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TABLE OF CONTENT

1) INTRODUCTION 1-13
a)
b)
d)
e)

About The Nike Industry 3


Nike Maxsight 4
Industry Overview 5
Product Trend 8

2) RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 14-20


a) Research objectives 14
b) Research design 15
c) Data sources 15
i) Primary data 15
ii) Secondary data 15
d) Questionnaire design formulation 16
e) Sample design 17
f) Limitations of the research 20
3) COMPANY PROFILE 21-43
a) Nike Industries Ltd. A company profile 21
b) Recent Development 21
c) Future Plan 23
d) Risk and Concern 28
e) Literature Review 31
f) 4ps of Nike 40
g) SWOT Analysis 41
4) DATA ANALYSIS 44-63
5) CONCLUSION & FINDINGS 64-67
6) RECOMMENDATIONS 68-75
a) OTHER SUGGESTION INCLUDE 69
7) ANNEXURE 76
8) BIBLIOGRAPHY 83
1

INTRODUCTION

ABOUT THE NIKE INDUSTRY


In sport, visual acuity and protection can mean the difference between winning
and losing. Light conditions have a dramatic effect on how the human eye
perceives and, subsequently how the body reacts and performs -- in the sun
glinting over the upper deck, shallow contrast on a putting green, or quickly
adjusting from shadows to light on a tennis court or mountain bike single track.
Nike knows that in athletic competition, even small advantages are critical to
performance. Nike has spent the last eight years exploring the human eye to
understand the science of vision in the development of the new Nike MaxSight
Sport-Tint Contact Lens, available August 2005.

WHAT IT IS
Nike MaxSight, developed in partnership with Bausch & Lomb, is a tinted soft
contact lens that behaves like sunglasses, reducing glare and filtering out 95% of
UVA and UVB and more than 90% of blue light. But because the lens rests directly
on the eye, theres virtually no distortion as with standard sunglasses. Athletes get
the same clear view at all angles.
Plus, Nike MaxSight eliminates the environmental effects that plague sunglasses
like fogging, scratching, additional weight, or nosepieces and frames to obstruct
vision. Theres no obstruction from the edge of the lens, the frame or the
nosepiece, because they dont exist. And there are no pressure points and no
slippage. Max Sight also eliminates light leakage, reducing the need to squint,
allowing the eye to relax and perform more naturally.
Nike MaxSight is, in effect, one giant visual sweet spot.

Nike Maxsight

HOW THEY WORK


Nikes patented Nike MaxSight Light Architecture selectively alters specific
wavelengths of light within the visual spectrum to enhance key elements in sport.
The athlete gets crisp, clear vision without anything getting in their way. By
removing most of the blue light, contrast and clarity are enhanced a decided
advantage for any competitor. For sports not conducive to eyewear, such as golf,
tennis and soccer, athletes will see marked improvement, even on days where the
suns not at its brightest.
Nike MaxSight provides through-and-through tinting (unlike cosmetically tinted
lenses), so theres no bending or scattering of light. Plus theres limited incidental
light or peripheral flickering creeping around the sides, as with sunglasses.
Athletes tested in Nike MaxSight lenses found they squinted less, were able to
relax more, and had exceptional views of contours and movement.
Marco Materazzi of Italys Inter Milan football club and Baltimore Orioles second
baseman Brian Roberts are among the pro athletes wearing Nike MaxSight. It has
been a lot of fun to start the season this hot, said Roberts early in the MLB
season. In fact, he became one of the first true fans of Nike MaxSight after
impressive initial results. During a spring daytime game, Roberts said, I wore the
lenses and went 2 for 4. They are so awesome.
With Nike MaxSight, theres minimal squinting in bright light, and quicker visual
definition when going from bright light to shadows.
Wearers will also discover a game-day benefit the look. It makes the eye look
distinct, the large-pupil effect, says Alan Reichow, Nike Vision Consultant. It
looks competitive.

ROLL OVER PHOTOS FOR A MAXSIGHT LENSE SIMULATION

THE WEAR
Nike MaxSight is a 30-day lens, though most athletes will wear them selectively
and for short durations. Lenses come in six-pack packaging. Nike MaxSight is
available with or without a correction, thereby making it accessible to athletes
whether they wear contacts or not.

THE HISTORY
Nike began exploring the Nike Max Sight technology in 1997, conducting an initial
clinical project, then subsequent research projects using collegiate athletes.
Oregons Pacific University baseball players were the first athletes to undergo
testing. Coach Greg Bradley requested that he be allowed to try them before his
players. Hed never worn contacts, says Dr. Reichow. He took two pitches and
turned around and said, Ive never seen a ball that distinct and clear. Put them on
anybody who wants them.

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
Bill Bowerman said this couple of decades ago. The guy was right. It defines how
he viewed the world, and it defines how Nike pursues its destiny. Ours is a
language of sports, a universally understood lexicon of passion and competition. A
lot has happened at Nike in the 30 years since we entered the industry, most of it
good, some of it downright embarrassing. But through it all, we remain totally
focused on creating performance opportunities for everyone who would benefit,
and offering empowering messages for everyone who would listen.
We feel lucky to have a genuine, altruistic reason to be: the service of human
potential. That's the great benefit of sports, and we're glad to be in the middle of
it.
What started with a handshake between two running geeks in sleepy Eugene,
Oregon, are now the world's most competitive sports and Fitness Company. The
World Headquarters is in Beaverton, Oregon. The Pacific Northwest is Nike's
hometown, but like so many ambitious souls, we have expanded our horizons to
every corner of the world. Nike employs around 23,000 people, and every one of
them is significant to our mission of bringing inspiration and innovation to every
athlete in the world.
Along the way Nike joined up with some great partner companies that help extend
our reach within and beyond sports.
Cole Haan offers casual luxury footwear and accessories out of New York City and

Yarmouth, Maine.
Bauer Nike Hockey, based in Montreal, Quebec, is the world's leading
manufacturer of hockey equipment and a wholly owned subsidiary of Nike, Inc.
Nike partnered with Hurley International, a premium teen lifestyle brand founded
by 20-year industry veteran Bob Hurley based in Costa Mesa, California.
In 2003, Nike completed the acquisition of Converse, the globally recognized
footwear brand with nearly a century of sports heritage, and home of the
perennially popular Chuck Taylor All-Star and Jack Purcell footwear.
Exeter Brands Group: In August 2004, Nike created the Exeter Brands Group, a
wholly owned subsidiary, dedicated to building athletic footwear and apparel
brands for the value retail channel. This portfolio of brands includes the Official
Starter Properties LLC and Official Starter LLC which are the sole owners and
licensors of the Starter, Team Starter and Asphalt brand names as well as master
licensee of the Shaq and Dunkman brands, a line of athletic apparel, footwear and
accessory products for the value retail channel.
Separate business units within the Nike brand include The Jordan/Jumpman 23
brand and Nike Golf.
As small as we feel, the Nike family is a fairly vast enterprise. We operate on six
continents. Our suppliers, shippers, retailers and service providers employ close to
1 million people. The diversity inherent in such size is helping Nike evolve its role
as a global company. We see a bigger picture today than when we started, one
that includes building sustainable business with sound labor practices. We retain
the zeal of youth yet act on our responsibilities as a global corporate citizen.
If you have a body, you are an athlete. And as long as there are athletes, there
will be Nike.

PRODUCT TREND

Bovine skin was by far the most preferred leather material, followed by
goat/kid/lamb/sheep skin and crocodile skin.
Respondents overwhelmingly preferred the color black and, to a lesser extent,
dark brown. For handbags/briefcases, popular colors included light brown, white
and red. Consumer Segments with the Biggest Spending Power Male professionals,
managers and executives are the segment with the biggest spending power for
now and in the coming three years. Other major consumer segments include male
office workers; sole proprietors/business owners; female office workers; and
female professionals, managers and executives.
The Competitiveness of Hong Kong Brands/Suppliers of Leather Consumer Goods.
Most retailers consider Hong Kong brands to be either very competitive or quite
competitive in both high-end and mid-range segments, but less competitive in the
low-end segment. The competitiveness of Hong Kong brands mainly rests on their
product style/design and quality, with most respondents picking those as the
major reasons behind the attractiveness of Hong Kong brands in the high-end and
mid-range segments respectively.

PRODUCT PROFILE
Apart from delivering a pair of comfortable sports shoes Nike also provides a
number of value-added features with its products. The features that are a part of
every Nike sports shoe are as follows.
High Performance Sports Shoes: Nike has patented the Air system and has made
it into a regular feature in most of its models. Many models feature an air pocket
in the shoe that reduces the weight of the shoe and reduces pressure on the heels.
Besides the overall design and compactness of the shoes have made it a favorite
of many professional athletes around the world.

