke on
condition of anonymity because he wasn’t
authorized to publicly disclose details of
the trip.

President Barack Obama bristled when
Boehner invited Netanyahu to address U.S.
lawmakers earlier this month about his
fears that an emerging nuclear agreement
would pave Iran’s path to nuclear weapons.
Relations took another hit Monday
when Netanyahu made hard-line statements
against the establishment of a Palestinian
state.
Speaking on the eve of his re-election,
Netanyahu said there could be no
Palestinian state while regional violence
and chaos persist — conditions that could
rule out progress on the issue for many
years. That ruffled the Obama administration, which views a two-state solution as a
top foreign policy priority and had dispatched Secretary of State John Kerry for
months of shuttle diplomacy in an effort to
reach an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement that never materialized.
On Thursday, Netanyahu seemed to back-

REUTERS

House Speaker John Boehner speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill.
track, saying in a TV interview that he
remains committed to Palestinian statehood — if conditions in the region
improve. Netanyahu told MSNBC that he
hadn’t changed his policy and that he
remained committed to the two-state
vision he spelled out in a landmark 2009
speech.
Obama called Netanyahu to congratulate

him on his re-election, but also told the
Israeli leader that the U.S. is reassessing
its approach to Israeli-Palestinian peace in
light of his comments about a Palestinian
state. A White House official said Obama
also raised Netanyahu’s critical comments
about Israeli Arabs ahead of the election,
which the White House has denounced as a
“cynical” effort to mobilize voters.

Capitol Hill Buzz: House Judiciary Committee enlists GIFs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The House Judiciary
Committee includes some of President
Barack Obama’s fiercest critics on immigration. That doesn’t mean they can’t have fun.
The panel took an unusually lighthearted

approach to immigration policy this week,
posting a Buzzfeed-style listicle comprised
of animated GIFs to illustrate the GOP’s
opposition to Obama’s executive actions
deferring deportations for millions of people in the U.S. illegally.
Celebrities including Britney Spears,

Jennifer Lawrence, Steve Carell and Kristen
Wiig are featured exclaiming in horror and
amazement at captions describing Obama’s
moves, and promoting a GOP bill that
allows state and local governments to
enforce immigration laws.
“This is the best!” actress Emma Stone is
shown exclaiming over a caption asserting that “By allowing hundreds of thousands of local law enforcement officers to
enforce our immigration laws, we keep
immigration enforcement up and operating, even when a president tries to unlaw-

fully refuse to enforce our laws.”
It’s just the latest example of politicians
trying to co-opt popular culture or Internet
trends. Obama appeared in a Buzzfeed video
recently wielding a “selfie stick” to photograph himself with a smart phone. House
Speaker John Boehner used a listicle of
Taylor Swift GIFs earlier this year to attack
Obama’s proposal for free community college.
Judiciary Committee aides said the panel
is always looking for more effective ways
to communicate.

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NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

9

World powers, Iran face make-or-break nuke talks
By George Jahn
and Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The
United States and Iran broke off
nuclear negotiations ahead of
schedule Friday, setting up makeor-break talks next week for a deal
providing long-term assurance to
the world that the Iranians cannot
develop nuclear weapons. The
sides were close to an agreement, a
top Russian official said.
The session in the Swiss city of
Lausanne was interrupted on its
sixth day so members of the
Iranian delegation could attend the
funeral of their president’s mother. Those departing included
Foreign Minister Mohammad
Javad Zarif, the main negotiating
partner of U.S. Secretary of State
John
Kerry,
and Hossein
Fereydoon, a brother of Iranian
President
Hassan
Rouhani.
Diplomats didn’t promise a breakthrough this week, but strove to
make as much progress as possible with a March 31 deadline for a
framework accord looming.
Top Russian negotiator Sergey
Ryabkov told the Associated Press
that while some disputes remain,
the U.S., Iran and five other world
powers negotiating the deal are
expected to “finish their main
work” before the talks resume next
week. He spoke shortly before
Kerry’s last meeting with Zarif on
Friday. This week’s discussions
had been tentatively extended to
go into Saturday.
Ryabkov’s comments were consistent with those of other officials who told the AP earlier that

REUTERS

Secretary of State John Kerry, left, expresses his condolences over the death of the mother of Iranian President
Hassan Rouhani before a nuclear program negotiation session with Iran’s Foreign Minister Javad Zarif.

Obama calls for return of Americans held in Iran
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — In the midst
of an unexpected break in Iranian
nuclear talks, President Barack
Obama is calling for the return of
Americans held in Iran.
In a message commemorati n g t h e Pers i an New Year,
Obama says it’s a time for fam-

ilies to be reunited.
He says Iran should immediately release U.S. prisoners Saeed
Abedini of Boise, Idaho; Amir
Hekmati of Flint, Michigan; and
Jason Rezaian of Marin County,
California. Obama also says Iran
should help
find Robert
Levinson, a former FBI agent
who went missing eight years

ago from the Iranian resort of
Kish Island.
Iran and six world powers broke
off nuclear negotiations Friday to
allow the Iranian delegation to
attend the funeral of their president’s mother. Secretary of State
John Kerry issued a statement
extending
condolences
to
President Hassan Rouhani.

the United States and Iran are drafting elements of a deal that commits the Iranians to a 40 percent

cut in the number of machines
they could use to make an atomic
bomb. In return, Iran would get

quick relief from some crippling
economic sanctions and a partial
lift of a U.N. embargo on conven-

tional arms. The sides ultimately
want to reach a full agreement by
June 30.
But both Washington and
Tehran face pressure to iron out the
main contours of a deal by this
month’s end, with U.S. President
Barack
Obama and Iran’s
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei having
spoken against extending negotiations for the third time. Iran says
the program’s aims are for energy,
medical and research purposes, but
much of the world believes it harbors nuclear weapons ambitions.
In Brussels, French President
Francois Hollande, British Prime
Minister David Cameron and
German Chancellor Angela Merkel
discussed the state of negotiations
Friday with the EU’s top diplomat,
Federica Mogherini. All three
countries are negotiating with the
United States, as are Russia and
China.
State Department spokeswoman
Marie Harf said Kerry would meet
with the foreign ministers of
Britain, France and Germany in
London Saturday, before returning
to Washington.
The U.S. is determined to maintain unity among its partners. But
France, which raised last minute
objections to an interim agreement reached with Iran in 2013,
could threaten a deal again. It is
particularly opposed to providing
Iran with quick relief from international sanctions and is trying to
secure a longer timeframe for
restrictions on Iran’s nuclear
activity.
Diplomats said the talks would
resume after March 25. The venue
will likely be in Switzerland.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks advance, capping strong week
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow 18,127.56 +168.62
Nasdaq 5,026.42 +34.04
S&P 500 2,108.10 +18.83

10-Yr Bond 1.93 –2.38%
Oil (per barrel) 46.44
Gold
1,181.70

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
KB Home, up $1.18 cents to $15.26
The homebuilder reported better-than-expected first-quarter profit and
revenue on a boost in home sales and prices.
The Macerich Co., down $4.29 to $89.21
Fellow mall operator Simon Property boosted its hostile bid for the
company, saying it was making its best and final offer.
AK Steel Holding Corp., down 15 cents to $4.05
The steel company forecast a first-quarter loss because of an increase
in imports and lower-than-expected shipments and prices.
Tiffany & Co., down $3.44 and $82.93
The luxury jeweler reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter profit,
but its revenue and outlook fell short of expectations.
Nasdaq
Biogen Idec Inc., up $42.33 to $475.98
The biotechnology company released positive study data for its
developing Alzheimer’s disease treatment.
Prothena Corp., up $9.43 to $38.66
The biotechnology company said its potential Parkinson’s disease
treatment showed promising results in an early-stage study.
Theravance Inc., down 94 cents to $17.03
An FDA panel of experts recommended that the Breo Ellipta inhaler for
asthma appears safe for adults, but not for adolescents.
Star Bulk Carriers Corp., up 4 cents to $3.30
The shipping company reported a fourth-quarter loss, but the earnings
met Wall Street expectations and revenue beat forecasts.

Business brief
Olive Garden gets boost
from diners splurging on extras
NEW YORK — Olive Garden is weaning diners off two-for$25 dinners and luring them to splurge a bit on extras like
drinks and desserts. Those add-ons, a sign that customers
might be more willing to open their wallets, helped push sales
up for a restaurant chain that limped through the recession and
a shift toward “better” fast food personified by Chipotle.
The struggling restaurant chain said Friday quarterly sales
edged up 2.2 percent at established locations, marking the first
back-to-back quarterly gains in five years. That’s partly
because diners were ordering more extras like alcohol and
desserts and Olive Garden pulled back on discounts.
“We are seeing a little bit healthier of a consumer,” said Gene
Lee, CEO of Darden Restaurants, which owns Olive Garden and
other chains including Yard House and Seasons 52.
The modest bump in sales follows a 0.5 percent increase in
the previous quarter, making it the first time since 2010 Olive
Garden achieved consecutive quarters of sales gains. Still, it’s
not necessarily a sign that a turnaround is underway; customer
traffic was still down in the period, and the improvement came
after a 5.4 percent decline in sales a year ago.

NEW YORK — Stocks advanced
Friday, capping a strong week, helped
by a recovery in the price of oil and
earnings from Olive Garden owner
Darden Restaurants and sportswear
giant Nike.
The Nasdaq composite index inched
closer to its all-time high set at the
height of the dot-com bubble.
Once again, it was the Federal
Reserve affecting much of this week’s
market movement.
The Fed implied at the end of its twoday meeting Wednesday that its policymakers were in no hurry to raise
interest rates with the U.S. economy
still growing slowly and inflation
extremely low. Friday’s rally was partly an extension of that, strategists
said.
“The trepidation in the market
before the Fed announcement has disappeared,” said Kristina Hooper, U.S.
investment strategist at Allianz
Global Investments.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 168.62 points, or 0.9 percent, to
18,127.65. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 18.79 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,108.06 and the Nasdaq composite added 34.04 points, or 0.7 percent, to 5,026.42.

“The trepidation in the market before
the Fed announcement has disappeared.”
— Kristina Hooper, U.S. investment strategist at Allianz Global Investments

The Nasdaq closed 22 points from
the record high of 5,048 it set in
March 2000. It has taken the Nasdaq
15 years to recover from the dot-com
bubble, while the S&P 500 and Dow
recovered their losses in 2007 and
2006, respectively.
Dow member Nike was among the
biggest gainers Friday, rising $3.66,
or 3.7 percent, to $101.98. Nike’s
results beat expectations, but
investors focused more on the fact that
foreign sales remain strong despite the
rising dollar and overseas market
volatility.
The rapid rise in the dollar has been
a particular sore spot for investors.
The dollar is up more than 8 percent
against the major currencies this year,
which makes goods made in the U.S.
more expensive abroad and has had a
direct negative impact on sales. The
dollar rose to 120.09 yen from 120.76
yen Thursday. The euro rose to
$1.0809 from $1.0668 the previous
day.
The latest example was jewelry
maker Tiffany & Co., which cut its

full-year profit forecast, saying the
higher dollar was making its products
less attractive to foreign buyers.
Tiffany’s stock fell $3.44, or 4 percent, to $82.93.
“The dollar’s appreciation has been
rapid and it’s become a problem for
many of these companies who have
significant exposure to foreign markets, ”
said
Russ
Koesterich,
BlackRock’s global chief investment
strategist.
Oil also helped the market Friday.
After dropping more than 3 percent
Thursday, U.S. benchmark oil for April
delivery jumped $1.76, or 4 percent,
to $45.72 a barrel. Energy stocks rose
far more than the rest of the market.
The S&P 500’s energy sector gained 2
percent.
Oil ended a volatile week up 2 percent even after dropping to its lowest
level in six years on Tuesday. Oil
inventories are at record highs, but the
number of rigs drilling for oil is
falling fast and a sliding U.S. dollar is
making oil a more attractive investment to overseas buyers.

Big returns can lead to higher taxes
By Stan Choe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Even the most pleasing ice cream on a hot summer day can
result in a headache.
Such is the pain mutual-fund
investors are feeling as they prepare
their taxes. Another year of sweet
returns for stock funds is leading to
bigger tax bills for many who own
funds in taxable accounts.
That, plus some other trends from
around the fund industry:
BIGGER TAX BITE
Funds charged ahead in 2014, after
the Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
by more than 10 percent for a third
straight year. But the sizeable gains
also pushed many funds to pass along
bigger capital-gains distributions to
their shareholders.
Each year, funds tally the gains and
losses they made from selling stocks.
They then pass on those gains to
shareholders, usually in December.
Investors who own funds in a taxable
retirement account must pay taxes on
these distributions, even if they don’t
sell any shares of the mutual fund.
Now that the S&P 500 has more than

tripled since hitting bottom six years
ago, funds are generally booking profits when they’re selling shares of any
stock in their portfolios. And that
means many funds passed along higher
capital-gains distributions for 2014.
A jump in corporate takeovers last
year also pushed the numbers higher.
At the Hennessy Focus fund, for example, shareholders received a long-term
capital-gain distribution of $5.11 per
share in December. That’s nearly five
times what they received a year before.
The fund generally aims to hold on
to stocks for at least five years, and
that buy-and-hold approach usually
results in smaller gains distributions.
The fund’s 10-year returns rank in the
top 9 percent of its category after
adjusting for capital-gains and other
taxes, according to Morningstar.
But last year, two companies that the
fund owned were acquired, says Ira
Rothberg, co-portfolio manager. That
forced the fund to sell their shares,
which triggered more gains.
INDEXES ON TOP, AGAIN
Last year was a struggle for most
stock pickers looking to beat the S&P
500, even more than the year before.
Most large-cap fund managers fell

short of the index, 86 percent last
year, up from 56 percent in 2013,
according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.
It continues a yearslong trend for
active managers. Over the last decade,
82 percent of large-cap managers have
failed to match the S&P 500. The last
time the majority of them beat the
index was in 2007.
Fund managers specializing in other
areas of the market likewise struggled
to keep up with their respective index.
The majority of small-cap U.S. stock
managers failed to keep up with the
benchmark both last year and over the
last decade. Same with managers who
focus on mid-cap stocks. And emerging-market stocks. And real-estate
investment trusts.
Bond fund managers had more success. The majority who focus on highquality, intermediate-term bonds either
matched or beat the benchmark both
last year and over the last decade, for
example. Same with managers who
focus on global bonds.
With so many funds struggling to
beat their benchmark index, dollars
have increasingly gone to those that
simply try to mimic stock indexes.
Index funds also have lower costs.

Felon using expedited airport security lane renews concerns
By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A key lawmaker
raised questions about air travel security after a convicted felon and former
member of a domestic terrorist organization was able to use an expedited airport security line.
Rep. Bennie Thompson, the senior
Democrat on the House Homeland
Security Committee, said the disclosure of June 29, 2014 incident highlights shortcomings in how the
Transportation
Security
Administration identifies low-risk
passengers as well as the need for
Congress to respond.
The
Homeland
Security
Department’s
inspector general
announced Thursday that a felon convicted of murder and explosives-related
offenses was allowed to pass through

the TSA’s PreCheck security lane
designed for passengers who are considered a low security risk.
TSA’s PreCheck lanes can be
accessed by airline passengers who
enroll in the program and submit to a
background check to ensure they present a low risk to security. But TSA also
selects some passengers for the expedited screening based on biographical
data provided to airlines, including a
passenger’s name and date of birth.
In the case of the convicted felon, he
was approved for the expedited security lane despite his criminal history. A
TSA officer who checked his boarding
pass recognized him as a convicted
criminal from news reports, the
Inspector General found. When a
supervisor was alerted, the officer was
instructed to let the passenger go
through the faster line, anyway.
The Inspector General’s report did

not say where the incident occurred or
provide any other details about the
man’s convictions or former affiliation with a domestic terrorist group.
In a statement issued late Thursday,
the TSA said it “takes its responsibility for protecting the traveling public
very seriously.”
It said, “All passengers, including
those with TSA PreCheck on boarding
passes, are subject to a robust security
approach that employs multiple layers
of security, both seen and unseen.”
Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat,
said he plans to introduce legislation
to ensure travelers like the convicted
felon aren’t able to access expedited
security lanes at airports.
“While I understand that expedited
screening is an interest of the traveling public, it should not be employed
at the expense of security,” Thompson
said.

