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m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

n 7 nisan 5775 n volume 91, no. 7 n www.jewishsound.org

Lhi
tra
ot
OUR
FINAL
ISSUE

april 15, 2011 11 nisan 5771 volume 87, no. 8

the voice of jewish washington

where the jews are page 11

JT

www.jtnews.net

news

a musical giant page 32

JEWISH

march

22,

2013

11

nisan

5773

volume

89,

no.

the voice of

w a s h i n g t o n

Our final issue

happy

pa s s o v e r

Will Deutsch Haggadot.com

www.facebook.com/jtnews

@jew_ish @jewish_dot_com @jewishcal

professionalwashington.com
connecting our local Jewish community

m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5 n 7 n i s a n 5 7 7 5 n v o l u m e 9 1 , n o . 7 n w w w . j e w i s h s o u n d . o r g

professionalwashington.com
connecting our local Jewish community

/jtnews

@jew_ish @jewishcal

Lhi
tra
ot

community news

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

April Family Calendar

2015 Jewish Family Service


Community of Caring Luncheon

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015


For more information, contact Leslie Sugiura,
(206) 861-3151 or lsugiura@jfsseattle.org.

FOR ADULTS AGE 60+

Endless Opportunities

A community-wide program offered


in partnership with Temple Bnai Torah &
Temple De Hirsch Sinai. EO events are open
to the public and are at 10:30 a.m. unless
otherwise noted.

Vote by MailIs it Working?


m

Thursday, April 9

What is East Asian Medicine?


m

Tuesday, April 14

Eddie Bauer and the Northwest:


Adventure-Driven Innovation
m

Thursday, April 23

RSVP Ellen Hendin or Wendy Warman,


(206) 461-3240 or
endlessopps@jfsseattle.org.

FOR THE COMMUNITY

Kosher Food Bank


Wednesday, April 1
5:00 6:30 p.m.
Contact Jana Lissiak, (206) 861-3174 or
jlissiak@jfsseattle.org.
m

Medicare 101
Sunday, April 19
1:00 3:00 p.m.
Contact Leonid Orlov, (206) 861-8784 or
familylife@jfsseattle.org.
m

PARENTS AND FAMILIES

ParentMap Lecture

Queen Bees and Masterminds


with Rosalind Wiseman
Wednesday, April 22
7:00 9:00 p.m.
Tickets through bit.ly/RosalindWiseman.
Use discount code JFS2015 to save 20%
Contact Marjorie Schnyder, (206) 861-3146 or
familylife@jfsseattle.org.
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Aging with Pride


Film Screening and Conversation about
LGBTQ Older Adults
Tuesday, April 28
6:00 8:00 p.m.
Contact Leonid Orlov, (206) 861-8784 or
familylife@jfsseattle.org.
m

AA Meetings at JFS
Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m.
Contact (206) 461-3240 or ata@jfsseattle.org.
m

Food Stamp Assistance


Ongoing
JFS is helping eligible people sign-up
for food stamps.
Contact (206) 461-3240
or emergency@jfsseattle.org.
m

Contact Shelly C. Shapiro, J.D.,


Director of Legacy Giving,
(206) 861-8785 or
sshapiro@jfsseattle.org.

VOLUNTEER TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Families
Fight Hunger
Bring the family for an afternoon of
service benefitting the Polack Food Bank.
Sunday, April 26
Pre-registration is required.
Contact Jane Deer-Hileman,
(206) 861-3155 or jdeer@jfsseattle.org.
m

For all volunteer events, pre-registration is


required. Contact Jane Deer-Hileman,
(206) 861-3155 or jdeer@jfsseattle.org.

Families Fight Hunger


m

Sunday, April 26

Friendly Visitors for Seniors


Family Mentors for Refugees
Home Delivery Drivers

Capitol Hill Campus 1601 16th Avenue, Seattle


(206) 461-3240 jfsseattle.org

OF GREATER SEATTLE

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2 015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

ALL IN A WEEKS NEWS

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Rabbis Turn: Out of the Ashes

Tragedy in Brooklyn

Seven Jewish siblings, aged 5 to 16, died in a Brooklyn house last Shabbat after a hot
plate malfunctioned during the night. The blaze was the worst in New York since a 2007
fire took the lives of 10 West African immigrants, nine of them children. The mother and
one 15-year-old daughter survived by jumping from an upper floor; the father was away
at a conference at the time. Please, everybody, love your child, love others children, said
Gabriel Sassoon, the father. Thats all that counts. Understand them, dont negate them.
New York Daily News

Rabbi Olivier BenHaim refers to this weeks Torah portion, which discusses the burnt offering of sacrifice, as an allegory for our own busy lives.

Letters of goodbye

Letters of thanks from The Jewish Sounds board and publisher to our readers for staying with us during our 91 years of publication.

Where do we go from here?

811

Multiple articles from multiple columnists approach how our community moves forward with vibrant
growth but without an accompanying newspaper.

Never forget

Buddy Elias, the cousin of Anne Frank and guardian of her legacy, passed away on
March 16 at the age of 89. For more than three decades, Elias, who stopped a company
from producing Anne Frank jeans and refused to cede rights to her diary for a Spanish
musical recalling her plight, headed the charity named after Frank and fought to ensure
that her legacy would never be forgotten.
The New York Times

Bus ads go bye-bye

12

A federal court has said that King County was following the law when it banned ads critical of Israel
from being placed on buses.

Longtime school leader to retire

13

Rabbi Bernie Fox, head of school at Northwest Yeshiva High School, will retire at the end of the 201516 school year.

Room for conversation?

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, the local Jewish coffee tycoon, is the man behind Starbucks controversial race together campaign, in which baristas are encouraged to engage
customers in conversation about race relations in the U.S. At a March 18 meeting, Schultz
addressed the campaign, saying, Race is an unorthodox and even uncomfortable topic
where others see costs, risks, excuses and hopelessness, we see and create pathways of
opportunity that is the role and responsibility of a for-profit, public company.
The Economist

Changing attitudes

Orthodox meditation

15

Rabbi Shmuel Brody takes a different kind of approach to meditation and mindfulness at his congregation each week.

Want to move to Spain?

16

Citizenship wont be easy, but the Spanish government will likely approve repatriation to Sephardic Jews.

Will the real Netanyahu please stand up?

New York Citys Yeshiva University is experiencing a cultural shift as students are challenging the Orthodox schools position on LGBT issues. Dasha Sominski, an openly gay
student, has become a leader since causing uproar among the faculty in 2013 after posting a survey on Facebook to learn about Modern Orthodox attitudes to sex. The student
body largely supported her. Also in 2008, Joy Ladin, the first male-to-female trans professor at Stern College, the universitys womens institution, was allowed back on campus
after a lengthy ban.
Tablet
Boris Kurbanov

18

Depending upon your view, Israels newly reelected prime minister is either a hero or a farce.

Coming events

19

Though this paper will no longer publish after this issue, the events will go on. Heres a listing of many
coming up in the next several months.

A little soul in your kosher?

21

We spoke with the stars of the reality sitcom Kosher Soul, which stars a former Seattleite.

Passover Greetings

30 and on

Weve got books, recipes, stories and more to prepare you for Pesach.

Remember when
From the Jewish Transcript, March 6, 1924.
Now that were at the end, we are going to go back to the beginning:
Thus, The Jewish Transcript is launched. Whether it will continue its mission of
espousing the Jewish cause is left to the Jewish communities of the Pacific Northwest to
decide. Either the Jewish Transcript will appear regularly or it will not appear at all.
Sincerely yours,
Herman Horowitz, Publisher.
Though the paper will no longer appear at all, you can still find all of our scanned
and digitized archives online at http://jtn.stparchive.com, as well as our past 15 years
of news posted online at jewishsound.org. Thank you for Remembering When with us!

MORE
Crossword 8
M.O.T.: Meet the columnist
23
Whats Your JQ?: A discomfiting Haggadah passage
24
The Arts
32
Abba Knows Best: Hastening our demise
33
Deliciously Sephardic: Salmon for Pesach
34
Lifecycles 51
Professional Services/Classified
44
The Jewish Sound is the Voice of Jewish Washington. Our mission is to meet the interests of
our Jewish community through fair and accurate coverage of local, national and international
news, opinion and information. We seek to expose our readers to diverse viewpoints and vibrant
debate on many fronts, including the news and events in Israel. We strive to contribute to the
continued growth of our local Jewish community as we carry out our mission.
2041 Third Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121
206-441-4553 editor@jewishsound.org www.jewishsound.org
The Jewish Sound (ISSN0021-678X) is published biweekly by The Seattle Jewish Transcript, a
nonprofit corporation owned by the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle, 2041 3rd Ave., Seattle,
WA 98121. Periodicals postage paid at Seattle, WA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The
Jewish Sound, 2041 Third Ave., Seattle, WA 98121.
Board of Directors
Stan Mark, Chair*; Jerry Anches; Marilyn Corets;
Nancy Greer; Cynthia Flash Hemphill*; Ron Leibsohn;
Cantor David Serkin-Poole*
Keith Dvorchik, CEO and President, Jewish Federation
of Greater Seattle
Celie Brown, Federation Board Chair
*Member, The Jewish Sound Editorial Board
Ex-Officio Member

STAFF
Reach us directly at 206-441-4553
Publisher & Editor
*Joel Magalnick
Associate Editor
Emily K. Alhadeff
Sales Manager
Lynn Feldhammer
Account Executive Cheryl Puterman
Account Executive
David Stahl
Classifieds Manager
Katy Lukas
Art Director
Andrea Rouleau
A Proud Partner Agency of

EXT
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269
238
239

community calendar

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

The Jewish community calendar


For a complete listing of events, or to add your event to The Jewish Sound calendar, visit jewishsound.org/calendar. The community calendar will remain online for the foreseeable future.

Candlelighting times
March 27..................................7:14 p.m.
April 3 (first seder)................. 7:24 p.m.
April 10................................... 7:34 p.m.
April 17.................................... 7:44 p.m.

Friday, March 27
Pre-Pesach Retreat at
Congregation Shevet Achim
^^ 206-275-1539 or info@shevetachim.com or
www.shevetachim.com
,, Congregation Shevet Achim, 8685 SE 47th
St., Mercer Island
Escape from Pesach preparations to a care-free
Shabbat of rabbinic inspiration and community
ruach. Catered Shabbat dinner, Saturday morning
kiddush, chocolate seder for children. $120/family,
$40/person. Hospitality offered.
Pardes: a Shabbaton of Creativity
^^ Araya Sol, Zann Jacobrown at
206-218-3213 or aurayah@gmail.com or
nwretreat.wordpress.com

,, Camp Indianola Retreat Center, Indianola


Arik Labowitz and Zann Jacobrown lead a spiritual
weekend retreat in nature. Be inspired through
story, music, dance, prayer and art.
6 p.m. HNT Scholar in Residence
^^ Rebecca Levy at 206-232-8555, ext. 207 or
rebecca@h-nt.org
,, Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation,
3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Featuring Rabbi Irwin Kula.

Saturday, March 28

7:309:30 p.m. The Seattle Jewish Theater


Company Presents Beau Jest
^^ 206-525-0915 or alexis@templebetham.org
or www.templebetham.org
,, University Prep Theater, 8000 25th Ave. NE,
Seattle
Sarah Goldman is secretly dating Chris, who
does not meet the approval of her parents. To
please them, Sarah invents a fictional boyfriend,
the impossibly perfect Dr. David Steinberg. Sarah
finally finds the perfect man, the only problem is he
doesnt exist. $15 adults, $10 students and seniors.

4:306:30 p.m. Entering the Garden:


Jewish Mystical Traditions
^^ 425-603-9677 or rsvp@templebnaitorah.org
or templebnaitorah.org
,, Issaquah, call for location
Seudah Shlishit, lecture, and Havdalah service.
Four teachers entered a garden of Torah. Each
one dove deeper into the text looking for
illumination. Their separate paths and teachings
became the foundation of Kabbalah.

1011 a.m. Jewish Life in Bulgaria


^^ Alexis Kort at 206-525-0915 or
alexis@templebetham.org or
www.templebetham.org
,, Temple Beth Am, 2632 NE 80th St., Seattle
Dr. Joseph Benatov offers an overview of
Jewish presence in Bulgaria focusing on
conflicting opinions about the role played by

Sunday, March 29

T H E A M E R I C A N I S R A E L P U B L I C A F FA I R S CO M M I T T E E
Co rdially inv ites yo u to a s pec ial

WASHINGTON STATE
AIPAC COMMUNITY EVENT
G enerously under wr itten by
Toby and Bill D onner & Judy and Joe S chocken

Featuring a briefing by one of the


worlds foremost authorities on the Middle East

Ambassador Dennis Ross

King Boris III, church officials, and politicians


in the rescue of Bulgarias Jewish population
during the war years.
11 a.m. Chai Mitzvah: Grow your Judaism
^^ 425-844-1604 or admin@kolaminw.org or
www.kolaminw.org
,, Congregation Kol Ami, 16530 Avondale Rd. NE
Class 7: Days of Remembrance.
24 p.m. The Seattle Jewish Theater
Company Presents Beau Jest
^^ 206-525-0915 or alexis@templebetham.org
or www.templebetham.org
,, University Prep Theater, 8000 25th Ave. NE,
Seattle
$15 adults, $10 students and seniors.

Tuesday, March 31
78:30 p.m. Israel Among the Angels:
Welcome Reception and Lecture for Prof.
Mika Ahuvia
^^ 206-543-0138 or rsteel44@uw.edu or
jewishstudies.washington.edu
,, Hillel at the University of Washington, 4745
17th Ave. NE, Seattle
Prof. Mika Ahuvia discusses how and why
angels were incorporated into midrashic,
mystical, liturgical, and magical contexts in
Jewish antiquity. Kosher reception to follow
lecture. Free.

Saturday, April 11
4:306:30 p.m. Jewish Spies: The True
Story of the Rosenbergs
^^425-603-9677 or rsvp@templebnaitorah.
org or templebnaitorah.org
,, Temple Bnai Torah, 15727 NE Fourth St.,
Bellevue
On June 19, 1953, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg
were executed for conspiring to pass U.S.
atomic secrets to the Soviets. Unknown to
the general public, the U.S. government had
been intercepting and decrypting sensitive
communications in the KGB. Learn why this
was kept a secret for so long. Free.

Sunday, April 12

Wednesday, June 3, 2015


Program 7:00 p.m.
Dessert following program

Temple De Hirsch Sinai 1511 E Pike Street, Seattle


Registration is required at www.aipac.org/WACE.
Your registration is not complete until you receive an email confirmation from AIPAC.

No Charge for Admission Dietary Laws Observed No Solicitation

For more information, please contact the Seattle AIPAC Office at


(206) 624-5152 or Seattle_Office@aipac.org.

9 a.m. Mercer Island Indoor/Outdoor


Sprint Triathlon
^^206-232-7115 or saraht@sjcc.org or
www.sjcc.org
,, Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 E
Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Includes a 10-minute swim, a 30-minute cycle
and a 20-minute run. Open to everyone. Price
includes a race t-shirt, cap, and race bib. $30$45.
3:455:45 p.m. 92Y Live Stream from the
J: In the News with Jeff Greenfield: Barney
Frank
^^206-232-7115 or saraht@sjcc.org or
www.sjcc.org
,, Stroum JCC, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer
Island
Barney Frank discusses his journey to the U.S.
Congress, where he played a vital role in the
struggle for personal freedom and economic
fairness. Hell talk about his fight for gay rights
and his lifelong struggle against inequality.
Copies of his new memoir Frank will be for sale.

OPINION

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

the rabbis turn

The sparks of a radiant


tomorrow
By Rabbi Olivier BenHaim, Bet Alef Meditative Synagogue
Our tradition assumes the
possibility of four different
levels of interpretation to any
text, from the literal to the esoteric. One of these levels, the
allegorical level, allows us to
understand our Biblical stories
as universal archetypes relating
to the human spiritual journey. The opening verses of this
weeks Torah portion, Tzav,
lend themselves well to such an interpretation.
The burnt offering shall remain where
it is burned upon the altar all night until
morning, while the fire on the altar is kept
aflame. The Kohen shallremove the
ashes to which the fire has reduced the
burnt offering on the altar and place them
next to the altar. He shall thencarry the
ashes outside the camp to a pure place.
The fire on the altar shall be kept burning, it shall not be extinguished; and the
Kohen shall kindle wood upon it every
morning. (Lev. 6:2-5)
What if we were to view the burnt offering as representing the waking hours of
our days, how we tend to burn up our
time and energy? If lived mindfully, every
day of our lives can become an offering of the best we have to give. Each day
lived to the fullest is a day we dont hold
back and share the choicest aspect of our
self, regardless of our circumstances; a
day we step into the fire of life fully
and with great gusto. Though not a rabbi
himself, G.B. Shaw could very well have
been reflecting on these verses when he
famously stated: I want to be thoroughly
used up when I die.
The Lubavitcher Rebbe Menachem M.
Schneerson teaches us that every aspect of
the physical Sanctuary has its counterpart
in the inward Sanctuary. That is to say,
every aspect of the described outer Tabernacle in Torah represents an aspect of our
inner being. For the rebbe, the [human]
heart is the altar (Torah studies; Tzav).
Our offering, therefore, has to be burned
upon the heart. The teaching here is that
our giving, our actions in the world to
be a pure expression of our true self necessarily have to come from the heart space.
These kinds of actions cannot be reasoned,
premeditated or calculated. They spontaneously arise of their own accord when

we are radically present to the


moment as it unfolds.
Furthermore, the Torah
suggests that as we practice
acting from the radically present heart, the shadow of our
subconscious and the limitations of our deeply rooted conditioning begin to heal and
dissolve. Similar to Jacob wrestling the whole night through
with his inner demon, The burnt offeringis burnedall night, the illusion
of our conditioned self is consumed in
the light of awareness burning brightly
through our darkest nights. And like Jacob
emerging victorious at daybreak, the altar
burning continues until morning until
the Light of Being eventually outshines our
inner darkness.
There is a caveat, however, to this process: We shallremove the ashes. Rabbi
Yehuda Leib Alter of Ger writes: The
commandment here to remove the ashes
hints that as we burn up the waste in our
lives we are uplifted each day, and then we
are given new light (Sfat Emet commentary; Tzav). This new light is the opportunity we have to kindle [new] wood
every morning. We have to let go of the
ashes of our past at the end of each day; to
enter into a process of releasing both the
good and the bad of what was, whatever
keeps us entangled to that past. We are
not to deny it; what happened, happened.
But as we break free from its hold on us,
we carry our past outside the camp to a
pure place, so it no longer clouds our way,
blocking our own evolution.
Days away from Passover, we are about
to reenact the ritual of biur chametz, committing our chametz to the flame; performing our own burnt offering. What is this
chametz in your life ready to be offered
up? What is it for you, this year, which has
burned so brightly and for so long that it
now feels fully consumed, and needs to
be let go of? What is your new wood of
tomorrow yearning to be finally kindled
that it might bring new light into your life?
This is the journey that Passover invites
us to embark upon: To leave the ashes of
our old inner chametz behind, and ignite
within us the liberated sparks of a radiant
tomorrow.
Chag Pesach Kosher vSameach!

letters to the editor

Dear Subscribers and Members of our community,

As the final chapter of this 91-year-old newspaper comes to an end, I would like
to express my heartfelt gratitude to the board and staff of The Jewish Sound (a.k.a.
JTNews and The Jewish Transcript) for its unwavering support and commitment
through the good times as well as the difficult ones in providing the Jewish community of Washington with balanced reporting of all things affecting the members of our
region. I would also like to thank the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle for its support, both financial and emotional, during this time and especially in the recent years. As
a board, we look back fondly on our involvement with the newspaper, but we also are
look forward to the new glossy magazine publication that will debut later this summer.
We thank you for your support for the newspaper over the years and thank you in
advance for your interest in this new, exciting publication.
Stanley P. Mark
Board Chair, The Jewish Sound

The Jewish Sounds final board, from left to right: Cynthia Flash Hemphill, Cantor David SerkinPoole, Ron Leibsohn, Joel Magalnick, Keith Dvorchik, Nancy Greer, Stan Mark, Marilyn Corets.
Not pictured: Jerry Anches and Celie Brown.
To our readers and our community,

By the time you read this, Ill be a few days from my title being changed from Publisher and Editor to Last Man Standing, The Jewish Sound. So Id like to say some goodbyes and thank yous while I have you.
Im going to start by saying Lhitraot until we meet again to my venerable
staff. Over the years our little paper has contracted, then contracted some more, but
so many of them stuck it out, always worked hard, and complained little, even in the
face of stressful situations like added work, short deadlines, long hours, and the prospect of their jobs coming to an end long before theyd planned. Thank you all Lynn,
Emily, Andrea, Cheryl, Katy, plus those that came before you for your hard work and
dedication.
The same goes for our freelance stable of writers, many of whom got here even
before I did. Why you stuck around for such crappy pay and assignments that occasionally put your face on dartboards Ill never know, but you turned out some excellent
work of which we can all be proud.
And finally, Id like to thank you, our readers and local Jewish organizations, so many
of whom I worked with over the years as we covered our vibrant and sometimes edgy
community. As a newspaper, we would occasionally celebrate you and occasionally
beat you with a stick. Sometimes those hard questions had to be asked. We wouldnt
be a newspaper if we ignored controversy or turned a blind eye to the occasional ugly
things that went on. Please know that we did so not out of malice, but in the spirit of
making our community the best it can be.
Im not yet sure where I will go from here, but youll see some of the names of our
current staff on the new magazines masthead. Im certain that what comes next will
reflect the growth and dynamic of this not-so-little town we call home.
Again, thank you.
Joel Magalnick
Publisher & Editor, The Jewish Sound

The opinions of our columnists and advertisers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Jewish Sound or the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.

In general, people think of meditation as something originating exclusively with Eastern religions to seek calm and an inner peace.
But there is a uniquely Jewish meditation tradition that can be traced back to the Prophets.
Rabbi Shmuel Brody of the Ashreichem Yisrael synagogue, who leads weekly sessions on meditation. See the article on page 15.

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Cultural Arts @
In addition to the Seattle Jewish Film Festival, the J offers a wide variety of arts programs, including concerts,
theater performances, and lectures, so the greater Seattle community can come together to explore, enjoy, and
engage in art. With the reopening of our newly renovated SJCC auditorium earlier this year, the J is proud to be
an artistic home for our community.

IN THE NEWS:
BARNEY FRANK

ESTER RADA IN CONCERT

Yom Haatzmaut Community Concert


Saturday, May 3, 7 p.m.

92Y Live Streaming


Sunday, April 12
3:15 p.m.

A community concert from Israeli Ethiopian Jazz artist


Ester Rada. Rada is a stimulating young singer and
songwriter with a unique cross-cultural approach that
reflects her Ethiopian heritage and Israeli upbringing,
while embracing the influence of American soul icons
like Nina Simone and Aretha Franklin. Combining R&B,
Ethio-Jazz, reggae and classic funk, Radas music is a
truly global stew that has earned her critical raves and
performances around the world, including an opening
tour slot for R&B queen Alicia Keys, who has become
one of Radas most outspoken champions.

Barney Frank discusses his


journey from New Jersey
to the U.S. Congress, where
he played a vital role in the
struggle for personal freedom and economic
fairness. Hell talk about his fight for gay rights
and his lifelong struggle against inequality.
With one of Americas most respected political
analysts, Jeff Greenfield. This is a live streaming
event from the 92nd Street Y in New York City.

FIDDLERS FORTUNES
50 Years of Musical Tradition
Sunday, May 31, 3 p.m.

A journalist, drama critic, and professor, Alisa Solomon presents


her book Wonder of Wonders, a history of Fiddler on the Roof.
Solomon traces how the story of Tevye the milkman became
blockbuster Hollywood entertainment and a cultural touchstone
not only for Jews, but all of America.

BASEBALL SAVED US

5th Avenue Theatre Family Show


Saturday, May 9, 6:30 p.m.

When Shiros family is sent to an internment


camp during World War II, they decide to
form a baseball league to boost the spirit of
the internees. Presented by The 5th Avenues
Adventure Musical Theater Touring Company.
For families with kids in grades 1-8.
Dessert included.

+
COMING SOON: the J brings SJFF encores,
film premieres and talk backs

THATS
FUNNY,
YOU DONT
LOOK JEWISH

Comedy Show
Saturday, June 13, 7:30 p.m.

What do an Italian, Black, Chinese, and Indian Jew have in common? In this stand-up show,
youll get a world of perspective on the humor of Jewish life from comedians Samson
Koletkar, Mike Capozzola, Gina Gold, and Joe Nguyen. Join us for this hilarious evening about
what it means to be Jewish.

Above events held at SJCC Mercer Island, 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island WA 98040.

Information and tickets are available at

www.SJCC.org

Wishing you all the joy of Passover!


Thank you to the JT News for being the voice of
Seattles Jewish community for more than 90 years.