Comfort: Nike shoes are renowned all over the world for the comfort they provide.
Well padded and cushioned, they provide a tremendous level of comfort to the
wearer and reduce the strain to his feet while playing.
Lightweight: This attribute is in line with the two described above. A lightweight
shoe provides greater mobility and eases the pressure on the feet of the wearer.
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Durability: People purchasing a pair of shoes at such a high price often feel that
they have made an investment. They would obviously want to see their shoes last
a long time. To prove this point we draw the example of the authors of this
marketing plan. All of us own a pair of Nikes and have been wearing them for well
over two years a symbol of the durability of Nike shoes.
Style: Nikes designs are considered to be the most stylish in the industry and beat
all others as far as looks are concerned. Attractively packaged, it is a delight to
bring a pair home. Add to this the Swoosh the most recognizable symbol in
sports and you have a product that would give the user a definite sense of pride.
Nike shoes also come with a guarantee card that enables the owner to return it in
case of manufacturing defects. However, owing to the fact that the company
implements strict quality control measures, coming across a defective pair in a
store are a rarity. The most recent additions to their line are the Nike 6.0 and Nike
SB shoes, designed for skateboarding. Nike has recently introduced cricket shoes,
called Air Zoom Yorker, designed to be 30% lighter than their competitors'.[ Nike
positions its products in such a way as to try to appeal to a
"youthful....materialistic crowd".[5] It is positioned as a premium performance
brand.
NIKE 6.O
NIKE SB

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research comprise defining and redefining problems, formulating hypothesis or
suggested solutions; collecting, organizing and evaluating data; making deductions

and reaching conclusions; and at last carefully testing the conclusions to


determine whether they fit the formulating Hypothesis.
In short, the search for Knowledge through Objective and Systematic method of
finding solutions to a problem is Research.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES
To study the tastes, preferences, and buying behavior of consumers in case of
footwear of Bata.
To analyze buying behavior of ladies segment of consumers.
To recommend strategies to Nike to increase sales in ladies segment.
The main objectives of this study are:
Working of Insurance Plans
SWOT analysis of the product sold
Comparative study with the competitors

RESEARCH DESIGN
TYPE OF RESEARCH: Descriptive research
Descriptive research includes Surveys and fact-finding enquiries of different kinds.
The main characteristic of this method is that the researcher has no control over
the variables; he can only report what has happened or what is happening.

DATA SOURCES
There are two types of data.
Source of primary data for the present study is collected through questionnaire
and answered by consumers of Nike shoes. The secondary data is collected from
journals, books and through Internet search.

PRIMARY DATA
The data that is collected first hand by someone specifically for the purpose of
facilitating the study is known as primary data. So in this research the data is

collected from respondents through questionnaire.

SECONDARY DATA
For the company information I had used secondary data like brochures, web site of
the company etc.
The Method used by me is Survey Method as the research done is Descriptive
Research.

RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS
Selected instrument for Data Collection for Survey is Questionnaire.

QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN FORMULATION


Under this method, list of questions pertaining to the survey are prepared for
marketing staff of consumers of Nike shoes.
Questionnaire has structured type questions as well as unstructured type
questions. Structured objective type questions are prepared for the respondents
with fixed response categories. Some of the questions are of multiple-choice type.
The questions have more than one alternative.
Questionnaire: - A questionnaire consists of a set of questions presented to
respondent for their answers. It can be Closed Ended or Open Ended
Open Ended: - Allows respondents to answer in their own words & are difficult to
Interpret and Tabulate.
Close Ended: - Pre-specify all the possible answers & are easy to Interpret and
Tabulate.
TYPES OF QUESTION INCLUDED:
DICHOTOMOUS QUESTIONS
Which has only two answers Yes or No?
MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS
Where respondent is offered more than two choices.
IMPORTANCE SCALE

A scale that rates the importance of some attribute.


RATING SCALE
A scale that rates some attribute from highly satisfied to highly unsatisfied
and very inefficient to very efficient

SAMPLING UNIT: Who is to be surveyed? The marketing researcher must define the target
population that will be sampled.
The sample Unit taken by me; General public of different age group, different
gender and different profession
EXTENT:Where the survey should be carried out?
I have covered entire residential area of Delhi city for the survey
TIME FRAME:When the survey should be conducted?
I conducted my survey for 8weeks from 10th may to 10th July
SAMPLING FRAME:The source from which the sample is drawn
SAMPLING TECHNIQUE: How should the respondent be chosen?
In the Project sampling is done on basis of Probability sampling. Among the
probability sampling design the sampling design chosen is stratified random
sampling.
Because in this survey I had stratified the sample in different age group, different
gender and different profession

SAMPLE SIZE
Consumers of shoes, 50 nos

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STEPS FOLLOWED IN COMPLETING THE STUDY


(i) Libraries at (a) Indian Council for Applied Economic Research (ICAER), (b)
Indian Institute of Technology, (IIT) Delhi, (c) Council of scientific and industrial
Research (CSIR) (d) PHD chamber of commerce, are visited. Management /
marketing books, journals are consulted.
(ii) Internet sites containing information on Nike shoes & marketing are browsed.
(iii) Sample survey was conducted.
(iv) Data was thoroughly checked for error.

DATA PROCESSING METHODOLOGY


(i) Once the primary data have been collected, they are (I) edited inspected,
corrected and modified.
(ii) Tabulation bring similar data together and totaling them in meaningful
categories.
Questionnaires are edited both in the field and later in home. Field editing took
place just often the interview. Generally editing is required for open type of
questions. Brief notes or symbols are frequently used during the interview to
initially record the interviewers response since it was not desirable to interrupt the
flow with lengthy note taking. Then immediately after the interview, brief notes
are respondent. The responses are thoroughly checked in home for incorrect,
inconsequential or contradictions categories are developed only often the replies
has been reviewed. This review provided a feel for the pattern of answers and thus
determine what categories best represent the answers.
The collected data are placed into an order. Percentages of respondents answered
similarly are calculated and placed in a table. Then this is interpreted. This
involved drawing conclusion from the gathered data. Interpretation changes the
new information immerging from the analysis into information that is pertinent or
relevant to the study.

CONCLUSION WAS DRAWN BASED ON THE SURVEY FINDINGS


Finally recommendation was made to improve the sales strategy of Nike shoes to
increase the sales volume in ladies segment.
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SAMPLE DESIGN
THE BASIS OF SAMPLING: Consumers of Nike shoes are chosen randomly, so that unbiased, representative
sample may be obtained.

LIMITATIONS OF RESEARCH
The geographical area was very much limited to residential area & so the results
are not particularly reflection of the current behavior.

BIASES AND NON-COOPERATION OF THE RESPONDENTS.


The collected data are placed into an order. Percentages of respondents answered
similarly are calculated and placed in a table. Then this is interpreted. This
involved drawing conclusion from the gathered data. Interpretation changes the
new information immerging from the analysis into information that is pertinent or
relevant to the study.
Due to limited time period and constrained working hours for most of the
respondents, the answers at times were vague enough to be ignored.
Most of the people in India take their Nike Shoes in the period preceding March
& so the response to initial contacts were not all encouraging and that has been
the primary reason in the inability to quantify the results large enough so as to
deduce any relevant outcomes.

COMPANY PROFILE
NIKE INDUSTRIES LTD. A COMPANY PROFILE
Nike India Ltd (BIL) is Indias largest footwear company. Nike first established
itself in India in 1931 and commenced manufacturing shoes in Batanagar in 1936.
The company has its Headquarters in Kolkata and manufactures over 33 million

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pairs per year in five plants located in Batanagar (West Bengal), Faridabad
(Haryana), Bangalore (Karnataka), Patna (Bihar), Hosur (Tamil Nadu). It secures
its leather supply from two tanneries in Mokamehghat (Bihar) and Batanagar
(West Bengal). It has a distribution network of over 1,500 retail stores and 27
wholesale depots provide excellent access to consumers and wholesale customers
throughout India.
As on December 31, 2006, the Canadian parent had a 51 per cent stake while
institutional holding was about 13 per cent.
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Nike India has said that its Faridabad and Mokamehghat units are being taken
over by Fashion Shoe Private Ltd and BDCL Enterprises Pvt Ltd, respectively. The
company is also enabling the buy back provision in its Articles of association to
enable buy back of shares.
The assets and liabilities of both the units will be transferred to these companies
and shares will be offered in the agreed ratio to the existing shareholders of Nike
India Ltd on a record date, which will be fixed by the Calcutta High Court.
While retail sales have increased both in value and volume, wholesale sales have
declined due to restriction of supplies as a means to recover
customersoutstanding. General recession and sluggish market conditions in the
industry also have had a direct impact on lower sales and profitability. Resistance
of consumers to price rises in popular volume products as well as discounts to
clear slow-moving stocks and under utilization of production capacity adversely
affected the operational results. The lockout declared at the Peenya factory on
October 1, 2007 due to serious industrial relation problems and non-compliance
with the tripartite settlement has been withdrawn. The footwear manufactured in
this factory, which was shifted to the companys other factories and associated
manufacturers, will now be gradually produced within the factory. The
commencement of production from this factory will help in re-cooping the minimal
loss being suffered by the company from this lockout.
In Simonsons words, The benefits and costs of fitting individual customer
preference are more complex and less deterministic than has been assumed.
Thats because customer preferences are often ill-defined and susceptible to
various influences, and in many cases, customers have poor insight into their
preferences. In one of his recent papers, Simonson tackles the issue of one-to-

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one marketing and mass customization. Supporters of these marketing approaches


have suggested that learning what customers want and giving them exactly what
they want will create customer loyalty and an insurmountable barrier to
competition.
But Simonson has this to say: The fact that consumer preferences are often
fuzzy, unstable, and manipulatable is unlikely to change. So, the effectiveness of
methods to give customers exactly what they (say they) want has been grossly
exaggerated. His take on the long-held assumption that individual marketing will
supplant targeted marketing is not so fast. In studies, he has learned that even
when customers have well-defined preferences and receive offers that fit those
preferences, it is far from certain that the response to such offers will consistently
be more favorable than those directed at larger market segments.
Its all psychology. Consumers with well-defined preferences may be skeptical that
a marketer could match expectations. Those who dont know what they want may
not ever see the fit with what the seller wants them to buy. So, individualized
offers depend on customers preferences &; how the offer was extended &; and on
trust. Effective individual marketing requires not only an understanding of
individual preferences and matching offers to those preferences, but also a
thorough familiarity with the various factors that impact customers responses,
Simonson writes. This is a tall order, one that some companies have been able to
fill, at least to some extent. For example, Amazon keeps track of customers
purchases and suggests other books they might like. Dell builds computers from
mass-made parts to customers specifications. But Simonson argues some
companies can take the concept too far, like the Custom Foot chain of shoe stores
that took detailed measurements and specifications from each customer to design
one-of-a-kind shoes. Custom Foot didnt take into account that some customers
were put off by the individualized attention, Simonson says, and felt obligated to
buy the shoes because the store went to so much trouble. They often didnt come
back. So knowing only the customer preferences is not enough. It is required to
understand other aspects of customer behavior. Kipping this in mind, present
study will find out and analyze consumer behavior of Nike shoes with reference to
ladies segment.
FUTURE PLAN
The management says that it is not averse to outsourcing if it worked out cheaper.
It is also open to the idea of importing shoes - mostly from China - if it works out

