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RP 32-3

INSPECTION AND TESTING OF


IN-SERVICE CIVIL AND MECHANICAL
PLANT-MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
October 1998

Copyright The British Petroleum Company p.l.c.

Copyright The British Petroleum Company p.l.c.


All rights reserved. The information contained in this document is subject to the terms
and conditions of the agreement or contract under which the document was supplied to
the recipient's organisation. None of the information contained in this document shall be
disclosed outside the recipient's own organisation without the prior written permission of
Manager, Standards, BP International Limited, unless the terms of such agreement or
contract expressly allow.

BP GROUP RECOMMENDED PRACTICES AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR ENGINEERING

Issue Date
Doc. No.

RP 32-3

October 1998

Latest Amendment Date

Document Title

INSPECTION AND TESTING OF


IN-SERVICE CIVIL AND MECHANICAL
PLANT-MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

APPLICABILITY
Regional Applicability:

International

SCOPE AND PURPOSE


This Recommended Practice gives guidance on the organising and management of
Inspection and Testing of In-Service Civil and Mechanical Plant and is for use onshore
and offshore.
Its purpose is to define organisational responsibilities and procedures based on
economical safe practice.

AMENDMENTS
Amd
Date
Page(s)
Description
___________________________________________________________________

CUSTODIAN (See Quarterly Status List for Contact)

Inspection
Issued by:Engineering Practices Group, BP International Limited, Research & Engineering Centre
Chertsey Road, Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex, TW16 7LN, UNITED KINGDOM
Tel: +44 1932 76 4067
Fax: +44 1932 76 4077
Telex: 296041

CONTENTS
Section

Page

FOREWORD ..........................................................................................................................iii
1. SCOPE .................................................................................................................................1
2. ORGANISATION ...............................................................................................................1
2.1 Management Responsibility ..........................................................................................1
2.2 Management Delegation................................................................................................2
2.3 Organisational Structure ................................................................................................2
2.4 Inspection Function Responsibilities.............................................................................2
2.5 Inspection Staff..............................................................................................................3
2.6 Specialist Services .........................................................................................................3
2.7 External Inspection Bodies ............................................................................................4
3. STAGES OF INSPECTION ...............................................................................................5
3.1 Design
.....................................................................................................................5
3.2 Manufacture...................................................................................................................5
3.3 Construction ..................................................................................................................6
3.4 Commissioning..............................................................................................................6
3.5 Operational ....................................................................................................................6
4. CLASSIFICATION AND REGISTRATION ...................................................................7
4.1 Identification..................................................................................................................7
4.2 Classification .................................................................................................................7
4.3 Registration....................................................................................................................7
4.4 Change of Conditions of Use.........................................................................................8
4.5 Plant Modification and Repairs .....................................................................................8
5. FREQUENCY AND EXTENT OF INSPECTION ..........................................................8
5.1 General
.....................................................................................................................8
5.2 Class B Equipment ........................................................................................................8
5.2.1 Introduction...............................................................................................8
5.2.2 Allocation of Grades .................................................................................9
5.2.3 Inspection Grades......................................................................................9
5.2.3.1 Inspection Grade 0 .................................................................................9
5.2.3.2 Inspection Grade 1 ...............................................................................10
5.2.3.3 Inspection Grade 2 ...............................................................................10
5.2.3.4 Inspection Grade 3 ...............................................................................10
5.2.4 Criticality Rating Systems.......................................................................11
5.2.5 Determination of Inspection Frequency..................................................11
5.2.6 Extensions...............................................................................................11
5.3 Class C Equipment ......................................................................................................12
5.4 Types of Inspection......................................................................................................12
5.4.1 Initial Thorough Inspection.....................................................................12

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5.4.2 Subsequent Thorough Inspections ..........................................................13


5.4.3 Sample Inspection ...................................................................................13
5.4.4 Inspection Reviews .................................................................................14
5.5 Inspection Grade Transfers..........................................................................................15
5.5.1 Principles.................................................................................................15
5.5.2 Grade Transfers - Thorough Inspection ..................................................15
5.5.3 Grade Transfers - Sample Inspections ....................................................15
5.6 Special Cases ...............................................................................................................16
5.6.1 Exemptions .............................................................................................16
5.6.2 Replacement Equipment .........................................................................16
5.6.3 Special Design and Construction ............................................................16
5.6.4 Mature Design.........................................................................................17
5.6.5 Deferred Start-up and Intermittent Operation .........................................17
6. INSPECTION REPORTS AND RECORDS ..................................................................18
6.1 Records ...................................................................................................................18
6.2 Statutory Documents ...................................................................................................19
6.3 Reports
...................................................................................................................19
7. REVIEW OF INSPECTION FUNCTION......................................................................20
7.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................20
7.2 Internal Review - Self Regulation ...............................................................................20
7.3 External Review ..........................................................................................................20
TABLE 1 - EQUIPMENT - RECOMMENDED INSPECTION INTERVALS ..............21
APPENDIX A.........................................................................................................................22
DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................22
APPENDIX B.........................................................................................................................24
LIST OF REFERENCED DOCUMENTS ........................................................................24
APPENDIX C.........................................................................................................................25
ENDORSEMENT REVIEW PROCEDURE ....................................................................25
C.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................25
C.2 Methodology ...............................................................................................................26
C.3 Set up Study ................................................................................................................27
C.4 Preparation for Study ..................................................................................................29
C.5 Study
...................................................................................................................32
C.6 Action and Follow Up.................................................................................................35
C.7 Plant Item Information Form ......................................................................................36
C.8 Response Form............................................................................................................40
C.9 Fluid Definition Form .................................................................................................41
C.10 Guide phrases/words in matrix format......................................................................43
C.11 Blank examples of PIIF, FDF and RF forms ............................................................45
C.12 Example Review .......................................................................................................51

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FOREWORD
Introduction to BP Group Recommended Practices and Specifications for Engineering
The Introductory Volume contains a series of documents that provide an introduction to the
BP Group Recommended Practices and Specifications for Engineering (RPSEs). In
particular, the 'General Foreword' sets out the philosophy of the RPSEs. Other documents in
the Introductory Volume provide general guidance on using the RPSEs and background
information to Engineering Standards in BP. There are also recommendations for specific
definitions and requirements.
Value of this Recommended Practice
This document represents the accumulated management principles that relate to the
Inspection and Testing of In-Service Civil and Mechanical Plant, for ensuring a high standard
of plant integrity based on economical safe practice.
Application
Text in italics is Commentary. Commentary provides background information which
supports the requirements of the Recommended Practice, and may discuss alternative options.
This document may refer to certain local, national or international regulations but the
responsibility to ensure compliance with legislation and any other statutory requirements lies
with the user. The user should adapt or supplement this document to ensure compliance for
the specific application.
Principal Changes from Previous Edition
Appendix C has been added
Feedback and Further Information
Users are invited to feed back any comments and to detail experiences in the application of
BP RPSE's, to assist in the process of their continuous improvement.
For feedback and further information, please contact Standards Group, BP International or
the Custodian. See Quarterly Status List for contacts.

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1.

SCOPE
This Recommended Practice gives guidance on the organisation and management of
inspection and testing of in-service civil and mechanical plant. It is applicable to oil
refineries, petrochemical and chemical plant, onshore and offshore production
facilities, transmission pipelines and storage and distribution facilities for finished
products. It is not applicable to road, rail or sea transportation.
It defines organisational responsibilities, procedures for registration, classification,
frequency of inspection, reporting and recording for civil and mechanical plant based
on economical safe practice and experience in the oil and chemical industries.

2.

ORGANISATION
2.1

Management Responsibility
The inspection of equipment, must be given adequate consideration
through all stages from initial design through shop manufacture, site
fabrication or erection, commissioning and subsequent operation until
permanent de-commissioning and disposal. This Recommended
Practice assumes that equipment has been designed, fabricated and
installed according to codes, standards or specifications approved by
BP. It should also be used for guidance for those installations where
BP has not been involved in design, fabrication and installation.
Where BP has not been involved then management should ensure that
design, construction, installation and testing has been carried out to
recognised industry standards and codes.
It is the responsibility of management at each operating centre to:(a)

Ensure that installed equipment is suitable for its current


service and that it is in a safe condition to commission and
operate and that documentation to this effect is available.

(b)

Ensure compliance with national statutory regulations


applicable to design, operation, inspection, test and
certification of equipment.

(c)

Ensure that the inspection requirements as defined by this


Recommended Practice are implemented, so that equipment is
maintained suitable for operation consistent with the prime
requirements of safety, compliance with national statutory
regulations and economical operation, in that order of priority.

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2.2

Management Delegation
The management of each centre should delegate the responsibility and the authority - for the correct application of this Recommended
Practice to those persons or departments most appropriate and with the
necessary technical abilities and qualifications. This delegation of
responsibility and authority should be in writing.