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

opinion

J Street Challenge film draws criticism from J Street rabbis


By Avi Goldwasser, Special to The Jewish Sound
In response to Rabbi Anson Laytners
article Challenging The J Street Challenge in the March 12 Jewish Sound, it
was disheartening to read Rabbi Laytners
critique of The J Street Challenge, a film
produced by the non-profit educational
organization Americans for Peace and Tolerance (APT). APT has been at the forefront of advocating for Israel on college
campuses and in the community.
The J Street Challenge presents a
sober analysis of the perplexing actions
of J Street, a lobbying organization that
most would agree has become a leading Jewish organizational critic of Israel
in recent years. Our film features distinguished speakers from across the political
spectrum, including Harvard professors
Alan Dershowitz and Ruth Wisse, Rabbi
Daniel Gordis, former AIPAC director of
research Lenny Ben David, and Jerusalem
Post editor Carolyn Glick.
Since its Miami premiere in February
2014, weve had over 80 screenings in the
U.S., Israel, and Canada, many to soldout audiences. At almost all the screenings weve invited J Street spokespeople

and supporters to join us on stage to discuss the film. So far none have accepted
our invitation.
The film has come under attack from J
Street leaders and supporters who, while
proclaiming the importance of vigorous discourse and debate in the Jewish
tradition, simultaneously seek to limit
discussion on the subject of J Streets questionable funding and operating methods.
Our film highlights J Streets highly critical
approach to Israels leaders and harsh criticism of the Israeli governments policies.
The J Street Challenge raises concerns
about J Streets founders, donors, policies
and the impact it is having on the Jewish
community and on pro-Israel activities on
college campuses. The film is critical of J
Street marketing efforts that seem intent
to circumvent Israels democratic process
by lobbying the Obama administration to
coerce the Israeli government.
Our film does not question the wellmeaning intentions of most of J Street supporters; it does question the veracity of the
organizations leadership, not unlike what
J Street supporters do to Israels leader-

Emanuel

ship. Recently, J Street


has tweeted its deep
disappointment, at the
results of the Israeli
election, claiming
Israel deserves better.
So it was disappointing to be accused of
causing rifts within the
Jewish community for
presenting a different
perspective. It is sad to
J Street Challenge
read false accusations of A frame of Irans former President Ahmadinejad in The J Street
our motives being used Challenge.
as an argument to deny
the film a fair hearing. We all recognize
movie, even those who entered as skepthat these are difficult times for the global
tics, the feedback has been overwhelmJewish community and the importance for
ingly positive.
Jewish unity.
The Pacific Northwest is known for tolIt was unfortunate that the Washingerance and open-mindedness, so we ask
ton Coalition of Rabbis issued a letter that
that rather than allowing others to decide
attempted to discourage the screening of
what can be discussed or seen please watch
our documentary in Seattle. Nevertheless,
the film and decide for yourself. Our webit was encouraging that in the two Seatsite is www.thejstreetchallenge.com.
tle screenings so far, over 300 concerned
community members had the opportunity
Avi Goldwasser is executive producer and director
to see the film. Of those who have seen the
of The J Street Challenge.

HAPPY PASSOVER FROM

EMANUEL CONGREGATION
David Dintenfass President
Boaz Pnini, Cantor

PESACH SERVICES 2015 5775


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moving our community forward

Set Out A Plate


by Mike Selinker

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Moving our community forward


The Jewish Sound comes to a close with the publication of this issue, to be succeeded
later this year with a magazine that will highlight the life of Jews in the Seattle area. The next
four pages look at how our community has grown over the years, and what we may lose as
Washington States 91-year-old stalwart disappears.
Joel Magalnick, Editor, The Jewish Sound

When it comes to Israel, lets


at least try to get along
By Joel Magalnick, Editor, The Jewish Sound

The Passover seder plate is the rarest of things: an edible story. Each of its six foods represents
a chapter of the story of Exodus, eaten to remind sedergoers of the importance of the legendary
journey. Here, weve laid out a seder plate in black and white, with the foods in approximately the
right arrangement. Btei Avon!
ACROSS
1
5
9
10
12
13
15
16
18
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
33
35
36
40
44
45
47
48
49
51
52
54
55
56
58
61
62
63
64

Clothe
Snow Crash author Stephenson
Two make a diameter
Pomp and Circumstance composer
Locate
Los ___ (nuke site)
Pro ___
SNLs Cheri
See 8-Down
Singer Redding
See 4-Down
___ culpa
Kissing disease, informally
Sushi topping
Five dollar bills, in old-timey slang
With 28-Down, seder plate item evoking
the Temples destruction
Isolate
My lord!
Play roughly
Given out
With 26-Down, seder plate item evoking
the mortar of the pyramids
___ weevil
Escape craft
Red monster on TV
Prefix for verse or form
These
Loretta of M*A*S*H
Shaking manifestations
With 58-Across, seder plate item evoking
the tyranny of slavery
Environmental prefix
See 38-Down
See 54-Across
Confederate anthem
Award a plurality, perhaps
Anxiety condition, for short
Jane Rochesters maiden name

DOWN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
11
12
14
15
17
19
21
26
28
29
31
32
34
36
37
38
39
41
42
43
46
49
50
53
57
59
60

Hoods pistol
Suffix for Gator or Power
Camera and copier maker
With 22-Across, seder plate item evoking
the harshness of the Pharaohs rule
Beverage containing less than 0.5% alcohol
Island on the Hudson
Turkish leader
With 18-Across, seder plate item evoking
the blood of the sacrifice
The King of Queens actress Leah
iRobots vacuum cleaner
Half a droids name
Give a snide look
Sarcophagus site
God of love
Seattle-Bellevue direction
Word meaning the Sun in a circuss name
See 40-Across
See 27-Across
Columnist Savage
Tug
Dr. group
Sent overseas, say
Come up against
Gary Payton was one
With 56-Across, seder plate item evoking
the pain of the slaves
Stern-faced
L.A. Dodgers, S.F. Giants, etc.
www.___.edu (website centered in
Ann Arbor)
Dorothys companion
She sang You Gotta Be in 1994
@midnight host Hardwick
Mattress maker
Poorly navigate 60-Down
Phone no. addition
German article
Rink substance

Answers on page 29
2015 Eltana Inc. All rights reserved. Puzzle created by Lone Shark Games, Inc.
Edited by Mike Selinker and Gaby Weidling. Crosswords of Wisdom, 1538 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122

As this 91-year experiment in community outreach comes to a close, I have


a question: Can we talk? I mean, really
talk? In particular, I want to talk about
Israel, because it seems like nobody else
is. When I mean talk about Israel, I mean
with each other, not at each other. Because
lately, thats all its been. One side talks at
the other, that side talks back, and nobody
hears a thing. Yet everybody gets angry,
mud gets flung, tempers flare, and were
once again a couple of steps behind where
we started.
I can be talking about the recent election, or what the prime minister said, or
what the president said, or the war in Gaza,
or the previous war in Gaza, or the war in
Lebanon. It doesnt matter. But the net cost
is the same: With all of this mud-flinging,
fewer people find the energy to wade into
the muck and feel any love for the Jewish
State. And this at a time when Israel needs
as much love as it can get.
If anything, in the 12 years Ive sat in this
chair, things have only gotten worse. Im not
suggesting things would be better if, love
him or hate him, everyone stood behind
Benjamin Netanyahu or adjusted their
thinking to one view of how Israel should
operate far from it. What Im suggesting
is that everyone who does have an opinion
about the ways of the world when it comes
that tiny corner should take a step back,
breathe deeply, and ask whether their point
of view is the only one that matters. Then
they should reflect on whether sticking with
that opinion, come hell or high water, does
damage to Israel, to their community, and
to their own reputation. Because sometimes
it happens to all three.
For those of us working in the trenches,
we can see it, we can smell it, and we
really dont like it. Over the years, especially during times of war, many leaders in our community would tell me how
the Israel issue made their jobs so much
harder. Those who cared never got their
news updates from the same sources,
they couldnt agree on solutions if any
existed and nobody would hold their
tongue. Those with a marginal interest ran
as far away from the country as they could.
Heres an example: In the past couple
weeks, in the run-up to Israels election,
this divisiveness reared its ugly head with
op-eds that slammed the New Israel Fund
as anti-Israel. While Im not going to use
this as a forum to defend New Israel Fund
they can do that on their own I bring

it up because the tenor got so bad that Jane


Eisner, editor of The Forward, actually
demanded that the people leading this campaign knock it off. Or, think back a couple
years, when a group of LGBT Israelis were
accused by people they would otherwise
consider their compatriots as being shills
for the Israeli occupation. The issue blew
up and nobody came out smelling like roses.
Both issues and so many more laid
bare the lengths people will go to smear
people they disagree with.
And thats really what its about, isnt
it? Disagreement? A fundamental feeling
that what the other side is saying doesnt
comport to our own world view? Thats
why were writing blog posts and op-eds
filled with half-truths and omissions? Or
attempting to block container ships that
would economically hurt the people the
protesters are trying to help? None of it
creates good will, and none of it brings us
closer to a lasting peace in the Middle East.
We need to spend time listening to
people outside of our own echo chambers.
We need to hear that people may feel a
love for Israel thats different from the way
we feel a love for Israel. We dont need to
agree with what our supposed enemies are
saying, but we do need to respect that their
opinions are coming from the same place of
love as ours.
Which brings me to what the Jewish
Transcript in all its different guises
attempted to provide over the years: A
forum for people with many different
views on Israel. Not everybody liked it,
and not everyone could understand why
we would allow voices many considered
to be outside of the acceptable discourse
on Israel. But I see it as a hallmark of this
newspaper in the last 12 years and beyond.
I lament that the magazine taking our
place will not offer this type of forum, and
I wonder where such a place that allows
voices from across the spectrum can exist.
That we would create a vacuum for people
with an agenda or an ax to grind is too
enticing and, sadly, likely to happen, given
what we have seen even when this medium
allowed such discourse.This issue is far too
important to leave in the hands of idealogues. I hope that we as a community will
eventually realize it before the next flareup occurs.
Lhitraot. Until we meet again.
Joel Magalnick began as editor of The Jewish Sound,
then known as The Jewish Transcript, in 2003.

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

moving our community forward

Mourning for a venerable friend


By Diana Brement, Jewish Sound Columnist
Please hand me that freshly sharpened stylus. I need to etch this in cuneiform on my clay tablet. When its dry,
Ill call the Pony Express to carry it to
my editor. Then a typesetter will set my
words, one letter at a time, into trays
of type and press them onto individual
sheets of paper.
This is how outmoded I felt when I
heard that this venerable newspaper, The
Jewish Transcript/JTNews/JewishSound,
was being terminated by its owner, the
Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.
Its no secret that newspapers are
dying. The local Norwegian community
newspaper announced its demise around
the same time, although an angel has
come forward to save it.
While this Jewish paper has tenaciously held onto a readership of about
3,000 households, estimated to be about
12,000 readers, advertisers have fled in
droves as Internet advertising has grown.
Even with an Internet presence, many
publications are still figuring out how to
make money in a world dominated by
Craigslist and Google.
As the weeks have worn on, Ive
become more sad. I am sad on a personal level to lose my position in the
community. But I am also sad for the
organizations that serve our community, particularly inclusive ones, such as
the Holocaust Center for Humanity, the
National Council of Jewish Women, or
the Stroum Jewish Community Center,
that cut across denominational boundaries. This is the community most affected
by the loss of the paper, and Ive heard
this from many. The local paper gives
organizations a tool for informing readers about the community at large through
articles and advertising. And while it
might be on a small scale, it gives organizations a chance to attract new donors
and volunteers.
Six months from now, a local Jewish
magazine will be launched by the Federation and SagaCity Media. With six issues
a year, it will serve a different function,
but might be limited in helping organizations publicize events. The lead time for
magazine advertising and copy is quite
long and events will need to be completely planned months in advance for
placement. Organizations will likely be
more dependent on their own databases
and may spend more money on marketing. Members and leaders of local organizations have told me that the loss of
the paper is a loss to their organizations
and the community. How will they reach
people outside their membership? Can
they afford magazine advertising? And
how many emails from different organizations are you or I really going to read?
On the other hand, a glossy color
magazine will likely appeal to advertisers the newspaper couldnt attract. Magazines offer staying power that their
dowdy great-aunt, still stuck on news-

print, doesnt have. A magazine sits


around your house or waiting room for a
lot longer than a newspaper its a fact.
Given the state of the newspaper business, I wasnt that surprised that the
Federation put the 90-year-old Jewish
Transcript out of its misery (and I revert
back to its historic name to honor its long
and respectable history). Yet, as the most
overarching organization in the community, what is the Federations obligation
to its donors and grantees to help keep
the community informed?
Its impossible to look at the loss of
the paper in the face of the revelation
that there are almost 20,000 more Jews
in our state than there were 15 years ago,
whether that factored into the decision or
not. I think most of us in the organized
and affiliated Jewish community are wondering how to reach those folks, most
of whom are not Jewishly active. Will a

Jewish population. I know that


newspapers are not much read anymore and that most people, young
and old, are getting their news from
the Internet. But I still see a gap that
is created in the ability of local organizations to communicate to the community.
Unhealthy and old? Or a longstanding community tradition put out
to pasture before its time? Whichever
you choose, it is a death in our family, a
heart-wrenching loss to many. We will
move forward day to day, as we do, but
lets not forget this vital piece of our community that once lived with us.
May its memory be for a blessing.

magazine
accomplish that better than a newspaper? Possibly, if that is part of its mission.
Im not nave. I know that the estimated readership of the newspaper was
less than a third of our regions estimated

Diana Brement was the longtime columnist of The


Jewish Sounds M.O.T.: Member of the Tribe
feature.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites all of its members


to the 2015 Annual Meeting, Thursday June 18, 2015, 1 pm sharp
at Federation offices, 2031 Third Ave, Seattle, WA 98121.

NOMINATIONS/BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2015/2016 FOR PUBLICATION


The Nominating Committee is pleased to notify you of the slate of nominations for the 2015-16 Board of Directors for
the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.
BOARD OFFICER NOMINATIONS

END OF TERM

Chair
Immediate Past Chair
Vice Chair
Vice Chair
Vice Chair
Secretary
Treasurer

6/30/2017
6/30/2016
6/30/2017
6/30/2017
6/30/2017
6/30/2017
6/30/2018

Dan Lowen
Celie Brown
Carl Bianco
Zane Brown, Jr.
Steve Loeb
David Stiefel
Helene Behar

DIRECTOR NOMINATIONS

Helene Behar
Lisa Brashem
Linda Clifton
David Ellenhorn

6/30/2018
6/30/2018
6/30/2018
6/30/2018

CHAIR APPOINTEES

Jordan Lott
Corey Salka

6/30/2016
6/30/2016

STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Finance &
Administration
Center for Jewish
Philanthropy
Planning & Allocations
Audit
Planned Giving
Community Relations
Board Development

Helene Behar

6/30/2018

Hal Jackson
Debra Mailman
Eric Hasson
Iantha Sidell
Linda Clifton
Dan Lowen

6/30/2016
6/30/2016
6/30/2016
6/30/2016
6/30/2018
6/30/2017

RETURNING DIRECTORS

Jerry Anches
Sarah Boden
Susan Edelheit
Aimee Johnson
Debra Mailman
Naomi Newman
Moss Patashnik
Elizabeth Richmond
Phil Roberts
Diane Sigel-Steinman

6/30/2017
6/30/2016
6/30/2017
6/30/2017
6/30/2016
6/30/2016
6/30/2016
6/30/2017
6/30/2016
6/30/2016

RABBINICAL ORGANIZATION REPRESENTATIVES

Rabbi Moshe Kletenik Vaad


Rabbi Aaron Meyer
WA Coalition of Rabbis

The procedure by which other At-Large Member candidates can be nominated by petition is as follows: At least thirty (30) days before the
Annual Membership Meeting on June 18, 2015, at the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle, a petition containing the signatures of at least
twenty-five (25) individual members of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle must be submitted to the current Secretary, Dan Lowen.

OF GREATER SEATTLE

2031 Third Avenue | Seattle, WA 98121-2412


Main 206.443.5400 | www.jewishinseattle.org
jewishinseattle
@jewishinseattle

10

moving our community forward

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Its Jewish Seattles moment lets grab on


By David Chivo, Special to The Jewish Sound
Our mirror, mirror on the wall
moment has arrived. The Jewish Federations 2014 Greater Seattle Community
Study provides a comprehensive picture
of what Jewish life in Puget Sound looks
like. Do we like what we see? Here are
five observations to consider:
The good news is that its mostly good
news! Population growth, a key barometer of communal health, shows were a
community of 63,400 Jews, an astounding
70 percent increase since 2000-01. Moreover, we are a relatively young community
that is affluent, well educated, civically and
communally engaged, and comprised of
households filled with children. Were also
relatively easy to find. Fifty-seven percent
of us live in Seattle proper, while the rest of
us live in adjacent communities to the east.
Notably, one in four Jewish households
lives in North Seattle. Finally, we connect
to Jewish life at respectable levels. Eightysix percent of respondents said they feel
a meaningful connection to their Jewish
heritage, while 82 percent said they attach
value to Jewish traditions. However, only
47 percent reported feeling a connection to
the Seattle Jewish community.
The big winner is the organized Jewish
community. Two-thirds of respondents
identify religiously with Judaism; another

third in secular ways. Measures of affiliations are not vastly different from more
established American Jewish communities. Most interestingly, those less affiliated
have not shut out the Jewish community. Forty-five percent of interfaith families are still deciding what religion to raise
their children. Seattles Jewish community
can be characterized by the term dispersity: Were diverse by every measure, dispersed geographically, and discerning in
terms of what we want. How do we serve
such a populace? One way is to invert the
old model of getting Jews into centralized Jewish institutions, and instead find
ways to bring high-quality Jewish offerings
closer to where Seattles Jews reside.
The surprising news is about Jewish povertythe lack of it. Make no mistake, our
wisdom tradition teaches of our sacred
obligation to take care of the needy. Yet
we cannot gloss over findings concerning measures of poverty. Just 2 percent of
households report being poor. Only 4 percent of families with children are earning
less than $50,000 annually. Nearly 90 percent report that they and their families are
in good health. And the vast majority are
reasonably confident they can fund their
retirements. What does this mean? Our
community generously supports human

Wishing the entire community a


HAPPY PASSOVER!

service agencies such as Jewish Family Service and Kline Galland, and our caring
must certainly continue. However, future
planning must acknowledge our need for
new and additional philanthropic revenue to strengthen the quality of Jewish life
in Seattle.
Bring on Sponge Boychik or in other
words, focus on the kids. About 25 percent of Seattles Jewish community are
children (infant to 18). And while 77 percent of young families say that raising their
children Jewishly is important to them,
participation rates in programs for children are low. Indeed, powerful Jewish
socializers such as Jewish day camp (26
percent), Jewish youth group (23 percent),
and Jewish overnight camp (22 percent) all
show room for significant improvement.
Research by Prof. Mark Rosen of Brandeis
University proves that if you Jewishly
engage families through initiatives for their
children, their connections to Jewish life
will increase and these connections will be
sustainable. As such, focusing on families
with young children is a crucial strategy.
We have to do this together! Like
the five books of the Torah, the 2014
Greater Seattle Community Study
describes what we look like as Jews
and as a people bound to one another at

a unique point in our history. The findings underscore the beauty of our community and the latent potential that we
have yet to realize. What our ancestors discovered during 40 years in the
desert was that no single individual, nor
one single group, was sufficiently prepared to mobilize the Israelites to forge
their future. Instead, they needed a
sense of unity, a sense of common purpose, and a sense of shared beliefs to
enter their promised land. Three thousand years later on lands adjacent to
the Pacific Ocean, our situation is not
so different. The study tells us that we
have remarkable opportunities in Seattle, perhaps more so than in most other
Jewish communities. To realize them,
we must work together, and in so doing
we bestow a gift onto ourselves and onto
the generations of Puget Sound Jewry
to come.
David Chivo is the North America director of Beit
Hatfutsot, the Museum of the Jewish People, in
support of its renewal campaign. Previously, he
served as executive vice president at the Jewish
Federation of Greater Seattle, which
commissioned the community study.

Wishing the community


an inspirational
Passover

Celebrating 17 fabulous years


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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

moving our community forward

11

With the community study now in hand, next


steps are all about the data
By Joel Magalnick, Editor, The Jewish Sound
Now that it has been two months since
the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle has released its Greater Seattle Jewish
Community Study, what happens next?
Lots of talking, for one.
We want to continue to share the
information and answer questions and
learn so that it really ends up being the
didactic method, said Keith Dvorchik, the
Federations president and CEO, because
we learn from the questions as well.
The study, conducted by the Cohen
Center for Modern Jewish Studies at
Brandeis University, projected that the
Jewish community stretching from Everett to Tacoma, and from the peninsulas to
the Cascade foothills, had grown some 70
percent to 63,400 Jews since the last study
took place in 2000. But the data uncovered
a much richer trove about the Jews that live
in the Puget Sound region than just numbers, and thats where the Federation wants
to go next.
In a big study like this, youve got 20
minutes. Youve got to cover a lot of areas,
Dvorchik said. So you get a decent swath,
but you dont get to dig really, really deep.
And depth is what local organizations
are now clamoring for.

Not only are we in the process of


the analysis and beginning to figure out
implementation opportunities, but the
community at large is also analyzing and
beginning to say, Wow, we really want to
be able to do X. Or it would be great if we
would be able to do Y, Dvorchik said.
What that means is that over the next
couple of years the Federation will likely
partner with a survey firm that specializes
in that deeper data. Thats why it held several community-wide and agency-wide
forums in February, and why Dvorchik
continues to speak at synagogues and organizational board meetings throughout the
community.
What we really want to do through
these research forums is understand what
questions people want to learn more
about, Dvorchik said. I imagine well do
deep-dive collection and then well want
to be able to move into a new area to do
another deep-dive collection, unless in
that deep dive things pop up that all of a
sudden you realize, Oh, weve got to dig
even deeper.
With that newer, most specific data in
hand, the organizations should then be
able to have ample information to begin

ick

Joel Magaln

tailoring their programming to what people want without having


to do the legwork on their own.
When Ive talked about this in town
halls and other organizations, it gets a very
positive reaction because its not an area
that they want to invest their dollars, [but]
they know they need it, Dvorchik said.
Given the tight budgets that every
agency sees these days, its not always easy
to justify spending money on surveys and
data collection. Thats where the Federation

can jump in.


Agencies like Jewish Family Service
or Hillel can ask: Do you want to feed
another person, or do you want to do the
deep-dive data? Do you want to ensure
someone is connected on campus Jewishly, or the data? Do you want to make
sure theres another spot for summer
camp, or the data? Dvorchik said.
Because were not direct service providers in those areas, it allows us to take a different role.

12

community news

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Appeals court supports rejection of anti-Israel ad on Seattle buses


JTA World News Service

(JTA) The Seattle-area transit


authority can refuse to post an advertisement criticizing Israeli policy as long as it is
part of a viewpoint-neutral ban on the subject, according to a ruling by a U.S. federal
appeals court.
In a ruling issued March 18, a panel
of judges from the 9th Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled that King County acted
within its rights when it rejected ads critical of Israel, upholding a previous ruling
by a federal district court. The opinion, authored by Judge Paul Watford and
joined by Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, reasoned that the bus advertisements constituted a limited public forum and that

the government could thus limit speech


in some circumstances, provided that the
limitations were both reasonable and not
prejudiced against a particular point of
view.
In dissent, Judge Morgan Christen
argued that the advertisements were, in fact,
a designated public forum, meaning that
they should be open to all forms of speech
except in specific, limited circumstances.
Christen argued that the county needed to
demonstrate that posting the advertisement
would lead to a real, rather than a speculative, threat to public safety.
The controversy arose in 2010, when
the Seattle Mideast Awareness Cam-

paign attempted to purchase an ad stating Israeli War Crimes Your Tax Dollars
At Work. The King County Metro and
county officials initially approved the ad,
but in response, King County Metro was
flooded with threats and complaints, as well
as demands to post a pair of inflammatory
ads critical of Palestinians and Muslims.
In response, Metro decided not to post the
original ad, and to ban all ads on the subject.
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle applauded the courts decision, saying
in a statement that we believe the advertising in question was divisive. It would have
driven communities further apart and exacerbated the difficulty of promoting reconcil-

Looking for lunch this Passover?


Friends rolling resWhats better than
taurant, Hillel at the
getting your lunch at
University of Washone of the many food
ington and its Jcontrucks around town on
nect program will
any given day? Getting
bring a kosher-foryour lunch at a food
Passover menu of
truck during Passover
items to multiple
thats actually kosher
Dikla Tuchman
for Passover! Armed Jonny Silverberg pokes his head out from the areas throughout the
region during the
with an Ignition grant order window of the Napkin Friends truck.
week of April 610.
from the Jewish FedExpected stops include South Lake
eration of Greater Seattle and in partnerUnion, Capitol Hill, downtown Seattle, in
ship with chef Jonny Silverbergs Napkin

Happy
y Passover
Pas

iation and securing a just and lasting peace.