LOCAL ROUNDUP: SEQUOIA CRUSHES CAPUCHINO 22-2 IN PAL BAY BASEBALL ACTION >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 14, Warriors
pound the Pelicans
Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Ravipati wants to do more than just coach football
could make a big impact.”
Ravipati lettered in five sports while at
Harker School, a private school in San
Jose. Dealing with so many different teammates and coaches gave Ravipati an appreciation for all that coaches do — and a lot of
it extends beyond the field.
“You see the impact all the coaches had on
you,” Ravipati said. “We want to push [our
players] in three phases — be the best student, best person and best football person
you can be.”
Ravipati said he plans to expand the academic support program that has already

been instituted and he wants his players to
be more than football players.
“Off the field we want to become a more
visible, positive member of the community,” Ravipati said.
Not that Ravipati is planning on neglecting the on-the-field product. He wants to
build a Bears’ squad that is similar to what
M-A has done in the past.
“I’ve always loved the game of football.
… I really started to love the x’s and o’s
when I was at (University of) San Diego,
when I had a chance to play with (now

Serra is struggling

Cal women open
tourney with win

By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Sione Taufoou may be gone as head football coach for the Menlo-Atherton football
team, but the man who was tabbed to replace
him will bring a lot of the same concepts
and goals.
Adhir Ravipati, who has been on the M-A
football staff since 2011, wants to be more
than a football coach. He looks at his position as a way of guiding high school athletes from children to men.
Ravipati picked up a lot of his philoso-

phy from working with
Taufoou.
“I’ve known Sione for
a while, since I was at
Harker and he was a trainer at the (sports performance center) Reikes
Center, ” Ravipati said.
“He had just gotten the
Adhir Ravipati job (as M-A coach) and
he offered me a job.
Sione really preached and really recruited
me and sold me on a vision of working with
the kids at M-A to change lives. I knew we

See COACH, Page 16

By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Padres have three
runs on nine hits in
0-2 start in WCAL
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The glow from the Serra baseball team’s
start to the 2015 campaign is quickly wearing off.
The Padres opened the season with a 5-1
mark in non-league play, beating the likes
of East Bay powers De La Salle, James
Logan and San Ramon Valley.
This week, the Padres started West
Catholic Athletic League play, dropping a
tough 2-1 decision to Mitty Wednesday.
The Padres had a chance to get into the
WCAL win column Friday, when they hosted St. Francis.
Suddenly, Serra finds itself in a 0-2 hole
in WCAL play after the Lancers recorded a 52 victory.
“[All league games are] important. We
can’t sit here and dwell on it,” said Serra
manager Craig Gianinno. “We have to look
to [Saturday].”
Awaiting Serra (0-2 WCAL, 5-3 overall)
Saturday? A road trip to San Jose to take on
8-1 Valley Christian.
The Padres are going to need to solve
their problems with their bats quickly if
they are going to compete for the WCAL
title. In their last two games, the Padres
have collected a total of nine hits.
For the second game in row, the Padres’
sticks were mostly silent as St. Francis’
starting pitcher Andrew Carter locked up the
Padres for most of the game.
Carter was perfect through 4 1/3 innings,
retiring the first 13 batters he faced. Serra
designated hitter Scott Ota broke up both
the perfecto and the no-no when he singled
to right with one out in the fifth inning for
the Padres’ first hit of the game. Tyler

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

See PADRES, Page 16

Serra second baseman Billy Gatt hurdles St. Francis’ Brian Knapp after throwing to first trying
to complete a double play. Serra lost 5-2 to the Lancers and are 0-2 in WCAL play.

BERKELEY — Reshanda Gray spent the
closing minutes pounding her chest in celebration and running up and down the bench
high-fiving as California’s supporting cast
closed out an impressive NCAA Tournament
opener at home in Haas Pavilion.
Gray, fellow senior Brittany Boyd, and
the rest of the Golden Bears are hopeful this
is just a start in another special run.
Gray had 22 points and nine rebounds as
Wichita State tried every which way to
defend her, and fourth-seeded California
beat the 13th-seeded Shockers 78-66 on
Friday night in the first round of the NCAA
Tournament at Haas Pavilion.
The Pac-12 Player of the Year received a
rousing standing ovation as she took a seat
in the waning moments, and then pounded
her chest in delight as the backups took
over. Boyd followed her to the bench to
roars 30 seconds later.
“We showed a ton of resolve,” Cal coach
Lindsay Gottlieb said, “Trying to be a little
better at what we do than what they are at
what they do.”
The Bears will face fifth-seeded Texas (2310) on Sunday night for a spot in the
Albany Regional after the Longhorns held
off No. 12 seed Western Kentucky 66-64 in
the first game.
Alex Harden scored 22 points and
Michaela Dapprich had 16 for Wichita State
(29-5), which had won 12 in a row.
The Shockers used a 9-0 run spanning 2
minutes, 44 seconds, to close to 47-43 on a
3-pointer by Dapprich with 12:54 left. But
she picked up her fourth foul 30 seconds
later.
Gottlieb used a timeout when Wichita
State got close, and could tell all would be
fine.
“They just have a swagger about them,
‘OK, we’ve got this,”’ she said.
Boyd’s two free throws with 11:48
remaining stopped a scoring drought of
4:11 for Cal. After a defensive stop, Gray
delivered the next time down and the Bears

See CAL, Page 16

Stanford women head into NCAAs without usual star power
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — For most of the last decade,
Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer has had the
luxury of entering the NCAA Tournament with
a team led by one of the top women’s players
in the game.
From Candice Wiggins to the Ogwumike
sisters, stars have helped Stanford make it to
the Final Four six times in the past seven
years.

“We’ve had so many people have big games for us and
we know any night it could be anybody who blows up.”
— Lili Thompson, Stanford guard

This Cardinal squad is a little bit different,
relying on balance more than star power to
make it to the tournament for the 28th consecutive year. Fourth-seeded Stanford (24-9)
will open play Saturday at home against 13thseeded Cal State Northridge (23-9).

“We’ve had so many people have big games
for us and we know any night it could be anybody who blows up,” guard Lili Thompson
said. “That makes it harder for other people to
guard and plan for than just that one AllAmerican center to throw bodies at.”

The other game at Maples Pavilion in the
Oklahoma City regional features fifth-seeded
Oklahoma (20-11) against 12th-seeded
Quinnipiac (31-3).
The season was far from a breeze for the
Cardinal, who lost five conference games to
have a streak of 14 straight regular season
Pac-12 titles snapped but recovered to win the
conference tournament.
After relying heavily on inside post play in

See STANFORD, Page 16

12

SPORTS

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Local sports roundup
Baseball
Carlmont 4, Burlingame 3
The Scots scored all four of their runs in the
first three innings to split the season series
with the Panthers.
Spencer Stewart went the distance in earning the win, giving up three runs on eight
hits. Stewart also produced the game-winning
RBI with a sacrifice fly in the in the third
inning that plated Alex Pennes.
Julian Billot paced the Carlmont offense,
going 2 for 3 with a double and a RBI.

Sequoia 22, Capuchino 2
The Cherokees scored 11 runs in the first
two innings to cruise to the win over the
Mustangs.
Sequoia scored 22 runs on 16 hits to give
the Sequoia (2-0 PAL Bay, 6-2 overall) the
series sweep. Antonio Arellano had three hits
and drove in three runs for the Cherokees,
while Kyle Pruhsmeier and Kasi Pohahau each
had two hits and three RBIs.

Sacred Heart Prep 7, Menlo-Atherton 3
Cole March had three RBIs and John Van
Sweden added two more as the Gators beat the
Bears in a crosstown-rivalry game.
Will Johnston earned the win, throwing a
complete game while allowing three runs
(only one earned) on five hits.
Mathew McGarry and Max Gardiner each
had an RBI for M-A.

Girls’ lacrosse
Menlo-Atherton 20,
Christian Brothers-Sacramento 3
The Bears recorded their third straight
blowout win, taking a 10-0 lead before
Christian Brothers got on the scoreboard.
Amanda Wiseman, once again, paced the MA attack, scoring five times and assisting on
two others. Annie Payne added four goals and
Sally Carlson chipped in with three goals and
three assists.
M-A had eight players score Friday.

Softball
Presentation 9, Notre Dame-Belmont 6
The Tigers suffered their first West Catholic
Athletic League loss to the rival Panthers
Friday afternoon.
The teams were tied at 2 after the first
inning, but Presentation took the lead for
good with a three-run second and four-run
fourth.
Notre Dame (2-1 WCAL, 9-2 overall) added
two more runs in the bottom of the fifth and
scored single runs in the sixth and seventh.
Marina Sylvestri led the Tigers’ offense,
going 3 for 4 with a pair of doubles and two
RBIs. Olivia Geronimo was 2 for 3 with a double and an RBI for Notre Dame.

Boys’ golf
Aragon 217, Mills 241
Carter Walling fired a 1-under 35 to lead the
Dons to a PAL victory over the Vikings at
Green Hills Country Club Friday.
Josh Tong finished with a 41 for Aragon (24 PAL), while Dillan Lovell shot a 34. Austin
Kang fired a 45, while Tyler Lopez and Justin
Li each finished with 53.
Mills (1-4) was led by Alex Tinsay’s 1-over
37. Matt Yoo and Thomas Montserrat each
finished with 48s, while Dom Levin shot a
50.

College track and field
CSM wins three events
JD Elzie, Mirka Uhlirova and Emma Mapa
all won events at the 11-team Bob Rush Team
Challenge Friday at College of San Mateo.
Elzie, a freshman out of Aragon, won the
100 meters, tying his season-best time of
11.09. He easily out-ran American River’s
Isaiah Griffin, who finished with an 11.27.
CSM’s Darren Nd-Peyou was third in 11.38.
Mapa, another freshman out of Aragon, captured the shotput competition with a throw of
37 feet, 11 1/4 inches. She was also fifth in
the javelin (89-2), ninth in the hammer throw
(104-2) and 11th in the discus (105-4).
Uhlirova won the 1,500 in a time of
5:16.53, which was a second off her personal
best.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Kershaw hit in face during A’s win
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MESA, Ariz. — Clayton Kershaw broke a
tooth when was hit in the face by a line drive
in the third, then he finished a sharp fiveinning outing for the Los Angeles Dodgers
in a 3-2 loss to the Oakland Athletics in a
game between split squads Friday.
Andy Parrino’s soft liner struck Kershaw
on the left side of his face. Third baseman
Juan Uribe picked it up and threw wildly past
first base, setting up the A’s only run.
“It was a cutter right on me,” A’s infielder
Andy Parrino said. “I didn’t hit it too well
and I don’t think he saw it too well. “This
early you never want this kind of thing to
happen.”
Kershaw fell in front of the mound then
was examined by Dodgers trainer Stan Conte
before throwing a warmup pitch. He
remained in the game and allowed one run on
three hits overall. He struck out four and did
not walk a batter.
“My initial feeling was he was going to be
OK,” Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis said. “I
think it just fooled him. I saw him get up
right away.”
Kershaw also had a hit.
Sonny Gray and Barry Zito each had solid
outings for the Athletics. Gray allowed two
runs on four hits in 5 1-3 innings. Zito, in
the hunt for a spot in the starting rotation,
pitched three perfect innings, striking out
five.

The Zito effect
Zito focuses on starting and does not even
consider questions about possibly making
the Athletics as a long-man in the bullpen.
“Pitching is all timing and every outing is
another opportunity to get that timing,” he
said. “Right now I’m in a starting position
and I’m getting innings like a starter.”
Non-roster catcher Luke Carlin, who drove
in the winning run in the bottom of the

ninth, has caught Zito in his past two outings, a combined seven scoreless innings.
“He looks like he’s taking steps forward
and he continues to impress,” Carlin said.
“He’s getting better every time out. He got a
couple of punch outs and that’s nice to see.”

Starting times
Do dg ers : Kershaw, who turned 27 on
Thursday, was a little too efficient and
pitched to two extra “batters” in the bullpen
to complete his day. He was happy, for the
most part, with his pitches. “My fastball
command was better and I had a better slider,
it had more depth on the hitters,” he said.
“The curve was hit or miss and I threw a couple at the end I’d like to have back.”
Dodgers’ catcher A.J. Ellis said Kershaw
looked much better than his 3 1-3 inning
stint the last time out. “He got back on a
good track today,” Ellis said. “He was good
at driving that fastball into righties.”
Athl eti cs : Gray regrets only that he
could not put up a zero after the A’s took a 10 lead in third. Otherwise, the A’s opening
day starter was satisfied with his performance. “I gave up a couple of runs but not
because of I made awful pitches.”

Trainer’s room
At h l e t i c s : Outfielder Josh Reddick
(right oblique strain) said he expected to
take some swings off a batting tee Friday. ...
OF Alex Hassan, out since March 11, will
also take swings off a tee. ... OF Sam Fuld
was hit in the jaw by an errant throw during
the seventh inning of the A’s game at
Talking Stick and was sent to a local hospital for tests.

Up next
Kershaw hit in face by liner, pitches 5
sharp innings

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

13

Giants blow ninth-inning lead, lose to Reds
By Don Ketchum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Joey Votto hit his
first home run of the spring in the first
inning and his Cincinnati Reds teammates
went on to rally for five runs in the top of
the ninth for a 6-5 victory over the San
Francisco Giants on Friday night.
A two-run double by Chris Dominguez
gave the Reds the go-ahead runs in the
ninth.
Right-handers Tim Hudson (Giants) and
Anthony DeSclafani (Reds) had solid efforts
to start the game.
Hudson made his third start of the spring
after having surgery to clean debris from his
right ankle in early January. He gave up a
run on one hit - Votto’s home run - and
struck out four in 3 2/3 innings.
DeSclafani, acquired in an offseason trade
with Miami for right-hander Mat Latos,
gave up three runs, one earned, on five hits
with two walks and three strikeouts in 4 2/3
innings.

Sports brief
Morgan Hoffmann takes
3-shot lead with 9 birdies at Bay Hill
ORLANDO, Fla. — Equipped with his first
PGA Tour lead in 67 starts, Morgan
Hoffmann played Friday like he wanted to
keep it a little longer in the Arnold Palmer
Invitational.
Hoffmann made nine birdies for a 7-under
65 and had a three-shot lead over Henrik
Stenson, Harris English and defending

Starting time
Reds : DeSclafani, the likely third man in
manager Bryan Price’s rotation, said he was
fighting himself from the beginning.
“Mechanically, I just didn’t feel right,” he
said. “I could sort of tell (warming up before
the game). I made some adjustments and felt
better once I got in the game, but I still wasn’t too crisp.”
Gi ants : Hudson, who was 9-13 in 31
starts in his first year with the team in
2014, said he “felt pretty good with his
pitches, particularly working out of the
windup. It was the best I have thrown this
spring. Everything was on rhythm, on
time.”
A large part of that was due to the work he
did in the bullpen in the days leading up to
Friday night, making some adjustments.

Trainer’s room
Reds : The team is taking it slow with
INF Todd Frazier, who has been dealing with
a sore lower back. CF Billy Hamilton is
being brought along at a moderate pace with

a sore right shoulder. He was thrown out by
Giants 3B Casey McGehee on a bang-bang
bunt play in the third inning. Devin
Mesoraco, who had a mild concussion on
March 7 when hit in the mask by a foul tip,
started behind the plate.
Gi ants : CF Angel Pagan continues to be
sidelined by stiffness in his lower back.
Pagan, who had back surgery in late in
2014, is expected to be out at least until
Monday or Tuesday. C Andrew Susac has
been slowed by a sore right wrist but is
expected to take batting practice on
Saturday after receiving a cortisone injection.

Musical chairs
The injuries to Pagan and RF Hunter Pence
(broken arm) have forced the Giants to reevaluate their group of OFs and who will
play where, or whether they will need to
make a trade.
The latest scenario has manager Bruce
Bochy considering using 1B Brandon Belt
some in LF. Gregor Blanco moved from LF

to CF on Friday night and Travis Ishikawa
started in LF.
Belt started 31 games there as a rookie in
2011 but has not played there since 2012,
when he played four. If Belt goes to the OF,
C Buster Posey could see time at 1B with
Hector Sanchez or Andrew Susac catching.

Roster moves
Reds : RHP Matt Magill, RHP Keyvius
Sampson and OF Kyle Waldrop were
optioned to Triple-A Louisville.
Gi ants : RHP Chris Heston, RHP Cody
Hall and OF Jarrett Parker were optioned to
Triple-A Sacramento and INF Mitchell
Delfino has been reassigned to minorleague camp.

Up next
RHP Tim Lincecum is Saturday’s scheduled
starter against the Los Angeles Angels in
Tempe, Ariz. Lincecum, making a bid for the
fifth spot in the Giants’ rotation, missed a
start earlier in the spring due to neck stiffness, but appears to be back at full strength.

champion Matt Every going into the weekend at Bay Hill.
Every, Stenson and English each shot a
66.
Rory McIlroy finally got into the picture
by making five straight birdies in his round
of 66. He was five shots behind after his
first sub-70 score in three PGA Tour events
this year.
Hoffmann was at 13-under 131, one short
of the 36-hole record at Bay Hill. The cut
was 142, matching the lowest score to make
the cut in Bay Hill history.