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cheaper.
Nike and Reebok India Company have announced an agreement to foray into
retailing partnership for sale of Reebok and Rockport footwear in Nike outlets. The
partnership entails retailing a range of sports shoes for walking, running, tennis
and training for personal fitness and sports ranging between Rs 900-2,500.
An attractive valuation compared to its peers is the main trigger for the scrip.
Besides, the companys aggressive focus on retailing and revamping of business (a
division into shoes and apparels) is also helping sentiment for the scrip. Plans are
afoot to start selling apparel in India made by the joint venture North Star. Theres
talk that the company is planning on a voluntary retirement scheme (VRS) to cut
costs.
For the third quarter ended 30 September 2007, Nike India reduced its losses to
Rs 5.68 crore (Rs 8.51 crore) on a 9.2% increase in net profit to Rs 154.27 crore
(Rs 141.26 crore). Despite reducing its losses for the quarter, Nike India has, over
the last few quarters, been continuously recording weak performances as a result
of an overall slowdown in the industry due to lower consumer spending. Increasing
domestic competition, particularly from the unorganized sector, has also been
eroding into the companys market share.
The company is finding it difficult to maintain its market share in a highly pricesensitive Indian market, despite having strong brand recall.
97% of the companys revenues are from the domestic market while the
remainder is from exports. Nike India is the biggest player in the Indian shoe
market.
Nike Indias major problems include its high cost of production and low emphasis
on marketing. The company may be able to address the first problem through
outsourcing products. Batas brand image has been restricted to that of a company
that emphasizes on utilitarian products more than trendy ones. Customers feel the
company is lacking in innovation. Hence, their preference has shifted to other local
brands.
Nike India has a large marketing network with over 1,500 showrooms, 27
wholesale depots and eight retail distribution centers across the country.
Besides, there is a network of 300 exclusive wholesalers servicing 25,000 dealers

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all over the country. However, in spite of this and the license to sell other brands
like Nike, Hush Puppies and Lotto, Nike has not been able to improve sales
consistently. The recent rise in sales during the third quarter ended September
2006 can be attributed to the festive season. Recently, it also entered into a
retailing tie-up for Lee Cooper shoes.
Nike India has also been trying to focus on aggressive marketing of its product.
The company has been going through a period of transition for the past one year.
With the expansion of the retail industry in New Delhi and Mumbai, the company
has recently decided to shift its marketing operations to Delhi in order to provide
value shopping for its customers. However, the manufacturing activity and the
registered office will continue at Kolkata.
Nike India has plans to invest in sophisticated machinery to retain its niche place
in manufacturing. The company has put a fresh focus to its retail business. The
company has decided to cleanse its wholesale operation by building relationships
with credit-worthy buyers.
It is to the companys credit that it has lately overhauled its marketing set-up into
a four-tier retail structure that will be stocked with products matching the areas
customer profile. A Nike outlet in an up market place will offer a distinctly different
range of footwear from another in the suburbs.
At the top of the four-tier structure will be international stores stocking brands like
Nike and Reebok. Next will be city stores, located in up market areas and catering
to middle and high-income groups. The company has identified the brands Power,
North Star, Bubble gummers, Marie Claire and Hush Puppies for the top end of the
market. Third in line will be family stores at commercial locations displaying basic
and mid-range footwear. At the bottom will be bazaar stores that will basically aim
at driving volume sales at lower price points.
The management of Nike India is taking major steps in terms of improving market
penetration, focus on stores configuration, distribution logistics, better industrial
relations and overhead rationalization. Launching of new products always
remained at the center stage of the companys operations.
At the same time, with the opening up of the economy, more and more goods will
be imported from China. This may significantly affect Nike Indias prospects unless

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it manages to wean away customers with a drastic cut in costs. Alternatively, like
other Indian manufacturers, even Nike may consider relocating its manufacturing
bases in China. However, it is not that easy a task to undertake.
Nike India, the 51% subsidiary of Toronto-based Nike Shoe Organization, remains
the biggest player in the Indian shoe market, though its share in footfalls has been
decreasing over the years.
Now in a determined bid to straddle across all product and price points, Nike India
has decided to restructure its 1,300-outlet strong retail business division along
specific customer segments into Bazaar, Family, and City and Flagship stores.
Nike India has decided to appoint brand managers for each product group in a
newfound aggression to tackle dwindling sales. Each of these managers assisted
by a dedicated team would be like a brand champion responsible for procurement,
production, advertisement, promotion and re-supply.
Nike India has roped in Ogilvy & Mother for devising its festive season advertising,
side-stepping JWT, its incumbent agency. The job involves developing special
communication directed towards the festival season shoppers.
Nike India Ltd (BIL) is Indias largest footwear company selling over 60 Mn pairs
per year in India, USA, UK, Europe, Middle East and Far East. BIL has a market
share of 60% in leather products and 70% in canvas shoes.
The footwear industry in India is highly fragmented and dominated by the
unorganized sector. The industry size is around Rs 75 Bn and is growing at around
10% annually. It competes with Indian players such as Liberty Shoes, Phoenix
International, Mirza Tanners, Tatas, Action Shoes and Lakhani Shoes and global
players like Adidas, Reebok and Nike. Accessories and garments contribute
footwear sales account for more than 96% of sales while the balance. The
turnover break up is as follows
Products Volume (%) Value (%)
Rubber and Canvas 50: 30
Leather 29 :57
Plastic 21: 9

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GROWTH DRIVERS
The company has a very comprehensive distribution network which comprises its
own and franchise stores. It has 1500 showrooms, 25 wholesale depots and 8
distribution centers.
POPULAR BRANDS
Nike owns brands like Hush Puppies, Signor, Marie Claire Power, Sandak, Hawai,
Naughty boy and Ambassador. It also distributes other brands such as Nike and
Lotto.
Focus on middle-class and upper class Nike will continue to focus on middle and
upper class customers. It is introducing budget stores which will help customers
to identify with the brand. It is also increasing focus on rural thrust for volume
growth in the low-priced footwear segment.
RISK AND CONCERN
Lifting of quantitative restriction on import of footwear will lead to the market
being flooded by imports. Labor issues have always bothered BIL and this resulted
in disruption of manufacturing activities on numerous occasions. Competition is
hotting up in the domestic market due to popular brands such as Gaitonde, Red
Tape, Lotus Bawa and Tatas. These brands are gaining market share especially in
the premium segment and in this segment BIL has no significant presence.
Latest Results Sales for Q3 FY2000 increased by 5.5% yoy to Rs1.7bn. profits
dropped by 90% yoy to Rs3.8 Mn due to lower operating margins and higher
depreciation and interest. Depreciation increased by 6.3% yoy to Rs 37 Mn while
interest cost increased by 9.3% yoy to Rs 23.4 Mn.
Operating margins dropped by 3.3% due to increase in input cost. The Peenya
plant has not commenced operations despite lifting up of the lock out since July 3,
2007.

VALUATION
BILs long-term success is dependent on the how labour issue is tackled and the
flexibility, which it can adopt to meet threat of imports and competition from local
footwear companies. Long term investors with a two-year investment horizon can
accumulate the stock at current levels. It is also increasing focus on rural thrust
for volume growth in the low-priced footwear segment.
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Lifting of quantitative restriction on import of footwear will lead to the market


being flooded by imports.
Labor issues have always bothered BIL and this resulted in disruption of
manufacturing activities on numerous occasions.
Competition is hotting up in the domestic market due to popular brands such as
Gaitonde, Red Tape, Lotus Bawa and Tatas. These brands are gaining market share
especially in the premium segment and in this segment BIL has no significant
presence.
Sales for Q1 CY2001 decreased marginally by 0.6% yoy to Rs 1590.7 mn. There
was a net loss of Rs 30.2 mn as against a profit of Rs 39.6 mn in the
corresponding period of the previous year. The loss is due to lower operating
margins and higher interest.
BILs long-term success is dependent on the labor issue and the flexibility, which it
can adopt to meet threat of imports and competition from local footwear
companies. Long term investors with a two-year investment horizon can
accumulate the stock at current levels.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
(In Rs Million) 200012 (12) 199912 (12) 199812 (12) Q1200103
Q1200003
Sales 7,315.70 7,103.90 6,353.20 1590.7 1600.9
% Growth 2.98 11.82 (0.6)
Net Profit 304.60 242.60 166.30 (30.2) 39.6
% Growth 25.56 45.88 (176)
EPS(Rs) 5.90 4.70 3.20 3.08
% Growth 25.53 46.88
Ratios 200012 (12) 199912 (12) 199812 (12) Q300009 Q399909
OPM(%) 9.77 9.08 7.16 1.09 6.9
NPM(%) 4.16 3.42 2.62 2.5
ROE(%) 8.95 7.44 5.31
Nike understated 9 month losses Brief Financials (in Rs. Mn.)Detailed Quarterly