The American Civil Liberties Union
of Washington criticized the decision in a
statement, according to Reuters, arguing
that King County allowed its fear of controversy to trump a commitment to free
speech.

If you go:

The truck will be


Bellevue, and on the
cleaned
and kashered
UW campus.
To find where the Napkin Friends
prior to Passover, and
Napkin Friends Passover food truck will be during the
supervised by Hillel
regular menu features week of April 610, visit Hillel UWs
staff. It will not be
sandwiches made using Facebook page or search the
supervised by the
pressed potato latkes @HuskyHillel Twitter handle or
Vaad HaRabanim of
instead of bread #PassoverAllOver hashtag.
Greater Seattle. Hillwrong holiday, but perels traditional Passover lunches will take
fect for this one. Sandwiches will include one
place this year Wednesday and Thurswith charoset, roasted root vegetables and
day, April 8 and 9 at 4745 17th Ave. NE,
spinach, and another with braised brisket
Seattle.
and spiced tomato jam. The menu will also
Joel Magalnick
include matzoh ball soup and kugel.

Wishing the entire


Jewish community
a Happy Passover

Wishing
shing yyou a holiday
filled with he
health and joy,
e and reflection.
re
peace
n of tog
A celebration
togetherness.

bader
Martin

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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

community news

13

After completing a double chai, yeshiva rabbi


will call it a career
By Boris Kurbanov, Jewish Sound Correspondent
Nearly 30 years after he was appointed
head of school at what was then the
states only Jewish high school, Rabbi
Bernie Fox will retire after the 2015-16
academic year, capping off 36 years at
Northwest Yeshiva High School.
This was not an easy decision, Fox
wrote in an email. I have enjoyed my
tenure as head of school. It has been a
challenging and exciting position. However, it is also a very demanding responsibility and it leaves little time for other
pursuits. There are many other things I
would like to do and I realize that I will
be more likely to get to them if I transfer
the responsibilities of head of school to
someone else.
Fox, who joined the schools faculty
in 1980, made his announcement in an
email on March 12. His last day as head
of school is slated for June 30, 2016.
I am grateful to have had the opportunity to serve as head of school for three
decades, he wrote, adding, It has been
a very rewarding experience that has
enabled me to work with amazingyoung
people, remarkable colleagues, dedicated
parents, and inspiring volunteers and
supporters.
He said many in the community have
reached out to offer their thoughts and
reflections on his decision.
I appreciate the many people who
have contacted me and shared with me
their kind thoughts and reflections on
my decision. These well-wishers express
their gratitude to me for the work that I
have done. But I feel I am the one who
must be appreciative, Fox said. Our
community has provided me the opportunity to pursue my passion and to make
a difference. The work I have done here is
my source of meaning. So, my thanks to
all of those who have supported me and
NYHS over these many years.
During his tenure, the high school
has seen incredible growth, said Jack
De Leon, who has served as the schools

president since June 2013 and has known


Fox for the better part of a decade.
Every year Rabbi Fox continues to
do a remarkable job improving our programs, De Leon said. Among his many
accomplishments, which are many, is
that between 25 and 30 percent of our
seniors continue to place in the top 10
percent of the state. Its a feather in his
cap and a big kudos to him for having so
many of our students represented.
In recent years, NYHS students have
been admitted into some of the most
revered universities in the U.S.
In a column in The Jewish Sound last
fall, Fox wrote, When I consider the past
35 years, I feel very accomplished. So
many of the young people with whom I
have worked are committed to the Jewish
people. Many are leaders in the community. But I am most proud of their
commitment to values and living ethical lives.
The school will form a search committee in the coming weeks to begin
looking for a new head of school, De
Leon said. He added that he hopes to
have two chair positions filled by Passover, which begins April 3.
The school is well-positioned for new
leadership, he said.
Right now we probably have the
strongest faculty weve ever had, De
Leon said. We dont know how long the
process will take, but we will do our due
diligence in searching the country, and
if someone locally wants to apply, well
open it up to everybody.
Fox reflected on his 36-year career
in Jewish education and said his biggest
takeaway was his work with the students.
During my tenure as head of school,
close to 500 students have graduated
from the program. Those lives are more
precious than anything else I take from
these years as head of school, he wrote.
But I have also had the opportunity
to work with many amazing educators,

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Pre-registration required.
Free Passover Workshop
Mon., March 30, 7-9pm
Taught by Rabbi Olivier BenHaim
Discover ways to move from
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Sat., April 4, 5pm
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Includes catered dinner.
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lay leaders, and volunteers. I was fortunate to be mentored by


brilliant leaders within
our community and I
have tried to use their
lessons well.
While Fox wrote
that he was looking
forthe opportunity to
refocus my efforts and
explore other areas,
he noted that he would
like to continue to
serve at NYHS as an
instructor.
There are so many
projects in which I am
interested. I will need
to set some priorities.
Writing will be a high
priority. We have a
wonderful community
and I am eager to lend
a hand where I can be
of service. But discus- Rabbi Bernie Fox
sion of what I will do
after completing my tenure should be
postponed until next June. My job right
now is to continue to serve as head of

school and that responsibility requires


my full attention.

Passover
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14

passover greetings

Happy Passover!

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Passover Greetings
in loving memory of
Rose & Irving Zimmer

Happy Passover!

Karen Zimmer
Kathy, Ray, Celina & Marlo Cafarelli
Bemoaning the exodus
see you in the
promised land!
Dita & Fred Appelbaum

Pesach Sameach

Peter & Peggy


Horvitz
Passover Greetings!

Passover Greetings!

Dick & Marilyn


Brody
and Family

Celie & Zane Brown


Melissa, Zane, Rebecca & Mira Brown
Keely, David, Naava & Samuel Berkman

Passover Greetings
to all our friends and
business associates!

THE RETTMAN FAMILY

Dean, Gwenn,
Robert & Andrea
Josh & Sam
Polik

Do L'hitraot

Debra, Peter and Zelle


Paula Rettman

Pesach Sameach
HASSON LAIBLE & CO., P.S.
206-328-2871
hassonlaible@earthlink.net

Passover Greetings

to all our family and friends


Frances Rogers
Jimmy, Zoey & Sabina Rogers
Linda & Michael Morgan
Todd Morgan & Wendy Lawrence
Oliver & Jacob
Melissa, Marty,
Ariella & Sasha Nelson

Esther & Al Lott


Jeff Lott
Susan & Robert Solomon
Bryan & Celina Solomon
Passover Greetings!

Best of luck in The Jewish Sounds new venture.


Congratulations and very best
wishes on your new publication!
From Frances Rogers & family

Jason and Betsy Schneier


Ariel and Amanda

Joel, Jennifer, Ben &


Oscar Magalnick

Happy Passover!
Aaron & Edith DICHTER
Stephen, Gina, Marisa &
Lauren DICHTER
Robin, Max &
Denielle
ZAMBROWSKY

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

community news

15

Rabbis interactive class explores the spiritual soul of Judaism


By Dan Aznoff, Jewish Sound Correspondent

toward achieving its goal


Prophets in the Far
to deepen our practice
East and the Holy Land
of mitzvot and build a
explored the use of relicloser connection to our
gious meditation during
Creator.
various periods in history,
The spiritual leader of
but have adopted the use
Ashreichem Yisrael, an
of the introspective form of
Orthodox congregation
prayer for completely difin Seattles Seward Park
ferent purposes.
neighborhood, teaches a
Rabbi Shmuel Brody
class each Tuesday night
explains that Jewish medithat traces the history
tation has its origins in the
of meditation within
words of the Prophets. The
Judaism that explores
practice, he said, was later
the practice from differextrapolated by the sages of Rabbi Shmuel Brody.
ent Jewish sources, and
the Mishna, the Kabbalistic
then examines meditation based on those
masters of the 16th century, and eventually
teachings.
by the Chassidic masters of 18th-century
Our group explores the different
Europe.
powers of the soul kochot hanefesh
In general, people think of meditation
and how to awaken them to influence the
as something originating exclusively with
conscious self, the rabbi explained. Were
Eastern religions to seek calm and an inner
trying to activate those powers through the
peace. But there is a uniquely Jewish medmeditative practice.
itation tradition that can be traced back to
Mark Fefer is a member of Rabbi Brothe Prophets, said Brody. Jewish meddys congregation and has attended several
itation seeks a tranquil state as a means

used meditation for thousands of years to


of his classes on various subjects. He said
reach deeper thought, build spiritual charthe rabbi has an uncanny ability to translate
acter, and establish a personal relationship
Talmudic wisdom into guidance that relates
with God.
directly to his life today.
Rabbi Shmuel Brody was raised in Silver
The rabbis classes are not limited to
Spring, Md. and earned his Bachelor of Talmembers of his own congregation, said
mudic Law degree from Ner Israel RabbiniFefer. You dont have to be a strict Orthocal College. In addition to his duties with his
dox Jew to gain tangible wisdom from his
congregation, Brody taught classes on the
teachings.
Talmud at Northwest Yeshiva High School
The rabbi agreed with Fefer, adding
from 2007 until two years ago. He and his
that the Seattle Jewish Meditation Group
wife Sarah have two children.
is committed to sharing the practice of
The weekly classes are
authentic medheld in a private home
itation rooted
in the Seward Park comin the Jewish
munity. The sessions last
tradition for Find more information on the meditation
only an hour, but provide
J e w s o f a l l classes at the groups website,
enough food for thought
backgrounds, www.jewishmeditationgroup.com or by
to last an entire week,
regardless of contacting Rabbi Shmuel Brody at
according to Fefer. In
previous expe- rabbibrody@jewishmeditationgroup.com.
the tradition of all Jewish
rience.
gatherings from Eastern
Meditation,
Europe, each session ends with some homeaccording to Brody, provides many Jews
made kugel prepared by the rabbis wife,
the language they seek to be closer to God.
some pickles, and a lchaim.
It provides the calm needed to reveal the
soul. The rabbi went on to say that Jews have

If you go:

Chag Pesach Sameach!


from Michael Benzikry & Evelyn Rubinstein Benzikry
Ronnie Stern, Tamar Benzikry Stern & Eden Stern
Aviad Benzikry & Erin Katz

Wishing the
Jewish community
a Happy Passover.
HAPPY PASSOVER!

Mercer Island
Sunset Chevron
Tune Up Brake Work Emission Specialist
7655 Sunset Hwy Mercer Island 206-232-8190

Thanks to The
Jewish Sound for
a great 90 years!
Representative Tana Senn
tana.senn@leg.wa.gov
@TanaSenn

1 6 C o m m u n i t y n e w s

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Have Sephardic roots? They could get you home to Spain


By Barbara Winkelman, Special to The Jewish Sound
Part two in a series about a new law that
may allow Sephardic Jews to return home
to Spain.
Seattles Sephardic population has
expanded exponentially since Vivian Kahn
Blums grandparents, Behor and Behora
Chiprut, arrived in 1909, yet it is too small
to sustain itself. This is partly because of the
communitys diaspora and partly because
of intermarriage that has diluted Sephardic
traditions.
Efforts to preserve the Sephardic culture are underway.
The Seattle Sephardic Network was
founded recently by Doreen and Joseph
Alhadeff, Joel Benoliel, and Al Maimon. Its
purpose is to keep the Sephardic tradition
alive. They are ironing out the details so
they can apply for nonprofit status.
The organizations creation was spurred
by Spains re-establishment of a historical
connection with the Sephardim. In April,
Spain is expected to pass a law granting
dual citizenship to those with a Jewish
ancestor living in Spain in 1492 when
King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella issued
an edict expelling the Jews from Spain or
forcing them to convert to Catholicism.
The law purports to correct this historic
mistake.
To gain citizenship, you must prove
your connection to Jewish Spain in 1492.
Thats a tall order.
Factors of proof under the proposed
law have been kicking around the web
since 2013, when Spain first announced its
intention to pass this law.
One of the factors is an applicants
family name. Listings of Sephardic sur-

H A P P Y

names have been disseminated


through various media channels.
Some sources say these names alone
are prima facie evidence of Sephardic roots; Doreen Alhadeff, currently in Madrid, believes thats
likely not the case.
There are many lists, she said.
So far, nothingstates that surname will suffice.
Benoliel read a draft of the bill a
few months ago.
It had a list of cumulative factors which would be used to determine eligibility for citizenship. No
single factor would be dispositive,
and all factors would be weighed
together, he said. The primary
document would be a certificate
issued by a rabbi in the applicants
community attesting to his or her
Sephardic heritage. I heard that in
anticipation of this, some rabbis in
South America were already issuing
certificates to their congregants.
Similar documents could be
signed by leaders of local Jewish
communities or by the General Secretary of the Federation of Jewish
Communities of Spain, located in
Madrid.
If youre hoping to make use of
this law of return, but dont know
where to start, dont despair if
youre not a member of a Sephardic
Courtesy Joel Benoliel
synagogue or community. Some Al Maimon, left, and Joel Benoliel stand next to a statue erected in the memory of Maimonides in the courtyard
sleuthing will put a little spice in of the Jewish museum in the Juderia of Cordoba, Spain. The Juderia was the Jewish quarter centuries before
your life!
the expulsion.
First, try to get your hands on
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WWfrom Page 16

family documents that show historical


connections to Spain.
Evidence that the family used Ladino
[Hebrew-Spanish] or Haketia [HebrewSpanish-Arabic] languages, including birth
certificates or ketubot [marriage licenses]
stating that theceremony was done under
the rules and traditions of Castile may
work, Benoliel said. Many Sephardim
after the expulsion continued to reference
Spanish traditional practice in written documents by saying that the marriage, for
example, was conducted under the laws
and traditions of Castile, as evidenced by
historical documents from the diaspora
that contain such language.
There could be circumstantial evidence
as well. An applicant might also show that
they focused on studies of Spanish history and culture, suggested Benoliel, or
that they conducted charitable activities
on behalf of Spanish institutions which are
not occasional or sporadic.
Doreen Alhadeff shared news of the
bills latest iteration that will likely deter
people from applying:
At first it appears that you will need to
be here in Spain to apply and hire a Spanish
notary, she said. They [the Spanish government] have no idea how many people
will apply and the impact this law might
have on embassies if they were to handle
[the applications].
As Luis Fernando Esteban, Honorary
Consul to Washington and Oregon, attests,
it is also unclear whether the law will mandate a civics test similar to the one required
by the United States for citizenship.
Benoliel notes that the bill applies to
anyone who is a descendant of a Spanish
Jew in 1492.
One factor that has not gotten a lot of
attention is that the applicant need not be
a practicing Jew, he said. In fact, many
Catholics are descended from Conversos
or Crypto-Jews, and are therefore equally
eligible as am I, so long as their ancestors
were Spanish Jews.
Some think the Sephardic citizenship
bill is a public relations stunt or ploy for
more money, or that Spains penitence is
misdirected; they should be fighting antiSemitism across Europe by supporting
Israel in the international arena.

17

Benoliel said he understands


that there is never enough that
any one country is doing for
Israel, but he alludes to two
institutions that Spain funds:
A well-regarded Jewish school
in Madrid and Centro Sefarad
Israel, an organization that
serves as a bridge between Spain
and the Jewish world, more specifically Sephardic Jews. Centro
Sefarad sponsors cultural
events, classes, and art expositions in their space. It is holding Erensya III, an international
conference of Sephardic Jews in
Avila on April 27. Many people
watching how this bill unfolds
predict the passage of the citizenship law will be announced
Courtesy Joel Benoliel
before then.
Joel Benoliel, right, presents a copy of the Seattle Sephardic Community Siddur to Spanish Congress member Miguel
Last fall, all four co-found- Angel Cortes during a recent visit to Spain. Benoliel said he and his group demonstrated that the Ladino language is
ers of the Seattle Sephardic Net- still used as part of the Sephardic liturgy more than 500 years after expulsion.
work traveled to Spain. Benoliel
where appropriate. They see the offer of citincluded tens of thousands of people now
described a private dinner with key governizenship to Sephardim in the same light.
living in Cuba.
ment officials, where they spoke about the
There was no financial motivation
governments intent with the citizenship law.
behind that law and it gained little public
They learned of the Historical Memory
Correction: Vivian Kahn Blum has four cousins
attention, Benoliel said. But for the SpanLaw, passed in 2007, which offers citiwith the name Louise. Her cousin Louise Levy
ish it was part of an effort to come to terms
zenship to descendants of those exiled
was inadvertently omitted in last issues article
with their past, and offer reconciliation
as a result of the Spanish Civil War. That
about the Sephardic Chiprut family.

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18

world news

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Will the real Netanyahu please stand up?


By Uriel Heilman JTA World News Service
Analysis

(JTA) There are two Benjamin


Netanyahus.
To his detractors, Netanyahu is arrogant, a dissembler and a racist. To his
defenders, he is intrepid, politically
astute and singularly devoted to Israels
security.
Netanyahus critics blame him for
alienating Israels closest ally snubbing the U.S. president, using Congress
as a backdrop for electioneering, and
hurting bipartisan support for Israel.
They point to Netanyahus statement
last week that he opposes Palestinian
statehood as proof that he, not the Palestinians, is responsible for the failure to
reach a two-state peace deal. And when
Netanyahu issued his plea on Election
Day that Israeli patriots had better get
out to counter the Arab-Israeli vote, they
saw it as the ugly epitome of a campaign
marked by fear-mongering and racism.
For these detractors who include
many Israelis and American Jews
Netanyahu is a symbol of everything
thats wrong about Israel, and his strong
showing is a distressing sign of the direction Israel is taking.
Benjamin Netanyahus victory is a
deep disappointment to all who hoped
that Israel might choose a new direction

vicious attacks against him


for the country in
and his wife, Sara, are little
yesterdays election,
more than political mudJ Streets executive
slinging.
director, Jeremy
In this view, NetanyaBen-Ami, wrote in
hus decision to go ahead
an email on March
with his controversial
18 to supporters of
March 3 speech to Conthe self-described
gress had a positive effect:
pro-Israel, pro-peace
It galvanized opposition
lobbying group.
to a bad nuclear deal with
The manner in
w h i c h t h e P r i m e Benjamin Netanyahu speaks before Iran, as evident in the
letter sent by 47 RepubMinister secured his Congress on March 3.
lican senators to Tehran.
victory shredding
Netanyahu may have upset some of Israthe broad bipartisanship that underpins
els friends, but the controversy actually
American political support for Israel
served the greater purpose of helping
and preying on fear and racism at home
focus attention on the deals shortcom also demonstrated that he willingly
ings.
put his own political interests before his
When Netanyahu said on Monday
concern for Israels relationship with the
that he wouldnt allow a Palestinian
United States and his commitment to
state on his watch, supporters saw it as
Israels democratic character.
an honest and sensible assessment of
To his defenders, Netanyahu is a very
the lessons Israel has drawn from the
different figure, one who makes no apolupheaval that radical Islam has brought
ogies for putting Israels security ahead
to the Arab world.
of diplomatic expediency, is bold enough
I think anyone who is going to estabto deliver hard truths even when they
lish a Palestinian state and to evacuate
are unpopular, and is clever enough to
territory is giving radical Islam a stagoutmaneuver political rivals even the
ing ground against the State of Israel,
president of the United States. Yes, he
Netanyahu told the Israeli website NRG.
has his flaws theres that penchant for
This is the reality that has been created
expensive pistachio ice cream but the

here in recent years. Anyone who ignores


it has his head in the sand.
He clarified his position (or backtracked, depending on your view) in an
MSNBC interview on March 19, saying
he supports a sustainable, peaceful,
two-state solution but for that, circumstances have to change.
This view holds currency across the
Israeli political spectrum, though left
wingers might articulate it differently
perhaps stressing the desire for an eventual two-state solution and trying harder
to figure out how to get there. After what
happened with Gaza and Lebanon following Israels withdrawals, polls show
few Israelis believe its possible right now
to cede West Bank territory without it
becoming a staging ground for attacks.
Following Netanyahus clarification,
President Obama said he told the prime
minister that the U.S. was evaluating
its options in the wake of his claim.
We take him at his word when he
said that it wouldnt happen during his
prime ministership, Obama told Huffington Post in an interview posted
March 21 on the news site. Thats why
weve got to evaluate what other options
are available to make sure that we dont
XXPage 49

Chag HPesach

Chag Pesach Sameach


from your Jewish Federation!
Keith Dvorchik, President & CEO
Pesach
Sameach

The Feldhammer Family


Allan & Lynn
Matthew & Sarah
David & Nici

Passover Greetings!
Happy
Passover!

Emily, Ty, Bina & Saadia Alhadeff

The Puterman Family


Cheryl, Jeff,
Shira, Dalia
& (matza) Farfel

from Andrea & Stanley Rouleau

You have been a huge asset to the community.


Stan & Iantha Sidell
Ben, Brooke, Ella & Emet Pariser
Mark, Leslie, Leah & Hannah Sidell
Scott, Pam, Sydney & Emma Sidell

The Staff of
wishes the
community a
Happy and Healthy
Passover.

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

community news

19

Upcoming events, now through August


Compiled by Joel Magalnick, Editor, The Jewish Sound
With the paper shutting down after this
weeks edition, and the upcoming magazine not emerging until August, there will
be a gap in which many local events would
otherwise be overlooked. So we are presenting to you listings of big events from
local organizations happening over the
next several months.

Fundraisers, Speakers, Galas


and Meetings

2015 Jewish Family Service


Community of Caring Luncheon
Thursday, April 30, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m.
Seattle Sheraton Hotel, downtown 6th
and Pike
www.jfsseattle.org/luncheon
The luncheon is our communitys commitment to turn values into action. A minimum $150 donation per guest is requested
to support vulnerable people with the help
that leads to hope. All guests must be preregistered.

The 50th Anniversary of the Founding


of Congregation Ner Tamid
Saturday, May 9, 10 a.m.
Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer
Island
h-nt.org/NerTamid
Join the founding families of Congregation
Ner Tamid for a special Shabbat service
and festive kiddush luncheon honoring the
passion that 50 years ago ignited the Ner
Tamid flame and keeps it burning bright.
Kids4Peace Annual Spring Event and
Silent Auction
Wednesday, May 20, 6-8 p.m.
Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 4400 86th
Ave, Mercer Island
www.k4p.org
Join Kids4Peaces spring event and silent
auction! Hear from camp participants, eat
Middle Eastern food, and enjoy entertainment from Youth Theatre Northwest. All
funds raised support Jewish, Muslim, and
Christian campers from Jerusalem and Seattle to attend this summers Kids4Peace camp.

Happy
Passover!
Farewell from The Jewish Sound!
HAPPY PASSOVER

Becky Zimmerman
Mike, Beth, Bauer and Grant Zimmerman
Esther, Rabbi Yossi, Yehudah, Yonah Mordechai, Raziel Yitzchak
and Moshe David Malka
Sharon Zimmerman and David Tutton
Susan and Joshua Stewart

10th Annual Friendship Circle


Volunteer Appreciation Dinner
Thursday, May 28, 6 p.m. reception, 7
p.m. dinner and program at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 2100 Alaskan Way,
Seattle
www.FCDinner.com
Celebrating the ripple effect of friendship.
Honoring Dan Dixon, Cantor Bradlee
Kurland and Sandy Samuel, and Bruce and
Esther Caplan.
Kadima Reconstructionist Communitys Kadima-Party-Palooza! Fundraiser and Auction
Saturday, May 30
Kasbah Moroccan Restaurant, 1471 NW
85th St., Seattle
bit.ly/1DPFh86
Kadima is a progressive Reconstructionist
community integrating celebration, study,
and work for social justice. Reserve your
tickets today at office@kadima.org and
help support their growing community.
Eat, drink, bid, and be merry!

AIPAC of Washington State Welcomes


Ambassador Dennis Ross
Wednesday, June 3, 7 p.m. at Temple De
Hirsch Sinai, 1511 E Pike St., Seattle
www.aipac.org/WACE
Features a briefing by one of the worlds
foremost authorities on the Middle East.
Dessert reception to follow. No charge
for admission. Dietary laws observed. No
solicitation. Registration required.
The Seattle Kollels 24th Anniversary
Gala
Sunday, June 7, 5 p.m. cocktails with
dinner at 6 p.m. at Congregation Ezra
Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St., Seattle
Please join the Seattle Kollel as it celebrates its 24th anniversary with a beautiful gala dinner! Contact 206-722-8289 or
seattlekollel@aol.com for reservations and
tribute journal opportunities.