2.3

Organisational Structure
The management is responsible for ensuring that the inspection
function is given terms of reference in writing defining the activities
for which it is responsible. These terms of reference should ensure
that the inspection function is able to offer advice unbiased by
pressures from other operational or engineering functions.
The inspection function should have direct access to the operating
centre senior management for those occasions:-

2.4

(a)

when it is not possible to reach an agreement acceptable to all


functional groups,

(b)

when the inspection function considers it necessary to advise


the management of critical information affecting the health and
safety of personnel or equipment.

Inspection Function Responsibilities


The basic responsibilities of an inspection function should be:(a)

To carry out inspection of all equipment in accordance with the


requirements of this Recommended Practice, in so far as it is
adopted by the operating centre management.

(b)

To classify equipment and allocate appropriate Inspection


Grades to that equipment.

(c)

To maintain a register of all equipment, together with detailed


and comprehensive records of each item.

(d)

To ensure that adequate notice is given when items of


equipment are due for inspection.

(e)

To inform the management of any items of equipment which


become overdue for their next inspection and advise on the
corrective action to be taken.

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2.5

(f)

To advise the management whenever the inspection intervals of


any item of equipment are reduced or if abnormal conditions of
corrosion, erosion or other form of deterioration are detected.

(g)

To advise on limiting conditions of pressure or temperature or


other conditions of service to which items of equipment may be
subjected.

(h)

To verify that repairs, modification or renewals to equipment


are carried out to the specified design.

(i)

To have trained, competent and qualified staff to assist in


carrying out the duties which are ascribed to it or to secure
specialist advice and assistance as necessary to enable it to
discharge its responsibilities in a satisfactory manner.

Inspection Staff
Inspection Engineers, should be properly trained and qualified and
recognised as competent persons for the work which they carry out.
The Inspection Body employing such engineers, either an in-house BP
Group or a third party Independent Inspection Authority, should
demonstrate competence as a body by compliance with the principles
of EN 45004: 1995 (or the ISO equivalent); General criteria for the
operation of various types of bodies performing inspection.
In the UK this should be demonstrated by the Inspection Body being
accredited to BS EN45004: 1995 by UKAS (United Kingdom
Accreditation Service). For those bodies not presently accredited,
progression towards accreditation in a timely manner should be
demonstrated.
In the EEC the accreditation will be by the appropriate national body
which provides accreditation of inspection bodies and should be
completed as soon as reasonably possible following the appointment of
the accreditation body.
In areas outside of the EEC the principles laid down in EN 45004
should be adopted by operating units when developing In-house
Inspection Bodies or selecting external bodies. Cross business peer
review and assistance from SPR or OTN may be used to confirm
compliance.

2.6

Specialist Services
From time to time it is necessary to supplement the inspection function
with additional personnel to provide either:(a)

specialist technical services,

(b)

additional personnel to cope with periods of peak activity.

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These additional personnel may be from specialist, competent


companies or BP personnel from other centres.
Personnel from outside the operating centre should be directly
responsible to a member of the inspection function who will direct
their activities, and be responsible for accepting their reports.
All specialist personnel should have recognised qualifications and
experience appropriate to their field of expertise.
2.7

External Inspection Bodies


In some of the countries in which BP operates, regulations require that
examinations are carried out by an external inspection body. Even
where there is no statutory requirement, BP may elect to use an
external inspection body for such work.
The Inspection Body, should demonstrate competence as a body by
compliance with the principles of EN 45004: 1995 (or the ISO
equivalent); General criteria for the operation of various types of
bodies performing inspection.
In the UK this should be demonstrated by the Inspection Body being
accredited to BS EN45004: 1995 by UKAS (United Kingdom
Accreditation Service). For those bodies not presently accredited,
progression towards accreditation in a timely manner should be
demonstrated.
In the EEC the accreditation will be by the appropriate national body
which provides accreditation of inspection bodies and should be
completed as soon as reasonably possible following the appointment of
the accreditation body.
In areas outside of the EEC the principles laid down in EN 45004
should be adopted by operating units when developing In-house
Inspection Bodies or selecting external bodies. Cross business peer
review and assistance from SPR or OTN may be used to confirm
compliance.

Where an external inspection body is used, the inspection function will


normally be responsible for ensuring:(a)

That management is advised of all requirements for statutory


inspection as appropriate

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(b)

That all information relative to the examination is made


available to BP.

(c)

That recommendations for repairs, renewals, etc., are


adequately discussed and agreed by BP.

In general, the statutory regulations express only the minimum


necessary to satisfy legal requirements, and the documentation
supplied by an external inspection body following their examination of
an item is essentially a certificate that the item examined meets the
requirements of the legislation.
Sometimes this is insufficient for BP purposes. At the discretion of
the inspection function, a BP inspection engineer may supplement the
work done by the surveyor acting for the external inspection body in
order to obtain more detailed information on the condition of the item
in question and to predict future repairs and safe life.
3.

STAGES OF INSPECTION
3.1

Design
Inspection requirements for manufacture, fabrication, construction,
commissioning and future operations should be considered at the
design stage.
Each significant item of equipment should at this stage be assigned a
criticality rating to cover the non-operational stages, based on the
recommendations of BP Group RP 50-1 or other accepted criticality
rating system. This rating is used, together with other local factors,
when deciding the level of inspection to apply during manufacture,
fabrication and construction.
In many countries, there are statutory requirements covering the design
of pressure vessels, containers, lifting appliances and certain other
classes of equipment. Approval of these designs may be by
government-approved inspection agencies only.

3.2

Manufacture
General inspection and test procedures for new equipment during
manufacture are covered in BP Group RP 32-1.

3.3

Construction
Guidance for site inspection and testing of new plant during
construction is in BP Group RP 32-2.

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Site fabrication usually involves installation of equipment under more


onerous and demanding conditions than works manufacture.
Appropriate inspection controls are needed to ensure fabrication
standards are met. Project teams should co-operate fully with site
inspection functions to ensure acceptable standards are being followed
and that adequate data and information is being collated for future
operational purposes. Deviations from design or specification and any
concessions to incorporate such deviations should be fully documented
for future reference.
3.4

Commissioning
Guidance for inspection and test of new equipment prior to
commissioning is covered in BP Group RP 32-2.
Pre-commissioning and commissioning procedures should be agreed
between BP and the contractor. In the case of projects directed by an
operating centre these should be prepared by the operational
management. These procedures should cover all requirements and
limitations in operating conditions as required by the design. The
operation of protective interface and safety devices should be given
special attention.

3.5

Operational
The degree and frequency of inspection and maintenance of equipment
after commissioning depends on many factors, but the prime
considerations are health, safety and current criticality.
Management also require up-to-date information on plant condition, its
rate of deterioration, future repairs or replacements and predicted safe
operating life.
Periodic inspection must be tailored to suit each item and its particular
needs and will include:(a)

Regular planned inspection to ensure safe, reliable and efficient


operation.

(b)

Periodic review of operating conditions and external influences


to assess their possible effect on previous inspection report
conclusions and inspection intervals. Such reviews may
involve limited inspection to verify assumptions.

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4.

CLASSIFICATION AND REGISTRATION


4.1

Identification
All equipment requiring periodic inspection should be identified by a
unique identification number. With the exception of piping systems
this should be stamped or otherwise clearly marked on the equipment.
A plant register should be maintained and there should be a procedure
for updating this register.

4.2

Classification
Equipment should be classified as either A (Statutory), B (NonStatutory) or C (Low Risk).
Class A includes all items which are subject to fixed period inspection
in accordance with national or local regulations. The external or
statutory classification will vary from one country to another.
Class B includes items not included in the statutory classification, but
subject to periodic inspection and review.
Class C includes all items not classified as A or B and which are
subject to unscheduled inspection and review. Class C covers
equipment on low hazard duty whose criticality in terms of safety
consequences and operational reliability does not justify a periodic
inspection strategy.
This equipment should normally be controlled within a routine maintenance
programme.

4.3

Registration
In addition to the identification of items of equipment individual
records shall be maintained for each item. (See Section 6). When an
item is registered a file will be opened for that item and shall contain
all relevant design and inspection data. This data may be stored
electronically.
Although paper systems can be used for recording purposes, this should be carried
out using a computerised maintenance management system.

4.4

Change of Conditions of Use


Where it is proposed to transfer equipment to a different duty the
classification of the equipment and the inspection grading must be the
subject of review. Where a change of operating conditions is
proposed, including changes in design throughput, careful
consideration must be given to the possible effects on the equipment

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and the inspection grading confirmed or modified.


Adequate
consideration should also be given to the effects of the change of duty
to associated plant and systems, particularly safety and pressure relief
systems.
4.5

Plant Modification and Repairs


Any proposed modification or repairs to plant or equipment must be
subject to a formal system of approval in which the design, fabrication,
inspection and test requirements are considered by appropriate
specialists. The operating centre, in conjunction with inspection
function, should ensure that the modifications and repairs are carried
out in accordance with detailed work instructions and procedures, that
full documentation of all technical details is retained in the records
systems and that, if appropriate, changes are made to the classification
and/or inspection grading of the item.
See commentary for 4.3.