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14

SPORTS

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Curry overcomes off night, leads Warriors to win
By Michael Wagaman

Warriors 112, Pelicans 96

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Stephen Curry overcame a
subpar shooting performance to score 16
points with 11 assists, Harrison Barnes
added 22 points and the Golden State
Warriors kept rolling at home with a 112-96
win over the New Orleans Pelicans on
Friday night.
Curry missed 12 of his first 13 shots from
the floor and was 0 for 7 from 3-point range
before making back-to-back shots from
beyond the arc in the third quarter. He finished 4 for 17.
Marreese Speights had 13 points off the
bench, while Leandro Barbosa scored 12 for
Golden State. The Warriors improved to 5513, the second-most wins in team history
and four shy of the franchise record.

Alexis Ajinca scored 15 points with eight
rebounds for banged-up New Orleans, which
played without four of their top six players,
including leading scorer Anthony Davis.
The Warriors were also short-handed as
All-Star Klay Thompson sat out his second
straight game with a sprained right ankle.
Even with Thompson sidelined and Curry
struggling on one of his worst shooting
nights of the season, Golden State eased to
its 10th straight win over New Orleans.
Coming off 114-95 win over NBA-leading Atlanta on Wednesday, the Warriors led
by as much as 27 and forced the Pelicans
into 21 turnovers.
Barnes filled some of the scoring void,
helping Golden State pull away in the second quarter before Curry warmed up late in

the third.
He missed his first seven shots beyond
the arc before hitting a deep 3-pointer with
2:36 left that extended Golden State’s lead
to 75-64. Curry later sank another trey to
make it 86-66.
New Orleans, which began the night one
game behind Oklahoma City in the race for
eighth place in the West, couldn’t overcome
their injury problems.
Davis missed his second consecutive
game with a left ankle injury he suffered during a shootaround before Thursday’s loss to
the Phoenix Suns. The Pelicans also were
without Omer Asik, Ryan Anderson and Jrue
Holiday.
Speights made a buzzer-beating 3-pointer
at the end of the first quarter to put the
Warriors up 29-26, then Barnes helped
Golden State pull away in the second. He

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made a step-back 3-pointer to push the
Warriors’ lead to 10, then closed out the
period with a three-point play and a 9-foot
bank shot that made it 53-42 at halftime.

Tip-ins
Pel i cans : Asik was a late scratch due to a
calf injury. Tyreke Evans went down with an
apparent hip injury midway through the
third.
Warri o rs : Golden State upped its NBAbest record at home to 32-2. ... Thompson
isn’t expected back until Monday the earliest.

Up next
Pelicans: At Los Angeles Clippers on
Sunday.
Warri o rs : Host Utah on Saturday.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NCAA roundup
SOUTH REGION
San Diego St. 76, St. John’s 64
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — JJ O’Brien
scored 18 points for San Diego State,
and Dwayne Polee II added 15 points
on five 3-pointers against his former
team.
Skylar Spencer added 10 points and
seven rebounds for the Aztecs (27-8),
who will face the top-seeded Duke on
Sunday.
Sir’Dominic Pointer had 21 points
and 10 rebounds for St. John’s.

Gonzaga 86, N. Dakota St. 76
SEATTLE — Kyle Wiltjer scored 23
points to lead Gonzaga to the victory.
Sophomore Dexter Werner had a
career-high 22 points — all of them
entertaining — while keeping North
Dakota State (23-10) within range for
much of the game.
Kevin Pangos had 18 points for
Gonzaga.

EAST REGION
Michigan St. 70, Georgia 63
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Denzel
Valentine scored 16 points and went 6
for 6 at the free-throw line in the final
30 seconds, helping Michigan State
hold on for the win.
Travis Trice scored 15 points for
the seventh-seeded Spartans (24-11).
Valentine’s free throws were critical as Georgia (21-12) rallied to make
it a one-possession game.
Charles Mann scored 19 points for
the 10th-seeded Bulldogs.

Louisville 57, U.C. Irvine 55
SEATTLE — Freshman Quentin
Snider hit the winning free throws and
Terry Rozier made the saving steal for
fourth-seeded Louisville.
With the game tied, Snider snagged
a rebound in the corner off a long miss
by Luke Nelson and drew a foul when
Will Davis II crashed into him.
Snider made the free throws with
8.9 seconds left and the 13th-seeded

Anteaters (21-13) never got a final
shot, thanks to Rozier’s pick of Alex
Young as he was moving up the court.
Wayne Blackshear had 19 points
for the Cardinals (25-8).

MIDWEST REGION
W. Viriginia 68, Buffalo 62
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Tarik Phillip
hit a big 3-pointer for fifth-seeded
West Virginia with 28 seconds left
while the shot clock was winding
down.
The Mountaineers (24-9) will take
on No. 4 Maryland (27-6) on Sunday.
Devin Williams, who led the
Mountaineers with 17 points and
nine rebounds, hit two free throws
with 2:10 left to give his team the
lead for good.
Xavier Ford had 11 of his 16 points
in the second half for the Bulls (2310).

Maryland 65, Valparaiso 62
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Dez Wells
turned an offensive rebound into a
three-point play with 1:44 left, and
Varun Ram stripped away Valparaiso’s
last chance as Maryland held off the
determined Crusaders.
Wells finished with 14 points for
the fourth-seeded Terrapins (28-6),
including that three-point play that
made it 65-61. Melo Trimble had 14
points and 10 rebounds for Maryland,
playing in its first NCAATournament
under fourth-year coach Mark
Turgeon.
Alec Peters led 13th-seeded Valpo
(28-6) with 18 points.

WEST REGION
Oregon 79, Oklahoma St. 73
OMAHA, Neb. — Joseph Young
scored 27 points and Elgin Cook
added 18, leading No. 8 seed Oregon
to the win.
Dillon Brooks had 17 points for
the Ducks (26-9), and Dana Altman
got the win in his return to Omaha and
the same building where he once
coached Creighton.

NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Montreal 72 45 20 7
Tampa Bay 72 44 21 7
Detroit
70 38 21 11
Boston
71 36 24 11
Ottawa
70 35 24 11
Florida
71 32 25 14
Toronto
72 27 39 6
Buffalo
71 20 44 7
Metropolitan Division
N.Y. Rangers 69 44 18 7
N.Y. Islanders72 43 25 4
Pittsburgh 71 39 22 10
Washington 72 39 23 10
New Jersey 71 31 29 11
Philadelphia 73 29 29 15
Columbus 71 32 35 4
Carolina
70 26 35 9

GF
191
233
202
189
202
175
189
135

GA
159
185
189
183
185
196
230
238

95
90
88
88
73
73
68
61

207
222
197
212
163
188
190
162

159
203
177
177
180
210
223
193

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
St. Louis
71 45 20 6
Nashville
72 43 21 8
Chicago
70 43 21 6
Minnesota 71 39 25 7
Winnipeg 71 36 23 12
Colorado 71 33 26 12
Dallas
71 33 28 10

96
94
92
85
84
78
76

219
205
203
201
198
191
220

172
176
158
178
189
198
230

Pacific Division
Anaheim 73 46 20 7
Vancouver 70 40 26 4
Calgary
71 39 27 5
Los Angeles 70 34 22 14
Sharks
71 35 28 8
Edmonton 71 19 39 13
Arizona
71 21 42 8

99
84
83
82
78
51
50

214
199
209
188
199
167
147

199
191
186
175
199
243
236

Friday’s Games
New Jersey 3, Buffalo 1
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 1
Anaheim 3, Colorado 2, OT
Saturday’s Games
St. Louis at Minnesota, 11 a.m.
Columbus at Calgary, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
San Jose at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Boston at Florida, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Washington at Winnipeg, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Edmonton, 7 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
St. Louis at Detroit, noon
Boston at Tampa Bay, 2 p.m.
Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Arizona, 5 p.m. 

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EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Toronto
41
28
Boston
30
38
Brooklyn
28
39
Philadelphia
17
52
New York
14
55
Southeast Division
y-Atlanta
53
16
Washington
40
29
Miami
32
36
Charlotte
29
38
Orlando
22
49
Central Division
x-Cleveland
45
26
Chicago
42
28
Milwaukee
34
35
Indiana
30
38
Detroit
24
44
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
48
21
Houston
46
22
San Antonio
43
25
Dallas
44
26
New Orleans
37
32
Northwest Division
Portland
44
23
Oklahoma City
39
30
Utah
31
37
Denver
26
44
Minnesota
15
53
Pacific Division
x-Warriors
55
13
L.A. Clippers
45
25
Phoenix
36
33
Sacramento
23
45
L.A. Lakers
17
50

Pct
.594
.441
.418
.246
.203

GB

10 1/2
12
24
27

.768
.580
.471
.433
.310


13
20 1/2
23
32

.634
.600
.493
.441
.353


2 1/2
10
13 1/2
19 1/2

Pct
.696
.676
.632
.629
.536

GB

1 1/2
4 1/2
4 1/2
11

.657
.565
.456
.371
.221


6
13 1/2
19 1/2
29 1/2

.809
.643
.522
.338
.254


11
19 1/2
32
37 1/2

x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 97, New York 81
Orlando 111, Portland 104
Miami 108, Denver 91
Brooklyn 129, Milwaukee 127,3OT
Cleveland 95, Indiana 92
Chicago 108, Toronto 92
Oklahoma City 123, Atlanta 115
Memphis 112, Dallas 101
San Antonio 101, Boston 89
Sacramento 101, Charlotte 91
Golden State 112, New Orleans 96
L.A. Clippers 113, Washington 99
Saturday’s Games
Brooklyn at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 5 p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Miami at Oklahoma City, noon
Cleveland at Milwaukee, noon
San Antonio at Atlanta, noon
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m.
New York at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Washington at Sacramento, 3 p.m.
Denver at Orlando, 3 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.

15

TRANSACTIONS

NBA GLANCE

Pts
97
95
87
83
81
78
60
47

Store Closing

-,'%,/*%)))(

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned LHP Tim Berry
and RHP Mike Wright to Norfolk (IL).
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with OF
Adam Eaton on a five-year contract.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned INF Erik Gonzalez to Akron (EL). Optioned OF Carlos Moncrief
to Columbus (IL). Reassigned LHP Nick Maronde
and OF James Ramsey to their minor league camp.
DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned RHPs Jose Valdez
and Drew VerHagen, INF Dixon Machado, and OF
Daniel Fields to Toledo (IL) and OF Wynton Bernard
to Erie (EL). Assigned RHP Tim Melville and C Miguel
Gonzalez to their minor league camp.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Assigned INF Matt Duffy,
INF Nolan Fontana, INF Colin Moran, C Roberto
Pena, RHP Jason Stoffel, OF Preston Tucker and RHP
Alex White to their minor league camp.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned RHPs Alex Meyer
and Michael Tonkin to Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES — Optioned OF Tyler Austin,
RHP Danny Burawa and LHP Jose De Paula to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL) and OF Mason Williams to
Trenton (EL). Reassigned RHP Wilking Rodriguez to
their minor league camp.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Optioned LHP Lucas
Luetge, C John Hicks, INF Ketel Marte, INF Jesus
Montero, OF James Jones and OF Stefen Romero to
Tacoma (PCL). Reassigned to RHP Justin Germano,
LHP Rafael Perez, INF D.J. Peterson, INF Patrick Kivlehan and OF Franklin Gutierrez to their minor league
camp.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS — Optioned RHP Matt Magill,
RHP Keyvius Sampson and OF Kyle Waldrop to
Louisville (IL).
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned RHP Taylor
Jungmann and RHP Corey Knebel to Colorado
Springs (PCL). Assigned C Adam Weisenburger to
their minor league camp.
NEW YORK METS — Optioned RHPs Noah Syndergaard and Cory Mazzoni to their minor league
camp, Reassigned C Kevin Plawecki and RHP Jon
Velasquez to their minor league camp.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Nick
Kingham and C Elias Diaz to Indianapolis (IL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned RHP Chris
Heston, RHP Cody Hall and OF Jarrett Parker to
Sacramento (PCL). Reassigned INF Mitch Delfino to
their minor league camp.

WHAT’S ON TAP
SATURDAY
Baseball
Serra at Valley Christian, noon
Boys’ lacrosse
Serra at Oak Ridge, 1 p.m.
College baseball
San Mateo at Chabot, Hartnell at Skyline, noon
MONDAY, MARCH 23
Softball
Notre Dame-Belmont at Aragon, 4 p.m.

16

SPORTS

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

CAL
Continued from page 11
found their groove again. Jefflo’s 3-pointer with 8:58 to go
put Cal back up by 10 at 57-47.
As athletic as Wichita State is with that attacking defense
that defines this group, the Shockers couldn’t stop Gray and
Co. in the paint. Mikayla Cowling added 11 points, six
rebounds and five assists for the Bears and Gabby Green had
11 points, eight rebounds and four assists, who had the backing of 2,079 in the home crowd while shooting 51.6 percent
in the first half on their way to a 10-point lead at the break.
Boyd picked up her second foul at the 11:23 mark of the
first half and sat for 3 minutes, 11 seconds before returning.
She was whistled for her third with 15:16 to go.
With Wichita State allowing opponents only 51 points,
good for fourth in the nation, Gottlieb prepared her team by
using examples from Arizona State’s swarming defense.
Taking care of the ball was the No. 1 priority.

STANFORD
Continued from page 11
recent years, VanDerveer switched gears this season to focus
the offense around the talented backcourt of Thompson and
Amber Orrange.
Thompson and Orrange lead the Cardinal in scoring but six
other players led Stanford in single games as the team’s
offense is more spread out.
“We all took it as a challenge that it was going to be different and a tough road but we could get to the outcome we wanted if we worked hard,” senior forward Bonnie Samuelson said.
Here are some other things to watch in the games at
Stanford:

Experience vs. youth
Oklahoma is a tournament regular with 16 straight appearances and three Final Four trips, while Quinnipiac lost in the
first round in its only trip in 2013. But the Bobcats have the
more experienced roster with five senior starters, while the
Sooners are the youngest team in the tournament. Oklahoma
has 12 players in their first or second year of eligibility with
the team. “This is a really new experience for a lot of them,”
center Kaylon Williams said. “As veterans, we shared our
experiences in the past and things we learned when we came
to our first NCAA.”

Tournament firsts
Quinnipiac wants to show that it is more than just
Connecticut’s “other team” in the shadow of perennial powerhouse UConn. Quinnipiac joined UConn and Notre Dame as
the only 30-win teams, but the first NCAA Tournament win in
school history would truly give the program validation.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

The Shockers, champions of the Missouri Valley
Conference, have never won an NCAA Tournament game in
making appearances in three straight years.
Cal committed 15 turnovers but held a 38-27 rebounding
advantage as the teams met for the first time.

SERRA

Tip-ins

Villaroman followed with a double and a Calvin Riley
groundout scored Ota to cut Serra’s deficit to 4-1. Felix
Aberouette homered in the bottom of the seventh and Riley
legged out an infield hit to account for Serra’s offensive production.
“Their guy (Carter) did a good job of mixing pitches,”
Gianinno said. “We’ve seen good arms this year.”
St. Francis (2-0, 4-2), on the other hand, raked Serra
pitching throughout the game. The Lancers scored five runs
on 12 hits, with most of the damage being done at the top
of the order. Leadoff hitter Jeremy Ydens went 3 for 4 with
three runs scored. Carter, the No. 2 hitter, helped his cause
by going 3 for 3 with a run scored and an RBI. Cleanup hitter Devin Canty was 3 for 4 with two RBIs.
Carter also stole four bases.
All told, the top five spots in the St. Francis lineup were
a combined 11 for 18, scoring and driving in all five runs.
St. Francis wasted little time in putting pressure on Serra,
scoring twice in the top of the first inning. Ydens singled to
lead off the game and went to second on a Carter sacrifice
bunt. Johnny Mendoza followed and ripped a run-scoring
double off the netting in left field for a 1-0 Lancers lead.
Mendoza would come around to score when designated hitter Emilio Nogales blooped a RBI-single in front of the
Serra center fielder to put St. Francis up 2-0.
“I … feel we needed to make some plays in that first
inning,” Gianinno said.
St. Francis added a third run in the top of the third. With
one out, Carter singled and stole second. Following a
groundout, Carter came in to score when Canty dumped a
ball into shallow right field that eluded both the Serra second baseman and right fielder.
The Lancers added single runs in the fifth and seventh
innings on RBIs from Canty and Carter to account for the
Lancers’ scoring.
“We’ve played a tough preseason. It’s not like our guys
aren’t ready,” Gianinno said. “We’ve been here before. It’s
no fun. We just have to get collectively better and it starts
with me.”