19

Period ending (months)30-Sep-2007 (9)31-Dec-2006


(12)31-Dec-2006 (12)
Net sales 4980.206461.177172.91
Other Income42.1063.6165.21
Total Income5022.306524.777238.12
Cost of goods sold4974.706471.797051.76
OPBDIT47.6052.98186.36
PAT-117.20-74.1039.80
Gross Block-2191.072062.26
Equity capital-514.22514.22
EPS (Rs.)--1.440.77
DPS (Rs.)-0.000.75
BV (Rs.)-37.2738.71
P/E range (x)-0.0 - 0.00.0 - 0.0
Debt / Equity (x)-0.320.26
Operating margin (% of OI) 0.90.82.6
Net margin (% of OI)-2.3-1.10.5
As on 30 June 2007, the public, institutions and foreign bodies held
31.23%, 13.91% and 0.16% stake in the company, respectively

LITERATURE REVIEW
The study of consumer behavior has evolved since the Information Processing
Model (Bettman, 1979) assumed that the individual is logical in his/her buying
process. This model was criticized because it failed to treat different consumption
phenomena motivated by symbolic meanings (Holbrook and Hirschman, 1982).
Individuals are not always looking for efficiency and economy, but also for
distraction, aesthetic, expression, etc. (Boyd and Levy, 1963). Calling for a
broadening of theoretical frameworks of consumer behavior, many authors pleaded
in favor of the study of all consumption forms (Holbrook, 1986), being inspired by
European semi logy and American semiotic (Levy, 1959, 1963, 1981; Hirschman,
1980; Kehret-Ward, Johnson and Louie, 1985; Mick, 1986; Holbrook, 1986;
OShaughnessy and Holbrook, 1988; Nth, 1988; Stern, 1988; Grafton-Small and
Linstead, 1989). These are the study of signs, meanings and production of
symbols. Fantasy, emotion and pleasant aspects of consumption were then tackled
from an experiential point of view. The Experiential View is a phenomenological
perspective that perceives consumption as a primary state of consciousness having
20

a variety of symbolic meanings, responses and hedonist criteria (Holbrook and


Hirschman, 1982; Olshavsky and Granbois, 1979). The basis of the traditional
Information Processing Model is the optimization of the utility of a product under
the basis of a utilitarian evaluation of its tangible characteristics. Nevertheless, it
neglects emotional aspects. On the other hand, the Experiential View leaves out
different factors such as economic conditions, expectations, some elements of the
marketing mix (price, distribution), perceived risk and conflicts, but mostly the
social influence of the consumers reference groups (Holbrook and Hirschman,
1982; Business Central Europe, 1994) which is the aim of the Symbolic
Interactionism Perspective. Acquisition, possession and consumption are activities
taking place in a process of impressions creation or identity management which is,
according to Belk (1978), an interactive process concerning both the image of
goods consumed and that of the individuals consuming them. The Symbolic
Interactionism Perspective deals with the relationship between consumers and the
products they consume, and suggests that a significant proportion of consumption
behaviors consist of social behaviors, and vice versa (Solomon, 1983). This leads
us to consider the importance of socialization processes (family, reference groups)
through which individuals learn the meanings of symbols and those of
consumption. With the aforementioned meanings being negotiated and built
through interactions with others, consumption is not only an individual activity, but
also a social process of goods definition (Gallant and Kleinman, 1983). Since
individuals are often motivated to acquire products according to what they mean
to them and to members of their social reference groups (Leigh and Gabel, 1992),
their behavior is subject to the pressures of cultural norms and the expectations of
socialization institutions rules such as those coming from family and other
reference groups (Faber, OGuinn and McCarthy, 1987; Engel, Blackwell and
Miniard, 1993). Thus, Symbolic Interactionism Perspective considers the human
spirit as fundamentally social, and dependent on shared symbols. The symbols
being generated at a global level (Geertz, 1973; Solomon, 1983; McCracken,
1986, 1988; Leigh and Gabel, 1992), the Symbolic Interactionism Perspective
accepts as precept the fact that society and its culture precede every individual
action, and that a cultural consensus results from interactions, communication,
and negotiation between social actors (Charon, 1989).
If, at a conceptual level, the consumption good becomes an instrument of
communication, at an operational level, image variables may be regarded as the
intangible attributes of the product that carry cultural and social meanings.
According to Erickson, Johansson and Chao (1984), an image variable is defined as

21

some aspect of the product that is distinct from its physical characteristics but
that is nevertheless identified with the product. The image variables emerge from
four cognitive representations individuals have of their environment: the
symbolism of advertising, the celebrity endorsement, the brand, and the country
of origin of the product.
The made-in is considered by Dichter (1962) as the fifth element of the marketing
mix, and is defined as the country where are located the corporate headquarters
of the organization doing the marketing of the product or the brand (Johansson,
Douglas and Nonaka, 1985). The country of origin carries a rhetoric that influences
consumers preconceptions towards the products of a country. Its meaning can be
conceived as an indication serving as a basis of evaluation (Bilkey and Nes, 1982),
when one considers a product as a bundle of information. Consequently, according
to Kaynak and Cavusgil (1983), the images of a foreign country that are formed by
consumers are made of cognitive, affective and behavioral components. The first
one represents the perceived characteristics of the country. The second one
concerns the appreciation or not of those characteristics, and the third one
corresponds to the actions about the country that the consumer feels are
appropriate. A tendency to evaluate positively the local production compared to
imported production, and biases in favor of industrialized countries have been
found in previous studies (Bilkey and Nes, 1982; Cordell, 1992). This does not
mean the consumer will not buy the product, but rather that he is not inclined to
do so (Schooler, 1971). When entering foreign markets, sellers often face quotas,
tariffs, and non-tariff barriers. In addition, they may face an intangible barrier in
the form of consumer bias on the basis of product origin (Schooler, 1971).
The informational value of the country of origin was also found to vary according
to the level of involvement of the consumer in purchasing the product and the
presence of other cues such as brand name, guarantee and price (Ahmed and
dAstous, 1993). In a recently published meta-analysis of country-of-origin effects,
Peterson and Jolibert (1995) conclude that the average effect size is lower (0.19)
for purchase intention, higher (0.30) for quality/reliability perceptions and context
dependent. More specifically, they found that the characteristics of the study
(research design, type of respondents, study cues, sample size, stimulus context
etc.) influence the relative effect of country-of-origin to a lesser degree for
quality/reliability perceptions than for purchase intention. However, the type of
respondents (students, consumers or businesspeople) had no influence on
quality/reliability perceptions.

22

Stanford GSB marketing professor Itamar Simonson and Ran Kivetz, an assistant
professor at Columbia University, asked a group of 195 Columbia students to do;
eat a lot of sushi.Participants were offered a "frequent diner" program that would
reward them for their patronage at various university dining locations and given a
card that would track their purchases. They were randomly assigned to one of two
groups those in the "low" requirement group were told they would have to
purchase 12 sandwiches to get two free movie tickets, whereas those in the "high"
requirement group were told they would have to purchase 12 sandwiches and 12
orders of sushi to get two free movie tickets. So, the second group had to do much
more to receive the same reward. Kivetz and Simonson also asked participants
how much they liked sushi relative to the typical student. The result? Students
who liked sushi were much more likely to join the "frequent diner" program that
required them to purchase both 12 sandwiches and 12 orders of sushi. "It shows a
common mistake that consumers make & if they see an offer that seems to fit
them better than other consumers, for example, a program that requires sushilovers to eat sushi that fit completely colors their assessment of how attractive the
offer is," Simonson says. "As a result, by creating what appears like personal fit,
marketers can attract consumers to frequency programs and many other
promotional offers." Kivetz and Simonson replicated these findings regarding
influences on participation in frequency, or loyalty, programs in studies with
travelers interviewed at domestic airports.The sushi study is among a number of
studies Simonson has been conducting since the late 1980s about how consumers
make choices. Much of his work debunks the accepted theory that giving
consumers what they want and making a profit are the most basic principles of
marketing.
The theme that pervades Simonson's work is that customers may not know what
they want and second-guessing them can be expensive. In his words, The
benefits and costs of fitting individual customer preference are more complex and
less deterministic than has been assumed." That's because, Simonson says,
"customer preferences are often ill-defined and susceptible to various influences,
and in many cases, customers have poor insight into their preferences."
In another recent paper, Simonson tackles the issue of one-to-one marketing and
mass customization. Supporters of these marketing approaches have suggested
that learning what customers want and giving them exactly what they want will
create customer loyalty and an insurmountable barrier to competition. In an

23

example taken to the extreme in the 2007 movie Minority Report, Tom Cruise's
character Anderson runs through a shopping mall past talking billboards that
recognize him by name and urge him to buy products he has expressed interest in
such as jeans and Ray-Bans; the ultimate in personalized advertising. But
Simonson has this to say: "The fact that consumer preferences are often fuzzy,
unstable, and manipulatable is unlikely to change. So, the effectiveness of
methods to give customers exactly what they (say they) want has been grossly
exaggerated." His take on the long-held assumption that individual marketing will
supplant targeted marketing is "not so fast." That's because consumers are very
difficult to figure out, science fiction and technology notwithstanding.
"Furthermore, even when customers have well-defined preferences and receive
offers that fit those preferences, it is far from certain that the response to such
offers will consistently be more favorable than those directed at larger market
segments."
It's all psychology. Consumers with well-defined preferences may be skeptical that
a marketer could match expectations. Those who don't know what they want may
not ever see the fit with what the seller wants them to buy. So, individualized
offers depend on customers' preferences; how the offer was extended & and on
trust. "Effective individual marketing requires not only an understanding of
individual preferences and matching offers to those preferences, but also a
thorough familiarity with the various factors that impact customers' responses," he
writes.
This is a tall order, one that some companies have been able to fill at least to some
extent. For example, Amazon keeps track of customers purchases and suggests
other books they might like. Dell builds computers from mass-made parts to
customers' specifications. But Simonson argues some companies can take the
concept too far, like the Custom Foot chain of shoe stores that took detailed
measurements and specifications from each customer to design one-of-a-kind
shoes. Simonson argues that Custom Foot didn't take into account that some
customers were put off by the individualized attention and felt obligated to buy the
shoes because the store went to so much trouble. They often didn't come back.
Indeed, an Internet search produces no Website.
Simonson, who has received many prestigious awards for his research on
consumer behavior and marketing, teaches MBA and Ph.D. marketing and
consumer decision-making courses. The loyalty program article is slated for

24

publication in the Journal of Marketing Research this year.