XXPage 20

cmw csp
Joel Erlitz
& Andrea Selig
HAPPY PASSOVER!
John and Anna Lukas;
David, Sara and Judah Lukas;
Katy Lukas and Tom Bowen;
Jake, Kisa, Shuggy, Stout,
Coconut, Pixel and Goldstein

Happy
Passover!
the jewish sound sta
Joel, Emily, Lynn,
Cheryl, Andrea & Katy

Health
Understanding
Happiness

Char Ahroni,
children and grandchildren

Farewell & Best Wishes,


Jewish Sound!
Joel & Maureen Benoliel

20

community news

WWupcoming events Page 19

NCJW Annual Meeting Honoring the


Founders of Council House
Sunday, June 14, 2 p.m.
The Summit on First Hill, 1200 University St., Seattle
ncjwseattle.org
Free. A book of raffle tickets will be sold for
$10 at the event. See details on the National
Council of Jewish Womens website later
in April.
Jewish Family Service Major
Supporter Event
Thursday, Sept. 17
Harley Marine Services, 910 SW Spokane
St., Seattle
www.jfsseattle.org
A special event to thank major supporters
of the agency.

Teens

Jewish High Seattle


www.jewishhighseattle.com
Register for Jewish High, Washington States only accredited supplemental school and Bnai Mitzvah program for
fall 2015.
Junior NCSY Shabbaton, Grades 58
May 1-3 in Seattles Seward Park neighborhood
www.seattlencsy.com
Join Junior NCSY for the annual end-ofthe-blowout weekend for middle schoolers
from all over the Pacific Northwest. Register now.
Livnot Chai Taste of Livnot
Tuesday, May 5, 68:30 p.m.
Temple Bnai Torah, 15727 NE 4th St.,
Bellevue
www.livnotchai.org
Come check out Livnot Chai! Livnot runs
programs in Seattle, Bellevue and Mercer
Island. Parents and teens welcome.
Livnot Chai is an after-school, pluralistic high school program that approaches
Jewish learning in a creative, flexible and
innovative way to responds to the changing needs of 21st-century learners.
NCSY Spring Regional Convention,
Grades 812
May 810 in Mount Baker, Washington
www.seattlencsy.com
Enjoy a weekend with teens from all over
the Pacific Northwest at a beautiful campsite. Special whitewater rafting activity on
Sunday. Register now.
Basarfest
May 31, 5 p.m. at Sephardic Bikur Holim,
6500 52nd Ave. S
www.seattlencsy.com
NCSYs annual meat cookoff and BBQ for
the whole family! This years theme will
be Back to the Future and a time machine
DeLorean replica will be on hand for pictures. Register now.

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Travel

Womens Trip to Israel for Jewish


Moms
July 5-14
Contact Shaindel Bresler at 206-7794373 or shainbresler@yahoo.com
Nine days in Israel with the Seattle Kollel.
Connect to the heritage that is yours
and bring it home. Its like Birthright
for moms! Travel the breathtaking land
from Tzfat to Jerusalem. Be inspired by
women who make a difference in Israel
and the Jewish world today. Spend Shabbat together in the Old City of Jerusalem,
steps from the Western Wall. Make friends
for a lifetime.
You pay the airfare and they do the rest.
Limited spaces available. Registration
deadline is April 15.

Camps

Camp Solomon Schechter Mens


Camp
April 24April 26 at Camp Solomon
Schechter, Tumwater
bit.ly/1AUpii1
Be part of a fantastic three-day retreat for
guys only. Come for a weekend of delicious kosher food, cigars, beer and spirits,
schmoozing and friendship in a relaxed,
casual environment. Go online for more
information or to register.
Camp Solomon Schechter Schechtercation Womens Camp
May 1May 3 at Camp Solomon Schechter, Tumwater
bitly.com/1AIwLB7
Come with your friends and make new
ones on a Shabbat getaway for women.
Enjoy delicious kosher cuisine and Jewish
learning in a beautiful camp setting. Theyll
have cocktails, games, and optional activities such as yoga, hiking, and professional
massage throughout the weekend. Go
online for more information or to register.
Camp Schechter Family Camp
May 29May 31 at Camp Solomon
Schechter, Tumwater
bit.ly/18DjWB5
Pack up the car and come experience a special Shabbat with the whole family at camp.
Family weekends are the perfect getaway,
whether youre checking out the facilities
before that first big summer, reliving old
camp memories, or coming to see what the
kids are always talking about. Go online for
more information or to register.
Camp Kalsman Shabbaton with The
Seattle Kollel
May 29May 31
206-722-8289 or seattlekollel@aol.com
for reservations and pre-payment
Please join the families of the Seattle Kollel
for a physically relaxing and spiritually
motivating Shabbat experience out in
nature. Three full Shabbat meals and learning opportunities for all interested.
Cost: $80/person; $40/child; $50/student;
$240/maximum family rate.

arts

NCJW Literary Event with author Joan


Leegant
Sunday, April 12, 2 p.m. at Temple Bnai
Torah, 15727 NE 4th St, Bellevue
Joan Leegant, author of two prize-winning
books and writer-in-residence at Hugo
House in Seattle, will speak on Jewish
American Fiction Is Alive and Well: Four
Topics Were (Still) Writing About. Free,
but a donation to the NCJW Scholarship
Fund will be requested.
A Little Light Music Music of Remembrances Annual Gala Dinner
Sunday, April 26, 6 p.m. at Womens
University Club of Seattle, 1105 6th Ave.,
Seattle
www.musicofremembrance.org/
~musicofr/concert/gala-dinner-2015little-light-music
Mingle with MOR artists and enjoy a magical evening of music classical, klezmer,
opera and show tunes. Be swept away as
you support MOR. Music of Remembrance fills a unique cultural role in Seattle
and throughout the world by remembering the Holocaust through music with concert performances, educational programs,
recordings and commissions of new works.
This evening includes wine, hors doeuvres,
dinner and live music by MORs musicians. Tickets online or at 206-365-7770.
Music of Remembrance: After Life
Monday, May 11, 7:30 p.m. at Illsley Ball
Nordstrom Recital Hall, Benaroya Hall,
2nd & Union, Seattle
www.musicofremembrance.org/
~musicofr/concert/spring-concert-afterlife
Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein meet
again and argue about art and life
in After Life, a new opera by composer
Tom Cipullo and librettist David Mason,
commissioned by Music of Remembrance.
With guest artists mezzo soprano Catherine Cook (San Francisco Opera), soprano
Ava Pine (Fort Worth Opera) and baritone Robert Orth. Tickets: $30-$40. Tickets online or at 206-365-7770.
Seattle Jewish Chorale Spring Concert
Sunday, May 17, 4-6 p.m. at Temple Beth
Am, 2632 NE 80th St., Seattle.
www.seattlejewishchorale.org
Please join Seattle Jewish Chorale and
guest musicians for their final concert of
the season. The performance, Shalom
Yerushalayim: Music for the Peace of Jerusalem, features music celebrating Jerusalem from ancient times through today.
Seattle Jewish Chorale
Yom Haatzmaut Concert
Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 7:30-9 p.m.
at the Stroum Jewish Community Center,
3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.eventbrite.com/e/yom-haatzmauttickets-16162595759
Please join Seattle Jewish Chorale and
guest musicians for a community Yom
Haatzmaut concert as they support the
Jewish Federation in celebrating Israels
Independence Day.

Service and Tikkun Olam

Herzl-Ner Tamid Day of Service


Sunday, April 26, 9:15 a.m. at Herzl-Ner
Tamid and several offsite locations
www.h-nt.org/DoS
HNTs biggest opportunity of the year to
provide needed services in the greater Seattle community! Projects include assembling
goodie bags for homeless childrens birthday parties, park restoration, volunteering
at a horse rescue, and many more. Come
share their passion for tikkun olam! Register
for your favorite project by April 12.

Holidays

Herzl-Ner Tamid and the Stroum JCCs


Lag BOmer Maccabiah, BBQ & Bonfire
Wednesday, May 6, 6 p.m. at the HerzlNer Tamid Wittenberg Waterfront, 3700
E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.h-nt.org/LBO
Join HNT and the SJCC for a communitywide Lag BOmer celebration! Theyll start
with Maccabiah games for kids and adults
alike, then enjoy a BBQ dinner, bonfire
and marshmallow roasting! Register by
April 29.
Herzl-Ner Tamid Solstice Shabbat
Friday, June 19, 6 p.m. service, 7:30 p.m.
dinner
www.h-nt.org/SolsticeShabbat
Everyone who wants to see some friendly
faces for a Friday night in shul is invited
for Shabbat services and a special dinner.
Being the weekend of the summer solstice,
learn about the connection between the
sun, the moon and Judaism.

Campus

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies


Graduate Fellows Research Symposium
Friday, May 1, 9:30 a.m.1:30p.m. at
HUB 214, University of Washington,
Seattle
jewishstudies.washington.edu/ourevents/may-1-spring-research-symposium/
The UW Stroum Center for Jewish Studies
is proud to host this half-day event, which
highlights research by the five members of
the 2014-15 Jewish Studies graduate fellowship. Each fellow has received funding
and mentorship from the Stroum Center
to help further their masters- and doctorallevel projects related to Jewish Studies.
Stroum Center for Jewish Studies:
Dreams of Sefarad: 40th Annual
Samuel and Althea Stroum Lectures
featuring Dr. Ruth Behar
Monday, May 18, 7:30-9:30 p.m. and
Wednesday, May 20, 7:30-9 p.m. at Kane
Hall 220, UW Campus, Seattle
jewishstudies.washington.edu/ourevents/stroum-lectures-ruth-behar/
Dr. Ruth Behars Stroum Lectures will
move between the personal essay and
poetry, history and ethnography, exile
and diaspora, and the role of the sea in
remembrances of Sefarad in such places as
Istanbul, Havana, Miami, New York, and
Seattle. Kosher reception to follow lecture
on May 18.

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

the arts

21

American love story


By Emily K. Alhadeff, Associate Editor, The Jewish Sound
What happens when a white Jewish girl
from Seattle falls in love with an AfricanAmerican Christian man from South Carolina? In the case of Miriam Sternoff and
ONeal McKnight, shenanigans. As their cultures collided again and again, McKnight, a
comedian, did the obvious thing. He pitched
a reality show.
Kosher Soul, a docu-sitcom about
the couples quirky, cross-cultural encounters, premiered on Lifetime on February 25.
Inspired by shows like Keeping Up with
the Kardashians, Kosher Soul attempts to
take an entertaining subject, but infuse it with
information and inspire audiences to step
outside their comfort zones.
Sometimes the love of your life might be
across the street, McKnight told The Jewish
Sound. What do you guys have in common?
Were human, were in love. Our message is
love.
Kosher Soul follows the L.A.-based
couple through various stereotypical scenarios. McKnight takes Sternoff to a swamp
meet to get fitted for a gold tooth. Then
she takes him to the beach to get over his
fear of water. McKnight good-naturedly
embarrasses his mother-in-law on stage in a
comedy routine. But, oh, its worth it just to
watch the discomfort on Sternoffs face when
she goes with his extended family to church.
Sternoff and McKnight met 10 years ago
in an elevator, when McKnight was rap artist
P. Diddys personal stylist, and Sternoff was a

freelance stylist.
We initially just started working
together, said Sternoff. We knew there was
some interest, but I wanted to keep it professional for a while.
She hates to admit it, but she was working for me, said McKnight. My late grandfather said, If youre able to give a beautiful
woman youre attracted to a job, give her a
job.
He paused, adding, That might be called
sexual harassment now.
Eventually, he started working for her,
and last year they married.
Sternoff grew up in Seattles Seward Park
neighborhood, attending Bikur Cholim
Machzikay Hadath with her family and Seattle Hebrew Academy for school. She has fond
memories of her friends piling into her home
on Shabbat afternoons for lunch.
Seattle is such a great place, she said.
Our community was so tight, it was small.
It was a phenomenal place to grow up.
In the early 1990s, her family migrated
east, eventually ending up in Brooklyn. Her
mother had a strict policy: Her daughter
could never bring home a non-Jewish man.
Enter McKnight.
Im from South Carolina, which is the
Bible Belt halleluyah, thank you, Jesus! he
said. Judaism was a foreign concept.
But for McKnight, who says he always
marched to the beat of his own drum, Judaism was one of those things I naturally grav-

itated to.
He completed his conversion last fall.
The whole conversion thing
was sort of like therapy, he
explained. In Judaism, its supposed to be a tug of war with
God. I was tapping into things
Courtesy A+E Networks
I couldnt express growing up ONeal McKnight and Miriam Sternoff shop the kosher aisle as
a Christian in South Carolina.
newlyweds in their docu-sitcom Kosher Soul.
The Sternoff-McKnight
home (Sternoffs refusal to change her name
the Jewish/Black divergence is a misconcepis the subject of an entire episode) is mostly
tion perpetuated throughout our culture, he
kosher, with no pork or shellfish. While
writes, mostly because of laziness: our laziMcKnight is stepping back from his Southness to try and find their binding attributes.
ern cuisine roots, he admits he still loves fried
Sternoff and McKnight brush off the
catfish. And Sternoff, though winning the
critics.
household religion, is willing to compromise
Stereotypes exist, said Sternoff. We just
for her husband. Except when he demands
want to add a little humor. Some people have
she change her name. Or when he compares
thought too much about it. This is how we
their wedding day to meeting Michael Jackjoke. This is our real life.
son. Or when he takes his time covering up
At the end of the day, you cant make
the tattoo of his ex-girlfriends name.
everybody happy, McKnight added.
Sternoff and McKnight might be called
Theres not a show talking about these
the fulfillment of the American Love Story:
issues.... I think our story is bigger than us.
Two individuals from minority communiOne guy said him and his girlfriend were
ties, fabulously successful, crashing through
having problems, and their therapy is tuning
social boundaries for the sake of love. It
into Kosher Soul every Friday at 11. At the
wasnt easy. But a decade later, theyre one
end of the day, we just want to show people
year into marriage and airing their stylish
love is love. It doesnt matter what color or
laundry on national television.
race you are.
The show is not without criticism. Ben
Faulding, writing for Tablet, complains that
Kosher Soul airs Fridays at 8 p.m. PT on Lifetime. See
the show turns his life into a farce. I think
clips at www.mylifetime.com/shows/kosher-soul.

Thank you
to the jewish sound

for 91 years of outstanding journalism


& service to our community.

OF GREATER SEATTLE

THE STRENGTH OF A PEOPLE.


THE POWER OF COMMUNITY.

2031 Third Avenue | Seattle, WA 98121-2412


Main 206.443.5400 | www.jewishinseattle.org
jewishinseattle
@jewishinseattle

2 2 COMMUNITY NEWS

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

In Ukraine, the JDC does its part to


offset a humanitarian catastrophe
By Emily K. Alhadeff, Associate Editor, The Jewish Sound

summer, leading to the deterioration of


Last Purim, Masha Shumatskaya was
circumstances and a lack of food, medidelivering mishloach manot to elderly
cine, water, and fuel. As of November, the
Jews in her home city of Donetsk, Ukraine,
Lugansk and Donetsk regions of Ukraine
when she and her friends encountered a
were declared Peoples Republics. With the
separatist rally in front of a nearby governbreakdown of truce talks at the beginning
ment building.
of this year, violence increased again, killIt was a bit scary to be next to the
ing at least 30 people in Mariupol.
crowd of thousands of people who were
Shumatskaya, 23, visited Seattle last
pretty aggressive, she said. But, she added,
week as a guest of the
It was nothing compared
American Jewish Joint Disto the situation we have
tribution Committee. With
now.
flawless English (she is also
Now, the city of Donetsk
fluent in Hebrew, Polish,
is under rebel control. Shuand Russian in addition
matskaya, who had lost her
to her native Ukrainian),
job as an English teacher,
Shumatskaya met with
fled to Kharkov, a large
JDC supporters in the area
Ukrainian city slightly farto describe the situation.
ther west of the war-torn
The JDC has provided
eastern border with Russia.
assistance to Jews in the
I would never have
thought that Id become a
Courtesy JDC former Soviet Union since
the fall of communism.
war refugee, she said.
Masha Shumatskaya
It has been in Ukraine
The crisis in Ukraine
the third largest home to Jews in Europe
picked up with a revolution last February
since 1989 to assist elderly and needy
following the ousting of president Viktor
Jews and build community and leadership
Yanukovych, who began leaning toward
opportunities among young people. Once
Russia as an economic ally over the Euroagain, the JDC is providing critical suppean Union. Fighting on the eastern border
port to the thousands of Jews of Donetsk
with pro-Russian separatists increased last

through food
and medicine
deliveries. On
February 11,
the JDC evacuated an unprecedented 130
Jewish children,
elderly and
their families to
Rachel Calman/JDC
Dnepropetro- Anna K., 77, from Slavyansk, Ukraine, stands in front of bombed-out residential
vsk, where the buildings in the formerly besieged city. Anna has relied on aid from JDC during the
organization is conflict, especially comforting to her as her husband died in September and her
providing hous- property was damaged during fighting. She survives, with help from JDC, on a
ing, food, and monthly pension of $100.
counseling serThose who remain in the conflict zone
vices for the time being.
have no access to money since the banks
Shumatskaya took refuge with friends
closed, and take shelter in cellars when
in Kharkov she knew from her Jewish comshelling occurs. Due to the overall devalumunal work, such as the JDCs Metsuda
ation of Ukrainian currency, inaccessible
leadership development program. Her
pensions, and inflation, access to food is
parents remain in Donetsk, and her father
limited. The area has been sealed by checkrefuses to leave his house near the Donetsk
points. People in Donetsk are starving.
airport, a strategic point that was obliterThere are unfortunately tons of people
ated by fighting and eventually fell to the
in the Lugansk region [on the border with
rebels. Shumatskaya considers him stubRussia] who stay in their houses, and they
born, but recognizes that for many Ukraidont want to leave, she said. Without
nians, a home is the only thing they own. If
he abandons his home, it could be looted
and he might never get it back.
XXPage 29

The Jewish SoundSHA Will Miss You!

SHA - Where We Belong!


Seattles Largest and Oldest Day School
1617 Interlaken Dr E | Seattle, WA 98112 | 206-323-5750 | www.seattlehebrewacademy.org

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

M.O.T.: Member of the Tribe

23

A supporter of local charities and the M.O.T. behind M.O.T.


By Diana Brement, Jewish Sound Columnist

Value Village sales have


My editor ran into Ken
historically supported three
Alterman at the Seatcharities: Northwest Center,
tle Jewish Film FestiBoys and Girls Club of King
val and rightly thought that
County, and Sight Conneche would be an excellent
tion for the Blind. Supporting
Member of the Tribe for this
other community initiatives
final newspaper edition of
is something weve dreamed
Member of the Tribe.
of doing, he says, but it takes
A long-time supporter of
a lot of technology...to do it
the Stroum Jewish Commuright. With that technology
nity Center, Ken says he first
became interested helping the M.O.T.: Member in place now, the company
is moving closer to letting
J raise money when he worked of the Tribe
donors of goods choose diffor the local Pepsi Bottling
ferent charities to support. Its kind of a
Group a job he moved here in 1994
no-brainer, he observes.
to take. We put a very aggressive proThat model was established with
gram together to help with funding at
the recent opening of a Value Village
the J with a bank of vending machines,
in Issaquah, which led to a partnership
he says.
with the Issaquah Schools Foundation.
Now, as
It might be soon nothing official has
president and
happened yet that youll bring your
CEO of Savers
bag of used items to Value Village and
Inc., the comdesignate proceeds to a local Jewish charpany that runs
ity.
Value Village
While he spent his early years in the
thrift stores, he
Bronx, in an Italian and Jewish neighis working to
borhood just about a mile from Yankee
have his comstadium, Kens family moved to Stony
pany expand
Brook on New Yorks Long Island when
the
local
charicuurtesy ken alterman
he was still in elementary school. It
ties it supports, which would hopefully
was the first day of band practice in 7th
include Jewish agencies.

grade that he met his wife, Jennifer.


Members of Herzl-Ner Tamid congregation, and the SJCC, of course, the couple
has two grown children who live and
work in New York.

I started writing this column for


the Jewish Transcript in about
2000. It was called Around the
Town, says Diana Brement, which
didnt make sense, since we were a statewide newspaper. In those halcyon days,
the paper was bigger and the column was
longer with room for three subjects and
bigger words.
Diana started with the Transcript in
1987 as the papers graphic designer, in
desktop publishings early days. We
worked on tiny screens, she remembers, and printed out 8-1/2 x 11 sheets
of paper, which were pasted up on long
light tables that ran the length of the
office walls and hallway. (The tables
still dominate the newsroom, but the
lights havent been turned on in over a
decade.) Diana also wrote book reviews
and author interviews.
I left the Transcript in 1993 to go
back to school, Diana says. I needed
some prerequisites and to do some volunteer work, and wanted to devote
myself full time to that. In March of

1994, Diana was accepted into the UW


School of Social Work. In May of 1994
she became pregnant with twins.
I went to school for a quarter, then
took leave for two years, she says.
At that point it became clear that fulltime motherhood would win out over
full-time schooling. Around then, the
Transcripts editor, Donna Blankinship,
called her to do some freelance writing.
Dianas been writing about people and
books ever since.
Diana and her husband Larry Katz
moved to Seattle in 1982 and she has
worked continually in the Jewish community since 1984, when she became the
communications coordinator for Temple
De Hirsch Sinai.
Admitting to a weakness for all things
food, Diana says she loves writing about
foodies.
It makes my heart go pitter-pat, she
says.
Another favorite topic is young
people.
It sounds corny, she says, but it
really gives me hope for our world when
I interview young people doing amazing
things for tikkun olam.
Diana looks forward to having a little
XXPage 29

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T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Preparing our seder for that which has yet to come


By Rivy Poupko Kletenik, Jewish Sound Columnist
Dear Rivy,
Try as I might, I cannot
make my peace with the
paragraph in the Haggadah
that is recited right after the
seder meal as we open the
door for Elijah:
Pour out Your wrath
upon the nations that
do not recognize You,
and upon governments
that do not call upon Whats
Your Name; for they
have devoured Jacob,
and destroyed their dwelling place
(Psalms 79:6-7).Pour out Your rage
upon them and let Your burning
fury overtake them (Psalms 69:25).
Pursue them with anger and destroy
them from under the heavens of the
Eternal (Lamentations 3:66).
Who are these nations? Anyone
who isnt Jewish? How does this feel to
others? This seems hateful and spiteful and appears to fly in the face of our
stance of oseh shalom make peace
or sim shalom give us peace.
How can we reconcile it with the spirit
of the evening of having been slaves
and not wanting to perpetuate oppression and suffering in the world?

It is a raw passage. The


Kasher Hagaddah ups the
ante with the Pour out Thy
Wrath passage preceded
by photographs of the infamous Arbeit Macht Frei
gate of Auschwitz, the death
camp of Treblinka, and a
painting depicting a scene
from the Spanish Inquisition. The author urges the
your JQ? participants to have the
Holocaust in mind as they
read the passage. This, my
friends, is hard core.
That said, in context with the flow of
the Hagaddah itself, your point is well
taken. Few of us have not experienced
some feelings of disequilibrium when
reading something in our tradition that
just doesnt resonate with our presentday sensibilities. When this occurs, we
must deal with it. Lets delve. Lets study.
Where did this come from? What have
others before us contributed to the conversation?
Though authorship of the Hagaddah
is uncertain, it is generally attributed to
the late Mishnaic period. This particular section of the Hagaddah is actually
a later insertion added after the First

Crusades of 1096 in the aftermath of


the bloody decimation of the Rhineland
communities. It first appeared in Vitry,
the 11th-century French Machzor. That
already tells us a story. The notion of
pouring forth wrath is less a component
of the story of the Exodus and more of a
yearning for relief from later oppression.
It serves as an introduction to the second
half of the seder when the focus gently
shifts from the Exodus story to the hopes
for that which has yet to come.
When paying close attention to the
text of the seder, you will notice that
after the meal the emphasis of the evening moves from slavery and sadness to
Elijah and eschatology. We transition
from commemorating the past redemption to anticipating, and praying for,
the redemption of the future. Symbolically, this passage is signaled with the
eating of the afikomen, representing
the future that has been concealed and
hidden away.
Rabbi Marcus Lehman, from 19thcentury Germany, goes to great lengths
to demonstrate that we wish no harm to
our gracious hosts in whatever lands in
which we dwell indeed, he reminds us
that we are enjoined to bless them as
we actually do till this day in the form

of the Prayer for the American Government.


In The New American Hagaddah,
edited by Jonathan Safran Foer, Rebecca
Neuberger Goldstein observes that
the anger of the ghetto ancestors was
understandable. Why not let powerless people have their fantasies of justice and revenge? she asks. She goes
on to talk about righteous anger: The
abolitionists were angry; the suffragists
were angry; Herzl was angry; Gandhi
was angry.
Rabbi Jonathan Sacks observes that
for a people so riddled with blood libels,
massacres, pogroms, forced conversions, inquisitions, confinement to
ghettoes, punitive taxation, and expulsions, culminating, in the very heart of
enlightenment Europe, in the Holocaust. Yet these verses, two from Psalms
and one from the Book of Lamentations,
are almost the only trace left by this
experience in the Hagaddah, the night
when we recall our past.
An idealistic yet haunting passage from 1936 by Yehiel Weingarten
of Kibbutz Ein Harod urges us to not
teach our children to hate, to even consider removing the paragraph from the
XXPage 28

Chag Pesach
Sameach
From your Jewish Federation

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THE STRENGTH OF A PEOPLE.


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C jewishinseattle M@jewishinseattle

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Friday 03/27 Jewish News 1507_QFJWM

3/19/15 4:37 PM

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If weve wished it for Greater Seattle once,


weve wished it 101 times...
May you be blessed with great happiness,
boundless prosperity and good health...
on Passover and always.
For 101 years, we have been honored to meet the
evolving quality-of-life and quality-of-care needs of seniors
throughout our community. Inspired by Jewish values
ever since 1914, all of us at The Kline Galland Center
wouldnt have it any other way.
Happy Passover.

THE KLINE GALLAND CENTER


Caroline Kline Galland Home
206.725.8800
The Summit at First Hill
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Kline Galland Community Based Services
206.805.1930
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206.725.8800
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27

2 8 WHAT S YOUR J Q ?

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WWwhats your JQ? Page 24

The Online Community Calendar. Still Active. Still Strong.

jewishsound.org/calendar
150309 JTrans Crossroads Happy Passover 4-75x5f.pdf

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nations.
It is based on a play on words. Your
wrath in Hebrew is chamatcha
cham meaning anger, coming from
the word for heat. Love might also be
expressed using the same root, cham
as in warm regards, dash cham.
So, instead of pour out your wrath,
the poem would read cheimah, your
warmth, your love. This addition is so
heartfelt why not incorporate it into
your seder? And if your family has a personal story that involves the protection
of a righteous gentile, this would be a
perfect place to share it with your guests.
It seems we Jews are not so found of
hating. Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach writes
that there is a lot of evil in the world,
evil that needs to be wiped out and eradicated. But you know what I am asking
of God? Please God, if there has to be a
wiping out of evil, let us not be the ones
who are forced to do it. Can You find
a way to destroy the evil in this world?
Please, can You do it? Amen.

Hagaddah altogether.
There are people who love us and
even those who hate us but can we
throw such harsh words at them? he
asks. Yes, there is anti-Semitism even
in our generation but not so low that
we would place such a hateful prayer
before our childrenIt is possible to
have mercy on our enemies, but to hate
them?! It is impossible to hate them and
surely impossible to also drag God in to
the hatred.
The mixed sentiments regarding this
passage go back even earlier. We are not
the first to feel a bit undone by the insertion. Here is this unique counter-addition found in the Worms Haggadah of
1521, attributed to the descendants of
Rashi appreciating the help offered by
righteous gentiles:
Pour out Your love on the nations who
have known You,
and on the kingdoms that call upon
Your name.
For they have shown loving-kindness
to the seed of Jacob,
And they defended Your people Israel
from those who would devour them alive.
May they live to see the sukkah of
peace spread over Your chosen ones,
And to participate in the joy of Your

12:33 PM

April 1 14, 2015

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WWJDC Page 22

JDCs assistance, I guess they wouldnt


have survived.
When Shumatskaya arrived to Kharkov, she started calling Jews back in
Donetsk to assess their needs and get
them JDC aid. After she found a job
teaching English again, she continued to
volunteer by collecting money to send to
Donetsk and helping organize a family
camp for refugees with her fellow Metsuda graduates.
The results of this camp were amazing, she said. People from Poltava
helped find jobs for the refugees, and the
mothers were treated to a spa day.
We helped them feel as if nothing
had happened in their lives, she said.
The JDC has a strict policy of not
commenting on politics. Its job is to aid
and save Jewish lives. Ultimately, says
Shumatskaya, Ukrainians just want the
fighting to stop.
Despite some provocation and
rumors about anti-Semitism coming out
of the conflict, Shumatskaya said Ukrainian Jews are not being targeted.
Thanks God, nothing like this, she
said. The war is enough.

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29

WWM.O.T. Page 23

more free time, and to actually reading not just skimming some of the
review books shes held on to. She hopes
readers will find her from time to time
in the new magazine that emerges later
this year.

Short Takes: Goldie Gendler Silverman has published her first


novel, Show Me Your Face. The
cookbook and textbook author and jour-

nalist says it was fun to write, but not so


much fun to publish. She used Amazons
Create Space platform, which means she
did almost all the work herself. And, she
adds, now I have to market it. Look

for it on Amazon.com, of course. Goldie


also wrote the enduringly popular Backpacking with Babies. I think we can call
it a Northwest classic.
Thank you, loyal readers!

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passover greetings

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Passover and the Promised Land


By Rita Berman Frischer, Special to The Jewish Sound
The Hebrew people may have
schlepped on foot for 40 years, but
modern transportation has updated traveling to and through the Promised Land.
Kar-Ben Publishing marks this
years Festival of
Freedom, Passover, by featuring
Engineer Ari and
his intrepid train
as a perfect vehicle for explaining
the seder and its
symbols. Engineer Ari and the
Passover Rush
by Deborah Bodin
Cohen, illustrated by Israeli artist Shahar
Kober, is the fourth in this series, which
has also spotlighted Rosh Hashanah,
Sukkot and Hanukkah.

Just one day before the seder, Engineer Ari must travel to Jerusalem and
back to Jaffa to buy and collect all the
things he needs for his seder. Fortunately,
he has many good
friends and neighbors who share various items with him.
Still, while in Jerusalem, he must visit
the matzoh factory
to get the matzoh
for everyone elses
seders, a big responsibility. Rushing, he
makes it back home,
exhausted, just in
time for the holiday seder to begin. The story effectively
includes an introduction to all the things
associated with the holidays observance,
including a description of how matzoh

is made. As Aris train chugs through a


landscape circa 1893, the illustrator indirectly provides a visual history lesson as
well as considerable charm.
Back matter includes a brief background about Passover and an actual
photograph of the first train between Jaffa
and Jerusalem, shortening the trip from
three days to three-and-a-half hours.
Eliezer Ban-Yehuda,
father of modern
Hebrew, named the
early trains rakevet from the Biblical
word for chariot.
And
Then
Another Sheep
Turned Up by
Laura Gehl, illustrated by English
artist Amy Adele, is
a story in rhyme with
minimum words
and with maximum
artistic exuberance.
The Sheep family
Mama, Papa,
Hannah and Noah
have worked hard and believe they are all
ready for their seder. But life is full of surprises and just as they are about to begin,
to the familys delight another sheep,

qTemple De Hirsch Sinai is honored to host two esteemed speakerss


in the coming months at our Seattle campus.

JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJ
The Tillie & Alfred Shemanski Trust , the Family of Mila & Henry
Einsenhardt, Seattle University and Temple De Hirsch Sinai present:
the 35th Annual Clergy Institute featuring Dr. Reza Aslan,
internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions.

Grandma, hurries in. But no sooner have


they added another chair and all been
seated then, guess what? Here comes
Uncle Sol. And Grandpaand later yet,
Danny. AndSharonand Aunt Deb.
My question: Wheres Elijah? Is there
room for him?
This story includes all the most important elements of the seder and gives an
ample opportunity for an elementary exercise
in addition. It
seems to me parents might also
want to use it as
a springboard for
talking about the
positive value of
hospitality and,
on the other
hand, the importance of showing
consideration
by actually letting people know
ahead that youll
be coming over
expecting to be fed.
Portland author Eric Kimmel has been
writing for children for over 40 years and
has built his career largely on books for

The Jesus Between Us

Join Us

What Jews, Christians, and Muslims Can Learn


from a 1st Century Carpenter

Thursday May 14 9:30am1:00pm

Be Inspired

Connect
with new friends

$12 per person (includes bag lunch)


To register, visit tinyurl.com/clergyinstitute2015.

for a lifetime

Travel

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The Keller Family Lecture Series presents:


Matti Friedman, author, journalist, former Associated Press
Middle East Correspondent.
r

The Anti-Israel
Media Bias
and the Underlying Growth of
Resurgent Anti-Semitism

by

S e b a s t i a n S ch e

ne

Thursday June 4 7:00pm


No RSVP required.
Dessert reception following lecture.

Pho

to

DAYS IN
ISRAEL
July 5 14, 2015

APPLY NOW

www.jwrp.org

* Momentum Trips are FREE to the participants, excluding airfare, $50 tip fee
and $36 acceptance fee.
Primarily for women with children under 18 at home.
Also must have limited formal Jewish Education.

For more information please contact:

Both events are open to the public.


Share our past. Shape our future.

1441 16th Ave Seattle, WA 98122 www.tdhs-nw.org 206.323.8486

FREE Trip*

State of Israel
Ministry of Jerusalem
and Diaspora Aairs

Amy Paquette
AmyHP@JewishInSeattle.org
T (206) 774-2259

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

younger children. This year, however,


he joined the time-travel brigade, with
Scarlett and Sam Escape From Egypt,
a Kar-Ben chapter book for ages 6 to 9,

illustrated in black and white by Ivica


Stevanovic. For 17 chapters, he takes
squabbling twins Scarlett and Sam back
to the Egypt of the Exodus, courtesy
of their grandmothers time-traveling
carpet. The twins have heard about the
Exodus during many seders, but when
they find themselves drawn into the story
as participants, along with Moses, Aaron
and Miriam, things look quite different,
especially after theyve made friends with
the Pharaohs oldest son.

Im a devoted fan of most of Kimmels


works for younger children, but I have
to confess that the time travel approach
to Biblical stories doesnt usually work
for me. First-hand reports on each of
the plagues? Modern quips by modern
kids in Goshen? But then, Im not a 7- or
8-year-old. Kimmels usual careful workmanship should hold his young readers
and they will probably learn a lot from
this accessible, quick moving, and exciting approach to the Passover story.
This month we also celebrate Yom
HaAtzmaut, Israels Independence Day,

passover greetings

Stand: Golda Meirs First Crusade,


written by Barbara Krasner and illustrated by Kelsey Garrity-Riley, introduces the young
Goldie, living in
America, as she
becomes an activist at age 9, raising money to buy
school books for
other immigrant
children. Readers
5 to 9 will see the
simple way Goldies concern turned
into positive action.
Back matter shows
pictures of Golda
Meir at age 6 and
as prime minister
of Israel and gives a
brief bio, references, and a bibliography.
Hare and Tortoise Race Across
Israel, another book by Laura Gehl,
features not a family of sheep but a pair
of classic opponents, Hare and Tortoise,

31

who live together in Tel Aviv as friends.


One day, watching the trains come and
go (see the connection with Engineer
Ari?), they decide
to race each other,
this time across
the Promised Land
all the way to the
Dead Sea. En route,
illustrator Sarah
Goodreau exposes
them and us to the
rich daily activities of
Israeli life, very distracting, especially
to over-confident
Hare. Young readers will enjoy the trip
and be glad when
the two friends, both
exhausted, finally
rest their aching muscles by floating in
the Dead Sea.
Thank you for letting me share my
love of childrens books with you these
past years. Lhitraot.

YOM HASHOAH

so I will conclude this column and


my several years of pleasurable connection with this paper with two works
about Israel. The first, Goldie Takes a

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
HOLOCAUST

yom
haatzmaut

CENTER for
HUMANIT Y
Educate. Inspire. Take Action.

SEATTLE WIDE EVENT

Wednesday, April 15, 2015: 2 Events

WED. APRIL 22, 7:30 - 9PM 2015

Daughter of Polish rescuer Irene Gut Opdyke, Smith shares her mothers story of hiding
and rescuing Jews during the Holocaust. Irene Gut Opdyke was named one of the Righteous
among the Nations, a title given to those who risked their lives by aiding and saving Jews
during the Holocaust. Read Opdykes story in her memoir In My Hands.

Featuring the

seattle jewish chorale

and the shalom klezmer band


featuring Chava Mirel and guests

Keynote Speaker Jeannie Opdyke Smith

Mid Day 11:45am - 1:15pm Evening 6:30pm - 8:30pm


Holocaust Center for Humanity
2045 -2nd Avenue, Seattle

Kane Hall
University of Washington, Seattle

Lunch-and-Learn
with Jeannie Opdyke Smith

70 Years After Liberation:


Commemorating the Holocaust

Find details online at HolocaustCenterSeattle.org


For reservations and information, call Amanda at 206-582-3000

Sunday, April 19, 2015


Memorial Service and Candle Lighting:
Remembering the Children

$10 adults $5 seniors & children


Stroum JCC, Mercer Island

SeattleJChorale@gmail.com

SeattleJewishChorale.org

OF GREATER SEATTLE

10:30am - 12:00 pm | Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island

206-582-3000 | HolocaustCenterSeattle.org | info@HolocaustCenterSeattle.org

3 2 T h e a r t s

GRIPPING FROM
START TO FINISH.
Manohla Dargis,
THE NEW YORK TIMES

++++

EXHILARATING.
John Anderson, NEWSDAY

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POWERFUL.
Michael OSullivan,
THE WASHINGTON POST

+++H

EXQUISITE.
Michael Phillips,
CHICAGO TRIBUNE

BRILLIANT.
George Robinson,
THE JEWISH WEEK

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T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Monday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m.


The Golem
Concert
Music of Remembrances next concert
features the complete screening of
1920s silent film The Golem, accompanied by a live performance of
Betty Oliveros film score conducted by
Guenter Buchwald of Freiburg, Germany. Buchwald is known for his mastery
of silent cinema repertoire, and he conducted the world premiere of Oliveros
score in Vienna. The concert additionally
features Hebrew Melody (1943) by
Joseph Achron, Dybbuk Dances (1941)
by David Beigelman, and The Dybbuk
Suite (1922) by Joel Engel.
At the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall
at Benaroya Hall, 200 University St.,
Seattle. Tickets are $40, $30 for guests
under the age of 30, and $5 for TeenTix
pass-holders. For tickets and information visit www.musicofremembrance.
org/concert/golem.

Sunday, April 12 at 2 p.m.


Joan Leegant
Literary event
Award-winning author Joan Leegant (An Hour in Paradise: Stories and Wherever
you Go: A Novel) presents on Jewish American Fiction Is Alive and Well: Four Topics
Were (Still) Writing About. What are contemporary American Jewish writers writing
about? Who are the writers doing it? Leegants awards include the PEN/New England
Book Award, the Edward Lewis Wallant Award for Jewish Fiction, selection as a Barnes
and Noble Discover Great New Writers pick, and finalist for the National Jewish Book
Award. Currently, Leegant is the writer-in-residence at Hugo House in Seattle. Hosted
by the National Council for Jewish Women. At Temple Bnai Torah, 15727 NE Fourth St.,
Bellevue. Please RSVP to ncjw@ncjwseattle.org.
Wednesday, April 15 at 7:15 p.m.
Raising Kane: The Film Music of Bernard Herrmann
Music talk
In his final lecture of the Great Jewish Composers of Cinema series, Theodore Deacon
discusses the musical genius behind films of Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, and Martin
Scorsese. Bernard Herrmann not only wrote film scores, the brilliant concert composer affected the sound of science fiction through electronic instruments and created
musical masterpieces that became iconic soundtracks. He was also a perfectionist and
individualist who made enemies along with friends in Hollywood. At Temple Beth Am,
2632 NE 80th St., Seattle.
Through June
Erez Benari
Art exhibit
Local Israeli Erez Benari is not only a cryptographer for
Microsoft and a comedian, but hes also a sculptor. One of
Benaris sculptures inspired by Star Wars and Steampunk will be on display in a Microsoft employee art exhibition at Microsoft Commons through spring. The honor
led GeekWire to select him as Geek of the Week earlier
this month (www.geekwire.com/2015/erez-benari).
The exhibit is open to the public in Microsoft Commons
Mixer, 15255 NE 40th St., Redmond.
R

Mina Miller, artistic director

The Golem
monday, march 30th, 7:30 p.m.
Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall, Benaroya Hall
A program of Jewish legends featuring
music to The Dybbuk. German guest
conductor Guenter Buchwald
leads MOR artists in Betty
Oliveros mesmerizing
klezmer-infused score, accompanied by a complete screening
of the classic 1920 silent film
The Golem.

Tickets: $30 - $40 206.365.7770


www.musicofremembrance.org

After Life

world premiere - commissioned by music of remembrance


catherine cook

NOW - MAY 17, 2015


Presented at ACT Theatre

robert orth

FOR TICKETS:

(206) 292-7676 WWW.ACTTHEATRE.ORG


5TH AVENUES 2014/15 SEASON SPONSORS

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

MEDIA SPONSOR

RESTAURANT SPONSOR

ava pine
Photos by Mark Kitaoka

monday, may 11th, 7:30 p.m.


Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall, Benaroya Hall
Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein meet again
and argue about art and life in After Life, a new
MOR-commissioned opera by Tom Cipullo. Imagining a posthumous conversation between these two
artistic giants, this musical drama reflects on the
artists responsibilities in a time of war.

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

abba knows best

33

The lasting impact of Eds last column


By Ed Harris
Life is all about changes including this column as
it will be my last one. It turns out I may have played a very
small part in hastening the Jewish Sounds demise. This is
not because of the obvious suspect insipid writing but
rather due to my extremely minor role in the development of
the Internet.
Digital technology has upended traditional publishing.
And, if you look hard enough at the recent history of our local
tech community, you can find me right there on the edge of
the scene, just behind a cubicle divider and next to the water
cooler.
Abba Knows
I started my career on Wall Street in the 1980s, when a
Best
handful of investment banking firms with Jewish roots
prominent among them Goldman Sachs, Lehman Brothers and Salomon Brothers
helped fuel a junk bond boom led by Jewish tycoons such as Carl Icahn and Mike
Milken. This frenetic era of leveraged buyouts and hostile takeovers, depending upon
your political point of view, either ushered in an unprecedented era of prosperity via
deregulation or strip-mined the corporate sector for paper profits and bankrupted our
nation. You decide.
Personal good fortune arose shortly after the arrival of our baby daughter, in the
form of a job offer from a Bellevue aircraft leasing company. We relocated to Puget
Sound in 1990 full of excitement about our familys future in Seattle. Then Saddam
invaded Kuwait and air travel around the world plummeted, as did my new employers
business prospects. As any other rational adult would do in similar circumstances, I
panicked. Eventually, I found my way into the world of technology, which began to pick
up its stride with the Internet boom. My anxiety subsided for a short period as stock
prices soared to infinity and beyond, but picked back up as our family expanded with
two more kinderlach. Jewish day school tuition times three can take a chunk out of a
household budget. Fortunately, in the unlikely event we found ourselves with a cash
surplus, synagogue dues were there to soak up any excess liquid assets.

As a finance professional, I cant claim to have invented anything of significance


during my years in technology, but I worked alongside a number of people who did. For
example, I was lucky enough to be employed by a company that developed an amazing
wireless network for making phone calls from commercial airplanes, a market that
unfortunately proved to enjoy about as much demand as that of divorce photography.
My job responsibilities largely focused on counting the corporate cash as it gushed
out and quietly calculating the eroding value of my stock options. I held this role at several
technology firms, to the point where my wife observed that my joining a company was
a signal to investors to make a mad dash for the exits.
The Internet is undeniably a powerful force. Old patterns of life have been upended.
For example, how can traditional matchmakers, as epitomized by Yenta in Fiddler on the
Roof, compete against JDate? Our lives used to be tied to schedules beyond our control.
Now, with the power of YouTube, we can watch funny cat videos anytime we want.
Religion, Judaism included, has also been impacted by the social changes technology has wrought. Consider traditional religious practices. According to a recent Gallup
poll, the percentage of the U.S. population that claims to not be part of any religious
group has doubled since 1999, from 8 to 16 percent. Over the same time period, the
percentage of the population that belongs to a church or synagogue has declined from
70 to 59 percent.
Religious expression is often built around being part of a community: Congregants
vastly outnumber religious hermits in the wilderness. If current trends persist, that may
change. Still, I for one like to take an occasional break from binge watching Netflix and
get out into the world. You might find me at shul, snoozing in a back row from time to time.
I came to the Jewish Sound late in its life. Is that merely a coincidence, or is my wife
is right about my joining an organization being an omen about its future prospects?
Dont be too hard on yourself, Ed. Youve still got Fifty Shades of Schwarz, which was
recently made into a blockbuster film oh, wait, that was that other Fifty Shades
book and your other titles. Eds blog, Fizz-Ed, and additional information about his
books are available at www.edharrisauthor.com.

r
t
a
i
h
o

t
L

From all of us at the Jewish Sound


for your support over our 91-year history.

We couldnt have done it without you.


Publisher & Editor
Associate Editor
Sales Manager
Account Executive
Account Executive
Classifieds Manager
Art Director

Joel Magalnick
Emily K. Alhadeff
Lynn Feldhammer
Cheryl Puterman
David Stahl
Katy Lukas
Andrea Rouleau

Our accounting staff: Nicole Johnson, Sophia Sullam and Jean Callahan.
And our team of columnists and freelance writers.

3 4 D e l i c i o u s l y s e p h a r d i c

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

A Passover feast: Where eggs and lemons meet fish


By Shelley Adatto-Baumgarten, Jewish Sound Columnist

nounced happily and withGrowing up Jewish-Turkout hesitation, Pescado con


ish in Seattle, the eight-day
Huevo y Limon. This is Sepfestival of Passover was quite
hardic soul food at its best and
meaningful to me. Celebratit has earned the coveted posiing the flight from bondage
tion of first recipe out of over
in Egypt to liberation trans100 in the Sephardic Bikur
lated into a lot of holiday
Holims cookbook.
preparation. The Sephardim
Pes cado con Huevo y
from Turkey were commitLimon is important because
ted to the rules of grand hosits main ingredients symbolpitality and generosity that
ically represent the holiday.
had been laid down centu- Deliciously
First, fish represents fertilries ago, brought about by a Sephardic
ity and abundance, which the
nomadic life. Food during the
Jews fought for and ultimately received
holidays and in this case Passover
when Moses freed them from slavery
was the great medium for demonstrating
and saved their lives. A parallel between
respect and utmost appreciation toward
fish and protection is also found in
loved ones.
the Talmud, where it states, Fish are
Preparing for Passover was a labor of
immune from the evil eye because they
love that the women of my grandmothare underwater. Although this passage
ers mid-20th-century generation hapis not specifically linked to Passover,
pily took head-on. At Mah Jongg games
the symbolism in the consumption of
during coffee and biscochos, my grandfish again demonstrates safekeeping, in
mother and her friends would liven the
this case from evil actions. Also, accordhouse with their chatter about what to
ing to Chassidic wisdom, Fish do not
serve at both seders. There were never
have eyelids and never close their eyes
complaints. This was a group of tough
(Chabad.org).
cookies who engineered these mammoth
This statement could be interpreted
meals from start to finish. Honestly, they
to symbolize the sheltering quality of
could have commanded a small army.
God, whose eyes and gaze are always
One Sephardic dish that appears on
upon those who follow in His way like
many Turkish-Jewish seder menus is
the Jews led from slavery by Moses.
Pescado con Huevo y Limon (Fish in Egg
The egg, which is part of the seder
and Lemon Sauce). This dish is so adored
plate, is symbolic as a visual reminder
among the Sephardim that it could be the
of the Jews pilgrimage and mourning
sine qua non of classic Sephardic cuisine.
over the loss of the great temple and the
In fact, when asked what his favorite SepPassover sacrifice made at the ancient
hardic dish is, Rabbi Solomon Maimon
Temple. The good taste and fragrance
of the Sephardic Bikur Holim pro-

Happy Passover!

Shelley Adatto-Baumgarten

of the lemon represents those who have


Torah and good deeds like the great
mitzvah Moses performed by shielding
the Jews from death, according to Karen
L. Fox in Seasons of Celebrations.
This lovely dish is an appetizer and is
served at the beginning of the seder feast
along with spinach fritada before the
main course. Gently prepare by poaching
the salmon and carefully making a lovely
rich and thick egg lemon sauce that luxuriously drips off your fork. The exquisite
flavor is beautifully tart and complements the salmon. Matzoh is perfect for
dipping into that luscious light yellow
pool on which you place the salmon. Be
certain to include a teaspoon in your
table setting so your guests can ingest
every mouth-watering drop. Beware:
this dish can (and should) be consumed
all year!

From Marv, Rebecca, Lee and Camille Meyers

Pescado con Huevo y Limon

2 lbs. fresh salmon (sliced or individual


portions)
1 large lemon
5 sprigs of parsley
1 tsp. salt
Dash of pepper
2 eggs
Place sliced fish in a deep skillet. Add
enough water to barely cover fish, juice of
1/2 of the lemon, parsley, salt and pepper.
Cook over medium heat for 10-15 minutes
until done. Stir the juice of the other 1/2
lemon into two beaten eggs. Remove pan
of fish from heat. Pour egg and lemon mixture into fish liquid and shake pan briskly
to blend thoroughly. May be served hot or
cold.
Serves 6-8.
Avid professional baker and culinary writer
Shelley Adatto-Baumgarten looks forward to
teaching Sephardic cuisine at North Seattle
College and other locations this spring.