Wichita State: The Shockers allowed their most points all
season after coming in fourth-best in the country for scoring
defense at 51 points. ... Adams is 0-4 in the NCAA
Tournament after also making one appearance guiding Murray
State. ... Wichita State didn’t substitute the entire first half,
going to the bench for the first time with 16:57 remaining.
... The Shockers were outrebounded for only the 12th time all
season.
Cal i fo rni a: Gottlieb is 7-3 coaching Cal in the NCAA
Tournament. ... Boyd, still with a bruise under her right eye
from an elbow during the Pac-12 Tournament, was briefly
shaken by a hit to the face with 17:35 left. “I’m built to run
through a wall,” she said. ... This marks the Bears’ first time
playing an NCAA Tournament home game since the 1991-92
season.
“Since we’ve been here that’s all we’ve been trying to do,
make history and leave our mark,” senior guard Jasmine
Martin said. “That would be a great way to go out with a win
in the tournament and do something we’ve never done
before.” Cal State Northridge is also looking for its first tournament win, having lost in the first round in 1999 and 2014.

Super subs
Quinnipiac coach Tricia Fabbri isn’t afraid to utilize her
bench. Eight reserves average more than 5 minutes per game
as the Bobcats employ an unusual strategy called the “The
Gold Rush” that involves subbing five players at a time like
a hockey line change. The Sooners also are deep with 10
players averaging double-digit minutes.

Great guards
Stanford and Cal State Northridge both rely heavily on
their backcourts, with the Matadors trio of Ashlee Guay,
Janae Sharpe and Cinnamon Lister providing a tough challenge for Thompson, Orrange and Brittany McPhee. Asked
which guard worried her most, VanDerveer said: “The one with
the ball. They’re all really good.”

Home cooking
Maples Pavilion has hosted 59 women’s tournament games
heading into this year, second most to the 63 at Tennessee’s
Thompson-Boling Arena. The Cardinal have played 34 of
those games, losing just four. They have a 10-game home
winning streak in the tournament. Matadors coach Jason
Foster has experience at Maples, as a player on the UCLA
team in 2001 that beat the top-ranked Cardinal and an assistant for the UC Riverside women’s team in 2010 that lost to
Stanford. “I have some fond memories of Maples as a player,”
he said. “As a coach, we came in here as a 16 seed when I was
an assistant at Riverside. That wasn’t as fond.”

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Continued from page 11

COACH
Continued from page 11
Stanford coach) Dave Shaw and Jim Harbaugh. You get a
crash course in football learning from those guys, ”
Ravipati said. “The Harbaugh-Shaw Stanford mindset is how
we want to be as a team. We want to build a bully. … We want
to create an illusion of complexity and have defenses have
to make fast decisions.”
Ravipati doesn’t want to over-complicate things, however. His goal is to develop his offensive and defensive systems that will allow the team to learn the entire playbook
by the end of summer.
“(Offensively) we implemented the West Coast system in
2012. We’ll look to build on that, ” Ravipati said.
“Defensively, keep the scheme really simple. Let them play
fast and really physical.”
Ravipati, who has served as the main play caller for several years, said he will turn those duties over to an offensive
coordinator for 2015. Right now, Ravipati is looking to fill
out his coaching staff and will look to fill those slots with
coaches who have a similar philosophy to his.
“I pay a lot more attention to how (a coach is) as a person.
We want our kids to be part of that (hiring) process. If we
have to bring a guy out and explain how he does things,
we’ll do that. We want to see them in action,” Ravipati said.
As for the team on the field, Ravipati could not have
picked a better year to take over the program. He is expecting 18 returning starters.
“We kind of went through some growing pains (last
year),” Ravipati said. “The kids are hungry.”

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

17

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Suicide bombings
in Yemeni mosques
kill more than 130
By Ahmed Al-Haj
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ADEN, Yemen — Suicide
bombers attacked a pair of
mosques Friday in the Yemeni capital, unleashing monstrous blasts
that ripped through worshippers
and killed 137 people in the deadliest assault yet targeting Shiite
rebels who have taken over large
parts of the rapidly fragmenting
nation. At least 13 children were
among the dead.
A purported affiliate of the
Islamic State group claimed
responsibility for the bombings,
which also wounded 357 people —
raising the alarming possibility
the extremist group has expanded
its presence to Yemen after already

Emails: U.N.
health agency resisted
declaring Ebola emergency
GENEVA — In a delay that some
say may have cost lives, the World
Health Organization resisted calling the Ebola outbreak in West

setting up a branch in Libya.
Earlier this week, the group
claimed responsibility for a
bloody attack on Western tourists
in Tunisia that authorities said was
carried out by militants trained in
Libya.
If the claim is true — and the
U. S. expressed skepticism —
Friday’s attacks would be the first
by the Islamic State group in
Yemen, adding a frightening new
layer to the country’s turmoil.
Shiite rebels known as Houthis
have taken over the capital,
Sanaa, and nine of the country’s
21 provinces over the past six
months, raising fears of a civil
war tinged with sectarianism. The
government of the internationally
backed president, Abed Rabbo

Aroound the world
Africa a public health emergency
until last summer, two months after
staff raised the possibility and long
after a senior manager called for a
drastic change in strategy, the
Associated Press has learned.
Among the reasons the United

REUTERS

Crime scene investigators look at the ground after a suicide bomb attack at a mosque in Sanaa, Yemen.
Mansour Hadi, has fled to the
southern port city of Aden.
Yemen is already home to the
most powerful branch of the alQaida network, which has been
battling the Houthis for months.
On Friday, al-Qaida militants

seized control of a southern
provincial capital, al-Houta, in
the group’s most dramatic grab of
territory in years. However, it
denied carrying out the mosque
bombings, citing instructions
from the terror network’s leader,

Ayman al-Zawahri, not to strike
mosques or markets.
Friday’s blasts left scenes of
bloody devastation in the Badr and
al-Hashoosh mosques, located
across town from each other in
Sanaa.

Nations agency cited in internal
deliberations: worries that declaring such an emergency — akin to
an international SOS — could
anger the African countries
involved, hurt their economies or
interfere with the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca.

experts and several former WHO
staff as wrong-headed.

University of Minnesota.
In public comments, WHO
Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan
has repeatedly said the epidemic
caught the world by surprise.
“The disease was unexpected and
unfamiliar to everyone, from (doctors) and laboratory staff to governments and their citizens,” she said.

Those arguments struck critics,

“That’s like saying you don’t
want to call the fire department
because you’re afraid the fire
trucks will create a disturbance in
the neighborhood,” said Michael
Osterholm, a prominent infectious diseases expert at the

Travels,
Tours + Trips
The Phoenician resort

SEE PAGE 24

Avoiding
senioritis
By Mayeesha Galiba

Second semester senior year is the one
everyone dreams of. By this time, all of our
college applications are in and we’re mentally checked out, daydreaming of other
places and our (hopefully) bright futures.
It’s the final stretch.
We’re tired, we’re a little
defeated, we see the light
and we aren’t sure
whether that’s a good
thing. Some of us are
still bogged down by AP
classes (I sure am) and
anxiety over impending college decisions.
Some of us just honestly don’t care anymore.
As much as we don’t care, we can’t let our
senioritis get the best of us. Many have
faced the battle we are currently fighting,
and not all have been successful. I’ve heard
tales of high school students accepted into
their dream colleges, who decided they no
longer want to work in their final semester,
got a few Ds and Fs, and ended up in community college in the fall. Why? Because
colleges don’t give a damn about your
senioritis. If you show them you aren’t
willing to continuously perform at the
level they expect, they’ll drop you like a
hot potato.
This doesn’t mean you have to continue
the pattern of sleepless nights and constant
stress that has become apparent in your
last four years of school. We should be having fun, relaxing, watching copious
amounts of Netflix and shopping for prom
dresses. My point is that we can do all of
these things without totally dropping the
ball. Think of senioritis as an extra large
Icee — it’s OK if you take small sips at a
time but if you attempt to down it, you’ll
inevitably get a brain freeze.
Any time you feel yourself succumbing to
this phenomenon, ask yourself this: After
working so hard, is it really worth ruining
it now? Is getting multiple truancy letters

See STUDENT, Page 20

Urban myth lives in ‘Kumiko’
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In 2001, a stranger-than-fiction “true
story” emerged in local papers about a 28year-old Japanese woman who flew from
Japan to Minnesota and bussed to North
Dakota to search for the buried money from
Joel and Ethan Coen’s 1996 film “Fargo.”
Her dead body was discovered in the snowy
wilderness, making the tale even more
intriguing.
As the reports will tell you, Takako
Konishi stood out as she wandered around in
the snow in a mini-skirt. Between the language barriers and the mysterious map that
she carried, rumors started to spread that

perhaps she had believed the opening title
card to the Coens’ film. It reads: “This is a
true story.”
The only problem was that none of it was
true.
An investigation by writer and filmmaker
Paul Berczeller a few years later found that
Takako Konishi’s journey and suicide was
likely related to an affair and not a briefcase
full of cash from a fictional movie.
In the years between the initial reports
and the ultimate debunking, indie filmmakers David and Nathan Zellner became fascinated with the myth, and decided to reimagine the sensational story as an epic quest —
even after the truth came out.
In “Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter,” the

Zellners (David Zellner directed, both cowrote and co-star) create a haunting, fantasy
adventure for the ages in one of this century’s most breathtaking independent films.
We first encounter Kumiko (Rinko
Kikuchi) as a distant figure trudging along a
rocky shore in a red-hooded sweatshirt. She
has the gait of someone who knows exactly
where she is going as she heads into a dark
cave and digs into a little crevice to find a
slimy, buried VHS tape of “Fargo.”
As the words “this is a true story” flash at
the start of the film, Kumiko decides that it
really is true and her obsession takes course
as she carefully sketches maps of the end-

See KUMIKO, Page 20

‘Run All Night’ has just
enough gas in the tank
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Liam Neeson stars in ‘Run All Night.’

There are, if not 50, at least a dozen
shades of world-weary masculinity in the
Liam Neeson thriller “Run All Night.”
There’s Neeson as Jimmy Conlon, a
washed-up Brooklyn hit-man; his mob boss
and pal Shawn Maguire (Ed Harris); Joel
Kinnaman as Jimmy’s straight-arrow, limodriving son Mike; and Vincent D’Onofrio’s
veteran police detective. By the time Nick
Nolte turns up, presumably contractually
obligated to appear anywhere father-son
issues are bandied and characters are gravely
musing about “the things I’ve seen,” “Run

All Night” can slam its cards down: a full
house.
“Run All Night” is the latest in that curious cinematic cottage industry: Old-man
Neeson Revenge Flicks. It’s a niche of
thriller often more fun in theory than in
practice, but on the whole, it’s hard not to
root for keeping alive the pleasures of solid
genre exercises. Such movies take a special
set of skills, ones that Hollywood once
flashed in its sleep, but now seldom rouses.
“Run All Night, ” directed by Jaume
Collet-Serra, who has helmed two previous
entries in the late Neeson canon (“Non-

See RUN, Page 20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

19

‘Insurgent’ could use
some more divergence
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Given that conformity is the scourge of
the “Divergent” series and much of its
young-adult ilk, it’s a shame that the
films, including the new “Insurgent,” do
so little to stray from well-worn YA paths.
For a series that waves the banner of
individualism, they make a poor case for
it. Instead of throbbing with a teenage
spirit of rebellion — or things like youthful wildness, humor or sex — the two
“Divergent” movies are curiously content
to eke out a rigid, lifeless fable in drab
futuristic environs.
The answer, here, to the question of what
are you rebelling against isn’t “Whaddya
got?” but the slightly less visceral “An
elaborate, highly metaphorical dystopian
system of militaristic control.”
But even faint, fantastical whiffs of teen
insurrection carry enough potency to drive
feverish young audiences. Why? Much of
it has to do with the stars.
Say what you will about YA movies, but
they’ve been an efficient star-making
machine
that’s
produced Jennifer
Lawrence, Kristen Stewart and Shailene
Woodley. We should be happy to have
them: good actresses all, who easily lead
their respective films over their male
counterparts.
The YA men aren’t as fine a bunch but
here include the hunky Theo James and the
excellent Miles Teller. Predictably providing “Insurgent” with its only lively,
comedic moments, Teller looks as if he
didn’t get the note that all must be sullen
and serious.
A quick summary. Based on Veronica
Roth’s trilogy of best-selling novels, the
“Divergent” films are set in a walled, postapocalyptic Chicago, where survivors are
ritualistically sorted into five factions.
Every 16-year-old is tested for which faction suits them, and then must choose one
and remain there forever.
Tris (Woodley) chose Dauntless, who are
known for their bravery and, it seems,
their proclivity for train hopping. But her
test revealed her to be “divergent” —
someone who has no dominant characteristic but a plethora — and this makes her
uncontrollable. In “Divergent,” Tris came
to embrace her fate, find a boyfriend in
Dauntless leader Four (James, who has a

natural chemistry with Woodley) and stop
a plot by the city’s overlord, Janine (Kate
Winslet) to make zombies of its citizens.
“Insurgent,” the full name of which is
the suitably clunky “The Divergent Series:
Insurgent,” finds the tale largely spinning
its wheels and features many redundant
confrontations. Along with an underground revolutionary leader played by an
underused Naomi Watts, Tris and Four
organize a revolt against Janine.
Allegiances are in constant flux; Teller’s
sarcastic operator switches sides with the
wind. The plot (which includes Tris’ brother, played by Ansel Elgort and Jai
Courtney’s burly enforcer) progresses less
in a forward motion than in a repetitive
cycle of escapes, surrenders and rescues,
often taking place in the same hallways.
Executions at gunpoint and frequently
threatened suicide add to the cheery atmosphere.
Much of the drama of “Insurgent” takes
place in a virtual reality in which Tris frequently faces various simulation challenges, forcing her to reconcile her guilt
in the death of her parents, as seen in the
first installment. These “sims” are where
“Insurgent” flashes its fanciest effects, but
this dream state just further removes the
film from any tangible reality. “Insurgent”
is already an allegorical fantasy.
The way of many YA adaptations is to
make the first film cheaply and then, once
its popularity has been proven, boost the
production value in subsequent sequels.
That’s the case with the 3-D “Insurgent,”
where
director
Robert
Schwentke
(“R. I. P. D. ”) takes over for “Divergent”
helmer Neil Burger. The result is a bigger,
glossier and better made action film with
less embarrassing fight choreography. But
any appeal still depends entirely on the
talent of its cast.
The final “Divergent” book will be split
into two movies, a future that is indeed a
little dystopian. Much brighter, though,
are the blossoming careers of Woodley and
Teller, who were best together in the indie
“The Spectacular Now.” Movies, thankfully, come in factions, too.
“The Divergent Series: Insurgent, ” a
Summit Entertainment release, is rated PG13 for “intense violence and action
throughout, some sensuality, thematic elements and brief language.” Running time:
118 minutes. Two stars out of four.

Based on Veronica Roth’s trilogy of best-selling novels, the ‘Divergent’ films are set in a walled,
post-apocalyptic Chicago, where survivors are ritualistically sorted into five factions.