Online customization gives consumers the opportunity to choose characteristics
they want in a product when they shop for it online. Many companies are looking
at online customization as the future of online business Janis Crow, Kansas State
University marketing instructor, researched how people make choices on the
Internet. She recently studied consumers in an online environment and their
ability to customize several products - pizza, shoes, and electronic devices.
Crow said that her study posed two questions for respondents: first, how difficult
is it to customize a product, and secondly, how likely is the person to purchase the
product he or she has customized?
All participants in the study chose to customize products. In terms of customers
likelihood to purchase, a greater number of customers made purchase decisions
when there are more options to choose, she said. However, it was slightly more
difficult when more features were offered.
She created a website where people could customize products to their individual
preferences and needs. Crow selected three generic products: pizza, shoes, and a
Personal Digital Assistant (PDA). Thirty-one college students took part in the
study.
"Students could customize the three products, and I provided a drop-down box on
the site with attributes to choose from," she explained. Consumers could click on a
drop-down box to customize a product they would want to purchase, she said. She
found that more people relied on the default choices rather than selecting other
choices that were offered. She said, some research suggests that many people do
not want to put a lot of effort into purchase decisions. "A lot of times, people may
not have preferences already in mind," she said. When consumers have the
chance to create preferences, the question is whether they rely on previous
preferences or if they develop new ones, she said. In the future, Crow says she
will be studying strategies that consumers go through during purchase decisions.
"I will be studying decision processes to develop computer aids that could help the
consumer reach their purchase decision," she said.
Although her current project involves analyzing the consumer behavior of college
students in an online environment, in future projects she plans to analyze other
demographic groups. Customization will be a key business opportunity in the

25

future for businesses online or in more typical shopping environments," Crow


said.
She hopes her research will help consumers in making purchase decisions and help
businesses determine products to offer and how to offer them.
Hong Kong companies, including leather consumer goods suppliers, have shown a
growing interest in tapping the mainland consumer market after China's accession
to the World Trade Organization and gradual opening of its domestic market. For
Hong Kong companies targeting this vast market, a good understanding of the
behavior of mainland consumers is necessary in order to formulate an effective
and suitable market strategy.
In view of this, the HKTDC conducted a survey study in four major mainland cities
in February 2007. The study was composed of two interlocking surveys. The first
survey (survey on shoppers) successfully interviewed a total of 1,000 shoppers of
leather consumer goods in four major cities, namely Beijing (BJ), Chengdu (CD),
Guangzhou (GZ) and Shanghai (SH). The second survey (survey on retailers)
interviewed managers/officers-in-charge of major department stores in these four
cities.
The survey study analyses leather consumer goods in terms of consumer behavior,
the competitiveness of Hong Kong brands and the consumer segments with the
greatest biggest spending power. The main survey findings are as follows:

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
Shopping locations, Department stores were the most preferred type of retailers,
followed by outlets in shopping malls and chain stores. Product variety, guaranteed
quality, brand choice, price, services and store environment were cited as the
major reasons for visiting a leather consumer goods store.
SHOPPING TIME
Thirty-eight percent of respondents visited leather consumer goods shops at least
once a month.
Shopping during weekends is common. Other popular shopping occasions include
National Day (1st October), Chinese New Year (January/February), New Year's Day
(January) and Labour Day (1st May).

26

MARKETING CHANNELS
Promotional activities in shopping malls and department stores are the most
popular promotional and sales activities, followed by discount/price reduction, TV
commercials, discount coupons, promotional stands, exhibitions, buy-one- (or
more) gets-one-free.
PURCHASING POWER
On average, respondents owned 4.2 pairs of shoes, 1.2 pieces of wallets, 1.3
pieces of belts and 1.3 pieces of handbags/briefcases. Over the past 12 months,
an average respondent's spending on leather consumer goods was as follows:
- Shoes: RMB 597 (total) RMB 328 (per pair)
- Wallet: RMB 226 (total) and RMB 193 (per piece)
- Belt: RMB 220 (total) and RMB 194 (per piece)
- Handbag/briefcase: RMB 476 (total) and RMB 359 (per piece)
SELECTION CRITERIA
When choosing leather consumer goods, product quality stood out as the principal
consideration for respondents, followed by product material, craftsmanship,
style/design, price and brand.
POPULAR BRANDS
Most respondents considered brands important.

4PS OF NIKE
Nikes 4Ps comprised of the following approaches to pricing, distribution,
advertising and promotion, and customer service:
Pricing: Nikes pricing is designed to be competitive to the other fashion shoe
retailers. The pricing is based on the basis of premium segment as target
customers. Nike as a brand commands high premium.
Place: Nike shoes are distributed to Multi Brand store front and the exclusive Nike
stores across countries. While this necessitates a second trip for the customer to
come and pick up the shoes, it allows Nike to offer a much wider selection than
any of the competition.

27

Promotion: Location, targeted advertising in the newspaper and strategic alliances


serves as the foundation of Nike advertising and promotion effort. The athletes
and other famous sports personalities are always taken as brand ambassadors.
They form the prime building blocks of their portion strategy.
Product: The product range of Nike comprise of shoes, sports wear, watches etc.
Its product history began with long distance running shoes in 1963. (Past 17
years: Air Jordan basketball shoes). Wide range of shoes, apparel and equipment.
For example:
Nike Oregon Digital Super Watch
Nike Presto Cee Digital Medium Watch
Nike Presto Cee Digital Small Watch
Nike Ron Analog Watch
Nike Triax 10 Regular Watch
Nike Triax Armored II Analog Super Watch
Nike Women's Imara Fit Digital Watch

SWOT ANALYSIS
SWOT ANALYSIS NIKE, INC.
STRENGTHS
Nike is a very competitive organization. Phil Knight (Founder and CEO) is often
quoted as saying that 'Business is war without bullets.' Nike has a healthy dislike
of is competitors. At the Atlanta Olympics, Reebok went to the expense of
sponsoring the games. Nike did not. However Nike sponsored the top athletes and
gained valuable coverage.
Nike has no factories. It does not tie up cash in buildings and manufacturing
workers. This makes a very lean organization. Nike is strong at research and
development, as is evidenced by its evolving and innovative product range. They
then manufacture wherever they can produce high quality product at the lowest
possible price. If prices rise, and products can be made more cheaply elsewhere
(to the same or better specification), Nike will move production.
28

Nike is a global brand. It is the number one sports brand in the World. Its famous
'Swoosh' is instantly recognizable, and Phil Knight even has it tattooed on his
ankle.
WEAKNESSES
The organization does have a diversified range of sports products. However, the
income of the business is still heavily dependent upon its share of the footwear
market. This may leave it vulnerable if for any reason its market share erodes.
The retail sector is very price sensitive. Nike does have its own retailer in Nike
Town. However, most of its income is derived from selling into retailers. Retailers
tend to offer a very similar experience to the consumer. Can you tell one sports
retailer from another? So margins tend to get squeezed as retailers try to pass
some of the low price competition pressure onto Nike.
OPPORTUNITIES
Product development offers Nike many opportunities. The brand is fiercely
defended by its owners whom truly believe that Nike is not a fashion brand.
However, like it or not, consumers that wear Nike product do not always buy it to
participate in sport. Some would argue that in youth culture especially, Nike is a
fashion brand. This creates its own opportunities, since product could become
unfashionable before it wears out i.e. consumers need to replace shoes.
There is also the opportunity to develop products such as sport wear, sunglasses
and jewellery. Such high value items do tend to have associated with them, high
profits.
The business could also be developed internationally, building upon its strong
global brand recognition. There are many markets that have the disposable income
to spend on high value sports goods. For example, emerging markets such as
China and India have a new richer generation of consumers. There are also global
marketing events that can be utilized to support the brand such as the World Cup
(soccer) and The Olympics.
THREATS
Nike is exposed to the international nature of trade. It buys and sells in different
currencies and so costs and margins are not stable over long periods of time. Such
an exposure could mean that Nike may be manufacturing and/or selling at a
29

loss. This is an issue that faces all global brands.


The market for sports shoes and garments is very competitive. The model
developed by Phil Knight in his Stamford Business School days (high value
branded product manufactured at a low cost) is now commonly used and to an
extent is no longer a basis for sustainable competitive advantage. Competitors are
developing alternative brands to take away Nike's market share.
As discussed above in weaknesses, the retail sector is becoming price
competitive. This ultimately means that consumers are shopping around for a
better deal. So if one store charges a price for a pair of sports shoes, the
consumer could go to the store along the street to compare prices for the exactly
the same item, and buy the cheaper of the two. Such consumer price sensitivity is
a potential external threat to Nike.
DATA ANALYSIS

1. Demography of respondents
ANALYSIS:
It was observed that the majority of the respondents consist of professional from
various fields like engineers, software professionals, working executive etc. who
effective form 38% of our database. While 36% were students from various fields.
Others constitute designers and athletes etc. the further study is carried on the
buying behavior of the above mentioned categories of consumer, which shows that
our consumer is well educated and is very well informed about the product.
2. Consumers income level and spending capacity on shoes

ANALYSIS:
In the survey conducted a direct relation between the income level and the
spending capacity was observed. Also it was found that students were spending in
the range of Rs 1000 Rs 3000 as compared to the working class professionals
who were ready to spend between Rs 3000 Rs 6000, since they have higher
spending power because of higher income levels.