5.

FREQUENCY AND EXTENT OF INSPECTION


5.1

General
The intervals which may elapse between inspections for Class A
equipment shall be in accordance with the relevant statutory
regulations. Where such regulations permit flexibility and self
regulation in setting intervals the philosophy and intervals
recommended for Class B equipment in this Recommended Practice
should be followed.

5.2

Class B Equipment

5.2.1

Introduction
All non-statutory equipment used in operating centres falls within
Class B or Class C.
The choice of inspection frequency can be made only by persons who
are thoroughly familiar with the equipment and its operating
conditions.
This RP includes four concepts which are inter-related and from which
decisions may be made regarding inspection frequency:(a)

The allocation of Inspection Grades.

(b)

Inspection review procedures.

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(c)

Sample inspection procedures.

(d)

The exemption of equipment from the requirements of this


Recommended Practice.

The maximum intervals for the particular Inspection Grade must not be
exceeded unless there are sound technical reasons for doing so, noting
the special case considerations in 5.6. Such reasons must be clearly
recorded in the equipment record file.
5.2.2

Allocation of Grades
Equipment in Class B should be subject to scheduled periodic
inspection and should be allocated an Inspection Grade 0, 1, 2 or 3
which indicates the maximum interval that may elapse between
thorough inspections. (See Section 5.2.5 and Table 1).
Some of the factors to be considered when assessing the Inspection
Grade to be allocated are:(a)

Severity of service duty and the risk (probability x


consequences) of failure of the item.

(b)

Previous history of similar equipment on similar duties.

(c)

The original standards of design, materials and construction.

(d)

The age of the item and the length of time it has been in
commission.

(e)

The proper use of components and materials.

5.2.3

Inspection Grades

5.2.3.1

Inspection Grade 0
This is the Grade to which all graded equipment should normally be
assigned, following the pre-commissioning inspection and until the
initial thorough inspection is carried out. A subsequent Grade is then
determined.
The recommended maximum interval for Grade 0 may be extended
when, in the opinion of the inspection function the maturity of design,
the operation conditions and the extent of quality control during
manufacture are sufficient to justify extension.

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5.2.3.2

Inspection Grade 1
This Grade should be applied when the conditions of service are such
that either:-

5.2.3.3

(a)

Deterioration is possible at a relatively rapid rate or at a known


mean rate which restricts service life or run duration.

(b)

There is little evidence or knowledge of operational effects on


which to predict behaviour in service.

Inspection Grade 2
This Grade should be applied when the conditions of service are such
that:-

5.2.3.4

(a)

Deterioration has been shown to be at a reasonable and


predictable rate, justifying an increased inspection interval.

(b)

Knowledge of actual behaviour in service is reliable enough to


justify an increased inspection interval.

Inspection Grade 3
This Grade should be applied when the conditions of service are such
that:-

5.2.4

(a)

The item has successfully concluded a period of service in


Grade 2.

(b)

Deterioration has been shown to be at a low and predictable


rate.

(c)

Knowledge of actual service conditions are sufficiently


accurate and reliable to justify an increased interval between
inspections.

Criticality Rating Systems


A criticality rating system may be used to assist in the determination of
inspection grades and frequencies. Criticality rating systems for new
plant are based on design criteria and are therefore not suitable on their
own for initial grading and scheduling of thorough inspections. Such
systems can be used to help identify potential failure mechanisms and
estimate failure consequences for specific items of equipment and
should not be used to determine generic risk and exposure potentials.
Any system used should take full account of the criteria for grade and

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inspection frequency allocation as detailed in sections 5.2.2, 5.2.3 &


5.2.5 of this Recommended Practice.
5.2.5

Determination of Inspection Frequency


Each item should normally:(a)

Have a pre-commissioning inspection before entering service


for the first time.

(b)

Initially be allocated to Grade 0 and be subject to its first


thorough inspection following a comparatively short period of
service.

(c)

Subsequently be allocated to Inspection Grade 1, 2 or 3, on the


basis of the guidance in 5.2.2 and 5.2.3.

(d)

For Grade 3 items be subject to an inspection review at


appropriate intervals to confirm or modify the
recommendations of previous inspections.

Table 1 at the end of this Section gives guidance on the maximum


intervals which may be allowed to elapse between examinations and
reviews for the various Inspection Grades. The recommended
maximum intervals given in Table 1 are based on previous BP
performance data. Consideration of local operating conditions and
results of risk assessment may dictate that the inspection intervals
quoted are revised. Reference should be made to 5.2.6 and 5.6 for
exemptions to the guidance.
5.2.6

Extensions
An extension beyond the date of the next thorough inspection as stated
on the last inspection report may be granted. Each case should be
considered by the inspection function and if acceptable the
management should be formally advised of the extension. In some
critical cases it may be appropriate to have formal management
approval to extend.
This extension shall not cause the maximum inspection interval for the
grade to be exceeded by more than twelve months unless
(i)

meaningful on-stream examination can be performed which


fully satisfies the inspection function

or
(ii)

A multidisciplied review including a thorough risk based


assessment which supports the extension has been carried out,

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typically as detailed in Appendix C to the full satisfaction of


the inspection authority.
It is important that detailed records are maintained of any decision to
extend. These records should include a clear statement of the authority
for such extensions and any calculations or examinations made to
justify the extension.
5.3

Class C Equipment
Class C equipment should be maintained and inspected as required to
ensure it remains fit for continued service. Alternatively it may be
treated on a breakdown maintenance basis. However, the decision to
allocate an item to Class C should be reviewed on a regular basis to
ensure the assumptions made at the time of original grade allocation
are still valid.

5.4

Types of Inspection

5.4.1

Initial Thorough Inspection


This is for the purpose of establishing:(a)

That the design and construction of the equipment, following a


period of service is sound, and that any deficiencies are
thoroughly investigated and corrected.

(b)

That standards of fabrication and material quality are fit for


their purpose and if not, are corrected.

(c)

That all components essential to the integrity of the equipment


are examined, and if appropriate measured and results recorded
to permit meaningful safe life predictions.

(d)

That repairs or renewals required are identified and notified to


the appropriate authorities and the user.

(e)

That a report, detailing the condition of the equipment is


prepared and that the management are made aware of any
inspection findings which are likely to prevent the future safe
operation of the equipment.

(f)

That the Inspection Grade is reviewed and a date set for the
next thorough inspection.

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5.4.2

Subsequent Thorough Inspections


These are follow-up inspections and are to ensure that the equipment
and all its essential components or fittings are examined and measured
and that the results are compared with previous results to enable
assessment of corrosion or wastage patterns - or other defects - to be
made, predictions made and the remaining safe life to be reliably
predicted.
As with the initial thorough examination repairs should be identified
and if appropriate carried out, reports issued, the Inspection Grade
reviewed and a date set for the next inspection.

5.4.3

Sample Inspection
Where a group of items of equipment have substantially the same
design, geometry and construction and are subject to similar conditions
of service such that they will be subject to similar deterioration, the
inspection function may accept sample items for thorough inspection.
Sampling should be on the following basis:No of items
in Group
Minimum No of
items in sample

2-4

5-8

9 - 12

13 - 40

Over 40

10%

Sample inspections may commence at the first examination following


commissioning and may continue at subsequent examinations subject
always to the proviso that each individual item shall be given a
thorough inspection within the maximum period for Grade 3. (See
Section 5.5.3).
In the event of the findings of a sample inspection being unsatisfactory
the Competent Person shall select additional similar items for thorough
inspection so that the number of items inspected is at least double that
given above.
Depending upon the nature of the defect found it may be considered
necessary to withdraw all endorsements based on previous sample
inspection and reclassify each item individually.
If the samples selected for inspection confirm the mechanical integrity
of all similar items, those items in the group which have not been
thoroughly inspected should have the inspection report endorsed to the
effect that;

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"............the item has been passed for service on the results of


inspection of Item Number x in this group............".
This principle of sampling does not apply to Protective (Safety)
Devices or for special application items (e.g. flexible hoses, piping
bellows).
5.4.4

Inspection Reviews
An inspection review is carried out to assess if there is any evidence to
suggest that an Inspection Grade given at the last thorough inspection
should be changed. It involves carrying out such on-stream inspection
as may be necessary, and examining other relevant data which may be
available, e.g. from corrosion probe wastage rates and metal contents
of effluent streams.
Equipment should be subjected to an inspection review for any of the
following:(a)

When an item has been given an Inspection Grade 3 allocation


at the intervals stated in Table 1. This is so that a reassessment
may be made of the criteria which led to this Grade allocation
and whether any changes have occurred since the last thorough
inspection which may lead to a possible shortening of the
interval before the next thorough inspection.

(b)

When significant changes take place in the conditions of


service of any item of equipment, irrespective of its Inspection
Grade allocation, which would affect its deterioration.