Women of ‘Insurgent’
break the action mold
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — On the surface,
“Insurgent,” with its dystopian setting and
teenage heroine, might just seem like another by-the-numbers young adult tale. Look a
little closer and it’s clear that this second
installment isn’t merely capitalizing on a
popular genre, but, with its half dozen female
leads and supporting characters, actually represents a subtle subversion of what audiences
have been taught action films should be.
When women lead up action-driven films
and franchises, it’s usually one exceptional
gal against the world. Here, they’re all over
the place, serving as leaders, radicals and
rebels, each wildly diverse, complicated,
charismatic and flawed in their own unique
way.
“Insurgent,” out Friday, picks up shortly
after the events of the first film, and finds
Tris (Shailene Woodley) exposed as a statewanted “divergent,” or someone who doesn’t
fit into the five designated factions, and on
the run from Jeanine (Kate Winslet), the controlling, ruthless leader whose goal is to

extradite Tris’s kind from the society.
Still shaken from the violent deaths of her
parents and friend in the first film and on a
path to self-actualization, Tris encounters a
number of adults hoping to mold her in their
image, including franchise newcomers
Johanna (Octavia Spencer), the stoic Amity
leader with the mysterious scar on her face,
and Evelyn (Naomi Watts), a factionless revolutionary with cryptic motives who also
happens to be the estranged mother of Tris’s
boyfriend Four (Theo James).
Credit for populating the world with strong
female characters goes to author Veronica
Roth, who saw “Insurgent” as a chance to
really flesh out the environment around Tris.
“It was very intentional for me that most of
the leaders in Tris’s world would be women,
and not necessarily the good guys all the
time,” said Roth on a recent afternoon in Los
Angeles.
“I think it’s equally important to have
female villains. When people notice that
there’s not a lot of representation in a particular area they try to make those characters

See INSURGENT, Page 20

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Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

INSURGENT

RUN

Continued from page 19

Continued from page 18

holy symbols that are pure and good. That does a disservice
to women,” she said.
Producer Lucy Fisher was particularly delighted by the
sheer number of significant moments between the female
characters, noting that the film easily passes the Bechdel Test
(meaning there must be at least one scene where two female
characters with names discuss something other than a man).
“She has a scene with each woman saying, ‘I’m not going
to be who you want me to be’,” said Fisher, who, along with
husband and co-producer Douglas Wick is often driven to
female-centric projects.
“We like female empowerment,” she said, adding that they
did try to get a woman in the director’s chair, before ultimately deciding on German filmmaker Robert Schwentke.
Despite Johanna’s limited on-screen time in this film,
Spencer said it was a no-brainer to join the project. Not only
was she a fan of the book, but she and Roth had met and bonded at a book event years earlier.
“I kind of stalked her,” said Spencer with a laugh.
“We talked about (Spencer) and the question of race came up
because she’s not written as African American but to us it
seemed like a great idea,” added Fisher. Unexpected casting
informed most of their decisions surrounding the characters
in the franchise. Fisher and her team liked the idea of Watts,
too, because she didn’t exactly fit the mold of a “tough,”
which makes her even more mysterious on the screen.
For Watts, the only real hesitation came when she realized
she’d be playing the mother to an actor only 16 years her junior.
“I thought, ‘Oh what the heck. She was young,’” said
Watts. Ultimately, though, the story belongs to Tris, who’s
at a sort of crossroads in figuring out who she wants to be
amid harsh directives from the leadership, her family, and the
various fractionalized micro societies.

Stop” and “Unknown”), may well be
the best of the bunch. It’s admittedly
not an extraordinarily high bar.
(Some, though not me, would cite
Neeson’s “The Grey.”) And while there
is precious little fresh ground to this
familiar New York crime drama, and the
film’s stylistic flourishes do it no
help, for simple, well-acted genre
thrills, the pulpy “Run All Night” has
enough gas in the tank.
In “Run All Night,” penned by Brad
Ingelsby (“Out of the Furnace”),
father-son disappointments flow in
both directions. Neeson’s boy,
Jimmy, has sworn off his alcoholic,
mobbed-up father, and kept his family
from ever meeting him. For the
Maguires, the son, Danny (Boyd
Holbrook) is the regrettable one: a
brash, drug-using punk.
The fathers, Jimmy and Maguire, are
Irish, whiskey-swilling holdouts of a
bygone criminal era. The ghosts of a
grittier New York hang over them. All

KUMIKO
Continued from page 18
less wire fence where Steve Buscemi’s
character buries the cash-packed
briefcase.
Kumiko’s life in Japan is a lonely
one, which is fleshed out in devastating, often hilarious detail. In her job
as an “office lady,” she hovers in the
corner in a near-trance deciding
whether or not to spit in her boss’s
tea. At home, in her tiny, cluttered
apartment, she reluctantly picks up
phone calls from her disapproving
mother and cares for her pet rabbit.
Kikuchi, an Academy Award nominee for Alejandro González Iñárritu’s
2006 film “Babel, ” is beautiful,
severe and makeup-free, with an
intense, suspicious gaze.

STUDENT
Continued from page 18
to the point where you’re banned from
all school-sanctioned events —
events that are the actual fun part of
the high school — something you

Expires 3/31/15

THE DAILY JOURNAL

their friends have died away or been
locked up. (Harris could be seen as
playing his “State of Grace” Hell’s
Kitchen mobster after another 25
years. ) They’re left to lament the
changing of old hangouts like a butcher shop turned into, Maguire sneers, an
Applebee’s.
After Danny makes promises to
Albanian heroin dealers that he can’t
follow through on, he panics and kills
them, only their limo driver (guess
who) witnesses it. When Danny pursues Mike, Jimmy is there to shoot
him. The seriousness of the situation
is immediately apparent: Jimmy has
just killed the son of his one true
friend, who’ll surely murder him for it.
He picks up the phone to confess.
An all-night chase across Brooklyn
and Manhattan ensues, a last ditch
effort for Jimmy’s salvation as he tries
to save his son’s life. “Listen to your
father for one night,” he tells his son.
Though Mike chafes at their reunion,
when Jimmy ably jacks a car with
nothing but a shoe lace, he begins to
brighten.
Collet-Serra links each jump
between characters spread across a

rainy, nighttime New York by an asthe-crow-flies camera zoom that even
avian enthusiasts will scoff at. Such
silly flashiness occasionally crops up
in the film, like in a dinner scene with
Jimmy and Maguire where Collet-Serra
can’t stop circling them like an overeager waiter.
But when Collet-Serra isn’t getting
in his own way, “Run All Night” is an
engrossing thriller: the bloody last
breathe of a dying New York, played
out in barrooms, subway stations and
train yards. It does err, though, with
the introduction of an absurdly elite
killer (Common), who kills three cops
within minutes, stealthily rampaging
through a burning apartment building.
The outcome, of course, is never in
doubt. Through the urban gloom
marches our aged hero, heavy of heart
and quick with a gun: our sacrificial
elder. Liam Neeson to the dark tower
came.
“Run All Night,” a Warner Bros.
release, is rated R for “strong violence, language including sexual references and some drug use.” Running
time: 108 minutes. Two and a half stars
out of four.

When Kumiko talks to others, it’s
almost in a whisper. Every word
uttered seems like a herculean effort.
She might be severely depressed or
something else entirely, but it’s clear
she was not meant for this world.
Already disconnected, her new mission allows her to retreat from society even further as she embarks for the
new world, imagining herself as a
modern-day conquistador.
Things go wrong from the start
when she arrives in Minnesota. After
her bus breaks down, she sets out on
foot, hobbling down the side of a
major road in the windy snow.
Every soul she encounters tries
their best to help her, while also trying as politely as they can to talk her
out of going to Fargo. A wonderful
police officer (played by director
David Zellner) actually tries to
explain that the movie is not real.

The setbacks just make her more
determined.
With a steady gaze and expert attention to composition and color, David
Zellner and cinematographer Sean
Porter have created a stylish, moody
world around Kumiko that is ominous
and alien. The atmosphere is
enhanced by The Octopus Project’s
melancholy music and a few perfectly
placed nods to Carter Burwell’s iconic
“Fargo” score.
“Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter, ”
transcends the gimmick of the mythical origin story to become something
of its own: An enchanting, original
work of art that seems too good to be
true.
“Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter,” an
Amplify release, has not been rated
by the Motion Picture Association of
America. Running time: 105 minutes.
Four stars out of four.

want to do? Probably not. Of course
there are times when I want to throw
my hands in the air and sleep for 27
hours straight. There are times when
the most complicated thing I want to
figure out is what I want in my burrito
or what TV show to binge watch next.
It’s OK to give into that, but only in
moderation.

Chill out. It’s almost over and,
when we reach the end, it will be bittersweet — but probably more sweet
than bitter.

Mayeesha Galiba is a senior at San Mateo
High School. Student News appears in the
weekend edition. You can email Student
News at news@smdailyjournal.com.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

BORN IN FREEDOM, FINDING
EXPRES S ION IN METAL AND
STONE: ALLAN HOUSER SCULPTURES AT THE PHOENICIAN
RESORT IN SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA. The celebrated Phoenician
resort, nestled at the foot of
Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale,
houses a multi-million dollar art collection, the stars of which are 11 largescale pieces by renowned Native
American sculptor Allan Houser. Set in
prominent locations throughout The
Phoenician’s lushly landscaped 250
acres, the works present traditional
Native American life in a contemporary style. Highlights include
Chiricahua Apache Family (bronze) at
the entrance gate and Kiowa Song
(pink Tennessee marble) and Resting
at the Spring (Indiana limestone) in
the Main Lobby outdoor fountains.
ABOUT ALLAN HOUSER. Allan
Houser was born on June 30, 1914, as
Allan Haozous. His parents were of the
Chiricahua Apache tribe held as prisoners for 28 years after refusing to
move from their ancestral lands in New
Mexico to a reservation in Arizona.
Houser’s father had been with
Geronimo in 1886 when the legendary
leader surrendered to the U.S. Army,
and had been among the 1200
Chiricahuas sent to prisons in Florida.
Houser’s mother was born in Alabama
where some members of the tribe were
moved in 1887. The Chiricahuas were
eventually placed at Fort Sill,
Oklahoma, where they were ultimately
freed in 1914. Houser was born just
months after their release, the first
child of the group born out of captivity. In 1934, Houser was able to study
at the United States Indian School in
Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he
gained recognition for his paintings

depicting traditional Native American
life. In 1939, Houser began his professional career by showing work at the
New York World’s Fair and the Golden
Gate International Exposition in San
Francisco. During World War II, Houser
worked in the Los Angeles shipyards
by day and painted and sculpted by
night, making friends at the Pasadena
Art Center where he was exposed to the
work
of
Modernist
sculptors
Constantin Brâncui and Henry Moore.
FLUID LINES AND GRACEFUL
DIGNITY. Phoenician Concierge
Jacque Payne, who leads individual and
group tours of The Phoenician Art
Collection, said: “Through the years,
the focus of Houser’s art work shifted
from drawing and painting to sculpture. In later life he worked primarily
in limestone, marble or bronze, where
the fluid lines and graceful dignity of
his figures give his work an unmistakable quality that reflects the ideals of
the people he portrays. ” Houser’s
work can also be found at the
Smithsonian Museum of American Art,
the National Museum of the American
Indian, and the National Portrait
Gallery in Washington, D.C. Houser,
who was awarded the National Medal of
Arts in 1992 by then-President George
H. W. Bush, was the first Native
American to receive this country’s
highest art award. Houser died on Aug.
22, 1994.
INDIVIDUAL
CHARACTER
AND ERA REPRES ENTATION.
The scope of The Phoenician’s collection extends beyond the Houser sculptures to numerous works from the pri-

Baptist

Lutheran

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
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Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
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21

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

The Phoenician resort in Scottsdale, Arizona holds 11
large-scale works by Native American sculptor Allan Houser.
Phoenician Concierge Jacque Payne, who conducts tours of
the collection, stands near Houser’s bronze ‘The Future’ in The
Phoenician’s Grand Ballroom Foyer.

Susan Cohn is a member of the North
American Travel Journalists Association,
Bay Area Travel Writers, and the
International Food, Wine & Travel Writers
Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her
stories
may
be
found
at
http://ifwtwa.org/author/susan-cohn.

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

Non-Denominational

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“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
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For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
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vate collection of The Phoenician’s
original owner, Charles Keating, as
well as from some of the nation’s top
galleries, such as Glenn Green
Galleries of Scottsdale. Concierge
Payne said: “The works in The
Phoenician’s art collection were
selected for their individual character
and are representative of the era in
which each was created. These art
pieces include the works of Josef
Bakos, an early modernist painter
whose main interest was landscapes;
Flemish painter David Vinckboons,
known primarily for his skill as an oil
painter, and proclaimed one of the
greatest painters in Amsterdam; Sven
Birger Sandezen who established a reputation as an Impressionist landscape
painter of the Rocky Mountain region;
and a work entitled “Ferriccio
Ferrazzi,” painted by Cavello, purchased from the Mosaic School of Art
of the Vatican City. Chinese porcelain
vases, Chippendale mirrors, a Dhurrie
area rug and two Louis XVI Commodes
were all purchased from the John
Connally estate.”
PHOENICIAN FACTS: The 583room AAA Five Diamond resort hotel
is located at 6000 E. Camelback Road
in Scottsdale, AZ. The Phoenician provides complimentary self-guided audio
tours of its artwork. Guests who take
the tour are given two general admission tickets to the Phoenix Art
Museum. For additional information
visit www.thephoenician.com or call
(480) 941-8200 or (800) 888-8234.
AND REMEMBER: I haven’t been
everywhere, but it’s on my list. —
Susan Sontag.

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

© 2014 Feld Motor Sports, Inc. Competitors shown are subject to change.

22

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

BASEBALL
Continued from page 1
Museum in Redwood City.
Hernandez’s Gold Glove is included with
other items from game-used bats from
Willie Mays and Barry Bonds to the first
professional contract signed by Joe
DiMaggio serve a looking glass into a century of local baseball history. Everything
on display ties to San Mateo County. And
immersing attendees in the rich world of the
county’s roots in the sport has been
Neitzel’s inspiration since she began
assembling the showcase three months
ago. “Bringing baseball back home was
kind of the hook we wanted to bring in
here,” Neitzel said.
In her six years as museum curator, Neitzel
has composed upwards of a dozen showcases, including an exhibit for the Loma Prieta
earthquake of 1989; a 100-year anniversary
display for the Boy Scouts of America; and
the “Broads, Bootleggers and Bookies”
exhibit, exploring U.S. prohibition and
gambling of the ’20s and ’30s.
In conjunction with Mitch Postel, president of the San Mateo County Association
since 1984, Neitzel has arranged an inspired

POST
Continued from page 1
acres in 2008. The recent purchase of the 21acre site was for an undisclosed amount from
a seller who wishes to remain anonymous,
said Noelle Thurlow, POST’s director of land
transactions.
The regional group adheres to a successful private-public partnership methodology by which it secures properties for
preservation and donates them to entities
like the San Mateo County Department of
Parks, Thurlow said. It also secures preser-

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

world of local baseball. By design, the
exhibit is set to open as the start of the
Major League Baseball season nears. It is
scheduled to run through next year, concluding in September 2016 near the end of next
baseball season.
And there are plenty of layers of baseball
history contained within the walls of the
intimate gallery to entertain and educate for
the exhibit’s 17-month run.
“It speaks to the history of baseball on
the Peninsula since way, way back,” Postel
said. “I don’t think that a lot of people
know that at one time or another, there were
more than 100 semipro teams that existed
on the Peninsula. Even after Major League
Baseball (arrived), the Seals were here, there
was still the San Mateo Blues, the
Burlingame Browns and other teams. Even
into the 1960s and even today, there is a
new semipro team in Menlo Park.”
The exhibit contains a separate wing for
semipro teams, including a life-size mockup of a dugout inspired by San Mateo’s
Fitzgerald Field, where the San Mateo Blues
played for more than 50 years until disbanding in 1978.
Upon entering the baseball wonderland,
however, the first display is the earliest in
the chronology of the exhibit — photos,
paraphernalia and even videos — of a 1915
game between the San Mateo Married Men

and the Santa Clara University baseball
team.
As the exhibit winds the wall of the
gallery counterclockwise, as one would run
the bases in the game of baseball, the memorabilia traces decade by decade into the current day.
The majority of memorabilia is comprised
of portions of private collections from San
Mateo County-based baseball aficionados,
including Keith Hernandez’s brother Gary
Hernandez; Hank Sauer Jr., son of former
Chicago Cubs great and Burlingame native
Hank Sauer; former minor leaguer and
Carlmont graduate David Turnbull; former
minor leaguer and current Carlmont High
School softball head coach Jim Liggett; as
well as organizations from the Menlo Park
Legends to the San Francisco Giants.
There are insights into the great 1964
Pacifica Little League champion Linda Mar
Realty Little League team, for which the
Hernandez brothers played. Next to it is a
San Carlos Little League display honoring
the 1961 Joe DiMaggio World Series champions.
Liggett’s corner of the showroom is perhaps the nearest and dearest to Neitzel’s
heart. The corner adjoining the entryway to
the semipro wing and the life-size dugout,
constructed by Neitzel’s husband. Liggett’s
collection contains the only photo of a

woman on display at the exhibit; it’s a larger-than-life photo of Liggett and his wife
Charlene taken at spring training in 1961
while he was a prospect in the Baltimore
Orioles organization.
“I love that I could finally get a woman in
here,” Neitzel said. “We’re going to have
slides with women including some of
Liggett’s softball teams. … There will be a
few women interspersed, but it’s mostly a
guy thing. It’s just such an adorable picture
I just had to put it in.”
Liggett attested to the time and effort
Neitzel dedicated to arranging the “Let’s
Play Ball” exhibit.
“She spent a lot of time putting that on,”
Liggett said. “She met with me two or three
times and met with a few of my friends. …
I’m expecting a well-organized exhibit
focusing on a lot of different elements of the
time period of our county.”
Liggett will be one of the many in attendance for Saturday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony, taking place at 1 p.m. at the San Mateo
County History Museum located at 2200
Broadway. Admission is $6 for adults, $4
for seniors and students and free for children
5-and-under. The museum, closed Mondays,
is open six days a week 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

vation easements, she added.
“County parks is a great partner of POST,”
Thurlow said. “POST, as a private nonprofit,
can act confidentially with landowners and
can be flexible in a way that public agencies
cannot. So we work with our public agency
partners to identify properties they’re interested in then we negotiate with the landowners directly. It serves both organizations
really well.”
Although the site has unofficial trails currently frequented by the public, Thurlow said,
POST plans to assist the county in extending
the coastal trail and transfer the property
later this year.
“We are so lucky for our ongoing partnership with POST to acquire parklands in San

Mateo County,” parks Director Marlene
Finley said in a press release. “I look forward
to taking this to the Board of Supervisors to
consider adding to county parks’ stewardship
at Pillar Point bluff, welcoming the public to
more access and exploration.”
POST’s preservation of the area has helped
deter development over the years, Thurlow
said. The recently acquired site was sought
after for construction about 20 to 30 years
ago and less than 10 years ago houses were
proposed just south on the bluffs, Thurlow
said.
The purchase aimed at supporting habitat
and facilitating public access was supported
by funding from the Coastal Conservancy
and a grant through the Living Landscape

Initiative Challenge Grant Program of
Resources Legacy Fund, which is funded by
the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation,
according to POST.
Thurlow said it took nearly a decade to buy
the property as it was formerly tied up in an
inheritance settlement. Now, Thurlow said
POST is thrilled to have secured up a link that
provides vital habitat and recreation.
“This was kind of the missing piece in the
puzzle because it’s between two other pieces.
So now it’s a contiguous area of protected
land that will have official trails,” Thurlow
said. “It’ll be great to have it be part of the
county parks ownership. Also, we’ll work
with county parks to improve the trail system.”