30

SHOPPING SEASON
ANALYSIS:
Amongst the student and the professional it was found the consumer buying
BEHAVIOR does not change with respect to the seasons and occasion as most of
the consumer would like to buy their shoes as and when need arises, whereas the
businessman generally do their shoes shopping during traveling or on special
occasions.

BRAND RECOLLECTION:
ANALYSIS:
When asked about reconciling a sports shoes brand about 70% of the respondent
were able to recall REEBOK or ADDIDAS were as rest were able to remember NIKE
and FILA brands. This was due to the fact that REEBOK has brand ambassador like
RAHUL DRAVID and YUVRAJ SINGH.

FACTOR INFLUENCING THE BUYING PROCESS:


ANALYSIS:
Among the various factors like social, psychological, personal and cultural factors it
was observed that the consumer give more preference to his personal choice and
psychological factors like 50% of the people consider comfort and they generally
do not consider durability as an important aspect because they believe that it
comes along with the brand. Also the social factor like style was second most
important factor behind the consumer buying motives.

(B) COMPARISON WITH OTHER BRANDS


ANALYSIS:
In response to the question about giving, out of 100 point to the various factors
affecting their buying BEHAVIOR between NIKE and OTHERS following was
observed:
OTHERS NIKE
a. Style ____20____ ___30_____
31

b. Price ____10____ ___10_____


c. Comfort _____30___ ___30_____
d. Brand ____10____ ___20_____
e. Durability _____30___ ___10____
this further shows that the consumer look for style in the NIKE more in
comparison to the other brand hence, gave their 30 points to it whereas 20 in case
of other brands it was seen that the comfort remains at equal place even while
choosing a competitive brand.

BUYING FORCES
ANALYSIS:
It was observed that consumer is forced by no factors like peer pressure, family
and friends and some time people would like to buy a product because it is being
endorsed by their favorite celebrity. It was observed that the beside that personal
choice of the respondent, the pressure from the friends plays an important buying
force for the students, while the peer and college in case of the professional and
the least pursuing factor is family which was seen in case of the respondents
belonging to age group 35 years and above.

NO OF PEOPLE BUYING NIKESHOES & REEBOK SHOES:


ANALYSIS:
This question was asked to know the market capture by the REEBOK and the time
period of association of the customers with REEBOK. It was deduced that more
than 75% of the respondents were using the REEBOK shoes and were mainly
associated with it for a period of 1 year or more. While the remaining respondents
were using either the NIKE or ADDIDAS brand shoes.

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:
ANALYSIS:

32

Because of the quality product offered by the REEBOK about 60% of the
respondents were either very satisfied or satisfied, while 10% did not gave any
response as they were not using the REEBOK shoes.
3. Do you ask for a specific brand by name?
90% people say yes to this. and the remaining 10% say no.
4. Which brand do you generally use?
People in India prefer Nike the most as we can see that 24% % people prefer Nike
sports wear. Then comes Adidas and Reebok.
5. Has any sports shoes ad (seen on TV/in a magazine) made an impact on you?
YES NO IF YES, THEN WHY
NIKE 43 57
ADIDAS 63 37
REEBOK 45 55
ACTION 30 70
Most of the people are influenced with Adidass ad, then with Reebok and then
Nike. The most un-influential is that of action.
6. What according to you is the relative importance of the following?
V. Imp Imp. Not so Imp. Doesnt matter
PRICE 50 28 12 10
DURABILITY 55 45 0 0
BRAND IMAGE 40 20 15 15
COMFORTABLE 54 36 10 0
LOOKS 40 40 15 5
By this we infer that the consumer wants the shoe to be durable that is of primary
importance for them. Then the price is also very important for them. The shoe
should be comfortable. Along with that looks and the brand image is also
important.
7. What features of Nike do you like the most?
The most liked feature of Nike is the light weight shoe. Then it is the enhanced toe
support. From here we can infer that most important aspect for the consumers is
33

the comfort they get from the shoes.


8. What range you prefer?
Larger number of people goes in for shoes that come under the range of Rs. 15003500. A s we know that Nike is a premium brand 27% of the buy shoes that falls
under the range of Rs. 3500-7500 and lesser no. of people buy shoes ranging in
between 3500 and 5500.
9. How often you buy Nike?
62% of the consumers buy Nike only once a year. Here we notice one thing that
some dont buy Nike.
10. Are you satisfied buying Nike?
The people who buy Nike are fully satisfied buying it, their percentage is 64%.
Only 15 % are not satisfied buying it.
11. Do you think Nike serves the purpose of being a good brand, for Sports wear?
56% of the people agree that Nike serves its purpose for being a sport brand. Only
27% people dont agree with it.
12. Will you prefer Nike launching a new range which can serve the purpose of
service class?
67% say yes to the idea of launching a new range for the service class. 36 dont
have any idea of this.

CONCLUSION & FINDINGS


The specific brand objective of Nike India would be to build up its brand
reputation, image and equity. A brand is not simply a collection of products and
benefits, but also a storehouse of value stemming from awareness, loyalty, and
association of quality and brand personality. A brand is a name, term, sign, symbol
or design or a combination of them intended to identify the goods or services of
one seller or group of sellers and to differentiate from those of competitors. In
essence, a brand identifies the seller or maker. It can convey up to six levels of
meaning: Attributes, Benefits, Values, Culture, Personality and User. If a company
treats a brand only as a name it misses the point. The branding challenge is to
develop a deep set of positive associations for the brand.
Although these six meanings are noticeable in the Nike brand in the west and
other parts of the world, they are yet to be cultivated in India. Nike has to ensure
that their brand is built up on these pillars in India.
34

The secondary brand objective of Nike India would be to ensure that they match
the market share and sales volumes of its competitors. After all, a company is in
business to make profits and stay ahead of its competitors. A company, product or
brand may have a very good reputation and image, but if it is not profitable, it
does serve its purpose. At the same time sales figures and data can be misleading.
Hence market share has also to be paid attention to.
Nike despite being one of the most popular brands in the world has not really
caught on in India. Yet, there is reason to believe that Batas Power and Liberty
would be ahead of Nike in terms of popularity. We also notice that Nike is at par
with Reebok. This again does not reflect too well on the brand, considering that
Nike outsells Reebok everywhere else in the world.
Hence it is reasonable to state that Nikes popularity level in India could do with a
boost. The best way to achieve this would be some serious brand building. The
image of the brand has to be improved and people must be made aware of its
presence. Thus, the rationale behind choosing improvement of brand image and
reputation as the companys primary objective is quite clear.
Nikes distinctive competency lies in the area of marketing, particularity in the area
of consumer brand awareness and brand power. On the global scale this key
distinctive competency towers over the competitors. As a result, Nikes market
share is number-one in the athletic footwear industry in most places around the
world. Catch phrases like, "Just Do It," and symbols like the Nike "Swoosh," couple
with sports icons to serve as instant reminders of the Nike Empire. It is about time
that this competency is leveraged on to India.
Two key attributes of a distinctive competency are its inability to be easily
replicated and the value or benefit it offers to consumers. Few companies have
such a recognizable image and the resources to promote it. This ultimately
translates into added value for consumers. The public benefits from the strength of
Nikes image at the point of purchase. For decades, consumers have come to
associate the Nike image with quality products. By associating star athletes and
motivational slogans like, "Just Do It," with marketing campaigns that emphasize
fitness, competition, and sportsmanship, consumers identify their purchases with
the prospect of achieving greatness. Younger consumers especially benefit from
this positive influence. This image is something that competing companies can not

35

easily duplicate by simply enhancing the physical characteristics of their products.


Nikes vision is to remain the leader in the industry. The company will continue to
produce the quality products that have been provided in the past. Most
importantly, Nike will continue to meet the ever-changing needs of the customers,
through product innovation. In the past, the company has utilized product
differentiation as the main competitive strategy. As Nikes reputation dictates, it
will continue to place emphasis in this area. Nike has built its business on
providing products that rise above all others and this has made it the worldwide
success that it is today.
Nike is known for its technologically advanced products and is the leader in this
area. This allows Nikes products to stand out from the rest. The companys focus
also allows it to maintain a somewhat narrow niche that enables it to effectively
capture the needs and wants of the consumers. An example of Nikes superior and
innovative technology is its new range of shoes called Air Presto. Termed as the
first T-shirt for the feet, these shoes can take the shape and size of the wearers
feet. Unlike regular shoes it comes are sizes like XL, L, M, S and XS. Each of these
sizes can accommodate three conventional foot sizes. Nike will continue to produce
such path-breaking products in the future and stay a step ahead of its
competitors.
Nike will also focus on making a strong effort in price leadership. Nikes products in
the past have been concentrated in the higher end of the pricing category. An
entrance will now be made into lower price categories with these quality products.
This will enable Nike to capture an even greater hold on market share.