(c)

When an abnormal incident occurs, which has or could have


affected the safety of operation of the item of equipment.

(d)

A special case exists which, in the opinion of the Competent


Person and at their discretion, warrants a review irrespective of
the Inspection Grade.

When undertaking a review, consideration must be given to any


changes in feed quality, feed rates, process upsets, cyclic temperature
or pressure excursions, and the number of stops and starts during the
period up to the review.
Appendix C indicates an approach which may be useful when conducting Inspection
Reviews

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5.5

Inspection Grade Transfers

5.5.1

Principles
The prime requirement when considering the transfer of an equipment
item to a different Inspection Grade is that:-

5.5.2

(a)

An inspection interval should be chosen which takes full


account of appropriate design criteria of that item, its service
conditions and its condition.

(b)

Decisions on Grade transfers and intervals between (and the


extent of) inspection and reviews should be formalised and
recorded in the inspection record file so that they are available
for enforcing authority scrutiny.

Grade Transfers - Thorough Inspection


On the basis of the initial thorough inspection, an item may be
transferred to Grade 1 or Grade 2, providing the inspection has
indicated that the conditions for this new Grade have been met.
On the basis of subsequent thorough inspections, items may be
transferred from Grade 1 to 2, and then from Grade 2 to 3, provided
the inspection has indicated that the conditions for the new Grade have
been met.

5.5.3

Conversely, and on the basis of an inspection, any item in Grade 2 or 3


may be transferred back to Grade 1 or 2 if the results of the inspection
indicate that the conditions for the present Grade are not being met.
Grade Transfers - Sample Inspections
When a sample inspection in accordance with 5.4.3 is performed at the
initial thorough inspection, the subsequent interval established
between inspections for a sample group should not exceed the
maximum for Grade 1.
When a sample inspection is again applied at a subsequent thorough
inspection, the interval between inspections may be increased to that
for Grade 2 or 3 based on the findings of the initial and subsequent
inspection. The elapsed time between any two thorough inspections
on pressurised equipment should not exceed the maximum intervals
given for Grade 3 in Table 1 and the selection of items for sample
inspections should be made in compliance with this requirement.

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5.6

Special Cases

5.6.1

Exemptions
A request for exemption to the normal grading procedures for
equipment may be applied for by the user as detailed in 5.6.2 to 5.6.4
below, provided the following conditions are met:-

5.6.2

5.6.3

(a)

The application is made in writing to the Inspection function


giving full details of the reasons why an exemption is required.

(b)

All documentation relating to the request including reasons for


acceptance or rejection is retained in the item record file.

(c)

Each approval of such an exemption shall clearly indicate


whether the continuation of the exemption is to be subject to
review and the maximum interval that shall be allowed to lapse
before the initial and subsequent reviews.

Replacement Equipment
(a)

Performs a duty similar in all respects to that of an existing


item.

(b)

Is substantially the same as the existing item as regards


material of construction and design.

Special Design and Construction


It is recognised that there may be special cases where, due to the
design, construction and/or the conditions of service the principles of
this Recommended Practice, are not applicable e.g. certain items in
cryogenic service.
Deviation from the normal principles are permitted but only when:(a)

A full technical justification, supported and signed jointly by


the engineering functions and the inspection function is
submitted to the management.

(b)

The management should give written approval to the inspection


function to deviate from the usual requirements. Copies of the
technical justification must be held in the item inspection
record file.

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5.6.4

Mature Design
Where process equipment has such design maturity and construction
assurance that its operating conditions and rate of deterioration can be
predicted with confidence, an Inspection Grade may be allocated based
on the service history of similar items. All documentation relating to
the above assessment must be recorded and on-stream monitoring
carried out to confirm the basis of the assessment.

5.6.5

Deferred Start-up and Intermittent Operation


Occasionally, process equipment may not be put back into operation
immediately following thorough inspection.
As the inspection intervals granted are for a positive expiry date rather
than on elapsed operating time, the period out of operation should be
regarded as equivalent to a period in operation. Should the outage
time exceed 6 months, the inspection engineer should carry out an
inspection review and may, at his discretion, take into account all or
some of that time which has expired whilst the equipment was not
operational.
The same approach may be applied to processing plant which is run on
an intermittent basis, and an inspection review should be carried out if
an item of equipment is out of service for more than 50% of any one
12-month period.
When making a decision to revise inspection intervals in such
circumstances it must be noted that in both a deferred start-up and
intermittent operation deterioration can occur at a rate much faster than
normal due to:(a)

External corrosion on insulated equipment.

(b)

Internal corrosion because of water and acidic compounds


which may not be damaging at operating temperatures.

(c)

Fouling of equipment because of low flow or stagnant


conditions.

(d)

Thermal cycling.

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6.

INSPECTION REPORTS AND RECORDS


6.1

Records
The inspection function should ensure that adequate, detailed and
auditable records of all items of equipment requiring inspection are
maintained.
The method by which records are maintained will vary from centre to
centre. In all cases, each item of equipment must be uniquely
identified and fully described.
The records will generally contain the following:(a)

Original basic technical data relating to the item, e.g. design


specification, general arrangement drawings, relevant process
data.

(b)

Original manufacturing documents, e.g. the inspection


authority certificate, material quality documents, pressure
vessel code data sheet, rubbings of identification and
certification stamps, manufacturer's certification document,
alignments, cold and hot clearances, balancing certificates,
performance curves, pressure test certificates.

(c)

The construction records issued by the project inspection


engineer following delivery to site and prior to being taken into
service.

(d)

The inspection classification and registration documents and


the Inspection Grade allocated to that item by the inspection
engineer.

(e)

All inspection reports issued for that item.

(f)

Documents relating to repairs, modifications or renewals made


to that item.

(g)

Calculations made to determine retrial limits, re-assessment of


operating conditions or re-rating of the item.

(h)

Documents relating to any abnormal occurrence, including


unexpected corrosion, erosion or other defects.

(i)

Specialist reports relating to materials, design, process


conditions, etc., which will affect the inspection requirements.
See commentary for 4.3.

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6.2

Statutory Documents
In many countries there are requirements to maintain certain
documentation to satisfy national and local rules and regulations. All
such requirements must be strictly observed.

6.3

Reports
The Inspection function should issue a detailed inspection report
within 28 days of completion of the examination or, for major plant
overhauls, within 28 days of the plant being returned to service.
As well as describing the 'as found' condition of the item including
quantification of any defects found the report should:(a)

Give full details of any repairs or renewals which were carried


out and forecast probable repairs or renewals which will be
required at the next inspection.

(b)

State areas not accessible for inspection and reasons why.

(c)

Give detailed methods of inspection techniques used including


procedures where appropriate.

(d)

State the date the next inspection is due, together with any
special facilities, materials or specific components which may
be required at that time.

(e)

State if there is any change in the Inspection Grade allocation


and inspection intervals and the reasons why.

Copies of the report should be issued as appropriate for each operating


centre and a copy placed in the item record file.
See commentary for 4.3.

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7.

REVIEW OF INSPECTION FUNCTION


7.1

Introduction
In order to ensure that consistent standards of inspection are being
applied to BP Group assets and that management can be assured that
the inspection functions are being carried out satisfactorily, operating
centres should perform and record periodic reviews of their inspection
functions to a predetermined schedule.
This review programme should take into account the rate of changes in
organisation, personnel, procedures, plant, technology and legislation,
and the significance of the activity. As a general guide, Internal
Reviews should be at least on an annual basis to cover all aspects of
the inspection function and may be divided into manageable parts
phased over the review period; External Reviews should be at least
every three years.

7.2

Internal Review - Self Regulation


Internal reviews should be carried out by a team drawn from the
operating centre. It is recommended that a locally developed standard
format be followed to ensure efficiency. The team should use as their
basis the operating centre and inspection function procedures and
should report areas where procedures are not being followed. An
important element is for the inspection function management to
resolve any unsatisfactory findings. Where an operating centre has
adopted a philosophy of self regulation there may be no need for a
review team. In this situation management should be confident that
the inspection function is performing satisfactorily and effectively and
is demonstrating self regulation.

7.3

External Review
External reviews should be carried out by a team independent of the
operating centre inspection function. The team should have specialist
inspection knowledge. The basis for the review should be as for an
Internal Review but with the important distinction that it should also
assess whether the organisation, procedures, systems and practices are
in compliance with this Recommended Practice (or other Operating
Centre policy) and Statutory Requirements and whether operating
centre plant integrity is adequately assured.

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PAGE 20

STATUTORY INSPECTION INTERVALS MUST BE FOLLOWED**


REFERENCE
SECTION

MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED INTERVAL


BETWEEN THOROUGH INSPECTIONS (month)

REVIEW
PER. FOR
Grade 3 ***

RP 32-4

Grade 0

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

(month)

Steam Equipment excluding


Direct Fired Boilers

36

48

96

120

84

Direct Fired Boilers

24

48

72

Process pressure vessels

36

48

96

144

84

Pressure storage vessels

48

72

108

144

96

Gas holders

36

48

120

240

108

Non pressure vessels

60

72

108

144

96

Lifting Equipment

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 4

Storage Tanks

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 5

Heat Exchangers

36

48

96

144

84

Piping Systems

36

48

96

144

84

Fired Heaters

24

48

72

See

Report

ESR.97.ER. 089*

See

BP Group

RP 32-5 &

RP 32-6

Stacks and chimneys

10

48

72

144

60

Cooling Towers
Land Based Steel and Concrete
Structures

10

48

72

144

60

11

48

96

144

84

Jetties

13

48

96

144

84

Flexible Hoses

14

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 14

Transmission pipelines

16

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 16

Cryogenic Equipment

18

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 18

Loading Arms

19

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 19

Offshore Installations

20

See

BP Group

RP 32-4

Section 20

PLANT OR EQUIPMENT

Protective

) Relief

devices

) Valves
) Other
) devices

* BP Report; Recommended practice for the Risk Based Inspection (RBI) of relief valves.
** See Section 5.1 of this Recommended Practice.
*** Review period for equipment with Inspection Grade 3 is consistently defined as twelve
months less than inspection interval for grade 2 equipment of the same type.
TABLE 1 - EQUIPMENT - RECOMMENDED INSPECTION INTERVALS

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PAGE 21

APPENDIX A
DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS
Definitions
Standardised definitions may be found in the BP Group RPSEs Introductory Volume.
class:

a BP classification of equipment for inspection purposes

competent person:

a person (who may be a body of persons or an individual


person) having such practical and theoretical knowledge and
actual experience of the type of equipment to be examined as
will enable him to detect defects or weaknesses which it is the
purpose of the examination to discover and to assess their
importance in relation to strength and function of the
equipment. The person must be qualified and trained to a
standard sufficient to meet any applicable statutory regulations.

enforcing authority:

the authority which enforces the provisions of any legal


requirements relating to inspection of plant and equipment.

engineering function:

a generic term covering both the design and maintenance


engineering function.

equipment:

all items or systems of production, processing, storage, utilities


and other installations.

inspection:

the examination or examination and physical test or checking of


functional operation.

inspection function:

that person or body appointed by the management to be


responsible for the examination and certification of equipment
utilised within the operating centre. The inspection function
may be an external body specialising in the inspection of
equipment.

inspection engineer/inspector:

an engineer appointed by the management to be


responsible to the inspection function for the inspection of
equipment within the operating centre.

management:

the person or persons legally responsible for an operating centre


owned or operated by BP.

operating centre:

the facility within the control and jurisdiction of the


management.

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surveyor:

an inspector engineer working on behalf of the enforcing


authority.

thorough inspection:

critical scrutiny in or out of service as appropriate. The


methods and extent of this scrutiny must be sufficient to satisfy
the inspection function that the equipment is fit for continued
service and will:(a)

detect defects or weaknesses in relation to the strength


and functions of the equipment being examined and to
ascertain its condition.

(b)

measure the rate and identify the type and cause of wear
and deterioration.

(c)

collect sufficient data on which to predict future service


life for safe, efficient, continuous operation.

(d)

establish the period for which the equipment may be


used prior to the next thorough examination.

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PAGE 23

APPENDIX B
LIST OF REFERENCED DOCUMENTS
A reference invokes the latest published issue or amendment unless stated otherwise.
Referenced standards may be replaced by equivalent standards that are internationally or
otherwise recognised provided that it can be shown to the satisfaction of the purchaser's
professional engineer that they meet or exceed the requirements of the referenced standards.

European Standards
EN 45004

General criteria for the operation of various types of bodies


performing inspection

BP Group Documents
BP Group RP 32-1

Inspection and Testing of New Equipment in Manufacture


(replaces BP CP 51)

BP Group RP 32-2

Site Inspection, Testing and Pre-commissioning of New Plant.


(replaces BP CP 20)

BP Group RP 32-4

Inspection and Testing of In-Service Civil and Mechanical


Plant - Technical Guidance
(replaces the relevant parts of BP CP 52)

BP Group RP 32-5

Inspection and Testing of In-Service Electrical Plant


(replaces the relevant parts of BP CP 52)

BP Group RP 32-6

Inspection and Testing of In-Service Instrumentation


(replaces the relevant parts of BP CP 52)

*ESR.97. ER.089

BP Report; Recommended Practice for the Risk Based


Inspection (RBI) of relief valves

*BP Report available from the custodian of this Recommended Practice

RP 32-3
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PAGE 24

APPENDIX C
ENDORSEMENT REVIEW PROCEDURE
C.1

Introduction
This Appendix specifies a systematic approach for reviewing Endorsement Periods of
Static Equipment, it is auditable, reproducible and takes account of the consequences
of failure and links with initial grades and grade reviews as recommended in RP 32
series.
It is a balanced and robust system designed to get to the correct and most appropriate
grade and inspection interval (which may be reduced), it removes some of the
subjectivity which formerly resided with the Inspection Engineer, this process now
being a team approach.
The process is conducted in an impartial way, the output of the process being
appropriate to the study, it is not just a tool to generate increased inspection periods.
The process also reflects changing technology (e.g. Non Invasive Inspection) and
legislation (e.g. emissions to environment, disposal of contaminated materials,
confined space entry) which must be taken into consideration and attempts to meet
these other requirements and not just the requirements of Pressure Systems
Regulations.
The process draws from existing reliability, safety and failure analysis models but is a
separate stand alone system that is available to perform the specific task of
Endorsement Review.
To conduct the study, a team of suitably experienced personnel are assigned under the
leadership of a chairman. These personnel will normally be discipline engineers with
a detailed knowledge of the process plant and equipment under review.
The quality of the study will be dependant both on the constitution of the team, and
the accuracy of the base information employed. Therefore it is important that the
significant input required from all team members during the data collection stage is
given; to ensure that information is as accurate as possible and that all the data
required is collected

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C.2

Methodology
The method used shall be as described below. The study is carried out in a very
similar manner to that of a HAZOP. The programme is comprised of four basic
stages, to be completed sequentially. These four stages are shown in the flowchart
below:-

Set up Study

Preparation for Study

Definition of Outputs
Selection of Team
Definition of Schedule
Preparation of Forms
Data Collection
Criticality Analysis
Data Collation
Process Overview
Operation Overview
Inspection Overview
Maintenance Overview
Discussion - Guidewords

Study

Action and Follow up

Draft Report
Action Findings
Review Findings
Final Report

For each stage, the method used shall be described in the relevant
section of this RP. For each stage a detailed description of the activity
will be given and the roles and responsibilities identified.
An example of a completed study is given in Section C.11

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C.3

Set up Study
Set up Study

Definition of Outputs
Selection of Team
Definition of Schedule

The Set up Study stage should identify clearly the outcome of the review, the
team that will undertake the review and the timescale in which it is to be
completed.
C.3.1 Definition of Possible Outcomes
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer and
Chairman.
The definition of clearly expected outcomes must be carried out and will be
appropriate to the extent of the review, e.g. a whole system or selected single
plant items.
System definition must include Pipework and Safety Related Devices therein
and how they are to be treated. This also applies any electrical equipment such
as motors and switchgear and mechanical machinery too.
Typical review topics are:
Maintenance / Inspection practices
Operational control
Feed quality changes
Corrosion control systems
Operational limiting factors
The definition of outputs will be circulated to each member of the team taking
part in the study.
The definition of outputs must be concise and define exactly the extent of the
review, identifying each distinct fluid stream (i.e. COD overheads or cooling
water), and by TAG number each piece of equipment to be included in the
study. On larger or more complex plant items, the exact area or stream should
also be identified (i.e. a column top or exchanger shellside).
For the purposes of the study, it may be beneficial to group duplicate plant
items on the same duty (i.e. heat exchangers in parallel) for discussion at the
one time. The selection and identification of such groups will be at the
discretion of the Chairman and Job Engineer.

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PAGE 27

Possible Outputs are:-

C.3.2

(a)

Written scheme of Examination may have to be amended

(b)

The Endorsement Period may be changed

(c)

The Grading may be altered

(d)

Changes to Maintenance Procedures

(e)

Changes to operational Procedures

(f)

On Stream Inspection may be necessary

(g)

Special Studies may be required

(h)

Plant Modifications may be required

Selection of Team
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer
and Chairman.
The team should consist of the minimum number of persons necessary
for the required range of expertise to be available for the study.
Provided all the necessary experience and disciplines are covered, the
team will normally consist of four core members as follows;
Study Leader
Inspection Engineer
Maintenance Engineer
Process Engineer
Operations Engineer
Chairman must satisfy themselves that the nominated personnel are
suitably qualified and experienced with the equipment under
consideration.
In addition, other personnel may be co-opted to advise on special
problems identified during the study, or to support the existing team
members. These additional personnel may be from within or without
the company.

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PAGE 28

Examples of other disciplines that may be required are;


Electrical / Instrumentation Engineer
Corrosion Engineer
QRA Assessor
Safety Engineer
Design Engineer
C.3.3

Definition of Schedule
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer
and Chairman.
A plan and schedule that has asset support should be generated and
adhered to.

C.4

Preparation for Study


Preparation of Forms

Preparation for Study

Data Collection
Criticality Analysis
Data Collation

C.4.1

Preparation of Forms
(NOTE: This is a site specific requirement, other sites may be able to
satisfy this requirement electronically from their own computer
systems.)
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer.
To simplify the matter of Data collection and ensure that the required
information is gathered effectively, three forms have been generated;
Plant Item Information Form

Technical information for each


process item.

Response Form

Responses by discipline
engineers to given prompts.

Fluid Definition Form

Specific process information for


each fluid stream

The forms have been generated in a similar format. Each is subdivided


into a number of sections to be filled out by the relevant discipline
engineer. Each section has a grey header identifying the title of that

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PAGE 29

section on the left and the engineer responsible for completion of that
section on the right.
Explanations for completion of the PIIF, RF and FDF are given in
sections C7, C8 and C9 respectively.
C.4.1.1

Plant Item Information Form (PIIF)


For each item, or defined group of items, a PIIF should
be generated. The Job Engineer should complete the
Common Details section before circulation to the
Process / Operations and Inspection Engineers for
completion.

C.4.1.2

Response Form (RF)


For each PIIF a RF should also be generated. The Job
Engineer should complete the Common Details
section before circulation to the core team for
completion.

C.4.1.3

Fluid Definition Form (FDF)


For each distinct fluid stream, a FDF should be
generated. The Job Engineer should complete the
Common Details section before circulation to the
Process / Operations engineer for completion.
Example:-

For the two heat exchangers, E101 and E102 illustrated


above, assuming they are on the same duty and can thus
be considered as a group of two items, six forms
would require to be generated;
Two FDFs, one for Stream 1 and one for Stream 2.
Two PIIFs, one for E101 and E102 shellside and one for
E101 and E102 tubeside.
Two RFs, one for each PIIF.

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In addition to the information from the team members, a


simplified RFX and full size set of EFDs will be
required, 1 set per 3 attendees. The extents of the study
as given in the definition of objectives, should be clearly
marked.
Copies of the FDF, PIIF and RF forms are given in
section C.10.
C.4.2

Data Collection
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the team members.
The forms generated by the Job Engineer are circulated to the team
members along with the definition of objectives, the team selected and
the schedule. All forms should be returned to the Job Engineer by the
completion of the Data Collection stage as indicated on the schedule.
Each of the team members are responsible for completion of the PIIFs,
RFs and FDFs as detailed in Sections C7, C8 and C9 respectively.

C.4.3

Criticality Analysis
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer.
To compliment the study, a risk based analysis tool may be employed.
This analysis should identify both a probability and consequence of
failure, which can then be combined to give an overall criticality rating.
All the information required to complete the risk based analysis should
be contained on the completed PIIF for each item, or defined group of
items.
The results of the analysis should be entered into the relevant PIIF as
detailed in section C.8.2. In addition the results it is suggested that the
results are also prepared graphically for presentation at the study.

C.4.4

Data Collation
(NOTE: the forms are site specific, other sites may satisfy this
requirement electronically with their own computer systems)
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Job Engineer.
The completed RFs and PIIFs from the team members should be
collated onto a single RF and PIIF for each item, or defined group of
items.
To facilitate Data Collation, it is suggested that the forms are circulated
digitally, either across a network or by diskette.

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PAGE 31

To allow the chairman to familiarise himself will the plant items under
review, the collated RFs and PIIFs should be copied to the chairman
at least one week prior to the study.
C.4.5

Site Visit
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the team members.
At the discretion of the chairman, all members of the team not
sufficiently familiar with the items to be

C.5

Study
Process Overview

Study

Operation Overview
Inspection Overview
Maintenance Overview
Discussion - Guidewords

The Study stage should include an overview by each of the discipline


engineers, followed by a structured discussion based on both defined
guidewords and the data collated during the previous stage.
C.5.1

Process Overview
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Process
Engineer.
With reference to the system FDX and EFDs, the Process Engineer
will give a brief outline of the system process as a whole, this should
include the following points;
Process history
Specific process requirements for plant items within scope
Specific limiting factors for plant items within scope
Possible future process issues
Any additional comments and information should be recorded on the
relevant RF by the Job Engineer.

C.5.2

Operation Overview
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Operations
Engineer.
With reference to the system FDX and EFDs, the Operations Engineer
will give a brief outline of the operation issues of the system as a
whole, this should include the following points;
Operation history
Routine operation
Specific operation requirements for plant items within scope

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Specific limiting factors for plant items within scope


Factors that can result in abnormal and upset conditions
Possible future operation issues
Any additional comments and information should be recorded on the
relevant RF by the Job Engineer.
C.5.3

Inspection Overview
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Inspection
Engineer.
With reference to the system FDX and EFDs, the Inspection Engineer
will give a brief outline of the inspection issues of the system as a
whole, this should include the following points:Inspection history
Routine inspection
Specific inspection requirements for plant items within scope
Specific limiting factors for plant items within scope
Possible future inspection issues
Any additional comments and information should be recorded on the
relevant RF by the Job Engineer.

C.5.4

Maintenance Overview
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Maintenance
Engineer.
With reference to the system FDX and EFDs, the Maintenance
Engineer will give a brief outline of the maintenance of the system as a
whole, this should include the following points;
Maintenance history
Routine maintenance
Specific maintenance requirements for plant items within scope
Specific limiting factors for plant items within scope
Possible future maintenance issues
Any additional comments and information should be recorded on the
relevant RF by the Job Engineer.

C.5.5

Discussion - Guidewords
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Chairman and
Job Engineer.
Given that each member of the team will now have a basic
understanding of the system, it is now possible to isolate and discuss
discrete sections of the system.

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Working from the list of equipment items identified for study. Each
plant item or group of plant items are identified on the EFD/P&IDs.
The chairman will work sequentially through the RF, using the factors
as a basis for discussion. The RF is intended to ensure that certain
factors are not omitted, but is not exhaustive, additional factors should
also be considered where applicable to a plant item.
Any additional comments and information should be recorded on the
relevant RF by the Job Engineer.
At the discretion of the Job Engineer and Chairman, any findings and
recommendations made by the study should be noted on the Finding /
Recommendation / Response Form (FRRF).
Copies of the FRRF form are given in Section C.11.
C.5.6

Typical guidewords and statements for the chairman to consider


Are there any outstanding repairs, HAZOP, PHSER or other
actions outstanding to the system ?
Are there any modifications planned ?
Any Engineering standards that have to be considered and
applied retrospectively?
Any parts of the Operational system that is not included in the
terms of reference that should be considered, as it may have an
impact on the safety of the system being reviewed?
Materials of Construction
Fluid
Composition
Flow
Pressure
Temperature
Level
Chemical Reaction
Power
Corrosion
Emissions
Start-up
Shutdown
Normal Conditions
Upset Conditions
Maintenance
Other
The above guide phrases/words are in matrix form in Section C.10.

C.5.7

The team agree response and any subsequent actions arising.

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C.6

Action and Follow Up


Draft Report

Action and Follow up

Action Findings
Review Findings
Final Report

The Action and Follow Up stage, should close out the review. A
draft report should be issued and findings from the study actioned. On
completion a final report is compiled for the client.
C.6.1

Draft Report
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Chairman and
Job Engineer.
A draft report should be compiled, containing;
Executive Summary
Introduction
Definition of Outcomes
Selection of Team
Definition of Schedule
Findings and Recommendations
Index of Findings
All relevant forms (FRRF, PIIF, RF and FDF) should be appended
along with the review schedule.
An example of a completed study is given in Section C.12.

C.6.2

Action Findings
Responsibility for completion of this stage lies with the Client and Job
Engineer.
Actions arising should be agreed with the client and entered into an
action tracking system and pursued to formal close out. Copies of the
draft report should be passed to the client, review team and any
actionees identified on the Finding/Recommendation/Response Form
(FRRF).
Responses should be returned to the Job Engineer by the date set in the
schedule.

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C.6.3

Review Findings
The review team shall meet to review the responses to the findings
raised. Any comments should be noted on the relevant FRRF.

C.6.4

Final Report
Once all the findings and responses have been accepted by the review
team, a final report should be compiled in a similar structure to that of
the draft report. This final report should be signed by the Job Engineer,
Chairman and relevant Endorsing Authority, as detailed below:C.6.4.1

C.7

Where the review recommends modifications to the written


scheme of examination, or endorsement frequency, or
grading as per the anticipated outcomes the Inspection Group
leader should be the Endorsement Authority.

Plant Item Information Form


Responsibility for completion of this form lies with the Job Engineer, Process /
Operations and Inspection Engineer.
All forms have been generated in a similar format. Each is subdivided into a number
of sections to be filled out by the relevant discipline engineer. Each section has a grey
header identifying the section title left and the engineer responsible for completion of
that section on the right.
C.7.1

Common Details - Job Engineer


A description of the item or defined group of items should be noted
and the TAG and WIN numbers for each item entered.

C.7.2

Normal Operation - Process / Operations Engineer


Inlet and outlet pressure and temperatures should be entered for the
plant item under normal operation.

C.7.3

Upset Conditions - Process / Operations Engineer


Inlet and outlet pressure and temperatures should be entered for the
plant item during upset conditions. Worst case upset conditions
should be considered, during abnormal operation, commissioning or
decommissioning.

C.7.4

API RBI Level 1 Details - Process / Operations Engineer


This information is required to perform the API risk analysis. The
majority of questions require an answer from a pick list.

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Representative Fluid - Defined as follows;


Light HC
Process stream mainly C1-C5.
Medium HC Process stream mainly C6-C16
Heavy HC
Process stream mainly C16-C25+
Capacity - Defined as follows;
Low
Medium
High

Release will result in total deinventory of plant item.


Release will result in total deinventory of plant item
plus 1-10 others.
Result will result in total deinventory of plant item plus
10+ others.

Business Interruption - Defined as follows;


No SD
No shutdown, little or no effect on throughput.
Short SD
1-2 day shutdown, or reduced throughput.
Extended SD 2+ day shutdown, or severely reduced throughput.
Phase
In the API model, this can only be selected as liquid or gas. If the fluid
exists in a two-phase state, as a worst case scenario, gas should be
entered.
Percentage Toxicity
The toxicity of the process stream expressed as a percentage.
Sold out Market
Expressed as a yes / no dependant on whether the market is sold out.
C.7.5

TISCHUK Details - Process / Operations Engineer


This information is required to perform the TISCHUK risk analysis.
As with the API the majority of questions require an answer from a
pick list.
Contents
A description of the process stream should be entered, this should be
the same as the description of the process stream given on the relevant
FDF.

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Capacity - As with the API, this is defined as follows:0.227 m3


2.270 m3
22.70 m3

Release will result in total deinventory of plant item.


Release will result in total deinventory of plant item
plus 1-10 others.
Result will result in total deinventory of plant item plus
10+ others.

Location Within Plant


This provides a rough assessment of the hazard to personnel and to
other equipment. Defined as follows;
3
2
1

Inaccessible or infrequently visited, such as a sump.


General plant area.
Inside an enclosure such as a pump / compressor house.

Phase
In the TISCHUK model, this can be selected as liquid, two-phase or
gas.
Financial Consequences
This provides an estimate of the cost of failure of a line. Defined as
follows:3
2
1

Negligible total cost, less than 24 hours lost production or


equivalent.
Moderate total cost, 1-7 days lost production or equivalent.
High total cost, 7+ days lost production or equivalent.

Standby Availability
This provides an assessment of the effect of a failure on the plant
operation. Defined as follows;
3
2
1
C.7.6

Allow the use of bypass or alternate production route.


Cause operating problems or reduce throughput.
Jeopardise plant operation or cause shutdown.

API RBI Level 1 Details - Inspection Engineer


This information is required to perform the API risk analysis. The
majority of questions require an answer from a pick list.
Material of Construction

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The material of construction, must be selected from the following pick


list;
Carbon Steel
Carbon 1/2 Mo (Annealed)
Carbon 1/2 Mo (Normalised)
Cr 1/2 Mo (PWHT'd)
1 1/4 Cr 1/2 Mo (PWHT'd)
2 1/4 Cr 1/2 Mo (PWHT'd)
Austenitic Stainless Steel
300 Series Stainless
321 Series Stainless
347 Series Stainless
H Grade Stainless
L Grade Stainless
Alloys 600
Alloys 800
Alloys 625
Alloys 20
Years since last inspection
This should account for the year since the last inspection to the date at
which the form was filled out. It is only necessary for this to be
accurate to the nearest year.
Deterioration Found
Expressed as a yes / no for each of the six mechanisms identified,
dependant on any deterioration found.
C.7.7

TISCHUK - Static Equipment Details


This information is required to perform the TISCHUK risk analysis.
These questions do not require an answer from a pick list and can be
entered as free text.
To determine nominal wall for heat exchanger tubebundles, convert the
BWG or SWG into wall thickness in mm.

C.8

Response Form
Responsibility for completion of this form lies with the core team members; Job
Engineer, OCA Assessor Process / Operations, Inspection Engineer, Corrosion
Engineer, Maintenance Engineer and Electrical / Instrument Engineer.

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All forms have been generated in a similar format. Each is subdivided into a number
of sections to be filled out by the relevant discipline engineer. Each section has a grey
header identifying the section title left and the engineer responsible for completion of
that section on the right.
C.8.1

Common Details - Job Engineer


A description of the item or defined group of items should be noted and
the TAG and WIN numbers for each item entered.

C.8.2

Criticality Analysis - OCA Assessor


Probability, Consequence and overall Criticality ratings should be
entered for the plant item or group of plant items and an indication of
the driving factor given.

C.8.3

Operation / Process Factors - Process / Operations Engineer


The factors identified should be considered for the plant item or group
of plant items. If any comments are made, the box alongside the
relevant factor should be blacked out and comments made alongside.
Where a factor has been considered and no comment has been made,
the box should be shaded grey.

C.8.4

Inspection Factors - Inspection Engineer


As for C.8.3

C.8.5

Corrosion Factors - Corrosion Engineer


As for C.8.3

C.8.6

Maintenance Factors - Maintenance Engineer


As for C 8.3

C.8.7

Electrical/Instrumentation Factors - Electrical/Instrumentation


Engineer
As for C.8.3

C.9

Fluid Definition Form


Responsibility for completion of this form lies with the Job Engineer and Process /
Operations Engineer.
The forms have been generated in a similar format. Each is subdivided into a number
of sections to be filled out by the relevant discipline engineer. Each section has a grey

RP 32-3
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header identifying the title of that section on the left and the engineer responsible for
completion of that section on the right.
C.9.1

Common Details - Job Engineer


A description of distinct process stream should be entered. For
example, Water or IC4 Recycle.

C.9.2

Fluid Content - Process / Operations Engineer


The fluid content in terms of Water, H2S, CO2, Elemental Hydrogen,
Sulphur, Chloride and Oxygen and Vapour Liquid Ratio should be
expressed in terms of the units given on the right side of the section;
where known.

C.9.3

Fluid Makeup - Process / Operations Engineer


In order to identify the base fluids which make up the process stream
from the picklist given, the box to the right of each of the relevant
fluids should be blacked out.

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Guide phrases/words in matrix format

ITEM

REP AIRS?

HAZOP? PHS ER?

PMP?

MATL of CONSTRN

FLUID? COMPO SITION?

FLOW ?

PRE SS?

TEMP ?

LEV EL?

REA CTION?

C.10

Page 1 of 2

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PAGE 42

OTHER?
MAINTENANCE?
UPSET CONDS?
NORMAL CONDS?
SHUT DOWN?
START UP?
EMISSIONS?
CORROSION?
POWER?
ITEM

Page 2 of 2

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C.11

Blank examples of PIIF, FDF and RF forms

PLANT ITEM INFORMATION FORM


Common Details
Tag No:

FORM PIIF
Job Engineer
Win No:

Description:
Normal Operation
Inlet Pressure (Bar):
Inlet Temperature (Deg C):

Process / Operations Engineer


Outlet Pressure (Bar):
Outlet Temperature (Deg C):

Upset Conditions
Inlet Pressure (Bar):
Inlet Temperature (Deg C):

Outlet Pressure (Bar):


Outlet Temperature (Deg C):

API RBI Level 1 Details


Representative Fluid
Capacity:
Business Interruption:

Phase (Liquid / Gas):


% Toxic:
Sold out Market (Y/N):

TISCHUK Details
Contents:
Capacity (m3):
Location Within Plant (1-3):

Phase (Liquid / T-Phase / Gas):


Financial Consequences (1-3):
Standby Availability (1-3):

API RBI Level 1 Details


Material of Construction:
Internal Corrosion Found (Y/N)
SCC Found (Y/N)
Fatigue Found (Y/N):

Inspection Engineer
Years since last inspection:
CUI Found (Y/N):
Creep Found (Y/N):
Embrittlement Found (Y/N)

TISCHUK Details
Material of Construction:
Design Pressure (Bar):
Test Pressure (Bar):
Heat Treatment:
Tracing (Steam / Electric):
Nominal Wall (mm):
Shell OD (mm)
Internal furnitures / fittings:

Material Specification:
Design Temperature (Deg C):
Design Code:
Lining:
Lagged (Y/N):
Corrosion Allowance (mm):
Inspection Grade:
Current Endorsement (months):

RP 32-3
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FLUID DEFINITION FORM

FORM FDF 1

Fluid:
Common Details
Water Content:
H2S Content:
CO2 Content:
Hydrogen Content:
Sulphur Content:
Chloride Content:
Oxygen Content:
Vapour Liquid Ratio

Y/N
PPM
%
%
%
PPM
PPM
Cu ft/Barrel

Common Details
/ACETALDEHYDE/
/ACETIC ACID/
/ACETIC ANHYDRIDE/
/ACETONE/
/ACETONITRILE/
/ACETYL CHLORIDE/
/ACETYLENE/
/ACROLEIN/
/ACRYLIC ACID/
/ACRYLONITRILE/
/AERATED ACETIC ACID/
/AERATED HYDROCHLORIC
ACID/
/AERATED HYDROFLUORIC
ACID/
/AERATED PHOSPHORIC
ACID/
/AERATED SULFURIC ACID/
/AIR/
/ALLYLAMINE/
/AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE/
/AMMONIUM BISULPHITE/
/ANNHYDROUS AMMONIA/
/ANNHYDROUS CARBON
DIOXIDE/
/ANNHYDROUS HYDROGEN
CHLORIDE/
/ANNHYDROUS HYDROGEN
FLUORIDE/
/ANNHYDROUS HYDROGEN
SULFIDE/
/ANTIFOAM/
/ASPHALT/

/DIETHYL ETHER/
/DIETHYL KETONE/
/DIETHYLAMINE/
/DIETHYLENE GLYCOL/
/DIETHYLENETRIAMINE/
/RICH
DIISOPROPANOLAMINE/
/DIISOPROPANOLAMINE
/
/DIISOPROPYL ETHER/
/DIISOPROPYLAMINE/
/DIMETHYLDISULFIDE/
/DIMETHYLAMINE/
/DIPHENYLAMINE/

/METHYLPROPYL KETONE/
/MONOETHANOLAMINE/
/RICH
MONOETHANOLAMINE/
/MONOETHYLENE GLYCOL/
/MORPHOLINE/
/NAPHTHA/
/NAPTHALENE/
/NATURAL GAS/
/NGL/
/NITRIC ACID/
/NITROGEN/
/NONANE/

/DISULFIDE OIL/

/OCTANE/

/ETHANE/

/ETHYL MERCAPTAN/
/ETHYL PROPIONATE/
/ETHYLAMINE/
/ETHYLBENZENE/

/OIL BASED DRILLING


MUD/
/OXYGEN/
/PARAFORMALDEHYDE/
/PARATOLUENE SULFONIC
ACID/
/PENTANE/
/PHENOL/
/PHOSPHORIC ACID/
/PHTHALIC ACID/

/ETHYLENE GLYCOL/

/PHTHALIC ANHYDRIDE/

/ETHYLENE OXIDE/

/POLYETHYLBENZENE/

/ETHYLENE/

/POLYETHYLENE/

/ETHYLENEDIAMINE/
/FLUORINE/

/POLYPROPYLENE/
/POLYSTYRENE/

/ETHANOL/
/ETHYL ACETATE/
/ETHYL CHLORIDE/

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FLUID DEFINITION FORM

FORM FDF 2

/BENZENE/
/BENZOIC ACID/
/BENZYL ACETATE/
/BENZYL ALCOHOL/
/BENZYL CHLORIDE/
/BROMINE/
/BUTADIENE/
/BUTANE/
/BUTANOL/
/BUTENE/
/BUTYL ACETATE/
/BUTYLENE/
/BUTYRIC ACID/
/C1/
/C10/
/C12/
/C15/
/C2/
/C20/
/C3/
/C4/
/C5/
/C6/
/C7/
/C8/

/FORMALDEHYDE/
/FORMIC ACID/
/FREON/
/FUEL OIL/
/FURFURAL/
/GASOIL/
/GASOLINE/
/GLUTERALDEHYDE/
/HALON/
/HEAT TRANSFER OIL/
/HEAVY FUEL OIL/
/HEPTANE/
/HEXANE/
/HEXANOL/
/HYDRAULIC FLUID/
/HYDRAULIC OIL/
/HYDRAZINE/
/HYDROBROMIC ACID/
/HYDROCHLORIC ACID/
/HYDROFLUORIC ACID/
/HYDROGEN CYANIDE/
/HYDROGEN PEROXIDE/
/HYDROGEN SULFIDE/
/HYDROGEN/
/HYDROQUINONE/

/C9/
/CALCIUM CHLORIDE/
/CARBON DIOXIDE/
/CARBON DISULFIDE/
/CARBON MONOXIDE/
/CARBON TETRACHLORIDE/
/CAUSTIC/
/CHLORINE/
/CITRIC ACID/
/CORROSION INHIBITOR/
/CRUDE OIL/
/CUMENE/
/CYCLOHEXANE/

/ISOBUTANE/
/ISOBUTANOL/
/ISOBUTYL ACETATE/
/ISOHEXANE/
/ISOOCTANE/
/ISOPENTANE/
/ISOPHORONE/
/ISOPROPANOL/
/ISOPROPANOLAMINE/
/ISOPROPYL ACETATE/
/ISOPROPYL ETHER/
/KEROSENE/
/LIQUIFIED PETROLEUM
GAS/
/LONG RESIDUE/
/LPG/
/LUBE OIL/
/METHANE/
/METHANOL/
/METHYL ACETATE/
/METHYL PROPIONATE/
/METHYLBUTYL
KETONE/
/METHYLETHYL
KETONE/

/CYCLOPENTANE/
/DEAERATED SEAWATER/
/DECANE/
/DEMULSIFIER/
/DETERGENT/
/DIBUTYLAMINE/
/DIESEL/
/RICH DIETHANOLAMINE/
/DIETHANOLAMINE/

/POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE/
/PROPANE/
/PROPANOL/
/PROPIONALDEHYDE/
/PROPIONIC ACID
/PROPYL ACETATE/
/PROPYLENE GLYCOL/
/PROPYLENE OXIDE/
/PROPYLENE/
/SALT/
/SCALE INHIBITOR/
/SEAWATER/
/SHORT RESIDUE/
/SODIUM BICARBONATE/
/SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE/
/STEAM/
/STYRENE/
/SULFOLANE/
/SULFUR DIOXIDE/
/SULFUR TRIOXIDE/
/SULFUR/
/SULFURIC ACID/
/SULFUROUS ACID/
/TETRAETHYL LEAD/
/TETRAETHYLENE
GLYCOL/
/TOLUENE/
/TOPANOL/
/TRIBUTYLAMINE/
/TRICHLOROETHANE/
/TRICHLOROETHYLENE/
/TRIETHANOLAMINE/
/TRIETHYLAMINE/
/TRIETHYLENE GLYCOL/
/TRIISOPROPANOLAMINE/
/TRIMETHYLAMINE/
/VINYL ACETATE/
/VINYL CHLORIDE/
/WATER BASED DRILLING
MUD/
/WATER/
/XYLENE/
/METHYL IODIDE/
/ETHYLIDENE DIACETATE/
/RHODIUM ACETATE/
/LITHIUM ACETATE/
/IMIDAZOLE/
/A5 POLYMER/

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PAGE 46

RESPONSE FORM

FORM RF (1)

Common Details
Tag No:

Job Engineer
Win No:

Description:
Criticality Analysis
Probability rating
Consequence rating
Criticality rating

OCA Assessor

Operations / Process Factors


Operation history
Impact on unit operation
Impact on other units
Impact on personnel
Potential for fouling
Operational window
Fluid quality
Upset conditions
Isolation / Gas freeing
Other

Process/Operations Engineer

Inspection Factors
Inspection history
General / local wastage
Isolated / multiple pitting
Surface / embedded cracks
Microstructural change
Delamination
Ultrasonic
Radiography
DPI
MPI
Additional NDT techniques
Design suitable for NDT
Endorsement frequency
Weldability
Welding Procedure
Post Weld Heat Treated
Repair considerations
Other

Inspection Engineer

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RESPONSE FORM

FORM RF (2)

Corrosion Factors
Internal Corrosion
CUI
SCC
Creep
Fatigue
Embrittlement
PCMS Data
Corrosion Prevention
Material Considerations
Other

Corrosion Engineer

Maintenance Factors
Accessibility
Sparing / Availability
Item reliability
Routine maintenance
Other

Maintenance Engineer

Electrical / Instrumentation Factors


Trip Testing
CV's
Other

Electrical/Instrumentation Engineer

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C.12

Example Review

FINDING / RECOMMENDATION / RESPONSE FORM

FORM FRRF

Common Details

Job Engineer

Tag No:

Win No:

Description:
Finding
Finding Reference:

Job Engineer

Recommendation

Job Engineer

Raised by :

Team

Date :

Response

By :

Date :

Review Team Comment

:
By

:
Date

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