YOUR ONE-STOP TRAVEL CENTER!

For
more
information
go
to
history smc.org or call (650) 299-0104.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, MARCH 21
The Easter Bunny at Hillsdale
Shopping
Center.
Hillsdale
Shopping Center, Macy’s Center
Court. Digital photo packages start
at $18.31. All kids receive a token
gift to take home for visiting. Runs
through April 4. For more information call 571-1029.
‘Let’s Play Ball’ Exhibit Opening.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. The
display will include rare materials
about local baseball teams from the
Museum’s permanent collection,
plus items borrowed from schools,
historical organizations and private
collections. Exhibit runs through
September 2016. For more information call 299-0104 or go to historysmc.org.
Fair
Oak s
Health
Center
Celebrates One Year Serving the
Community. 9 a.m. to noon. Fair
Oaks
Health
Center,
2710
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Public health fair featuring local officials, health information, healthy
cooking demonstrations, gardening
tips to grow fresh produce and
prizes for kids. For more information
call Robyn Thaw at 573-3935.
Change Your Writing in 15
Minutes a Day. 10 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Mary Knippel will provide
fun, fast and effective writing tips,
techniques and strategies.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Windy Hill
Open Space Preserve, Portola Road,
Portola Valley. Free program of the
San Mateo County Medical
Association’s Community Service
Foundation that encourages physical activity. For more information
and
to
sign
up
visit
smcma.org/walkwithadoc or call
312-1663.
Wavecrest Work day. 10 a.m. to
noon. Smith Field Ball Parks, end of
Wavecrest Road, Half Moon Bay.
Bring small hand tools for weed
removal and wear sturdy shoes, layers and sun protection. Under 18
must be accompanied by and adult.
Free. For more information call 7265056.
Friends of the San Bruno Library
Booksale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San
Bruno Public Library, 701 W. Angus
Ave., San Bruno. $6 for bring-yourown-bag sale, tote bags for $3,
paperback books for 50 cents, and
hardback books for $1. Specials as
marked. For more information email
leew@plsinfo.org.
French Fair. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Lucie
Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Culture, food,
fashion, businesses and services exhibition. Free. For more information
visit frenchfair.org.
San Francisco Flower and Garden
Show. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. San Mateo
County Event Center. Immerse yourself in the world of gardening, talk to
experts and learn new techniques.
For more information contact
shelbi@spinpr.com.
Ukulele Story Time. 10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont.

schools, historical organizations and
private collections. Runs through September 2016. For more information
call 299-0104.

photo packages start at $18.31. All
kids receive a token gift to take home
for visiting. Runs through April 4. For
more information call 571-1029.

The Guardian Princesses Come to
San Mateo. 1 p.m. Reach and Teach,
144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. The
Guardian Princesses are super-heroines of a new book series that
transforms princesses into inspiring
leaders who use their powers to protect people and the planet. Free. For
more
information
email
craig@reachandteach.com.

San Francisco Flower and Garden
Show. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo
County Event Center. Immerse yourself in the world of gardening, talk to
experts and learn new techniques.
For more information contact
shelbi@spinpr.com.

Author Event: Susan Alcorn. 2 p.m.
South San Francisco Main Public Library 840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. For more information email
ssfpl840@gmail.com.
Uncle Jer ’s B ee Show. 2 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont.
Not Going Gently: A Psychologist
Fights Back Against Alzheimer’s for
her Mother and Perhaps Herself. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610
Elm St., San Carlos. Author Constance
Vincent will discuss her book that describes her and her mother’s
relationship during her mother’s illness. Susan Feledy RN, MA
Gerontology will also address the
medical treatment of Alzhemier’s.
Free and open to the public. For more
information call Rhea Bradley at 5910341 ext. 237.
E-Book/E-Audiobook Drop-In Session. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
and open to the public. For more information call Rhea Bradley at
591-0341 ext. 237.
PHS/SPCA to Host Book Signing
Party for Guy Kawasaki. 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. Center for Compassion, 1450
Rollins Road, Burlingame. In ‘The Art
of the Start,’ Kawasaki brings two
decades of experience as one of business’s most original and irreverent
strategists to offer the essential guide
for anyone starting anything, from a
multinational corporation to a church
group. Free. For more information call
340-7022 ext. 343.
‘Warm/Cool’ and ‘Shadows’ Joint
Reception. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Main
Gallery, 1018 Main St., Redwood City.
Exhibits continue from March 18
through April 19. Free. For more information email Ginger Slonaker at
tmgginger@gmail.com.
Aragon presents ‘Romeo and
Juliet.’ 7 p.m. Aragon High School
Theater, 900 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Tickets $10 to $17. Purchase
tickets
at
www.aragondrama.com. For more information
email
info@aragondrama.com or call 5582920.
Half Moon Bay High School Presents ‘Cabaret.’ 7 p.m. Half Moon Bay
High School Theater, 1 Lewis Foster
Drive, Half Moon Bay. Cabaret tells the
story of a night club in 1930’s Berlin
where a young English performer
strikes up a relationship with an
American writer, all while a master of
ceremonies commands the action at
the Kit Kat Klub. Runs through March
22. For more information visit
hmbhs.schoolloop.com/musical.

Little Dog Adoption Day. 10:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Little dog
adoptions sponsored by Pets in Need
of Redwood City. For more information email info@petsinneed.org.

Tri-School Productions presents,
‘Grease.’ 7:30 p.m. Gellert Auditorium, Serra High School, 451 W. 20th
Ave., San Mateo. Tickets can be purchased
at
trischoolproductions.com/wp/grease
-spring-musical-2015/.

2015 Speaker Series Home Selling and Buying Secrets. 1 p.m.
Millbrae Library, Civic Center Plaza
Meeting Room A, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. All attendees will receive a
home selling saving booklet. Free. For
more information call 589-1000, ext.
3696.

A Gathering of Light. 8 p.m. Congregational church of San Mateo. 225
Tilton Ave., San Mateo. Tickets $25 in
advance, $30 at the door, $10 for students with ID. To purchase tickets call
(800) 838-3006 ext. 1.

Paint the Mall Purple San Bruno
Relay for Life. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Shops at Tanforan, 1150 El Camino
Real, San Bruno. Join the fight against
cancer. For more information contact
Ken Ibarra at 400-1005 or email sanbrunorelay@gmail.com.
Final Cut Pro X Class. Noon to 4 p.m.
Midpen Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. The Media Center
will provide everything you need, including a professional editor/teacher.
Open to beginners of all ages 14 and
up, and younger if accompanied by
an adult. For more information contact katie@midpenmedia.org.
Wine, Cheese and Por t Tasting.
Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda Winery, 2645
Fair Oaks Ave., Redwood City. Tickets
are $10 for non-members and free for
wine club members. For more information
email
info@lahondawinery.com or call 8149727.
Opening Program for exhibit ‘Let’s
Play Ball.’ 1 p.m. San Mateo County
history Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City. New exhibit includes rare
materials about local baseball teams
from the Musem’s permanent collection, plus items borrowed from

The Crestmont Conser vatory of
Music Gourmet Concer t Series. 8
p.m. The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music, 2575 Flores St., San Mateo. The
event will feature pianist Daniel
Glover, who will perform works by
three great composers: Paderewski,
Szymanowski and Chopin. Gourmet
refreshments at reception to follow.
$20 general admission, $15 for seniors and students 16 and under. For
more information call 574-4633.
Dragon Theater presents Paul
Weitz’s ‘People.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood City.
Runs through March 22. Tickets are
$30. For more information and to purchase
tickets
visit
dragonproductions.net.
‘How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.’ 8 p.m. Woodside
High School Performing Arts Center,
199 Churchill St., Woodside. Purchase
tickets
at
www.whsdramaboosters.com. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for
staff/students, and $15 for seniors 65
and over.
SUNDAY, MARCH 22
The Easter Bunny at Hillsdale Shopping Center. Hillsdale Shopping
Center, Macy’s Center Court. Digital

24th Annual Authors Salon Luncheon. 10:30 a.m. Sharon Heights Golf
and Country Club, 2900 Sand Hill
Road, Menlo Park. Features authors
Benjamin Griffin, Bruce Hendderson,
Meg Walte Clayton and C.W. Gortner.
For more information visit penvol.org
or call 326-0665 ext. 238 for tickets.
Paint the Mall Purple San Bruno
Relay for Life. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Shops at Tanforan, 1150 El Camino
Real, San Bruno. Join the fight against
cancer. For more information contact
Ken Ibarra at 400-1005 or email sanbrunorelay@gmail.com.
Presentation – ‘Housing for Everyone.’ 11:30 a.m. Broadmoor
Presbyterian Church, 377 87th St.,
Daly City.
Fundraiser Brunch and Opening
Reception for Close to Home: Art
by Miriam Hitchcock. 12:30 p.m. to 4
p.m. Wiegand Gallery,1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Paintings, drawings
and stop-animations films by the
noted artist Miriam Hitchcock. The
works encounter the contemporary
landscape, which she describes as ‘a
place at once gorgeous and anxious,
shaped by human longing and expectation.’ Gallery runs through April
25. Free. For more information go to
www.wiegandgallery.org.
Chamber Music Potpourri. 1 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Rewood City, 2124 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. $10, children under 10
free. Reception to follow. For more information
email
pegharrison51@aol.com.
Dragon Theater presents Paul
Weitz’s ‘People.’ 2 p.m. Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood City.
Runs through March 22. Tickets are
$30. For more information and to purchase
tickets
visit
dragonproductions.net.
Aragon presents ‘Romeo and
Juliet.’ 2 p.m. Aragon High School
Theater, 900 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Tickets $10 to $17. Purchase
tickets
at
www.aragondrama.com. For more information
email
info@aragondrama.com or call 5582920.
Half Moon Bay High School presents ‘Cabaret.’ 2 p.m. Half Moon Bay
High School Theater, 1 Lewis Foster
Drive, Half Moon Bay. Cabaret tells the
story of a night club in 1930’s Berlin
where a young English performer
strikes up a relationship with an
American writer, all while a master of
ceremonies commands the action at
the Kit Kat Klub. Runs through March
22. For more information visit
hmbhs.schoolloop.com/musical.
Magic Flutes: Xtreme Group. 2 p.m.
Crystal Springs UMC, 2145 Bunker Hill
Drive, San Mateo. Tickets are $10. For
more information call 345-2381 or
visit magicflutes.org.
‘Letters from the way: a walk ing
journey Arles, France to Puente La
Reina, Spain.’ 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Author Barbara V. Anderson will discuss her travels through Europe. Free
and open to the public. For more information call Rhea Bradley at
591-0341 ext. 237.
Author Visit: Dr. Joan Steidinger. 3
p.m. Belmont Public Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Please join us as we welcome author
Dr. Joan Steidinger to the Belmont Library. Dr. Steidinger will be reading
from her new book, ‘Sisterhood in
Sports: How Female Athletes Collaborate and Compete.’ For more
information email belmont.smcl.org.
A Gathering of Light. 4 p.m. Congregational church of San Mateo. 225
Tilton Ave., San Mateo. Tickets $25 in
advance, $30 at the door, $10 for students with ID. To purchase tickets call
(800) 838-3006 ext. 1.
Classical Jam. 7 p.m. Kohl Mansion,
2750 Adeline Drive, Burlingame. $48
for adults, $45 for seniors (ages 62
and up) and $15 for ages 30 and
under. Parking is free. For more information email info@musicatkohl.org.
MONDAY, MARCH 23
The Easter Bunny at Hillsdale
Shopping Center. Hillsdale Shopping Center, Macy’s Center Court.
Digital photo packages start at
$18.31. All kids receive a token gift
to take home for visiting. Runs
through April 4. For more information call 571-1029.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

23

Former rap mogul collapses
in court after bail hearing
By Anthony McCartney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Former rap music mogul
Marion “Suge” Knight collapsed in a courtroom Friday shortly after a judge ordered
him held on $25 million bail in a murder
case.
Bailiffs cleared the courtroom, paramedics
arrived with a stretcher a few minutes later
and an ambulance was seen leaving the
courthouse.
Defense attorney Matthew Fletcher said
Knight was unconscious when the lawyer
left the courtroom and an update on his condition was not immediately available.
Fletcher said his client, who is diabetic
and has a blood clot, previously told him

DESIGN
Continued from page 3
two stories, located at the same location as
the current 25,000-square-foot structure,
which abuts Washington Park.
Officials have been working since 2013
to develop plans for a new facility, because
the current recreation center is not seismically sound, and cannot offer many of the
services that the new facility is slated to
provide.
The new community center would maintain the current level of programs offered,
plus potentially add new features such as a
community hall with a raised platform,
classrooms to house kids’ and teen’s activities, a workshop, a dance and stretch studio
as well as a fitness and wellness center.
The Parks and Recreation Commission
session was the initial meeting in a series of
opportunities for residents to express their
opinion to architects and officials regarding
the proposed layouts.
“This is very early in the design process,”
said Dawn Merkes, a representative from
Group 4 Architecture. “It is the first opportunity for you to give us some feedback.”
The next chance for the community to
express their opinion on design will be during the community open house, held
Saturday, March 21, from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m. at Washington Park.
City representatives will also be present
from 9 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at a community
kiosk during the Burlingame farmers’ market Sunday, March 22.
Building the project, which is expected to
cost between $30 million and $32 million,
is currently unfunded, according to a city
report. City officials have said that a bond
measure would likely be necessary to
finance the construction cost.
Later at the meeting, the Parks and

that he hadn’t received
any medication since
Thursday.
Knight hit his head on
a chair when he fell after
the bail hearing, Fletcher
said.
The 6-foot-4-inch tall
Knight collapsed while
‘Suge’ Knight deputies were bringing
him back into the courtroom after Fletcher asked a judge to order
that Knight be given his medication.
The attorney said Knight was being kept
in solitary confinement in jail without
proper access to medication.
“He’s being treated worse than Charles
Manson,” Fletcher said.
Recreation Commission unanimously
agreed to recommend extending a pilot program establishing off-leash dog runs at
Cuernavaca and Washington parks for
another year, and increasing the hours.
The program allows owners to let their
dogs run off their leash outside of peak
usage hours at the park, from 7:30 a.m. until
2 p. m. from Monday through Friday
between September and May.
The commission also recommended the
program’s hours be extended to start at 6
a.m. at Washington and Cuernavaca parks,
to keep in line with the city’s dog park near
the Bayshore. Dogs are allowed to roam off
leash in the ball fields at Washington and
Cuernavaca parks.
Under the commission’s approval, the
recommendation will come to City Council
for final approval in April to extend the program.
Recreation Supervisor Nicole Acquisti
said the city has received limited complaints about issues with off-leash dogs and
most of the feedback has been positive, and
many users have requested the hours be
extended.
She said in the cases in which the parks
requires oversight, such as cleaning up after
the dogs or intervening during confrontations, she said dog owners have done a good
job of policing themselves.
Some residents expressed concerns
regarding disorderly dogs or unresponsive
owners, to which commissioner Steven
Baum suggested increasing the occasional
police presence to write tickets for those
who violate park rules.
Ultimately though, Acquisti said the offleash dog areas have been popular, and supported the commission’s decision to recommend extending the pilot program.
“It’s been really positive for the past
year,” she said.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