Presently, the only form of customer relationship management activity that Nike
has adopted in India is product warranty. Nike shoes come with a six-month
warranty. If the shoe is found to be defective or wears out within six months due
to no fault of the wearer, Nike replaces the product. This is only the first step and
more needs to be dome in this area.
Being a company that always strives towards excellence, Nike needs to know
exactly what its customers think about their products. A good way of assessing
this would be to have the customer fill in a form at the point of purchase. The form
will ask the customer his / her opinion on the product as well as the showroom.
Suggestions and comments would be welcome. However, care must be taken to

36

ensure that these forms are not too cumbersome and do not take up too much of
the customers time. Surveys have indicated that normally people dont mind filling
in forms as long as they are not too long.
Another good method would be to introduce a system of customer points. Every
time a customer makes a purchase, he would earn himself a certain number of
points, depending on the price of the product. After he crosses a certain point
level, he would be entitled to a gift from the company or choose a product of a
certain value from the range. This would be helpful in building customer loyalty
and give them an incentive to make repeat purchases. A most valued customer
database could be created from her e and various forms of direct marketing could
be directed at them. This would help the company to retain its existing customers.
A third way to improve customer relationship would be to issue gift coupons and
vouchers. People would have the facility to buy these vouchers and present them
to their dear ones. This would be a good way to reach out towards newer
customers through existing ones.

RECOMMENDATIONS

To explore the mainland market, Hong Kong companies should position themselves
in areas in which they are strong. From the viewpoint of mainland consumers,
Hong Kong's leather consumer goods are considered competitive in the high-end
and mid-range. Mainland consumers are brand conscious, and it is vital to promote
own brands which have clear image.
This survey also shows that Hong Kong products are preferred for their
design/style and quality. Bearing these in mind, Hong Kong companies should
never compromise on quality, and they should allocate more resources to product
design, selection of material and craftsmanship.

37

OTHER SUGGESTION INCLUDE


Department stores are the prime sales and marketing channel for leather
consumer goods. In addition, store decorations and product displays should be
designed to create a strong first impression. Seasonal promotion campaigns, like
special discounts and advertisements, could be employed. New lines of collections
should be introduced for festivals.
In addition to promotional activities in shopping malls and department stores,
discounts and TV commercials are considered effective channels for promotion. It
is advisable to pay attention to the affordability of customers in different cities,
while setting price points for different product categories. Meanwhile, leather
shoes offer better growth potential.
Popular materials used for leather consumer goods include bovine skin,
goat/kid/lamb/sheep skin and crocodile skin. Regarding colors, black is by far most
sought-after with dark brown in second place.
Due to their growing spending power, the rising middle class should be the target
of Hong Kong's sellers of leather consumer goods. Hong Kong companies should
put more emphasis on products for business use. In addition, it is useful to
introduce appropriate designs that cater for the tastes of the middles class.
Double Click 2006 Consumer Email Study October 2006, the fourth of Double-Click
annual consumer email studies points to an increasing sophistication in consumer
usage of email functionality and a corresponding complexity of purchasing
behavior. The Spam crisis continues to affect consumer behavior online but does
not necessarily cloud consumer receptiveness to legitimate marketers: an
overwhelming majority of online consumers receive offers by email and have made
a purchase online or offline as a result. Consumers are using available tools to
limit spam and are employing operate email accounts for purchasing, all in
attempts to increase control and improve their email experience. Working with
Beyond Interactive and the NFO//net source panel of 900,000 US consumers,
polled 1,000consumers via email from July 30 - August5, 2007. All respondents
recruited use email/internet 1+ times per week, which reflects the usage of the
larger online population (94% of the 18+ online population according to Nielsen,
2006).There was an equal segmentation of men and women and the average age
was 42.7.This is the fourth of an annual series of consumer research studies and
38

trending information was derived using the data from previous years. The sample
mirrored previous studies and is reflective of the online population as a whole.
Key Findings The majority of consumers receive some kind of marketing email with
special offers from retailers most common Sender recognition most impacts
operates, while content relevance increases likeliness to purchase Frequency
ascertain category, are very specific to the category of email but vary greatly from
one consumer to the next; frequency of permission based email is clearly a great
concern to consumers and has an impact on what they consider to be Spam. Email
drives multi-channel purchases and has an immediate as well as a latent Nearly
64% of consumers cite the line as the most important factor in opening an
email.2006 Consumer Email Study impact. It drives consumers most often to the
online channel but also results in retail and catalog sales. Consumers have become
sophisticated in their use of ISP-supplied tools to limits Pam and in their usage of
various email addresses to manage their varied email activities Home and free
email addresses are most often used for purchasing, within email address
specifically designated for that usage. Men and women have radically different
ideas of what spam is and different purchasing behavior related to Spam. Women
are more receptive to promotions and discounts and correspondingly more
interested in and tolerant of marketing emails than men. Receptiveness to
Marketer Emails. The vast majority (91%) of consumers receive some form of
permission-based email with 57.2% receiving special offers from online
merchants, 55.4% receiving them from traditional retailers, and 48.5%receiving
them from catalogers. Other popular types of marketing emails included account
statements/online bill payment information (received by 49.8% of respondents),
travel emails (43.3%), coupons for groceries (40.0%), health (41.1%) and
household tips/recipes/crafts (42.1%). Of categories in which consumers do not
currently receive e-mails, respondents are most interested in receiving grocery
coupons (cited by 22.1%) and household tips/recipes/crafts (13.6%).Other
categories of strong interest were electronics and computer software/hardware,
13.8% and apparel/shoes at12.3%. Permission-based email also continues to be
the preferred method of contact from the favorite retailer regarding new products,
services or promotions (preferred by 59% of consumers), while only 32.1%
preferred direct mail. Sender Recognition, Content Relevance Most Impacts
Purchasing consideration behavior, the line continues to be the most compelling
reason to open permission-based email, cited by 63.3% of all respondents, an
increase from 59.9% in2005. This speaks to the growing significance of user
recognition of sender and the power of brands even more important in an era
of spam. Of all types of subject lines, discount offers are the primary motivational

39

factor for opening permission based email (increased to59.5% of all respondents
from 56.7% in 2007), while compelling news and information fell from 57.6% of
all respondents to 48.6% in 2006.Special offers from retailers/catalogers received
by at least 50% of respondents
When asked what most compelled them to take action on a permission-based
email, product I needed at the time, a reflection of the relevancy of the offer, was
noted by37.8% of all respondents, outranking the next most common choice,
special offer or discount, cited by 35.0% of respondents. Likeliness to respond
could be increased if an email contains relevant information (noted by 67.3% of
respondents) and contains information based on interests specified to that
company. Consumers found recommendations based on past purchasing behavior
less appealing (noted by only 28.1% of all respondents).Consumers clearly want a
degree of control over what marketers send them and would like their specified
interests taken into account. Consumers are also very specific in their frequency
preferences, with news and weather most often preferred daily, special offers from
retailers, online merchants and catalogers most often preferred weekly, and
account statements/bill payment communications monthly. However, therere
significant numbers of consumers who vary in these preferences, with just
over20% of those who receive special offers and discounts from retailers, online
merchants and catalogers preferring the communications to come monthly. In
accordance with specified frequency statements, when asked what concerned
them about their inboxes, frequency of permission-based email was second only to
Spam, cited by 42% of respondents. This danger is even more pronounced
considering only 28% noted frequency of permission-based email as a concern
in2006. Clearly marketers need to test for optimal frequency and solicit customer
preferences. Email Drives Multi-Channel Purchases But at the Expense of Offline
Retail Permission-based emails clearly drives purchases. Sixty-seven percent of
respondents received an email offer from a Consumers take action on emails
corresponding to product need Relevant content, information specified by user
increases likeliness to respond 2007 Consumer Email Study, Cataloger or online
merchant that resulted in a purchase. Top purchasing categories were:
apparel/shoes at 83.4%making a purchase, computer software/hardware at
81.4%, gifts/flower sat 77.6%, travel at 77.2%, electronics at77.1% and food at
71.7%. The only under performing category was financial products and services at
41.5%, which could relate to the high consideration necessary for these products,
the incidence of spam in this category or lack of interest due to the economy. The
channel purchased in as a result of permission-based email is highly specific to the

40

category of product: travel had the highest incidence of online purchase at70%
with only 13% purchasing by catalog/phone/mail, while apparel/shoes had a
relatively high incidence of online purchase, 58% with 41% purchasing via offline
retail and 23% via catalog, and over the counter and prescription drugs had equal
levels of online and retail purchase at 32%.Email marketing promotes use of the
online channel. In comparing the typical channel purchase behavior of respondents
in a variety of categories to where they were most likely to purchase after
receiving permission based email, the results show that respondents are more
likely than usual to use the online channel for purchasing after receiving a
permission based email; this is true in all categories except financial services. In
apparel/shoes, where 31% would typically buy online, a permission-based email
resulted in an increase of online channel usage to 58%, gifts/flowers saw online
channel lift from 45%to 61%, and electronics from 45% to 60%.For consumers
who receive email offers from retailers in the apparel/shoes category, email
marketing does increase use of the catalog channel. Of those who receive emails
from catalogers, 16% reported that they typically bought via catalogs. This
number rose to 23% saying they had purchased though a catalog after receiving
permission based email. This example illustrates the direct connection between
catalog drops with effectively sequenced email marketing used as a purchase
driver. The Latent Impact of Email Marketing Most action taken in response to
email marketing does not result immediately from the click. While 27% clicked
through and made a purchase during that same online session, an even greater
number, 33.6%, clicked through to find out more information, then purchased
online at a later date. An additional 12.2% clicked through to find more
information and then purchase offline through catalog or retail. Permission-based
offers generate sales.
As was demonstrated by the great interesting discounts and special offers, email
usage for composing is on the rise and as offline thus latent impact as well.
Seventy two percent of respondents reported having used coupons or offer codes
(an increase of 57% over the 46%who reported using them in 2007). Fifty-eight
percent of respondents used the coupon or offer code at an offline store. All of this
latent activity resulting from email marketing demands that marketers increase
their own cross-channel sophistication in data capture: unless theyre measuring
both online and offline purchase activity, immediate and latent impact, they are
not capturing the full effect of their email performance. Consumers Become More
Selective in their Practices, Increasingly Use Tools to Limit SPAME mail volume as
reported by consumers was up but not markedly so (264 emails per week vs. 254