Million Dollar Service At Every Price Range

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206-448-6940

7525 SE 24th Street, Suite 350, Mercer Island, WA 98040


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Broker, Residential Specialist

Marvin Meyers

Happy
Passover!

1700 NW Gilman Blvd., Suite 300, Issaquah, WA 98027


cell: 425-941-7971
email: mimyhilchie@johnlscott.com
web: www.johnlscott.com/mimyhilchie

Dennis B. Goldstein
& Associates
Certied Public Accountants
Tax Preparation
Consulting & Planning
for Individuals & Small Business

425-455-0430
dennis@dbgoldsteincpa.com

We want
to extend a
Happy Passover
to our clients,
family & friends.

Happy Passover!
Russ Katz, Realtor

Windermere Real Estate/Wall St. Inc.


206-284-7327 (Direct) y H
Happ
www.russellkatz.com

k ka h !
H
JDS Grad & Past Board of Trustees Member
Mercer Island High School Grad
University of Washington Grad

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

PASSOVER GREETINGS

35

For Passover, a clergy couples vegetarian seder menu


By Marshall Weiss, The Dayton Jewish Observer
Vegetarian food brought Cantor Jenna
Greenberg and Rabbi Josh Ginsberg
together. The two met as students at the
Jewish Theological Seminary in New York,
when a classmate organized a singles
dinner at a kosher vegetarian restaurant in
Chinatown.
Greenberg had become a vegetarian in
her teens, Ginsberg in his 20s.
Ginsberg says he neither encourages
his congregants to become vegetarians nor
discourages them from eating meat.
People know Im a vegetarian, but I
dont engage in proselytizing vegetarianism, he says. Jewish tradition allows
that one can eat meat. I really applaud the
trend of some who are trying to create ethical, eco-kashrut and small-scale slaughtering where animals are fed a better diet and
treated better.
A few times a year, Greenberg and
Ginsberg have prepared vegetarian entres
alongside meat dishes for Shabbat dinners
at their Dayton, Ohio synagogue. Theyve
received rave reviews from congregants,
many of whom hadnt tried tofu as a meat
substitute before.
At home, they turn out creative vegetarian meals for their boys ages 7, 5,
and eight months. Jenna says their recipes
come from experimentation, some guidance from cookbooks, and online recipes,
along with suggestions from friends and
family.
Here, they offer a kosher-for-Passover
seder menu that suits their fast-paced, vegetarian lifestyle and keeps their children happy:
Developed by the couples friend
Susan K. Finston, author of Dining in the
Garden of Eden, this is a tasty spring alternative to the traditional matzoh ball soup.

ery and cook until vegetables are softened,


stirring occasionally. Stir in the 6 cups of
mixed chopped greens. When vegetables are
wilted, add soup stock. Bring to a boil and
then simmer for 45 minutes. Add salt and
pepper to taste.
Add 12 tablespoons Passover dumplings
(see below) per serving. Serve with freshgrated parmesan cheese.

Roman Soup with Passover Dumplings

Caprese Salad

34 Tbs. of extra-virgin olive oil or other


vegetable oil
1 small onion, chopped
1 medium carrot, small dice
1 celery stalk, chopped
6 cups chopped mixed greens: Swiss chard,
spinach, kale, butter lettuce, Savoy cabbage or other seasonally available greens
6 cups vegetable broth or water
Salt and pepper to taste
Parmesan cheese
Saut chopped onion in oil until translucent
over medium-low heat. Add carrot and cel-

Happy
Passover!

Passover soup dumplings

2 cups mashed potatoes


2 eggs, lightly beaten
1/4 cup Passover cake meal
Optional: 1 Tbs. finely chopped parsley or basil
Reserve: 12 tsp. of extra-virgin olive oil
Mix all ingredients, adding additional cake
meal to form a dough that is pliable and not
too sticky. Bring water to a boil in a 23
quart pot. Form small balls out of the dough
and carefully slide them into the water to
bring them to a boil.
Use a slotted spoon to remove the dumplings from the pot as they rise to the top
and transfer to a container, adding 12 tsp.
of extra-virgin olive oil.

This delicious dish, also from Susan K.


Finston, is a creative pasta alternative for
Pesach.

This is a favorite dish year-round, even


with matzoh meal as the breading!

Eggplant Parmesan

Potato Spinach Gnocchi

2 large eggplants, sliced lengthwise into


1/2-inch-thick pieces
Salt, for sweating eggplants
4 eggs, beaten with a fork
3 cups matzoh meal
4 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
26-oz. jar pasta sauce (any variety)
1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
Preheat oven to 350. Sweat eggplant slices,
sprinkling salt, allowing time for the moisture to come out; rinse and wipe the eggplant slices. Coat eggplant slices with beaten egg, then bread with matzoh meal. Saut
coated eggplant slices in oil until lightly
brown on both sides.
In a 9x11 ovenproof dish, layer pasta sauce,
then eggplant and top with cheeses. Repeat,
finishing with cheese. Bake until the cheese
melts and turns golden in spots, about 30
minutes.

2 lb. potatoes
1-1/2 cups potato starch
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 tsp. salt
1 lb. cooked, finely chopped spinach (frozen
or fresh)
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
Optional: 1 cup ricotta cheese for richer
gnocchi
Reserve: 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
Peel, boil and mash potatoes. Add remaining ingredients to create the gnocchi dough,
adding additional potato starch in case the
dough is too sticky.
Fill a 46 quart pot with cold water and bring
water to a boil. While the water is heating,
form small patties out of the gnocchi and
then carefully slide them one at a time into
the boiling water. When the gnocchi rise to
the top of the pot, they are ready use a
slotted spoon to remove them from the pot
and place them in an oiled baking dish.
Sprinkle with the parmesan cheese and
bake at 375 for 1015 minutes to melt the
cheese.

A hearty side dish for mushroom lovers


that can be served either warm or cold.

Mushroom Quinoa Pilaf

1 cup red, black, or mixed quinoa


2 cups water
Vegetable soup broth OR salt to taste
Medley of 3 varieties of fresh mushrooms:
Portabella, crimini, or white mushrooms
Olive oil for cooking
Splash of balsamic vinegar
4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
Rinse quinoa. Saut quinoa in nonstick pan
for 5 minutes, tossing regularly to avoid
burning. Combine quinoa with water and
broth in a medium saucepan. Bring to a
boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer

Tomato Sauce for Gnocchi

dmc_fz7_az/Creative Commons

Caprese salad.

This preface to the main course tastes


best when the tomatoes are ripe and sweet,
and the basil is very fresh.

2 lb. vine-ripened tomatoes (about 4 large),


sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 lb. fresh mozzarella, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1/4 cup packed fresh basil
34 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
Fine sea salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
On a large platter, arrange tomato and mozzarella slices and basil leaves, alternating
and overlapping them. Sprinkle salad with
oregano and arugula, and drizzle with oil.
Season salad with salt and pepper.

Cynthia Shultz Williams


Managing Broker, Realtor
QuorumLaurelhurst, Inc.
cwilliams@quorumlaurelhurst.com
www.seattlehomesforsale.net
Call 206-769-7140

23 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil or other cooking oil


1/2 cup chopped onion
12 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
1/4 cup of parsley, chopped
1 bay leaf
26-oz jar of crushed or stewed tomatoes
1 small can tomato paste
Heat oil in saut pan, add onion and garlic, and cook on low heat until translucent.
Add parsley, bay leaf, tomatoes and tomato
paste. Bring to a low boil and then turn heat
down and simmer for 2030 minutes.

Chag Pesach Sameach!


Vicki Robbins, CTC

XXPage 36

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The Seattle Section of NCJW


wishes you and your family
a joyous Passover.

36

passover greetings

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Scrambled egg potato muffins for a kid-friendly Passover breakfast


By Shannon Sarna, Kveller.com

Passover is bad enough without having


to feed your kids, too. And breakfast during
Passover can be pretty tricky: No toast, no
oatmeal, no (palatable) cereal, and no traditional syrup-drenched pancakes. Aside
from making matzoh brei every day, the
options are somewhat limited for American kids.
A few years ago we started making egg
in hash brown nests from The Pioneer
Woman, one of my favorite bloggers and
TV personalities, so I adapted the recipe
to include scrambled eggs and even a little
color in the form of a vegetable. If your kids
dont like peppers, you could also try spinach, broccoli, or even sweet potato. Or just
leave out a veggie altogether.
These little muffins are portable and can

be re-heated, so you can make a big batch to


help ease the Passover cooking just a little.

Scrambled Egg Potato Muffins

2 medium-large Yukon gold potatoes


3 large eggs
1-1/2 Tbs. milk
1/2 cup chopped bell pepper (or other
veggie)
1/4 cup cheese (cheddar, goat, or feta
recommended)
Salt and pepper
1. Preheat oven to 400. Place whole potatoes in the oven and roast until almost totally cooked, but not quite edible around
25 minutes.
2. Cut potatoes open and allow to cool. Peel
off skin (it should come off pretty easily).

WWvegetarian passover Page 35

until quinoa is tender, about 15 minutes.


Set aside.
Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan, add the garlic. Once the garlic is
lightly browned, add the mushrooms and
balsamic vinegar. Saut until the mushrooms are well cooked.
Toss the sauted mushrooms in with the
quinoa and serve.

This recipe is inspired by the tastebuds and the baking artistry of the cou-

ples mothers, Linda Greenberg and


Tina Strauss-Hoder.

Lora Brodys Bte Noir

1-1/3 cups superfine sugar


1/2 cup water
8 oz. unsweetened chocolate, chopped
4 oz. bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 sticks unsalted butter at room temperature, cut into 10 chunks
6 large eggs, room temperature
Preheat oven to 350. Grease a 9-inch
round cake pan, line with parchment,

This step can also be done the


night before to save time.
3. Grate potatoes and season
well with salt and pepper.
4. Increase oven temperature
to 425.
Shannon Sarna
5. Whisk together eggs, milk, These egg potato muffins are an easy, delicious Passover breakfast
cheese, salt, and pepper in a or snack for adults and kids alike.
bowl.
tatoes are starting to brown.
6. Grease a standard size muffin tin. Push
9. Using a small spatula or butter knife,
shredded potatoes into the bottom and
loosen sides of egg-potato muffins and resides of each cup.
move. Serve warm.
7. Pour about 2 Tbs. of egg mix into each
Yields 12 potato-egg muffins.
cup and top with diced red pepper. Dont
allow them to sit too long pop them
Kveller is a thriving community of women and
quickly into the oven.
parents who convene online to share, celebrate, and
8. Bake 12-14 minutes until the eggs are
commiserate their experiences of raising kids
golden and baked, and the sides of the pothrough a Jewish lens. Visit Kveller.com.
lightly greased. Have a larger roasting
pan available for a Bain Marie.
In a medium saucepan, place 1 cup of
sugar and the 4 ounces of water in it.
Heat to boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove the pan from its heat source,
melt the chocolate in the hot syrup, stirring to melt. Add the chunks of butter,
stirring each chunk in before adding another.
Beat eggs together, with an electric beater until foamy and thickened. Stir eggs
into cooled chocolate mixture, stirring

until combined. Pour batter into prepared pan. Place a roasting pan on the
middle oven rack, placing the cake in the
middle of the roasting pan. Pour hot tap
water into the roasting pan to a depth of
one inch along the outside of the cake
pan. Avoid splashing water on the cake
batter.
Gently push pan into the oven. Bake for
30 minutes. Remove the cake pan and
cool cake. When ready to serve, run a
butter knife along the edge of the cake.
Unmold the cake onto serving plate.

KEHILLA Our Community


Its not manna from heaven, but this
Passover, provide something just as crucial
to the survival of the Israeli people.

Where Judaism and Joy are One

206-447-1967 www.campschechter.org

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Kol Haneshamah is a progressive and


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transforming Judaism for the
21st century.
6115 SW Hinds St., Seattle 98116
E-mail: info@khnseattle.org
Telephone: 206-935-1590
www.khnseattle.org
In a country where terrorism and sporadic rocket barrages are an all-too-frequent
occurrence, your gift to Magen David Adom ensures Israels national paramedic
organization has the medical supplies it needs to save lives. So this year, while
you recount the story of the Jews redemption from slavery, your gift will help
modern-day Israelis survive the threats they face today.
Thank you for making a gift today. And we wish you and your family a
Pesach kasher vsameach.
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With warmth and caring,
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We invite you to share
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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

PASSOVER GREETINGS

37

Marking the passage from slavery to freedom


By Dasee Berkowitz, JTA World News Service
JERUSALEM (JTA) Transitions are
never easy.
You decide to leave one place you know
for unfamiliar territory. You dont feel
quite like yourself (and probably wont for
a while). You try to act like everything is
fine even though you know that your whole
life has just been upended. It will take time
until things begin to fall into place when
you start to integrate the old you into your
new identity, when you can trust that your
life will make sense as you take this step into
the unknown.
And while we all might experience one
or two of these major transitions in our lifetime (marriage, divorce, becoming a parent
or moving cities), the transition for the
ancient Israelites, from slavery in Egypt to
freedom, was one of epic proportions.
After suffering under the oppressive
yoke of bondage, the promise of redemption was palpable. With Gods guiding
hand and Moses in place to lead the way,
the Israelites had their matzoh in hand
and were ready to go. Their transition to a
new life from being slaves of Pharaoh
in Egypt to servants of God was set in
motion. While the steps along the way may
have been unsure and filled with trepidation (theres nothing like the sound of Pharaohs army behind you and a sea that isnt
splitting before you to make you wonder if
you made the right decision), the Red Sea
did split, and faith that everything would be
okay won out.
While the Biblical narrative that
recounts the Exodus from Egypt has power
in the linear nature of its telling, the way

the rabbis ritualized that transition in the


Passover Haggadah is anything but linear.
They transformed the raw material of the
Exodus story into an associative, sometimes disjointed pedagogical tool. And in
this disjointed medium of the Haggadah is
the message. Transitions are not a straightforward endeavor. They are a process that
can be meandering, confusing and rife with
double meanings and complexities. What
are the ways that our experience of Passover
can shed light onto how we experience transitions in our own lives?
Embrace complexity. Eat matzoh.
The most ubiquitous symbol of Passover, matzoh is in itself a conundrum. It
is the bread of affliction, which reminds us
of the hard bread the Israelites ate in servitude in Egypt. But it is also the food that the
Israelites baked on the eve of their departure. Its the same substance (just flour
and water), but the meaning of the bread
changes based on how we relate to it. When
we were passive recipients of the bread it
represented our affliction and reminded
us of our identity as slaves, but when created with our own hands it represents the
moment of our freedom.
It might have been simpler to have two
different kinds of bread a flat bread to
represent slavery and a fluffier one to represent freedom. But instead, on seder night we
are obligated to eat matzoh and imbibe the
two identities at the same time. We hold the
complexity even as we celebrate freedom,
we remember our harsh past. More than
that, our past serves as a moral compass
and guides us not to oppress the stranger

because we remembered what oppression


felt like.
When we go through a transition in our
lives, we recognize that we dont negate
the past to embrace a new future. Our past
experiences ground and guide us as we take
steps toward a new identity.
The rabbis put questions and questionings at the center of the Haggadahs telling.
The nature of asking questions on Passover
is in itself an act of freedom. The most powerless the children traditionally ask
the Four Questions. Then four children ask
questions based on their own characters:
The questions that everyone is thinking but
nobody dare articulate.
Only free people can ask, wonder and
challenge. Being able to ask good questions
connects us to the bigger picture and opens
doors to lifes possibilities.
Transitions are overwhelming. And
when you are going through one, sometimes all you want are the right answers.
(Im not sure how many Israelites asked
questions when they were leaving Egypt on
that 14th of Nisan.)
But the Haggadah teaches us to ask questions, even when it might feel frightening to
do so. Our questions might range from the
wise and rebellious to the simple, and sometimes we might find ourselves unable to
ask. The questions that start with Why did
I do this? may lead to broader ones like I
wonder what awaits me on the other side?
Keep asking.
Offer praise and thanks.
In the middle of the Haggadah, soon
after Dayenu and right before we wash our

hands to eat the matzoh, there is a shortened Hallel (songs of praise). It is smack in
the middle of the Haggadah. Praise, O servants of the Lord, Praise the Lords name.
May the Lords name be blessed now and
forevermore. We move away from the
heady conversations about why we eat the
paschal lamb, matzoh and maror, and the
meta-values that the Haggadah conveys
with the line In every generation one is
obligated to see oneself as if on had gone out
of Egypt. Instead we sing, dance and offer
gratitude that we have made it this far.
This short Hallel stuck in the middle
of the Haggadah reminds us how important it is to recognize milestones along the
journey. When our tendency is to see how
much farther we need to go, the Haggadah
reminds us to recognize how far we have
come, and to give thanks.
Every day our lives are filled with transitions in small and big ways, from home to
work and then back home again. Crises big
and small happen at these threshold points
kids have breakdowns, adults feel anxiety. These feelings are real because they
reflect that we are heading into unknown
territory. In our daily lives we ritualize these
moments the goodbye kiss, the welcome
home hug. And for our bigger transitions
changing careers, moving houses, leaving a
marriage, or deciding to have a child the
rituals become larger and more complex.
As we approach each of these transitions, let us move from the narrow places,
our personal Egypts, to a place of openness
and expansiveness of the desert. This Passover season beckons you.

Though we may no longer make a sound


The Jewish Sound will live on
Online | All of our current articles at jewishsound.org will remain online indefinitely.
Community Calendar | Continue to visit jewishsound.org/calendar for all of our Jewish communitys
events.
Archives | Nearly 40 years of our 91-year history have been scanned and digitized and
are available online at http://jtn.stparchive.com.
And coming soon...
Jewish Magazine | A new magazine from Sagacity Media will launch in August.
Community Newsletter | A newsletter produced by the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle
will come later this year.

Stay tuned!

38

passover greetings

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Herb
Jon & Justice Bobbe
Rabbi Dan & Simcha

BRIDGE

The Tribe Motorcycle


Club of Seattle wishes
everyone a safe and
Happy Passover.

To Joel,
from your Beth Am
Sunday morning
walking buddies.

Farewell!

HAPPY PASSOVER

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS


AND RELATIVES
JUDY AND KRIJN DE JONGE
SASKIA AND ANNEKE
STAN AND MICHELE ROSEN
LESLIE ROSEN
JACK AND ANA ROSEN
MIMI ROSEN AND NATHAN GOLDBERG
SADIE, MATILDA AND HANNAH

Goodbye
Jewish Sound.
Well miss you!
www.SeattleTribe.com
Doug & Marcia Wiviott
Stephanie, Tony, Tory
& Bentley Harris
David, Christin, Naomi & Leo
Wiviott
Rainier Overseas Movers, Inc.

Gerry & Sandra Ostroff


Tami, Ed, Yoni, Emma, Tova &
Zachary Gelb
Joel, Leslie, Torry & Kaya Ostroff
In memory of Al & Ruth Sanft
Louie Sanft

Happy Passover!

Nettie & Mark Cohodas


Samantha & Ben

Toby Franco

Barrie & Richard Galanti


Sam, Oliver & Rachel Ada
Brina Sanft

SANFT FAMILY
Thanks JTNews/Jewish Sound!
Until we meet again...
Passover Greetings
to the community from

PASSOVER
GREETINGS!

Small, friendly Reform Congregation


Celebrating 26 years in South King County

Come check us out!

www.betchaverim.org 206-577-0403
25701 14th Pl. S., Des Moines

Farewell!

SONNY ROSE & FAMILY

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

PASSOVER GREETINGS

39

Brisket in a pie? Why not for Passover?


By Tami Ganeles-Weiser, The Nosher
Savory meat pies have been everyday fare in Britain since the early Middle
Ages, and Cumberland pie is a variant
that doesnt get as much notice. It is not
only delicious, but it is a great way to use
cooked meat.
With the accessibility of so many parve
milk-style products from almond and
cashew to soy or oat the creamy potatoes
this pie calls for are easy for kosher cooks.
But what sets Cumberland pie apart is the
crunchy topping, often a broiled top with
plenty of toasted breadcrumbs.
My Cumberland pie is slowly braised
at a low temperature with sweet wine. The
parsnips in the stew give it a decidedly
Anglo-Ashkenazi spin. The recipe is easy
to make in parts, which makes it perfect
for seder fare. The meat should be made at
least a day in advance, but it can be made
up to five days ahead. The potatoes can be
made the day before. The day you serve the
pie, skim the brisket pot well and remove
the meat and vegetables. Heat the sauce
until it has reduced in volume enough to
coat the back of a spoon. That nappe (as
French chefs call it) will make the dish
flavor-rich. Cover the pie with the potatoes, warm in the oven, top with the crusty
topping and broil at the last minute. Its a
showy and fun dish, perfect for a crowd
and anything but bland.
This recipe is actually as easy as pie to
make, but fear not the long list of ingredients! Youll have a memorably hearty and
flavor-rich dish that is worth the time.

Shredded Brisket Cumberland Pie


for Passover

For the brisket filling:


3 pounds brisket, second cut preferred
1 Tbs. kosher salt
3 Tbs. sweet paprika
1 Tbs. canola or vegetable oil
1 Tbs. olive oil
6 large cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half,
any green center removed
1 (6-oz.) can tomato paste
4 large leeks, washed well and cut into
1-inch chunks, white part only
2 cups sweet, full-bodied red wine
1/3 cup mushroom broth
1 cup low-sodium beef stock
4 large carrots (about 1 pound), peeled and
cut into 1-inch chunks
6 medium parsnips, (about 1 pound) peeled
and cut into 1-inch chunks
6 small turnips (about 1 pound), peeled and
cut into 1-inch chunks
4 dried bay leaves
For the topping:
3 pounds russet potatoes (about 6 medium),
peeled and cubed (about 9 cups total)
4 Tbs. dairy-free, non-hydrogenated margarine
2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup non-dairy milk
1 Tbs. olive oil
2 tsp. kosher salt, divided
1/4 cup matzoh meal

1 Tbs. ground sweet paprika


Make the brisket: Preheat the
oven to 285. Gently sprinkle
the brisket with salt and paprika on both sides and rub well
to coat.
Heat a large, heavy ovenproof
saucepan or Dutch oven over
high heat, pour in the oils, and
heat until they shimmer.
Carefully place the brisket into
the pan and sear for 2 minutes on each side. Transfer to
a rimmed sheet pan and set
aside. Reserve the saucepan.
Add the tomato paste to the
pan and stir well to toast for 45
seconds to 1 minute. Add the
leeks, stir to coat, and cook for
2 minutes, or until the leeks
just begin to soften. Add the
wine and mushroom broth and
stir well. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add
the stock and stir well. Carefully return the brisket to the pot, The brisket, cut before it goes into the crust.
and add the carrots, parsnips,
turnips, and bay leaves. Cover the pot and
then chop it before covering with foil. Set
place in the oven.
aside. Transfer the carrots, parsnips, and turCook for 3 hours. Refrigerate, covered, for 2
nips to a work surface, reserving the pot. Cut
to 3 days.
the vegetables into 1/2-inch pieces.

When you are ready to continue with


the recipe, make the mashed potatoes: Fill a
large pot with cold water and salt well. Add
the potatoes and bring to a boil over high
heat. Cook until the potatoes are fork tender,
about 30 minutes. Drain the potatoes and
push them through a ricer into a large bowl.
Add the margarine and 2 Tbs. extra-virgin
olive oil and mash until melted. Add almond
milk and mix well. Season with 1 tsp. salt.
While the potatoes are cooking, skim the
layer of fat and accumulated scum from the
surface of the brisket pot and discard.
Remove the meat from the pot, shred and

Set the pot over medium heat and cook


the sauce until it is reduced in volume by
half, about 10 minutes. Strain the sauce
through a fine-mesh strainer and return to
the pot. Return the brisket and vegetables to
the pot and stir well. Cover and reduce the
heat to a simmer.
Spray a 2-1/2- to 3-quart round ovenproof casserole/serving dish with nonstick
vegetable oil spray.
Preheat the oven to 400. Place the brisket and vegetable mixture into the prepared
casserole dish. Cover with the mashed potatoes. Bake until heated through and the

BrownGuacamole/Creative Commons

mashed potatoes just begin to turn golden,


about 30 to 35 minutes.
Heat the olive oil in a small skillet set
over high heat until it shimmers. Add the
matzoh meal, paprika, and the remaining
salt, stir well, and cook until the mixture
turns a light brown. Sprinkle the seasoned
crumbs liberally over the casserole and
return it to the oven. Bake for an additional
5 to 6 minutes, until the matzoh meal and
potatoes are deep golden brown on top.
Serve immediately.
The Nosher food blog offers a dazzling array of new
and classic Jewish recipes and food news, from
Europe to Yemen, from challah to shakshuka and
beyond. Check it out at www.TheNosher.com.

40

passover greetings

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

The Holiday Kiddush


A story by Sholem Aleichem
Translated by Curt Leviant

3
1
5
6
2
4
7
My gang of pals always called me
Dunderhead. Was it because I refused to
study? Well, that wasnt the only reason.
Truth is I didnt want to study. Who
does? Did they dub me Dunderhead on
account of my wooden head? Maybe.
Truth is, I was a numbskull. Nothing
penetrated, my teacher complained. I
had to work my head to the bone before I
understood anything.
But, on the other hand, my memory,
knock wood, was pretty weak, too. I
couldnt remember a blessed thing. In
one ear, out the other. Absolutely nothing sank in.

During the Eve of Passover Im going


to tell you about how my fathers joy
knew no bounds. What was the big occasion? Mazel tov. I had become engaged.
My father-in-law was a merchant. He
was even offering a dowry. Not much,
though. My father was giving twice as
much. But in turn, they were giving me
a bride.
And what a bride! I myself hadnt
met her. But those who had couldnt
stop raving about her. Mama declared
she was beautiful. My sister said she was
smart. My brother-in-law insisted she
was good-natured. He said her face was
kindness itself.
But my father said whatever she was, I
wasnt worthy of her.
And I yearned for Passover like a
pious Jew yearned for the Moshiach. For
I was going to spend the entire eight days
of Pesach as a guest of my future in-laws.
My parents told me to be on my best
behavior to stand and sit and eat properly and not talk any nonsense.
In brief, said Father, dont let them

get wind of the fact that youre a Dunderhead.... Say, wait a minute, do you know
the holiday Kiddush?
It turned out that I did not. How
should I know it? Remember it from last
year? And this year the second night of
Pesach fell on a Saturday night. Which
made it doubly disastrous! For on that
night one had to recite not only the Kiddush over the wine but also the tricky
Havdoleh, the prayer of separation as
well.
Listen to this:
Blessed art thou, Lord, our God,
King of the universe, who has made a
distinction between the holiness of the
Sabbath and the holiness of the festival; the seventh day above the six working days hast thou exalted; distinguished
and exalted thy people hast thou with thy
holiness.
There you have exalted followed
immediately by distinguished and
exalted.
Some piece of work, eh?
Never mind, said Father. Youll
learn it. You still have three weeks till
Pesach.
But Father wasnt banking on my abilities. He got a Hebrew teacher to study
the Kiddush with me. So that Id get to
know it backwards.
After three weeks I can proudly say I
had the Kiddush down pat. But the Havdoleh still tripped me up. I mean the
Havdoleh itself went like a song. But
only up to a certain point. Up to the
first exalted. From there, things went
haywire. The man who thought up that
prayer apparently had nothing else to
do. So he popped in the word exalted,
and, right at its heels, distinguished and
exalted.
Couldnt he have just used either dis-

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tinguished or exalted?
Why cause trouble?

Hows the Kiddush coming along?


Father asked me just as I was about to
leave before Pesach. Do you know it by
heart?
Like I know my name.
All right. Lets hear it.
I recited it, going 80 miles per hour.
But when it came to the tricky part, the
express slowed down.
The seventh day above the six working days hast thou exalted; exalted and
distinguished hast thou thy people ...
My father caught this:
Not exalted and distinguished,
you dunderhead, but distinguished and
exalted. I want you to repeat distinguished and exalted two hundred-fifty
times.

I wandered around the house like a


lunatic, softly muttering distinguished
and exalted until my eyes grew bleary
and my head began to spin. At my wits
end, I sank into the sofa, more dead than
alive.
Whats with you? asked Mama.
Nothing, I said. Distinguished and
exalted. Exalted and distinguished.

Did I hear and distinguished


again? asked Father. Where did you
get and distinguished from, you dunderhead?
Dont you think its high time to put
a stop to this? said Mama, God bless her.
Youre going to get him so confused the
poor child wont know if hes coming or
going.
As I sat in the coach on my way to
my fiancees house, I recited the Kiddush by heart. When I came to the words
exalted; distinguished and exalted I
made a sign for myself.
Since the horse on the left looked
like such a noble steed, I labeled him
exalted.
And since the horse on the right
kept throwing his head up so proudly, I
labeled him distinguished. The key was
left-right-left. Exalted; distinguished
and exalted. And so it burned itself into
my memory.
Now no force on earth could knock
that pattern out of my mind.
I arrived safely at my fiancees house
on Friday afternoon, erev Pesach, and I
got a quick glimpse of her. Not bad. Not
at all ugly. Whether she was smart or not,
I couldnt say. But as far as I could tell,
her face wasnt kindness itself, as my
brother-in-law put it.
If a cluster of little pimples scattered
all over ones face was a sign of kindness,
then she should have been a saint!
We came home from the synagogue,
wishing every one Gut yontiff, and
sat down at once to begin the seder.
The bride responded to the greeting
and immediately blushed, red as a ripe
watermelon. My mother-in-law beamed,
decked out with an assortment of gems,
looking like Gods grandma.
The first seder went well, for the
Friday night Kiddush is a snap. But then
came Saturday night and the second
seder. My father-in-law chanted the long

y and KosHer passove


ave a Happ
r
Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle
5305 52nd Ave. S
206-760-0805
www.seattlevaad.org

For Passover questions and product information, please visit our website:
www.seattlevaad.org/passover.
You may also contact your synagogue or any of the following rabbis:
Rabbi M. Kletenik
206-228-0692

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EVERY FRIDAY IS CHALLAH DAY!

Rabbi S. B. Levitin
206-527-1411

Rabbi M. Farkash
206-957-7860

Rabbi Hassan
206-602-9375

Rabbi R. Meyers
206-722-5500

Rabbi Y. Kornfeld
206-232-1797
Rabbi S. Benzaquen
206-200-6829

For Pre-Passover and Yom Tov services and classes please contact your Synagogue.

For general kashrut questions, please visit www.seattlevaad.org.


or email us at vaadinfo@seattlevaad.org. You may also call our office at 206-760-0805.
For Passover questions, please call the Seattle Vaad/OU Seattle Passover Hotline at
212-613-8314 or Rabbi Kletenik at 206-228-0692.

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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

Kiddush and then signaled his future


son-in-law to get up.
I rose, took the wine goblet in hand,
and dispatched the courier express. Loud
and pretty. On tune. Quick as a flash.
Till I came to the tricky Hebrew phrases.
Smack into the swamp. Then I slowed up,
literally crawling along.
Thou hast made a distinction...
between the holiness of the Sabbath...and
the holiness of the holiday.... The seventh...day...above...the six...working...
days...hast....thou...exalted...
At once I thought of the horses, the
one on the left, exalted; the one on the
right, distinguished; but, forgetting
which was which, I sang: Extinguished
and desalted hast thou thy people...

Early in the morning of the third day,


my father-in-law was composing a letter
to my father. I was already packed, all set
for the return trip.
Here, he said, handing me a sealed
letter. Regards to your father. Give him
this note and have a nice trip home.
While riding on the wagon, I was curious to see what he had written and why
they had sent me packing so soon. When
I opened the envelope, out fell the marriage contract and the note. In the letter
my ex-father-in-law begged my fathers
pardon and declared:
Dont be angry, but the match is off.
May the Almighty send your son his destined mate and my daughter hers. The
dowry and all the presents will be divided
and well part best of friends.
Luckily, he didnt say a word about my
fine Kiddush, God bless him.
But hold on! As soon as I set foot in
the house my father promptly greeted me
with a couple of smacks.
Extinguished and desalted, huh?
Where did you dig that up all of a sudden,
you apostate? Ill give you extinguished
and desalted!
How did he find out so quickly? And
do you think it was only my father?
Everyone in town knew it. And no longer
was I called Dunderhead.
I got myself a new nickname.
From then on everyone called me
Extinguished and Desalted.
Curt Leviants most recent book is the short story
collection, Zix Zexy Ztories.

By Avital Norman Nathman, Kveller.com


(Kveller via JTA) Whether you weave
in one, a few, or all 10 of these tips, consider
honoring the matriarchal roots of Judaism
this Passover with a little girl power fun at
your seder this year.
1. Add an orange and coffee bean to your
seder plate
The orange represents
both inclusion and solidarity with women
and the LGBT community. The new tradition
was started by Professor
Susannah Heschel, who
was inspired by women at Oberlin College in
1984 who made space on their seder plate to
represent all who were not explicitly present
in the Passover story.
The coffee bean represents and honors
both the bitterness and
strength of juggling
your work life and
family life something were pretty sure
you can relate to.
2. Miriams Cup
In addition to the traditional cup of
Elijah, include Miriams Cup and begin your
seder by filling it up together. It serves as
the symbol of Miriams Well the source
of water for the Israelites in the desert. Pass
the cup around the table and let each guest
add a bit of water from his or her own cup,
establishing that the seder is an inclusive and
participatory one. Remind your guests that
while we may enjoy drinking our four cups
of wine, water is just as important. Like Miriams Well, water sustains and nourishes us
(and prevents hangovers).
3. Lighting candles
Candle lighting has traditionally fallen
to women in Jewish practice. Honor this by
recognizing that the lighting of candles helps
usher light into the darkness and allows us
to begin our holidays peacefully. This poem,
written by Hannah Senesch, is an excellent
way to help usher in that feeling:
Blessed is the match consumed in kindling flame.
Blessed is the flame that burns in the
secret fastness of the heart.
Blessed is the heart with the strength to
stop its beating for honors sake.
Blessed is the match consumed in kindling flame.
4. The four mothers
Speaking of those four cups of wine, you

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can note during your seder that some scholars connect the four cups of wine with the
four mothers: Sarah, Rivka, Rachel and
Leah. After all, the only thing better than one
Jewish mother is four.
5. Honor the women in your life
The four cups of wine are also excellent
opportunities to honor the women in your
own life, both past and present. With each
glass of wine, take a moment to dedicate it
to a woman who has impacted your life in
some way. (Pro tip: If your own mom is in
attendance, you might want to go ahead and
include her.)
6. The four daughters
While were familiar with the story of
the four sons from the traditional Haggadah, why not also give a nod to the four Biblical daughters, a wonderful addition from
A Night To Remember: The Haggadah
of Contemporary Voices, by Mishael and
Noam Zion. The reading shares wisdom
from Miriam, Tamar, Ruth and The Beautiful Captive.
7. Four alternative questions
After reciting the Ma Nishtanah, the traditional Four Questions, take the time to
ask four alternative questions, ones that feel
relevant to you and your family and ignite
discussion. Heres one example to get you
started: What still enslaves us as Jewish
women today, and how do we seek freedom
from our own Pharaohs (or Sheryl Sandbergs, if you will)?
8. Add to the story!
There are many women who play crucial
roles in the Exodus story, yet theyre usually
left out of the retelling. Take some time to
sing their praises:
Shifra and Puah: These two midwives
were respected members of their community. Despite risk of punishment, they
defied the Pharaohs orders and continued
to help deliver baby boys for Jewish women
in Egypt.
Yocheved: Yocheved kept her secret
from the Egyptians, saving Moses life. She
then made the ultimate mothers sacrifice by
sending him down the river her only hope
in saving him from otherwise certain death.
Now theres a birth story to remember.
Batya: Pharaohs daughter found Moses

in the reeds of the Nile and decided to raise


him as her own, knowingly going against her
fathers decree to kill all male Jewish babies.
Without her defiance and bravery, our Passover story might have looked very different.
Miriam: One of the most well-known
women in the Bible, Miriam was the brave
young woman who ensured Moses was safe
during his journey down the Nile River. She
also brought Yocheved to Batya to be used as
a nursemaid, ensuring that mother and son
were never far apart. We dont hear much
about Miriam again until the exodus from
Egypt, but when we do, it is her strength and
song that stick with us, which brings us to
9. Miriams Song
One of Debbie Friedmans most joyful
songs, Miriams Song is rooted in the
Exodus verse describing how Miriam led the
Israelite women in song and dance after they
crossed the Red Sea. Miriam the Prophet,
Aarons sister, took a timbrel in her hand
and all the women went after her with timbrels, dancing. And Miriam called to them:
Sing to God.
10. Wise women
Many songs, poems and stories written
by women are a perfect match for Passover;
include them in your seder along the way.
Some of my favorites:
Marge Piercys poem Season of the Egg.
Rabbi Rachel Berenblat (aka The Velveteen Rabbi) has a poem about what happens after the seder.
Rabbi Jill Hammers Orah Hi, a feminist version of the traditional end of seder
song Adir Hu.
This piece was originally published on Kveller, a 70
Faces Media property.

HickmanMenashe
attorneys at law
a professional company

Happy Passover to the community!


William S. Hickman Jacob H. Menashe
Estate and Elder Law Planning
Special Needs Trust Planning

Offices in Lynnwood
and Bellevue

www.hickmanmenashe.com
425-744-5658

a jewish sound special section


friday, March 27, 2015

Family Calendar
Saturday, March 28

Monday, March 30

58 p.m. SJCC 2015 Summer Camp Open House and Information Session
^^206-232-7115 or saraht@sjcc.org or www.sjcc.org
,, Stroum JCC, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Havdalah, dinner and fun, and a chance to learn more about this years camp sessions. Camp
discounts available. Activities for kids. Free.

68 p.m. Family Shabbat Celebrations


^^425-844-1604 or admin@kolaminw.org or www.kolaminw.org
,, Congregation Kol Ami, 16530 Avondale Rd. NE, Woodinville
Take a breath and enjoy the peace and calm of Shabbat every last Friday of the month. Bring a
side or a dessert and they will bring the rest. Free.

Sunday, March 29

Monday, April 6

12:304:30 p.m. Matzoh Bakery


^^206-232-7115 or saraht@sjcc.org or www.sjcc.org
,, Stroum JCC, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Grind the wheat, mix the flour, knead the dough, and bake the matzoh. Drop in any time. Hosted
by Chabad Lubavitch of Seattle. $4 per child.

9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. SJCC Spring Break Camp: April 6-10


^^206-388-0839 or DaliahS@sjcc.org or www.sjcc.org
,, Stroum JCC, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Each day features activities on a theme from a different historical era. Plus swimming, playing,
and arts and crafts. PreK-5th grade. Members $60, guests $70 per day.

WHERE TO WORSHIP
GREATER SEATTLE
Bet Alef (Meditative)
206/527-9399
1111 Harvard Ave., Seattle
Chabad House
206/527-1411
4541 19th Ave. NE
Congregation Kol Ami (Reform) 425/844-1604
16530 Avondale Rd. NE, Woodinville
Cong. Beis Menachem (Traditional Hassidic)
16199 Northup Way, Bellevue
425/957-7860
Congregation Beth Shalom (Conservative)
6800 35th Ave. NE
206/524-0075
Cong. Bikur Cholim Machzikay Hadath
(Orthodox)
5145 S Morgan St.
206/721-0970
Capitol Hill Minyan-BCMH (Orthodox)
1501 17th Ave. E
206/721-0970
Congregation Eitz Or (Jewish Renewal)
Call for locations
206/467-2617
Cong. Ezra Bessaroth (Sephardic Orthodox)
5217 S Brandon St.
206/722-5500
Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch
(Orthodox/Chabad)
6250 43rd Ave. NE
206/527-1411
Congregation Shevet Achim (Orthodox)
8685 SE 47th St., Mercer Island 206/275-1539
Congregation Tikvah Chadashah
(LGBTQ)
206/355-1414
Emanuel Congregation (Modern Orthodox)
3412 NE 65th St.
206/525-1055
Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation
(Conservative)
206/232-8555
3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Hillel (Multi-denominational)
4745 17th Ave. NE
206/527-1997
Kadima (Reconstructionist)
206/547-3914
12353 8th Ave. NE, Seattle
Kavana Cooperative kavanaseattle@gmail.com
Ashreichem Yisrael (Traditional) 206-397-2671
5134 S Holly St., Seattle
www.ashreichemyisrael.com
Khal Ateres Zekainim (Orthodox)
206/722-1464
at Kline Galland Home, 7500 Seward Park Ave. S
Kol HaNeshamah
206/935-1590
(Progressive Reform)
Alki UCC, 6115 SW Hinds St., West Seattle

Mercaz Seattle (Modern Orthodox)


5720 37th Ave. NE
rachelirosenfeld@gmail.com
www.mercazseattle.org
Minyan Ohr Chadash (Modern Orthodox)
Brighton Building, 6701 51st Ave. S
www.minyanohrchadash.org
Mitriyah (Progressive, Unaffiliated)
www.mitriyah.com
206/651-5891
Secular Jewish Circle of Puget Sound
(Humanist)
www.secularjewishcircle.org
206/528-1944
Sephardic Bikur Holim Congregation (Orthodox)
6500 52nd Ave. S
206/723-3028
The Summit at First Hill (Orthodox)
1200 University St.
206/652-4444
Temple Beth Am (Reform)
206/525-0915
2632 NE 80th St.
Temple Bnai Torah (Reform)
425/603-9677
15727 NE 4th St., Bellevue
Temple De Hirsch Sinai (Reform)
Seattle, 1441 16th Ave.
206/323-8486
Bellevue, 3850 156th Ave. SE
Torah Learning Center (Orthodox)
5121 SW Olga St., West Seattle
206/722-8289
SOUTH KING COUNTY
Bet Chaverim (Reform)
206/577-0403
25701 14th Place S, Des Moines

WASHINGTON STATE
ABERDEEN
Temple Beth Israel
1819 Sumner at Martin

360/533-5755

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND
Congregation Kol Shalom (Reform)
9010 Miller Rd. NE
206/855-0885
Chavurat Shir Hayam
206/842-8453
BELLINGHAM
Chabad Jewish Center of Whatcom County
102 Highland Dr.
360/393-3845

Congregation Beth Israel (Reform)


2200 Broadway
360/733-8890
BREMERTON
Congregation Beth Hatikvah
360/373-9884
11th and Veneta
EVERETT / LYNNWOOD
Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County
19626 76th Ave. W, Lynnwood
425/640-2811
Temple Beth Or (Reform)
425/259-7125
3215 Lombard St., Everett
FORT LEWIS
Jewish Chapel
Liggett Avenue and 12th
ISSAQUAH
Chabad of the Central Cascades
24121 SE Black Nugget Rd.

253/967-6590

425/427-1654

Temple Beth Shalom (Conservative)


1322 E 30th Ave.
509/747-3304
TACOMA
Chabad-Lubavitch of Pierce County
2146 N Mildred St..
253/565-8770
Temple Beth El (Reform)
253/564-7101
5975 S 12th St.
TRI CITIES
Congregation Beth Sholom (Conservative)
312 Thayer Dr., Richland
509/375-4 740
VANCOUVER
Chabad-Lubavitch of Clark County
9604 NE 126th Ave., Suite 2320 360/993-5222
Rabbi@ChabadClarkCounty.com
www.chabadclarkcounty.com
Congregation Kol Ami
360/574-5169
www.jewishvancouverusa.org

OLYMPIA
Chabad Jewish Discovery Center
1770 Barnes Blvd. SW, Tumwater 360/584-4306
Congregation Bnai Torah (Conservative)
3437 Libby Rd.
360/943-7354
Temple Beth Hatfiloh (Reconstructionist)
201 8th Ave. SE
360/754-8519

VASHON ISLAND
Havurat Ee Shalom
206/567-1608
15401 Westside Highway
P O Box 89, Vashon Island, WA 98070

PORT ANGELES AND SEQUIM


Congregation Bnai Shalom
360/452-2471

WENATCHEE
Greater Wenatchee Jewish Community
509/662-3333 or 206/782-1044

PORT TOWNSEND
Congregation Bet Shira
360/379-3042
PULLMAN, WA AND MOSCOW, ID
Jewish Community of the Palouse
509/334-7868 or 208/882-1280
SPOKANE
Chabad of Spokane County
4116 E 37th Ave.
509/443-0770
Congregation Emanu-El (Reform)
P O Box 30234
509/835-5050
www.spokaneemanu-el.org

WALLA WALLA
Congregation Beth Israel

509/522-2511

WHIDBEY ISLAND
Jewish Community of Whidbey Island
360/331-2190
YAKIMA
Temple Shalom (Reform)
1517 Browne Ave.
yakimatemple@gmail.com

509/453-8988

f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

IN HER OWN WORDS

43

March of the Living: My journey


By Michal Lotzkar, Special to the Jewish Sound
I went on a trip to Israel a few months ago.
I had been to Israel many times before, and
each time I travelled there by way of a different route. This time I traveled to Israel via
Auschwitz, on the March of the Living.
Every spring, thousands of Jews from
all corners of the earth gather together
in Poland and Israel for an inspirational,
transformational and educational trip that
truly changes peoples lives.
The trip begins in Poland, where I
searched, studied and traced a Jewish
world that no longer exists. My family
roots are in Poland, not unlike many Jews. I
never truly understood why my family and
so many Jews like them lived in Poland.
How did they get there? What did they
do there? Why did they stay? I traveled
to places in that country that enlightened
me about the glorious Jewish life that once
thrived there and was then destroyed.
On Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, thousands of March participants from 40 countries and regions
around the world shared in a once-in-alifetime experience. Together we marched
the three kilometers from Auschwitz to
Birkenau, the largest concentration camp
complex built by the Nazis.
As a March participant, my experience
directly contrasted the tragic fate of the hundreds of thousands of Jews and others forced
by the Nazis to take part in the infamous

death marches across vast expanses of European terrain under the harshest conditions.
For me and thousands of other Jews, this
was, as our tour was named, the March of the
Living. We marched together reaffirming am
Yisrael chai the Jewish People live.
In an impactful memorial service at one
of the gas chambers/crematoria in Birkenau,
we concluded with the singing of Hatikvah.
Never have I sung the national anthem of our
State of Israel with such, passion, emotion,
commitment, volume and tears of sadness, anger, joy, hope a spectrum of emotions all different, all at once. I felt our shared
past with all of my senses, being there in
the guts of where the unthinkable took place.
As our El Al flight took off from Poland
to fly to Israel, I felt a dark cloud lift. Our
groups lightened mood was palpable. In
Israel, we celebrated Yom Haatzmaut, Israels Independence Day. As a March participant, I took part in many unique events
organized specifically for us. I learned about
the many challenges that still face this young
country and of the role that we can play in
ensuring that Israel continues to flourish as a
strong, independent and democratic nation.
For as many times as I had been to
Israel, my week there with the March of the
Living was filled with unforgettable experiences. I saw and felt everything in Israel with
renewed appreciation, passion, commitment and support for my country.

Jewish sports heroes will


take center stage during
Jewish Historical Society
road show
The personalities and stories of Jewish sports heroes
from across Washington
State featured in the book
Distant Replay will all be
part of an interactive presentation available through
the Washington State Jewish
Historical Society.
Individuals and family
members of athletes highlighted in the 350-page book
published as a fundraiser by
the society will be part of the
latest road show available
to congregations and community groups beginning
this June. Proceeds from the
exhibit will benefit the ongoing efforts of the historical
society to preserve memories
of Jewish roots in the Northwest.
For more information, or to schedule a
Distant Replay presentation, contact Lisa
Kranseler at 206-774-2277 or lkranseler@
wsjhs.org.

this takes time, thought,


Yom HaShoah and
planning and discipline,
Yom Haatzmaut are two
but this is whats needed
of the most important
for us and our children
days in modern Jewish
to be strong and self relitimes. As I returned
ant with a deep sense of
home from the March
identity and direction.
with a renewed sense of
I realized by being
myself, my people, and
on the March that the
my history, I pledged
medium is the message.
that I could not keep this
Emotions are evoked
experience of a lifetime
to myself, that I must
Courtesy Michal Lotzkar and memories etched
share it. I think about Michal Lotzkar, during her March of the not with documentaries,
the March a lot, partic- Living sojourn on Israels northern border. articles, books or lectures, but through the
ularly now, on the heels
senses by being there.
of the 70-year commemoration of the libGoing on the March was difficult. Why
eration of Auschwitz. Yom HaShoah and
would anyone want to go to Auschwitz?
Yom Haatzmaut are quickly approaching,
Its a horrible place. No one should ever go
and I read and I listen to the news about
to Auschwitz. But that is precisely why we
events of intolerance, hatred and discrimmust all go there. We must pay tribute to
ination around the world, even right here
the memory of the victims who never lived
in Seattle, where we feel safe, accepted and
to see redemption and then we must supcomfortable.
port and celebrate our State of Israel.
I have a nice life here in Seattle. I live in a
And that is why I have become prolovely home in a beautiful and safe neighborgram coordinator for March of the Living
hood with my husband and two children. As
for Seattle. This year, join me on the March.
a Jewish family we are members of Temple
March of the Living 2015 runs April 1328.
De Hirsch Sinai, we participate in temple life,
March of the Living 2016 runs April 28
we feel were doing our part. Are we?
May 11 (approximate dates). Reach me at
It occurred to me after having been on
michal@motlthewest.org or 425-736-2336
the March that its absolutely necessary
to learn more.
to take a long view into our glorious and
tragic past and forward to our future. Yes,

206 992-2235
rachel1h@aol.com
SephardicReligiousSchool.com
We provide a warm, vibrant learning experience, regardless of affiliation.
Hebrew Reading
Jewish values
Hebrew Languge
Jewish Holidays
Prayer
Prep for Bar / Bat Mitzvah
Torah
K - 8th Grade
Israel
Sundays & Tuesdays

Wishing You a
Happy Passover
Robert Friedman

robfriedman@acuraofbellevue.com
425-644-3000 x.1108
425-503-0804
THE #1 Volume New Acura Dealer in Washington

44

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY to JEWISH WASHINGTON


Care Givers

Dentists (continued)

HomeCare Associates
A program of Jewish Family Service
206-861-3193
 www.homecareassoc.org
Provides personal care, assistance with
daily activities, medication reminders,
light housekeeping, meal preparation and
companionship to older adults living at
home or in assisted-living facilities.

Warren J. Libman, D.D.S., M.S.D.


425-453-1308
 www.libmandds.com
Certified Specialist in Prosthodontics:
Restorative Reconstructive
Cosmetic Dentistry
14595 Bel Red Rd. #100, Bellevue

Certified Public
Accountants
Dennis B. Goldstein & Assoc., CPAs, PS
Tax Preparation & Consulting
425-455-0430
F 425-455-0459
dennis@dbgoldsteincpa.com

Newman Dierst Hales, PLLC


Nolan A. Newman, CPA
206-284-1383
nnewman@ndhaccountants.com
 www.ndhaccountants.com
Tax Accounting Healthcare Consulting

College Placement
College Placement Consultants
425-453-1730
preiter@outlook.com
 www.collegeplacementconsultants.com
Pauline B. Reiter, Ph.D.
Expert help with undergraduate and
graduate college selection,
applications and essays.
40 Lake Bellevue, #100, Bellevue 98005

Counselors/Therapists
Jewish Family Service
Individual, couple, child and family therapy
206-861-3152
contactus@jfsseattle.org
 www.jfsseattle.org
Expertise with life transitions, addiction
and recovery, relationships and personal
challenges all in a cultural context.
Licensed therapists; flexible day or
evening appointments; sliding fee scale;
most insurance plans.

Dentists
Wally Kegel, DDS, MSD. P.S.
Periodontists Dental Implants
206-682-9269
 www.DrKegel.com
Seattle Met Top Dentist 2012, 2014
Tues.-Fri
Medical-Dental Bldg, Seattle

Michael Spektor, D.D.S.


425-643-3746
info@spektordental.com
 www.spektordental.com
Specializing in periodontics, dental
implants, and cosmetic gum therapy.
Bellevue

Wendy Shultz Spektor, D.D.S.


425-454-1322
info@spektordental.com
 www.spektordental.com
Emphasis: Cosmetic and Preventive
Dentistry Convenient location in Bellevue

Financial Services
Hamrick Investment Counsel, LLC
Roy A. Hamrick, CFA
206-441-9911
rahamrick@hamrickinvestment.com
 www.hamrickinvestment.com
Professional portfolio management
services for individuals, foundations and
nonprofit organizations.

Solomon M. Karmel, Ph.D


First Allied Securities
425-454-2285 x 1080
 www.hedgingstrategist.com
Retirement, stocks, bonds, college,
annuities, business 401Ks.

Investments
WaterRock Global
Asset Management, LLC.
Adam Droker, CRPC MBA
425-269-1499 (cel)
425-698-1463
adroker@waterrockglobal.com
 www.waterrockglobal.com
Registered Investment Advisory Firm.
Core Principles. Fluid Investing. Global
Opportunities. Independent.
15912 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98008

Funeral/Burial Services
Hills of Eternity Cemetery
Owned and operated by Temple De Hirsch Sinai
206-323-8486
Serving the greater Seattle Jewish community. Jewish cemetery open to all preneed and at-need services. Affordable
rates Planning assistance.
Queen Anne, Seattle

MARCH 27, 2015

Funeral/Burial Services

Sound
Studio

(continued)

Seattle Jewish Chapel


206-725-3067
seattlejewishchapel@gmail.com
Traditional burial services provided at all
area cemeteries. Burial plots available for
purchase at Bikur Cholim and Machzikay
Hadath cemeteries.

Hospice & Home Health


Kline Galland Hospice & Home Health
206-805-1930
pams@klinegalland.org
 www.klinegalland.org
Kline Galland Hospice & Home Health
provides individualized care to meet the
physical, emotional, spiritual and practical
needs of those dealing with advanced
illness or the need for rehabilitation.
Founded in Jewish values and traditions,
our hospice and home health reflect a spirit
and philosophy of caring that emphasizes
comfort and dignity for our patients, no
matter what stage of life they are in.

Nutrition
NUTRITIONIST
Susan Price Gins, M.A, M.S., C.N.
Citysearch Best Nutritionist in
Seattle 2006
206-795-8892
nourish1@comcast.net
 www.nourish.net
Passionate about helping people make
food choices that enrich their lives.
Seattle, Issaquah

DANI WEISS PHOTOGRAPHY

Senior Services
(continued)

The Summit at First Hill


Retirement Living at its Best!
206-652-4444
 www.summitatfirsthill.org
The only Jewish retirement community
in Washington State. Featuring gourmet
kosher dining, spacious, light-filled
apartments and life-enriching social,
educational and wellness activities.

THANK YOU
FOR ALL YOUR

SERVICE LISTINGS
AND SUPPORT!
THE JEWISH SOUND

MARCH 27, 2015

THE SHOUK @ JEWISH SOUND


Gift
Certific
ate
Availab s
le!

Photographers
Dani Weiss Photography
206-760-3336
 www.daniweissphotography.com
Photographer Specializing in People.
Children, Bnai Mitzvahs, Families,
Parties, Promotions & Weddings.

Senior Services
Jewish Family Service
206-461-3240
 www.jfsseattle.org
Comprehensive geriatric care management and support services for seniors
and their families. Expertise with in-home
assessments, residential placement,
family dynamics and on-going case
management. Jewish knowledge and
sensitivity.

jewishsound.org/calendar

A HOUSECLEANING SERVICE
www.rentayentaseattle.com
LICENSED BONDED INSURED

Seattle

206/325-8902

Eastside

425/454-1512

Heartfelt thanks
to Andy Taylor and
the entire staff at
Sound Publishing
for making The Jewish
Sound look so good
throughout the years.

the life & times of


northwest jewish teens
A JEWISH SOUND SPECIAL SECTION | FRIDAY, march 27, 2015

The power of community service


By Emma Graham

Sam Swire

In BBYO, the unspoken rules of high school do not apply. All are welcome,
and everyone is made to feel important and included. In this environment,
weekly meetings and events become outlets for teens who shy away from raising their hands in class or joining school clubs.
Because individual interests are encouraged in BBYO, members bring
their passions to
the organization.
Students with interests in art, nature,
community service, politics, event
planning, and so
on have incorporated their passions
into BBYO through
chapter or regional
Sam Swire
programs. Teens
J-Serve volunteers at last years event in Portland.
interested in philanthropy create education programs for the Israel Defense Forces and StandWithUs and then hold
fundraisers. Chapters volunteer at local homeless shelters and food banks.
The shift in the organization was not initiated by the international leaders or
corporate staff. Teens throughout the world have led this transition, but it has
been quickly adopted and encouraged by the international leadership. Events
such as J-Serve and Dance Marathon, created by BBYO teens for their respective chapters or regions, have become international movements. The teens who
created J-Serve embraced volunteer service as a rite of passage in Jewish life
and an integral core value. J-Serve has engaged thousands of Jewish teens in
meaningful service opportunities globally since its start in 2005.
Dance Marathon Madness, started by a teen in Connecticut named Zoe, uses

Sunday, March 29
11 a.m.4 p.m. NCSYs Pre-Passover
Car Wash Fundraiser
^^ 206-295-5888 or thehoffather@gmail.
com or www.seattlencsy.com
,, Sephardic Bikur holim, 6500 52nd Ave.
S, Seattle
Get your car cleaned for Passover inside and
out. $20 for a car, $25 for a van or SUV.

s
Grader p.m.
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1

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Hillel
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Monda m JCC & UW
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dance as a mean to raise awareness and funds for Parkinsons research, a cause
near and dear to Zoe and her family. Thanks to Zoes initiative, BBYO chapters
across the country are holding four 24-hour dance marathons to raise awareness
for causes that teens of the particular community feel strongly about.
Evergreen Region BBYO is carrying both of these initiatives out. Along with
teens from other Seattle-area Jewish youth organizations like NFTY, USY, NCSY
and JSU, J-Serve 2015 is shaping up to be a meaningful day of service. Volunteer options include working with Teen Feed to assemble toiletries for homeless
teens, taking part in the Rainier Beach Preservation project with Seattle Tilth,
and visiting the Caroline Kline Galland home for Bingo with the residents. Teens
in 6th through 8th grade will assemble care boxes with games and blankets for
a local childrens hospital.
Finally, as a member of BBYO myself, I invite you to attend our weekly meetings and regional conventions. This organization has allowed me and countless others to not only find myself, but to explore what I am passionate about.
It is an organization that goes beyond being a Jewish youth group. The BBYO
experience allows teens to come into their own.It has been a valuable experience to be able to work with Jewish teens in the area who feel the same way
about the Jewish organization they belong to, and we invite all Jewish teens to
take part in Seattle J-Serve 2015: Choose Your Own Adventure, which is sure
to set the precedent for the impact Jewish teens can make in their communities, now and into the future.

If you go:
J-Serve takes place Sunday, April 26 at 1:30 p.m. at the Stroum Jewish Community
Center, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island. It is open to all Jewish teens grades 6 through
12. Teens can choose the project they wish to take part in by registering online at www.
Jserve.org. Transportation to volunteer sites included.

Emma Graham is a senior at Mercer Island High School and the teen coordinator for J-Serve. She holds the position of Evergreen BBYO regional shlicha
and supervises the J-Serve 2015 planning committee.

We wish
you a
meaningful
Pesach.

4 6 S u m m e r CAMP s

CAMP INFO

2015
Bnai Brith Camp

Nestled on a lakeside campus, Bnai


Brith Camp provides a welcoming and
nurturing camp community based in
Jewish values. Campers expand their creativity, develop their Jewish identities, and
enjoy a summer filled with music, athletics,
art, nature and aquatics. Building friendships for life since 1921!
For more information: 503-452-3443
bbcamp.org

Camp Miriam

Camp Miriam, on beautiful Gabriola


Island, B.C., offers a diverse Jewish camping program for children completing grades
211. Through creative experiences, and in
a supportive community, campers receive a
value-based education and, at the same time,
gain knowledge of Israel, Jewish history,
Hebrew, social justice and the environment.
The program is enhanced with swimming, sports, arts and crafts, drama, camping trips, canoeing, kayaking, Israeli
dancing, and music. A Jewish experience
not to be missed!
For more information: 604-266-2825
www.campmiriam.org

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

Chess4Life

The game of chess has


many benefits, from complex pattern recognition
that helps students excel in
mathematics and science,
to increasing analytical and
decision-making skills that
they will carry forever. Chess4Life brings
the game to life in a fun and exciting environment, through chess and sports camps,
after-school chess clubs, and daily premium center classes.
For more information:
425-283-0549 kids@chess4life.com
www.chess4life.com.

iD Tech Camps iD Programming Academy, and iD Game Design and


Development Academy held at UW
Code, game, create! At iD Tech Camps
held at UW Seattle and Bothell, students
ages 7-17 code apps, design video games,
mod with Minecraft, engineer robots,
build websites, produce movies, and more.
Kids meet new friends and gain a competitive edge for school and future STEM
careers. iD Programming Academy and iD
Game Design and Development Academy
offer two-week, pre-college academies for
teens ages 13-18 held at the University of
Washington in Seattle.
For more information: 1-888-709-8324
www.iDTEch.com/WA

iD Tech Mini

held at Eton School


Kids ages 6-9 will have a blast at iD
Tech Mini, where half-day options let
aspiring innovators discover a love for
tech. Campers make new friends and learn
hands-on STEM skills in a kid-friendly
environment.
For more information: 1-888-709-8324
www.iDTechMini.com

Alexa Caf

All-Girls
Program held at UW Seattle
At Alexa Caf, girls ages 10-15 collaborate around caf tables and learn to
code apps, produce films, design websites, develop wearable electronics, and
more. Discover a passion for technology
in this unique environment that emphasizes leadership, philanthropy, innovation,
and more.
For more information: 1-888-709-8324
www.AlexaCafe.com

JCC Maccabi Sports Camp

Located in Atherton, Calif.


Various sessions June 16July 26
Grades 412
For more information: 415-997-8844
info@maccabisportscamp.org
Maccabisportscamp.org

Mercer Island Parks


& Recreation

camps, sports, Lego, technology, kayaking,


paddle boarding and sailing. Dont miss
Camp Burbank and the Adventure Playground! Fun for everyone!
For more information: 206-275-7609
www.playonmercer.com

The Robinson Center

The Robinson Centers Summer Program provides an intensive, inspirational


and in-depth learning experience for students who are ready to take on the challenge of an intellectual adventure. A rich
variety of math, science, literature, philosophy and writing classes are offered
in small classes by faculty experienced in
their fields.
For more information:
206-543-4160 rcys@uw.edu
www.RobinsonCenter.uw.edu.

URJ Camp Kalsman

What does a summer at URJ Camp


Kalsman look like? Sunshine, swimming,
Tfilah on the lake, Tfilah in the woods,
hiking, climbing, art, sports, Tikkun Olam,
rocking song sessions, goats on walks,
Shabbat shira, friendships, laughter, and a
staff of inspiring Jewish role models. Join
the fun for Summer 2015!
For more information: 425-284-4484
kalsman.urjcamps.org

The Mercer Island Parks & Recreation Department offers a wide variety of
summer camps for ages 3-17! Arts, day

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48

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

OSHER LIFELONG
LEARNING INSTITUTE

UPCOMING CAMPS

at the University of Washington

APRIL 6TH-10TH & APRIL 13TH-17TH | JUNE - AUGUST 2015


Register now for spring courses oered
at the Mercer Island Community and
Event Center:

CHESS PLUS PARTNERS

> CRITICAL PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS


AND WHY THEY MATTER

ANIMATION
BADMINTON
CODING
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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

world news

49

WWreal Netanyahu Page 18

see a chaotic situation in the region.


Then theres the matter of Netanyahus 11th-hour appeal to supporters to
counter the Arab vote. Some defenders of the prime minister have downplayed it as campaign politics, noting
that Netanyahu tried to soften his tone
right after his election win, saying he
would bring security and social welfare
to all citizens of Israel, Jews and nonJews alike.
Theres a lot of room between the
polar opposite views of Netanyahu,
and many Israelis occupy that space.
Thats key to understanding the election results.
Netanyahu wasnt the overwhelming favorite in Israel. His party captured
only one-quarter of all votes. Even the
right wing as a whole did not capture
the majority of the Knesset (44 seats
went to the nationalist parties Likud,
Jewish Home and Yisrael Beiteinu
and another 15 to the haredi Orthodox
parties).
But Netanyahu was the beneficiary
of several factors. Plenty of Israelis who
dont like him or his leadership style still
agree with the fundamentals of his positions on Palestinian statehood, Iran and
the threat of radical Islam.
Netanyahus chief rival, Isaac Herzog

of Labor running under the Zionist


Union banner, lacked the security credentials that helped elect the only other
two Labor Party prime ministers since
1977 Yitzhak Rabin and Ehud Barak,
both former Israeli Defense Forces
chiefs of staff.
While kitchen table issues are increasingly important for Israeli voters the
two parties focused most intensely on
these, Yesh Atid and Kulanu, won a total
of 21 Knesset seats the results overall
suggest that ideology and security concerns still remain paramount for most
Israelis at the ballot box.
And with the ascendance of radical
Islamists in the Arab world, rising antiSemitism in Europe, deep unease about
the emerging nuclear deal with Iran, and
a growing sense of diplomatic isolation
in Israel, the right-wing parties and
Likud in particular were able to capitalize on Israeli fears.
Whether Netanyahus premiership
will be seen as having improved Israels
security or imperiled it may ultimately
depend on how history unfolds and
your view of Netanyahu.
Whats clear is that with Israel facing
threats on multiple fronts, including
myriad domestic challenges and a crisis
in relations with the U.S. president,
Netanyahu has his work cut out for him.

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T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

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f r i d a y , m a r c h 27 , 2 015 n www.jewishsound.org n T h e J e w i sh So un d

lifecycles

51

lifecycles
Bat Mitzvah

Bat Mitzvah

Gabrielle Lynn Kadish

Lauren Rachel Harris

Gabrielle will celebrate her Bat


Mitzvah on March 28, 2015 at Temple
De Hirsch Sinai in Bellevue.
Gabrielle is the daughter of Deb and
Marc Kadish of Issaquah and the sister
of Elana. Her grandparents are Judy
and Norm Rosenbloom of Portland,
Ore., and Susi and Ira Kadish of
Seattle.
Gabrielle is a 7th grader at the
Jewish Day School. She enjoys
hanging out with friends and cousins,
playing with her dog, traveling, and
anything crafty. For her mitzvah
project, she is raising money through
HelpHOPELive for medical expenses for
her cousin Ethan, who was struck by
lightning and suffered a brain injury.

Lauren will celebrate her Bat


Mitzvah on March 28, 2015 at
Temple Beth Am in Seattle.
Lauren is the daughter of Jess
and Judi Harris of Kirkland and the
sister of Aliza. Her grandparents are
Don and Alice Schindel of Highland
Park, Ill., Joyce Harris of Atlanta,
Ga., and the late Henry Harris.
Lauren is a 7th grader at Kirkland
Middle School. She enjoys reading,
music, and hanging out with friends.
For her mitzvah project, Lauren is
volunteering with Hopelink, Food
Lifeline, and Teen Feed.

Bat Mitzvah

Bat Mitzvah

Sophia Mariel Lazarus


Sophie will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah onApril 18, 2015, at
Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative
Congregation.
Sophie is the daughter of Patty and
Jonathan Lazarus, and the sister of
Jake and Micah Lazarus.
Her grandparents are Joseph and
Maryellen Eastern of Woodinville, Earl
Lazarus of Mercer Island, the late
Merielle Eastern, and the late Lucille
Lazarus.
Sophie is in the 7th grade at Seattle
Academy. She plays tennis competitively and volunteers with the
Friendship Circle and Mercy Vet. She
also loves her Labradoodle, Duffy, and
enjoys skiing, snowboarding, wake
boarding, biking, swimming, traveling,
and hanging out with friends and texting. For her mitzvah project, Sophie will donate a portion
of her gifts to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Miriam Bacharach Cory


and Rose Susan Bacharach
Palmieri
Cousins Miriam and Rose will
celebrate their Bat Mitzvah together
June 20, 2015 at Temple Beth Am in
Seattle.
Miriam is the daughter of Julia
Bacharach and Dan Cory of Seattle and
the sister of Ariana. Rose is the
daughter of Debby Bacharach and John
Palmieri of Seattle and the sister of
David. Their grandparents are Mike and
Sheila Cory, Ruth Bacharach, Jere
Bacharach, and Barbara Fudge, all of
Seattle, and Joe and Sue Palmieri of
Oberlin, Ohio.
The girls are in 7th grade at Hamilton
International Middle School and both
love to read. Miriam especially enjoys swimming and math, and Rose enjoys dance and playing
cello. For their mitzvah project, the girls worked with Grandma Sheila to create preemie quilts,
which are given to families with newborns in the NICU.

Birth

Rowan Pocasangre
Rowan was born March 5, 2015 to
Sarah Hartley and David Pocasangre.The joyful grandparents are Tom
and Margaret Hartley of Shoreline,
and Ricardo and Joy Pocasangre of
Bellevue.The delighted cousins are
Ben and Miriam Lucking, Piper
Campbell, and Kalev Campbell.

Dani Weiss Photography

Cameron Levin, left, who created the short film Accidental Activist, stands with the subject of
her film, Cheryl Stumbo. Stumbo, years after suffering injuries from the shooting at the Jewish
Federation of Greater Seattle in 2006, has become a leader in passing responsible gun legislation
in Washington State.

Pay our advertisers a visit.


They appreciate it!

2-for-1
Get Well Soon
Cards
When you let JFS Tribute Cards
do the talking, you send your best
wishes and say you care about
funding vital JFS programs here at
home. Call Irene at (206) 861-3150
or, on the web, click on Donations
at www.jfsseattle.org. Use Visa,
MasterCard or American Express.

52

israel: to your health

T h e J e w i sh So un d n www.jewishsound.org n f r i d a y , m a r c h 2 7, 2 0 1 5

The future of surgery: Robotics


By Janis Siegel, Jewish Sound Correspondent
Robotic flying drones
will soon be delivering your
Amazon.com purchases in
the U.S. and robotic automation has largely taken over
manufacturing assembly lines
across the world, but would
you trust a robotic arm, guided
by your doctor across the room
remotely viewing its surgical
cuts to make incisions into your
abdomen or to go further ISRAEL:
and surgically remove an organ To Your
or a tumor?
Increasingly, patients are depending on
motorized, remotely guided technologies to
help them walk, manage chronic illnesses,
and to benefit from laparoscopic surgery.
Robotically guided laparoscopic surgery
minimizes blood loss, pain, surgical complications and hospitalization time, but a
study led by Dr. Ilana Nisky, a senior lecturer
at Ben-Gurion University of the Negevs
department of Biomedical Robotics Lab and
a new faculty member from Stanford University, found that surgeons cant accurately
determine how the movements of the robotic
arm affect the surgical tools placed inside the
patient during the procedure.
Its called the fulcrum effect.
Nisky wanted to look at the surgeons
ability to perceive touch, pressures on the

patients body, the textures of


the tissue, and the humidity and
temperature of the operating
room environment through the
laparoscopic device, which had
not yet been evaluated.
Because the doctor is located
across the room, viewing and
directing the procedure on a
monitor like on the newest episode of Greys Anatomy, the
wand-like, elongated instruHealth ment with a camera on its end is
inserted through a one- to twoinch incision in the patients abdominal wall
to perform surgical procedures. The instrument is balanced at the point of the incision,
which makes it hard for surgeons to remotely
see and feel it inside the patient.
According to Nisky, the fulcrum effect
lessened the novices perception of tissue
stiffness, and consequently their ability to
operate, Nisky told BGU.
These findings could aid in the development of training techniques for future surgeons and could contribute to improving
surgical outcomes, she said.
The study was published in Surgical
Endoscopy and was funded by the FP7 Marie
Curie International Outgoing Fellowship
and the Weizmann Institute National Postdoctoral Award for Advancing Women in

Science.
To systematically study this effect, we
connected a mechanical simulator a box
with a hole through which a mockup of a
surgical instrument was inserted, to a robotic
system that can apply forces as a function
of its position, said Nisky in The Jerusalem Post. The participants interacted with
virtual tissues and were asked to compare
between pairs of different tissues and say
which felt stiffer. Based on their answers
in different experimental conditions, we
extracted the bias in perception due to the
fulcrum.
Both inexperienced BGU students and
sensory touch experts from its computational motor control laboratory participated
in the study.

Health Maintenance Through Your


Smartphone
For patients who need to manage a
chronic illness or monitor an ongoing set of
symptoms, but dont need to continually be
seen in the doctors office, BGU researchers
who developed MobiGuide are on the cusp
of ongoing innovations in robotic technology.
They developed a smartphone-based,
wearable and portable health-monitoring
device with a voice-activated interface.
Its personalized health care on the go.
MobiGuide provides clinically based recommendations in real-time to help patients
manage their health conditions wherever
they are, in any environment.

The BGU Medical Informatics Research


Center, headed by Prof. Yuval Shahar in its
Medical Informatics laboratory, specializes
in chronic-patient care, intelligent monitoring, and automated analysis of a patients
real-time clinical data.
The MobiGuide also offers the newest
policy-centered medical advice to patients.
The aim of the MobiGuide project is to
develop an intelligent decision-based support system for patients with chronic illnesses, Shahar told BGU. The system
accompanies the patients wherever they go
and helps them and their care providers in
managing their illness, whether they are at
home, at work, out and about, or traveling
abroad on holiday or for business.
A patient can have individualized and
complete health information and personal
health records, which are now increasingly
stored electronically, as well as other physiological and personal information delivered
by a Patient Guidance System, a uniquely
tailored health information base that synthesizes personal patient health data with
individualized self-care techniques.
Using a portable or wearable set of sensors, an intelligent application uploaded to
the patients phone continually retrieves realtime data from a large bank of servers configured to use artificial intelligence related to the
patients unique disease or symptoms.
The program provides ongoing signal
and hospital data, research abstractions, and
medical conclusions generated by a decision
support system.

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