24

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

COMICS/GAMES

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Regard as
5 Fergie’s duchy
9 Consumer org.
12 Arm bone
13 Volkswagen kin
14 Milne marsupial
15 Flock
16 Gets a wrong number
18 Ladles
20 Extinct birds
21 Novice
22 Cauldron
23 Sordid
26 Well-qualified
30 In time past
33 Heather locale
34 Marinate
35 Big laugh (hyph.)
37 Wished undone
39 Be in debt
40 Piggy’s dinner
41 Dallas resident
43 Round veggie
45 Harden bricks

GET FUZZY®

48
51
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

— lily
Wrote on glass
Dismantled a tent
Sedgwick of the screen
Marsh
Earl or duke
Kuwaiti leader
Santa — winds
Piece of cake
Give off fumes

DOWN
1 Confers knighthood
2 Vote in
3 Ambassador
4 Town officials
5 Candied tubers
6 Monsieur’s yes
7 Rural rtes.
8 Buddy
9 Headless nail
10 String tie
11 Order around
17 Jots
19 Ode or sonnet

22
24
25
27
28
29
30
31
32
36
38
42
44
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
54
55

Tough glass
Ventricle neighbor
Grimace
Opposite of cheer
Scientific principle
Make ends meet
Happy sighs
Lass
Gotcha!
Mac maker
Senseless
Whinny
Two under par
— nor reason
Spooky
Castro’s land
Unknown auth.
Links org.
Whirlpool
Nightfall
— — step further
Hesitation syllables

3-21-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Make certain that
whomever you deal with is up for the challenge you
present. Look before you leap to avoid wasting time on
someone who cannot keep up with you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Be discreet and keep
sensitive personal matters under wraps. If you are too
vocal, someone will interfere in your affairs. The less
you reveal, the less judgment you’ll face.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Joining an interest group
will give you the opportunity to make new friends and
participate in stimulating discussions. Sports, cultural
or educational events will provide a creative outlet.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Turn your love life
up a notch by being bold. You can add some spark
with a new or enticing pastime. Make music,
dance or another enjoyable activity an integral part
of your relationship.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Whether you decide to
take a trip, learn a new skill or make new friends,
now is the time to take action. Don’t wait for
change to come to you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Critics may try to
undermine your accomplishments, but the people
who mean the most to you will be supportive. Make
a speech or presentation or do whatever is needed
to make an impression.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You’ll avoid tension at

3-21-15

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

home if you compare notes before making a decision.
Don’t fall behind with your household responsibilities
or chores. Ask for help when you need it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Don’t keep putting
your creative projects on the back burner. You do a
lot for everyone else, and you must take time to do
things you enjoy, as well.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Be truthful. You
will have to confess if you have been overspending on
gambling or entertainment. The strain that you put on
your budget will cause problems with your partners.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll increase
the comfort and value of your home by renovating it.
Keep an eye on the real estate market. You will find a
lucrative investment property if you do your homework.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Your involvement
in a humanitarian or charitable organization
will lead to interesting new friendships. Your
compassion for others will make you very attractive
to the people in charge.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You are likely to hear
all kinds of stories, but don’t let rumors or innuendos
influence your thinking. Keep your facts straight and
avoid getting involved in gossip.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.

110 Employment

We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS NEEDED:
Personal care of elderly. $10/hr. Resumes: Rainbow Bright Adult Residential
Facility, 29 Duval Dr., SSF, CA 94080,
jgamos@gmail.com

College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.

HOUSEKEEPER /
CARE GIVER
Senior Living Facility
(650)596-3489
Ask for Violet

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Asst. General Manager
Food Production Manager
Food Shift Manager
Warehouse Manager
Sous Chefs

Apply in person:
753 Laurel St
San Carlos.
127 Elderly Care

FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
with Sign-On-Bonus

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Flying Food Fare
50 Adrian Court
Burlingame, CA 94010

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KITCHEN
STAFF
NEEDED

Complete Senior Living welcomes
applicants in San Mateo.

Please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

COME
EARLY!

RESTAURANT -

C A R E G I V E R S

Do you have….Good communication skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?

TOW TRUCK DRIVER WANTED Days-NIghts-Weekends available.
Clean driving record - Towing experience
a plus.
palmave@aol.com or (650)345-3596.

110 Employment

NOW HIRING!

Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
• Customer Service
• Presser

DRIVERS NEEDED Taxi company. 24 hour dispatch service.
Make money every day! (650)678-5743

110 Employment

Food Prepares
Porters (Sanitation)
Dishwashers
Storekeepers (Warehouse/Purchasing)
Drivers (required Commercial License)
Driver Helpers (required Driver License)
Equipment/Food Runner
Food Supervisor
Transportation Supervisor
Food Safety & Quality Technician

25

s#!2%')6%23n%XPERIENCEDONLY
s,)6%/54n!LL3HIFTS

650-995-7123
ASSISTANCE ABIGAILCOMPLETECARECOM
%/% $IVISIONOF,ABOR3TANDARD7AGE/RDER

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

FREE

CAREGIVER
TRAINING

Employment Opportunity for
Successful Candidates
$11.70/hr. Plus Benefits (FT)
Call for Appointment for
Next Info Session

650-458-2202
www.homebridgeca.org

NOW HIRING!
The Abigail welcomes
applicants in Redwood City
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
with Sign-On-Bonus

• CAREGIVERS – Experienced only
• PT MED TECH – Experienced only

650-995-7123
assistance@abigailcompletecare.com
EOE, Division of Labor Standard Wage Order 5

203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 532993
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jacquiline Cerezo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Jacquiline Cerezo filed a petition with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present names: Joushua Louis C. Ferrer
Proposed Name: Joushua Louis Cerezo.
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on 4/30/15 at 9
a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation:
San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 3/18/15
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/18/15
(Published 03/21/2015, 03/28/2015,
04/04/2015, 04/11/2015)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-264130
The following person is doing business
as: TLT BBQ, 35 E. 3rd Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner: TLT
International, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporationl. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Nam Tang/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264150
The following person is doing business
as: CW Cabinets and Woodworks, 810
Edgehill Drive, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: John Arthur
Jones, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/John Arthur Jones /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/24/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263859
The following person is doing business
as: Ava’s Gardening Services, 420 N.
Bayshore Blvd, APT 49, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401. Registered Owner: Vicente P.
Perea Zevallos, same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Vicente P. Zevallos/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-264136
The following person is doing business
as: BodyBalancing Essentials, 300 N.
San Mateo Drive, Suite 4, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 Registered Owner: Beverly
Addy, 1951 O’Farrell St. #115, San Mateo CA 94403. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Beverly Addy /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264175
The following person is doing business
as: Bartels Law Group, 222 Grand Blvd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Donald L.. Bartels, same address. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
12/19/2009
/s/Donald L. Bartels/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/25/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263401
The following person is doing business
as: Plo Art Window Tinting, 1550 Rollins
Rd, Suite B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Netto Ribeiro Lazaro
Olympio, 645 Palmetto Ave, San Francisco CA 94132. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Netto Ribeiro Lazaro Olympio /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/23/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264253
The following person is doing business
as: David Editorial, 511 Taylor Blvd,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030. Registered Owner: David Editorial, LLC, CA. The business is conducted by a Limitied Liability
Company. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
March 1, 2009
/s/Jane E. Ford/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263711
The following person is doing business
as: True Classics Tattoos, 405 Grand
Ave Ste 200, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner:Jessica
Nickle, 354 Alta Mesa Dr, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Jessica Nickle /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264216
The following person is doing business
as: Cal East Motors, 1270 S. Amphlett
Blvd, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 Registered Owner: STI Investments, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Edgar Chen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/27/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264307
The following person is doing business
as: Music Matters, 2250 Palm Ave, CA
94403. Registered Owner: Myriad Music,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Keith Johns/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/4/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263959
The following person is doing business
as: Edible A, 1421 Gordon ST, #10,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061. Registered
Owner: Vincent Gee, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Vincent Gee /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/09/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).

LIEN SALE 4/8/15 9am at
671 MARINA BLVD, S.
SAN FRANCISCO
‘91
BAYLINER
CF#
6718NC
Vin#
BL3B38CXH091
Length:
20.0

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264162
The following person is doing business
as: All For Keeps, 93 Chestnut Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: James Guevara,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/James Guevara/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/24/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264251
The following person is doing business
as: Yes Care Services, 739 Sycamore
Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner: Arthur F. Hurrell, same address. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Arthur F. Hurrell/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264109
The following person is doing business
as: Five Rivers Indian Cuisine, 314
Westlake Center, DALY CITY, CA
94015. Registered Owner: Junction E
Punjab Indian Cuisine Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Daljit Singh/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/20/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264376
The following person is doing business
as: Raymond’s Sourdough Bakery, 172
Starlite Street, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owners: Romono, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/19/1995
/s/Nicholas Ofiesh/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264303
The following person is doing business
as: Grupo Serenidad, AA, 555 San Bruno Ave W, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066.
Registered Owners: Rolando Bejarano,
1400 Hemlock Ave, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Unincorporated Association other than a
Partnership. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Rolando Bejarano/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/04/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15).

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

27

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

298 Collectibles

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

310 Misc. For Sale

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264440
The following person is doing business
as: SoSoJolie, 951 Berkeley Avenue,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered
Owners: Sonia Chang, same address.
The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Sonia D. Chang/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/14/15, 03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15).

LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

STAR TREK, 1990's Entertainment
Weekly Magazines; autographed team
picture; fan club patch:$30-650-591-9769
San Carlos
TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264490
The following person is doing business
as: 1) SilverSpot Media, 136 Trinity
Road, BRISBANE, CA 94005 2) KM
Publishing, same address. Registered
Owner: Keith Adam Moreau, same address. This business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
1998 (2010 SilverSpot)
/s/Keith Adam Moreau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/17/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15).

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264373
The following person is doing business
as: Phodita, 407 Manor Dr, PACIFICA,
CA 94044. Registered Owner: 1) Heidy
Hernandez-Heins, same address, 2)
Thomas Heins, same address. The business is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Heidy Hernandez-Heins/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264557
The following person is doing business
as: Grow Shop Hydroponics, 131 S. Maple Ave #3, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: DJ, Inc.,
CA.. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
7/15/10
/s/Joseph Chu/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/19/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264408
The following person is doing business
as: Car Hop, 7428 Mission ST, DALY
CITY, CA 94010. Registered Owner: Interstate Auto Group Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Don Griffin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/11/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264531
The following person is doing business
as: All Flow Plumbing, 111 9th Ave #301,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner:Anthony Pratali, same address.
The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on Dec. 17,
1990
/s/Anthony Pratali/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264448
The following person is doing business
as: Barry Bonds Baseball Training Academy, 3 Lagoon Drive, Suite 400, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065. Registered
Owner: Killer Bee, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on March 1, 2015
/s/Barry Bonds/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634

300 Toys
525 MINT baseball cards 1999 Upper
Deck series 1&2. $45 OBO. Steve, 650518-6614.
EIGHT 1996 Star Wars main action figures mint unopened. $75 OBO. Steve,
650-518-6614.

NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208
FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208
KITCHENAID SUPERBA REFRIGERATOR, w/ice-maker, runs great, some
mold, 6'x3'x3', FREE, you haul. (650)
574-5459

297 Bicycles

AB CIRCLE machine. $55. 310-8894850. Text Only. Will send pictures upon
request.
BRIDGESTONE MOUNTAIN Bike. $95.
27" tires. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.
GIRLS 24" 10-speed purple-blue bike,
manual, carrier, bell, like new. used <15
mi. $80. 650-328-6709.
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

ITALIAN TABLE 34 X 34 X 29Hm Beautiful Oak inlaid $90 OBO In RC (650)3630360

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400

2 KIDS Bikes for $60. 310-889-4850.
Text Only. Will send pictures upon request.

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SAN FRANCISCO Seals autographed
1947 baseball $75, 650-591-9769 San
Carlos

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $60. 650-596-0513

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,
carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263998
The following person is doing business
as: Alfredo’s Market #1 #2, 612 Linden
Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080. Registered Owner: 1. Doris Molina, 611 Olive Ave, South San Francisco,
CA 94080. 2. Maria A McQueen, 392
Susie Way #3, South San Francisco, CA
94080. 3. Jose C Caravantes, 611 Olive
Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Doris Molina/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/11/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/15, 03/07/15, 03/14/15, 03/21/15)

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
LOVESEAT, BEIGE, $55. Call Gary,
(650)533-3413 San Mateo
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO HEATER. Table top. 34" in
height. 15,000 Btu/hr. Excellent condition. Instructions. $65. 650-654-9252

303 Electronics
Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
FREE 36" COLOR TV (not a flat
screen). Great condition. Ph. 650 6302329.
HOME THEATER System" KLH"digital
DVD/CD/MP3.Player
6
speakers
ex.$100. (650)992-4544
KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/cassette
deck/CD,3 speakers box ex/con. $60
(650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MEMOREX DVD player progressive
scanning, Dolby Digital, $19.95, 650595-3933
PANASONIC STEREO color TV 36"
ex/con/ $30 (650)992-4544
PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
TUNER AMPS, 3, Technics SA-GX100,
Quadraflex 767, Pioneer VSX-3300. All
for $99. (650)591-8062

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324

73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$60.(650)596-0513

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

306 Housewares

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30 OBO
(650) 995-0012

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

302 Antiques

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. ** SOLD **

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
$12.,

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

STAR WARS, new Battle Droid figures,
all four variations. $25 OBO.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.

WW1

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

FIVE RARE purple card Star Wars figures mint unopened. $45 OBO. Steve,
650-518-6614.

Books
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

made in Spain

DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. 40” x
35.5” x 17.5” . $65. (207)329-2853.

299 Computers

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264554
The following person is doing business
as: Brand Motors, 4001 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo, CA 94403. Registered
Owner: Brand Motors, LLC., CA.. The
business is conducted by a LImited Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Mushvig Baghirov/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 03/19/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/15, 03/28/15, 04/04/15, 04/11/15)

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN COMFORTER, bedskirt, decorative pillows, sheets and shams, $75
(650)533-3413
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

307 Jewelry & Clothing
VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

308 Tools
7.5 GALLON compressor, air regulator,
pressure gauge, .5 horsepower. $75.
(650)345-5224 before 8:00 p.m.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW heavy duty" Craftman"
new in box $45.00- D.C. (650)992-4544
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR nylon string excellent condition w/case $95. (650)5765026
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
CYMBAL-ZILDJIAN 22” ride cymbal.
Good shape. $140. 650-369-8013
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

315 Wanted to Buy

CRAFTSMAN 10" one horsepower motor saw. Cast iron top. $99. (650)3455224 before 8:00 p.m.

WE BUY

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373

316 Clothes

POWER INVERTER - STATPOWER
PROWATT 2500. modified, Sine wave
phase corrected. $245.
650-591-8062

ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

BRAND NEW K-Swiss hiking boots European 42 (U.S. size 10), $29, 650-5953933

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

309 Office Equipment

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
REAL LIZARD skin mens shoes, size
9.5 D in superb condition, $39, 650-5953933

STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

310 Misc. For Sale

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

10 VIDEOTAPES (3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.

XXL HARLEY Davidson Racing Team
Shirt. $90. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HAND CRAFTED Pawleys Island Hammock. New , in original box with hanging
hardware. $100. 650-349-3205.
HANGING WHITE silk flower decoration
$25 each - 650-341-2679
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

317 Building Materials
2 MULTI-BROWN granite counter tops
4ft x 2ft each $100 for both. (650)6785133
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $69
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

318 Sports Equipment

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

304 Furniture

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, wheels, manual, once used/like
new. $75. 650-328-6709.
SAMSONITE WHEELED carry on with 3
zippered exterior pockets, $15, 650-5953933
SENTRY SAFE, Combination, on
wheels,good condition. 17w x 17d x21
high.Heavy. $85, Call 650-591-2393
SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
TRIPOD : Oak and brass construction.
Used in 1930"s Hollywood In RC $90
OBO (650)363-0360

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.
CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GOLF CART Tour Trec, 3 detachable wheels, Foldable, good condition,
$65, call 650-591-2393
GOLF SET for $95. 310-889-4850. Text
Only. Will send pictures upon request.
HJC MOTORCYCLE helmet, black, DOT
certified, size L/XL, $29, 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MOHAWK CARPET TILES, new 2’x2’
multi colored, 37 sq. yards. $875. Call
(650)579-0933.
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

318 Sports Equipment
TENNIS RACQUETS $20 each. Call
650-341-2679
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

321 Hunting/Fishing
HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

322 Garage Sales

GARAGE
SALE

EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
3400 Chris Lane
San Mateo

Saturday Only
March 21
9 am to 2pm
Furniture, Artwork,
household items,
and more!