41

in 2007). Spam remained the number-one concern about their email box, noted by
89% of respondents (consistent with last year).The percent of email received that
was Spam 56% was also consistent with2007. What have changed are their
opening practices: Only 27% opened 90% of their permission based email, while
about a third (30%) did so in 2007. In regards to what they are most likely to do
with Spam, an increasing number are deleting without reading (65% as compared
to60% in 2007) and only 4% are reading to determine whether it is of interest (as
compared to 5% in 2007 and 18% in2006). The likeliness of unsubscribe has
declined markedly (from 33% in2006 to 24% in 2007).
Perhaps consumers have gotten fed up or decided the activity was futile. When
asked what specifically they were doing to eliminate or limit spam, a vocal
minority, 36.1% reported using a Spam function of their email program,
15.9%downloaded spam filtering software and13.7% created a secondary email
addressor making online purchases. A key finding of the 2005 study had been the
usage of on average 2.6 email addresses per respondent. This year, respondents
have clearly become tired of the complexity of managing those accounts: this year,
only 34% reported having more than two addresses while44% reported having
that many in 2007.Respondents seem to be consolidating, with an average number
of accounts at2.3 in 2007.Latent impact: nearly 46% purchase online or offline
some time after clicking through an email With more than one in-box, what do
consumers consider the primary address? Perhaps in relation to the amount of job
instability and the desire of having a more permanent address, the home address
was considered the primary one. Of those with multiple addresses, 74% had a
specific email address that they used for online purchasing, with either the home
address (cited by 48.3%) and a free address (cited by 39.7%) as this purchasing
address. Retail-oriented email marketers clearly need to make special efforts at
improving deliverability among the major home ISPs and free email providers as
this clearly will impact overall performance. Mars & Venus: Men Really Are
Different from Women in Respect to Email Marketing Two very specific areas stand
out in how men vs. women react to email marketing: men have a much broader
definition of Spam, while women are much more likely to be active purchasers as a
result of permission-based email. More men than women consider spam to fall into
these very broad definitions: 65% cited an email from a company that I have done
business with but comes too often while only 56% of women did so, 61% of men
cited an email that may have been permission based but comes too frequently
while only 55% of women did so and 36% cited any email that tries to sell me a
product or service while 32% of women did so. Correspondingly, women are more

42

sensitive to emails of offensive subject matter (94% women vs. 91% men) .Active
purchasers, those who purchased in multiple product categories or from various
types of companies (multi-channel shoppers) after receiving an email, are more
likely to be women than men. Aloof these data points add up to online behavior
that mirrors offline.
Women remain the primary household purchasers, 2007 Consumer Email Study
Respondents with multiple accounts likely to use a free one for online purchases
Women more likely to be active purchasers, multi-channel purchasers.
The fourth of Double-Click annual consumer email studies points to an increasing
sophistication in consumer usage of email functionality and a corresponding
complexity of purchasing behavior. The Spam crisis continues to affect consumer
behavior online but does not necessarily cloud consumer receptiveness to
legitimate marketers: an overwhelming majority of online consumers receive
offers by email and have made a purchase online or offline as a result. Consumers
are using available tools to limit spam and are employing separate email accounts
for purchasing, all in attempts to increase control and improve their email
experience. Objectives/Methodology Double-Click, working with Beyond Interactive
and the NFO//net source panel of 900,000 US consumers, polled 1,000consumers
via email from July 30 - August5, 2007. All respondents recruited use
email/internet 1+ times per week, which reflects the usage of the larger online
population (94% of the 18+ online population according to Nielsen, 2007).There
was an equal segmentation of men and women and the average age was 42.7.This
is the fourth of an annual series of consumer research studies and trending
information was derived using the data from previous years. The sample mirrored
previous studies and is reflective of the online population as a whole. Key Findings
The majority of consumers receive some kind of marketing email with special
offers from retailers, online merchants and catalogers most common Two to one
consumers prefer to be contacted by their favorite retailer regarding new products,
services or promotions via email rather than direct mail. Sender recognition most
impacts operates, while content relevance increases likeliness to purchase
Frequency preferences, or how often respondents prefer to receive emails of
ascertain category, are very specific to the category of email but vary greatly from
one Consumers prefer to be contacted by their favorite retailer via email.

ANNEXURE

43

QUESTIONNAIRE
1 I buy my own shoes
Very frequently
frequently
sometimes
never
2 I find buying shoes a pleasurable event.
Very frequently
frequently
sometimes
never
3. I buy costly shoes
Very frequently
frequently
sometimes
never
4 for purchasing shoes, I can travel long distance
Very frequently
frequently
sometimes
never
5 I buy shoes which are liked by my family
Strongly agree
Agree
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
6 I buy shoes which are advertised attractitively
Strongly agree
Agree
Indifferent

44

Disagree
Strongly disagree
7 I buy shoes which are advertised and endorsed by celebrity.
8 I like to buy shoes which are imported from Paris or Italy.
Strongly agree
Agree
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
9. I like to buy shoes which are designed in Paris or Italy.
10. I like to buy shoes which are very stylish & of latest design.
Strongly agree
Agree
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
11. I like to buy shoes which are less expensive but very stylish & of latest design.
Strongly agree 30.00
Agree 50.00
Indifferent 14.00
Disagree 4.00
Strongly disagree 2.00
12. I Like to buy shoes which are not very stylish but comfortable (%.of
Respondents)
Strongly agree 10.00
Agree 30.00
Indifferent 18.00
Disagree 32.00
Strongly disagree 10.00
13. I Like to buy shoes which are not stylish but comfortable and long lasting
Strongly agree
45

Agree
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
14 I Like to buy shoes which are expensive & stylish but comfortable strongly
agree
Agree
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
15 I like to buy Nike shoes which are expensive & stylish but comfortable
Strongly agree 8.00
Agree 24.00
Indifferent 4.00
Disagree 2.00
Strongly disagree 2.00

16 I like to buy Nike shoes which are not very stylish but comfortable
Strongly agree 12.00
Agree 16.00
Indifferent 2.00
Disagree 8.00
Strongly disagree 2.00
17 I like to buy Nikeshoes which are not stylish but comfortable and long lasting
Strongly agree 8.00
Agree 16.00
Indifferent 2.00
Disagree 12.00
Strongly disagree 2.00
18 I like to buy Nikeshoes which are not very stylish but comfortable
46

Strongly agree 14.00


Agree 16.00
Indifferent
Disagree
Strongly disagree
19 I like to buy Nikeshoes which are less expensive but very stylish & of latest
design.
Strongly agree 4.00
Agree 10.00
Indifferent 4.00
Disagree 14.00
Strongly disagree 4.00
20 I like to buy Nikeshoes which are very stylish & of latest design.
Strongly agree 2.00
Agree 6.00
Indifferent 8.00
Disagree 22.00
Strongly disagree 2.00
21 I like to buy Tailor made shoes which are very stylish & of latest design.
Strongly agree 10.00
Agree 38.00
Indifferent 24.00
Disagree 16.00
Strongly disagree 12.00
22 I will certainly buy shoes if high quality matching imitation jewelry given free.
Strongly agree 36.00
Agree 56.00
Indifferent 4.00
Disagree 4.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
23 I will certainly buy shoes if high quality imported scent given free.
47

Strongly agree 38.00


Agree 60.00
Indifferent 2.00
Disagree 2.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
24 My expectation is fulfilled by my shoe supplier.
Strongly agree 6.00
Agree 24.00
Indifferent 42.00
Disagree 8.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
25 Shoe companies should survey customer preferences.
Strongly agree 24.00
Agree 56.00
Indifferent 16.00
Disagree 2.00
Strongly disagree 2.00
26 Shoe companies should suggest shoe design using celebrity.
Strongly agree 32.00
Agree 52.00
Indifferent 14.00
Disagree 2.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
27 I know exactly what I want in my shoes.
Strongly agree 8.00
Agree 26.00
Indifferent 24.00
Disagree 22.00
Strongly disagree 20.00
28 I dont want to spend too much time on deciding my shoes.
Strongly agree 28.00
Agree 58.00

48

Indifferent 8.00
Disagree 6.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
29 Stores display is the best form of advertisement
Strongly agree 24.00
Agree 48.00
Indifferent 10.00
Disagree 4.00
Strongly disagree 0.00
30 T.V advertisement is the best form of advertisement
Strongly agree 16.00
Agree 52.00
Indifferent 4.00
Disagree 16.00
Strongly disagree 12.00
31 Buying customized shoe by internet is very attractive.
Strongly agree 24.00
Agree 52.00
Indifferent 4.00
Disagree 16.00
Strongly disagree 4.00
32 Buying customized shoe by internet is very attractive. But no spam mail.
Strongly agree 16.00
Agree 28.00
Indifferent 2.00
Disagree 10.00
Strongly disagree 44.00

BIBLIOGRAPHY
49

BOOKS
Marketing Management - Philip Kotler
Consumer Behavior, 6th Edition, by Hawkins, Best ad Coney.

WEBSITES
Nikebiz : NIKE, Inc. Official Site, the world?s largest, leading athletic brand[/url]
Nike town:

Business.com: - The Business Search Engine and Business Directory for


Business Information[/url]

Apna Bangalore: ]Apnabangalore.com [Home][/url]


Indiainfoline: Indiainfoline.com-Comprehensive information on stock market,
equity, derivatives, companies, Commodities,Forex, Global markets, Mutual fund,
IPO,Personal Finance, insurance, Loans, Credit
cards,money,debt,mortgages,economy,sector[/url]
Nikes online store for India: [

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