322 Garage Sales

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

GARAGE SALE
Friday 3/20,
Saturday 3/21
and Sunday 3/22
9am-4pm

611 Industrial Way,
San Carlos.
Tools, Printers,
Air Conditioner,
Casino Equipment,
Furniture, cabinets,
sewing machines,
office equipment,
recording equipment,
miscellaneous
and more.

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

335 Garden Equipment
BIRDBATH. CONCRETE/BEIGE color.
37" in height-25" wide. $45. Great condition. 650-654-9252

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment

Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

620 Automobiles

650 RVs

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

BMW ‘06 325i, black on black, very
clean, 124K miles, $9,700. SOLD!.

COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

‘08 BMW 528i, beige, great condition,
complete dealer maintenance. Can be
seen in Foster City. $11,700.00
(650)349-6969

HOMEDICS SHIATSU Massaging Cushion, still in box. $25. Pacifica (650) 3550266

1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

INVACARE ADJUSTABLE hospital bed,
good condition. $500. (415)516-4964

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.

470 Rooms

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA ‘93 LX SD, 244K miles, all
power, complete, runs. $1,900 OBO,
(650)481-5296
LEXUS ‘03 ES300, 160K miles, $6,900
Call (650)302-5523.
LEXUS ‘07 ES350 Ultra Sport Package
Very clean, fully loaded, 107K miles,
charcoal gray, $13,800.. (650)302-5523.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

625 Classic Cars

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568

Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

Call (650)344-5200

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

Call (650)344-5200

BMW ‘07 750i, silver, black interior, 87K
miles, clean title, clean car, everything
great. $15,500. (650)302-5523.

630 Trucks & SUV’s

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568

670 Auto Service
CADILLAC, CHEVY, BUICK, GMC
Eligible For FREE Oil Change/Tire
Rotation! Visit www.Shop.BestMark.com
or call 800-969-8477.

670 Auto Parts
1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225
2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225
4 TIRES sizes-275-60-R17 and 275-60R16 for $100/For All. (650)678-5133
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
SCOOTER - 2009 Yamaha Zuma. 50
cc’s, 100 mpg, 1076 original miles (used
it to commute but now retired). $1,100.
Call (650)834-6055

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 City on the South
Saskatchewan
River
12 It’s about 5 mL
15 Over
16 Cut (into)
17 Factor in cold
waves
18 Boomer’s offspring
19 Put in
20 Senseless
21 Jazz duo?
22 Answered back
24 Drivetrain
component,
perhaps
26 Southwestern
language
28 Brawn
29 Sign of shock
33 Diamond shape
35 Star movers
37 Runs through
39 Take time to
answer
41 Mail
42 Save for later, in
a way
44 City southwest of
Bayeux
45 Woodstock
performer before
Sly
47 Ecua. rejoined it
in 2007
49 Hail Mary
51 Charges for
rounds
56 Newspaper
section
57 Goya’s “La __
vestida”
59 Washington
portraitist
60 Star Wars letters
61 December-toMay fruit
63 RBI producer,
perhaps
64 Outlet worker
65 Stick-__
66 1623
Shakespeare
work, with “The”
DOWN
1 Blues
2 “Waterworld”
orphan girl

3 Strikes out
4 Apple
purchases
5 Mexico’s Sea
of __
6 Journalist
Kupcinet
7 Krypton relative
8 Ancient Italian
region
9 Opposite of
“stand”
10 They multiply by
dividing
11 Drive handle
12 Like churches, as
a rule
13 Common
abrasive
14 Intrinsically
21 The Marx
Brothers, e.g.
23 Deceive
25 Bug but good
27 Home in the
woods
29 Meas. of course
performance
30 Brand with a
Jumpman logo
31 Meaning
32 Fine points

34 Letters
sometimes seen
before a phone no.
36 Nestlé’s __-Caps
38 Cheat
40 1924 codefendant
43 Court complaint
46 Horn of Africa
native
48 Cousins of clam
diggers

49 Western ring
50 Expert
52 Jerk, say
53 Patty Hearst alias
54 __ bloom: pond
vegetation
55 __ Bag:
eponymous ’70s
designer label
58 Old, in Oldenburg
61 Additional
62 Legend on ice

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Asphalt/Paving

Cleaning

NORTHWEST
ASPHALT PAVING

HOUSE CLEANING
SERVICES
Vacancy, Janitorial,
Post Construction Cleaning.
Commercial & Residential
Cleaning

Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimates
(650)213-2648
Lic #935122

650.918.0354

Cabinetry

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

Detail Cleaing *Office*Window
Washing
LICENSED & INSURED

MOVE OUT/IN
FREE ESTIMATES

650-219-3459

JANITORIALELBOWGREASE.COM

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

650-294-3360
xwordeditor@aol.com

03/21/15

Cleaning

Concrete
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Rambo
Concrete
Works
by Greenstarr

WALKWAYSs$RIVEWAYSs0ATIOS
#OLOREDs!GGREGATEs2ETAINING
WALLSs3TAMPED#ONCRETE
3WIMMING0OOL2EMOVAL
other services at Yardboss.net

TOM (650) 834-2365
Licensed Bonded & Insured
License#752250 Since 1985

03/21/15

Construction

AIM CONSTUCTION

JOHN PETERSON
*Paving *Grading *Slurry Sealing
*Paving Stovnes *Concrete
*Patching
WE AIM TO PLEASE!

(408) 422-7695
LIC.# 916680

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

By Barry C. Silk
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Concrete

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Construction

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Electricians

Gutters

Hauling

ELECTRICAL and
General Home Repair

MAURICIO

License #619908

ROLANDO’S
GUTTER CLEANING
My specialty is power
washing and rain gutter
cleaning. Call me at
(650) 283-9449

Gardening

Handy Help

J.B GARDENING

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Wiring • Remodel
Panel Upgrade
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

(650)400-5604
279 Chimney Sweep

LEMUS PAINTING
(650)271-3955

Interior & Exterior
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Sheetrock Repairs
Lead safe certified
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461

MR. CHIMNEY
CRICKET

Chimney and
Dryer Vent Cleaning
Lic#527653

(650)368-0695
Flooring

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION

(650)271-3955

Flamingo’s Flooring

Dryrot & Termite Repair
Decks, Doors/Windows, Siding
Bath Remodels, Painting
General Home Improvements

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD

Free Estimates
Lic. #913461

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Drywall
DRYWALL /
PLASTER / STUCCO
Patching w/
Texture Matching
Invisible Repair
Small jobs only
Local references
Free Estimates
30 years in Business
Licensed-Bonded

(650)248-4205
Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

SHOP
AT HOME

Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
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650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157

Hauling t Landscaping
t Handyman Service

Commercial & Residential
- Hauling
- Demolition
- Concrete Services:
- Sidewalk
- Driveways
- Fences

Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602
The Village
Handyman
• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
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(650)556-9780
PATRICK
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• Gutters & Downspout Repair
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(650)302-7791
Lic# 910421

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NICK MEJIA PAINTING
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Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
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(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

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Tree Service
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PLEASE CALL OR TEXT

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• Trimming

HAULING
$25 and up!

• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates

Landscaping

Mention

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to get 10% off
for new customers

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile

CUBIAS TILE

AND DESIGN
Kitchen *Natural Stone*Floors
*Marble*Bathrooms *Porcelain
*Fire Place*s *Mosaic*Entryways
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Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
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Plumbing

Free Estimates
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(650)341-7482

Light moving!
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Pruning

• Shaping

(415)850-2471

AAA RATED!

CHEAP
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TAPIAROOFING.NET

LICENSE # 729271

Hauling

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years

(650) 367-8795

Lic# 979435

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

ROOFING
Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair

(650)701-6072

Junk & Debris Clean Up

TAPIA

FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

Call Joe

CHAINEY HAULING

Roofing

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

Lic#1211534

Gutters

Painting

29

NATE LANDSCAPING
* Tree Service * Paint
* Fence Deck
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete
* Ret. Wall * Pavers
* Sprinkler System
* Yard Clean-Up
& Haul

Free Estimate

650.353.6554
Lic. #973081

SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition
Fences • Interlocking Pavers
Clean-Ups • Hauling
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
Lic# 36267

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAINS! with proper access
Installation of: Water Heaters •
Faucets •Toilets • Sinks • Gas • Water
& Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

Window Washing

WINDOW
WASHING

(650)461-0326 or
(650)226-3762
Lic.# 983312

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

Attorneys

Food

Health & Medical

Law Office of Jason Honaker

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE

EYE EXAMINATIONS

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

Tea, espresso, Duvel, Ballast
Point Sculpin and other beers
today

579-7774

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo

1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

Cemetery

SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Call us for a consultation

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

Financial
RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

www.russodentalcare.com

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

Food

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

FATTORIA E MARE
Locally Sourced
Fresh Italian Food.
Join us for
Happy Hour 4-6:30 M-F
1095 Rollins Road
Burlingame
(650) 342-4922

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
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desire to open your
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Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Health & Medical

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Loans

Massage Therapy

Tax Preparation

REVERSE MORTGAGE

HEALING MASSAGE

ELLIOTT TAX
SERVICE

Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

NEW YORK LIFE
www.ericbarrett.com
Eric L. Barrett,

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President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

2305-A Carlos St.
Alongside Highway 1

SINCE 1997

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DISCOUNT

Marketing

Music

For first time customers

GROW

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

(Cash Only)

Bronstein Music
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Sign up for the free newsletter

Musical Instruction

Real Estate Loans

DRUM LESSONS
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We Fund Bank Turndowns!

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Massage Therapy

650-348-7191

ACUHEALTH CLINIC
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$35/hr

Wachter Investments, Inc.
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CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
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(with this ad for first time visitors)

Free Parking

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1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay

COMFORT PRO
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Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
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New Masseuses
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(650) 595-7750

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www.mycareoncall.com
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1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Legal Services

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
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(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Exp. 3/31/15

Travel

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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LESLIE
Continued from page 1
after a nationwide search, said the foundation is in the process of deciding the strategy to allocate the $68.75 million for the
long-term benefit of San Bruno. Pacific Gas
& Electric gave the money following the
gas pipeline explosion in the city that
killed eight and injured 66.
Hatamiya will work with a seven-member
board to guide allocation of the fund. The
board includes President Nancy A. Kraus,
Vice President John P. McGlothlin,
Secretary Emily Roberts, Treasurer Ben
Cohn, Patricia Bohm, Frank Hedley and
Regina Stanback Stroud. The board’s last
meeting was March 19.
She said the foundation is preparing to
make strategic decisions such as electing
to spend large sums of money on capital
improvement projects, or running the
fund as an endowment, and spending a
small percent annually to offer the community ongoing social services such a

BELMONT
Continued from page 1
orities and accomplishments on key projects over the last year while discussing
future needs.
After prioritizing several major projects
last year, the study session served as a
chance to reaffirm the city’s efforts, said

31

child or health care.
“One of the great things about this is the
overall, unrestricted nature of the fund,” she
said.
The foundation will begin engaging in
community outreach to discover the will of
residents regarding how the fund should be
spent.
“We want to hear the voices throughout
the community, not just the loudest,” she
said.
The foundation will spend the summer
developing strategies for the fund, and
plans to come to the City Council in the fall
for approval.
Hatamiya, a San Bruno resident, said she
appreciates the chance to do something
positive for the city that suffered such a
tremendous loss.
“I’m both excited and honored to take on
this responsibility,” she said. “I think San
Bruno has a remarkable opportunity to do
something significant and beneficial to the
community,” she said.
She said she was cooking dinner when the
explosion occurred about a mile from her
house, but was unaware it happened until a

friend who had heard the news called and
notified her.
“It was scary because at that point no one
knew what was going on,” she said. “You
didn’t really know what was happening.”
She said she is proud to serve as director
of the foundation that can honor the lives
lost and forever altered from the explosion.
“It was a horrible thing that happened
but, for our community, this is a way to turn
around and say ‘look at all the great things
that come from this tragedy that we had to
live through,’” she said.
Hatamiya led the California State Bar
Foundation for seven years, which she felt
prepared her for directing the San Bruno
community fund, because it gave her extensive experience running a charitable organization.
She has also held positions at Stanford
University, Yale University, with the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and in
former U.S. senator Bill Bradley’s Capitol
Hill office.
She also served as a longtime Stanford
University volunteer, including service on
the university’s Board of Trustees, the

Alumni Association’s Board of Directors
and the National Advisory Board of the Haas
Center for Public Service.
Since moving to San Bruno in 2003,
Hatamiya has been involved with the PTA,
volunteered for San Bruno Pee Wee Baseball
and was a past AYSO soccer coach
Due in part to the guidance driven by her
roots in the community, she said the foundation understands the influence of its role
in allocating the funds to serve San Bruno.
“We are stewards of a significant amount
of money to benefit the entire community,
and the board is taking that charge very seriously. We want to be very thoughtful and
deliberate,” she said. “It would be easy to
hand it out to everyone who asks for money.
But we are deciding what makes the most
sense, and then putting together a strategy
to
execute
that
plan. ”
The fund that the foundation controls is distinct and separate from the $50 million trust
agreement to specifically benefit the
Crestmoor neighborhood.

Vice Mayor Eric Reed.
“I left the meeting thinking what we started last year was setting us off on the right
track. And this year, there’s not a need to
make radical changes to the direction we’re
headed. We’re on the right course,” Reed
said.
The city has made significant progress on
the Ralston Avenue Corridor Study, which
seeks to address multi-modal traffic concerns by making recommendations for
infrastructure improvements on the city’s

main east-to-west artery. It has also proceeded with several key planning documents such as the Belmont Village Zone
that aims to promote a centralized downtown by allowing for more housing and
businesses, as well as initiating amendments to the city’s home remodel rules that
are currently being considered by the
Planning Commission.
Much of what the council identifies as priorities end up being long-term projects,
such as its current efforts to update the city’s
General Plan, said Councilman Warren
Lieberman.
“This is mostly about identifying what
policies we want to pursue and various initiatives over time that will help us get
there. So these initiatives tend to be longer
than a year. Just the General Plan, that probably we’ve been working on that over the
last 10 or 12 years, but over the last year or
two we really put together a definitive plan,
we put more resources to it,” Lieberman
said.
An update to Belmont’s General Plan,
which serves as a comprehensive policy and
zoning document to guide future development in the city through 2035, is in the
works with the City Council and Planning
Commission holding a joint study session
Tuesday, March 24.
The city has challenges ahead, particularly as it seeks to fund critical improvements
to streets, sewers and recreational amenities
such as parks. City officials are pleased the
attention to developing Davey Glen Park, a
nearly 1-acre site in the Cipriani neighborhood that’s been in the works since 2009, is
paying off. However, the council hesitantly
acknowledged forming a long-term plan for
the Barrett Community Center may need to
be put on the back burner as the city has
limited resources.
Several councilmembers had new ideas
they suggested the city consider pursuing
over the coming year.
Councilman Charles Stone is interested in
having Belmont consider means to promote

workforce housing, particularly for teachers, by potentially partnering with other
entities to build on properties purchased
with former redevelopment agency funds.
Stone also suggested the city amend its
smoking ordinance to include the increasingly popular electronic cigarettes.
Lieberman said he wants officials to
address Airbnb rentals in Belmont arguing
with “the new sharing economy initiatives,
I can begin to see in the future that some of
these initiatives might have a real significant impact on our neighborhoods. So I just
wanted to get a little bit ahead of the curve
in understanding how we might control that
so it doesn’t create such an upheaval.”
Lieberman also suggested the city consider a possible ordinance to address massage
parlors, work that San Mateo County officials have recently began.
As the state continues to suffer from a
fourth year of drought, Reed suggested the
city consider following in the footsteps of
the Portola Valley by creating a volunteerbased committee dedicated to water conservation.
Reed said he’d like to see “a panel of residents who can help other residents with
ideas [on] how to save water. What are the
kinds of things we can do? When you get
residents involved in providing solutions,
you get some fantastic ideas,” Reed said.
Overall, Reed and Lieberman agreed the
takeaway from Wednesday’s meeting is that
Belmont is headed in a positive direction.
“If [the priority setting session is] like
repairing a car, we would have done the
major overhaul last year,” Reed said. “And
this year was an exercise in ‘have we made
progress and what more do we need to do to
keep that momentum going?’”

Exp. 3/31/15

MEMORY CARE now

M

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

The Belmont City Council and Planning
Commission will meet to discuss the
General Plan 2035 Update 6 p.m. Tuesday,
March 24 at City Hall, 1 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. For more information v isit
www.belmont.gov.

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32

Weekend • March 21-22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL