History  Camp  2015  Sessions  
 
See  the  back  page  for  the  wi-­‐fi  password  and  other  logistics,  and  for  important  notes  for  presenters.  

 
 
“Decoding  and  Applying  Common  Core  for  Public  Historians:  Close  Reading  19th  
Century  Sources”  from  Mark  Gardner.    In  this  session,  Western  Rhode  Island  Civic  
Historical  Society  archivist  and  American  History  teacher  Mark  Gardner  
(@HistoryGardner)  will  walk  through  several  hands-­‐on  exercises  designed  to  familiarize  
museum  and  historical  society  volunteers  and  professionals  with  the  vernacular  of  the  
Common  Core,  in  particular,  close  reading,  lenses,  and  response  to  informational  text.    
 
Using  primary  source  materials  not  too  different  than  what  many  public  history  
institutions  already  have  in  great  abundance,  you  will  learn  how  to  “speak  the  language”  
and  better  understand  how  we  can  connect  to  what  high  school  teachers  and  students  
are  doing  in  the  classrooms.    Mark  K.  Gardner  is  the  archivist  at  the  Western  Rhode  
Island  Civic  Historical  Society  (headquartered  at  the  Paine  House  Museum  in  Coventry  
RI)  and  serves  on  the  board  of  directors  at  the  Pettaquamscutt  Historical  Society  in  
Kingston,  RI.    He  also  teaches  US  History  and  AP  US  Government  and  Politics  and  is  state  
co-­‐coordinator  for  Rhode  Island  Model  Legislature.  
 
"Digital  Humanities/Tools  for  Teachers  of  American  History:  Using  Primary  Sources  
(U.S.  History  to  1865,  part  one)"  from  Sara  Hamlen.    Are  you  looking  for  original  history  
texts  and  primary  resources  tools  for  your  classroom  projects?    Come  take  a  virtual  tour  
of  the  Library  of  Congress  website.    We'll  join  Harriet  Tubman  as  our  guide,  to  explore  
"beyond  the  text  book"  resources  at  LOC.gov.    We'll  search  for  prints,  portraits,  
manuscripts,  sound  clips,  scrapbooks,  and  diary  entries  to  encourage  "history-­‐thinking."  
 
"A  History  of  the  Boston  Post  Road—America’s  First  Information  Highway”  from  Henry  
Lukas,  Education  Director  at  the  Spellman  Museum  of  Stamps  &  Postal  History  at  Regis  
College.    Traces  the  history  of  the  delivery  of  mail  from  Boston  to  New  York  and  beyond  
from  early  colonial  days  to  the  present.    Learn  about  early  postmasters,  postal  riders  
and  early  rest  stops,  including  the  Wayside  Inn.    Hear  descriptions  of  traveling  on  the  
Post  Road  by  postal  riders  carrying  letters  and  newspapers  from  Massachusetts  through  
Connecticut  and  to  New  York  and  southward,  and  the  start  of  stage  coach  travel  after  
the  Revolution.    Learn  about  the  setting  of  milestones  by  early  postmaster  Benjamin  
Franklin  and  the  secret  mails  used  during  the  War  of  independence.    Hear  about  the  
expansion  of  the  road  system  in  the  early  1800s  and  its  impact  on  the  post  office.    Gain  
knowledge  about  famous  people  connected  with  the  Post  Road  and  its  importance  in  
the  growth  of  the  country.    
 
 

1  
 

 

“How  Would-­‐Be  Assassin  Samuel  Dyer  Nearly  Triggered  the  Revolutionary  War"  from  
J.  L.  Bell,  proprietor  of  the  Boston  1775  blog.  In  October  1774  an  angry  seaman  named  
Samuel  Dyer  arrived  in  Newport,  describing  how  the  Royal  Navy  had  kidnapped  him  
from  Boston  to  London,  how  high  government  ministers  had  interrogated  him  about  the  
Boston  Tea  Party,  and  how  the  Lord  Mayor  of  London  had  helped  him  to  return  to  
America.    Rhode  Island  Patriots  fêted  Dyer  and  sent  him  back  to  Boston.    Soon  after  
arriving,  Dyer  confronted  two  Royal  Artillery  officers  on  the  street  and  shot  at  them  
before  escaping  to  the  rebellious  Provincial  Congress  in  Cambridge—only  for  those  
Patriots  to  send  him  back  to  the  royal  authorities  and  the  Boston  jail.    This  talk  digs  into  
Dyer's  story:  how  he  came  close  to  setting  off  war  in  Massachusetts,  what  happened  to  
him  next,  and  how  much  of  the  outlandish  story  he  told  was  true.    
 
"In  Defense  of  Material  Culture"  from  Erik  R.  Bauer,  Archivist,  Peabody  Institute  Library,  
Peabody,  MA  (@hipster818  &  @PeaLibArchives).    The  term  “material  culture”  typically  
brings  to  mind  images  of  objects  behind  glass  in  galleries,  archives  and  museums.  
However,  what  defines  material  culture—and  it’s  role—stretches  beyond  these  
boundaries.  This  session  looks  at  ways  to  connect  the  public,  especially  students,  with  
the  wider  world  of  material  culture.  
 
"John  Trumbull's  Portraiture  in  an  Iconic  Historical  Painting  of  the  Revolutionary  Era"  
from  Sam  Forman,  modern  biographer  of  Dr.  Joseph  Warren  and  author  of  the  
upcoming  young  adult  historical  romance  "Twenty-­‐One  Heroes."    Architect  Rick  
Detwiller  has  identified  for  study  whether  the  controversial  patriot  James  Swan  (1751-­‐
1830)  is  depicted  as  the  hitherto  anonymous  protector  of  the  mortally  wounded  Joseph  
Warren  in  the  central  vignette  of  Trumbull’s  precedent-­‐setting  historical  painting  
“Bunker’s  Hill.”    The  resulting  inquiry  provides  a  window  into  Trumbull’s  design,  visual  
storytelling,  and  meticulous  individual  portraiture  of  this  early  and  well-­‐known  image  of  
the  Revolutionary  Era.    Art,  history,  and  biography  come  together  in  this  illustrated  
lecture.  
 
"Living  History:    Historic  House  Museums  and  the  Classroom  Teacher:  The  Age  of  
Medicine  and  Midwifery"  from  Patricia  Violette,  Executive  Director  of  the  Shirley-­‐Eustis  
House.    The  primary  goal  of  any  Living  History  Program  is  to  provide  a  hands-­‐on,  
experiential  learning  environment  that  fulfills  the  need  for  a  creative  approach  to  social  
studies.  Living  history  is  designed  to  stimulate  student  interest  in  learning  about  the  
human  side  of  history  and  involves  not  only  social  studies,  but  English,  mathematics,  
and  science,  as  well  as  the  arts  and  music.  It  is  applicable  at  an  elementary,  secondary,  
and  graduate  level,  but  has  proven  especially  effective  at  the  middle  school  level.      
(continued  on  next  page)  

 

 

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"Living  History:    Historic  House  Museums  and  the  Classroom  Teacher:  The  Age  of  
Medicine  and  Midwifery"    (cont’d.)  
This  session  will  also  focus  on  The  Age  of  Medicine  and  Midwifery  as  an  example  of  
living  history  education.    Session  participants  will  experience  how  a  midwife  develops  
skills  and  abilities  required  to  become  a  midwife.    By  identifying  medicinal  plants  and  
preparing  simple  remedies,  participants  will  be  able  to  understand  how  midwives  were  
an  important  part  of  the  18th-­‐century.    Participants  will  compare  and  contrast  
midwifery  of  the  past  to  midwifery  today  by  engaging  in  hands-­‐on  activities  and  making  
connections  to  the  growth  of  technology.    These  guided  activities  will  help  them  to  
better  understand  how  living  history  can  bring  together  the  new  and  traditional,  social  
and  educational  practices  and  how  to  relate  personal  skills,  aptitudes,  and  abilities  to  
future  career  decisions  especially  when  related  to  the  role  of  women.    (20  people  or  
fewer)  
 
"Making  History  Comics"  from  Jason  Rodriguez,  editor  of  the  Colonial  Comics  series,  
with  assistant  editor  J.  L.  Bell.    For  over  a  century,  artists  and  storytellers  have  been  
taking  stories  that  existed  in  their  heads  and  placing  them  into  a  series  of  panels  to  
make  comic  strips  and  books.    In  this  workshop,  comic  book  writer  and  editor  Jason  
Rodriguez  will  show  you  how  to  craft  your  own  history  comic  books,  starting  with  an  
idea  and  people  that  exist  in  some  continuous  space,  and  moving  them  into  a  series  of  
moments  that  tell  an  exciting  and  engaging  story.    The  workshop  will  cover  the  process  
of  making  a  comic  book—from  an  idea  to  a  story  and  even  to  the  printing,  folding,  and  
stapling—in  order  to  encourage  folks  to  bring  history  into  four-­‐color  (or  grayscale)  life.  
 
"Our  Forebears  &  Massachusetts  in  the  Civil  War"  from  Bob  Schecter.    This  
presentation,  with  extensive  slides,  is  based  on  Bob’s  recently  published  book,  which  is  
not  for  sale.    It  consists  of  brief  profiles  of  men  who  served  as  Union  Army  and  Navy  
officers  in  the  Civil  War.    The  majority  of  officers  profiled  (and  pictured)  are  ancestors  of  
members  of  the  Massachusetts  Commandery  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion  
of  the  United  States  (MOLLUS).    Prominent  officers  from  Massachusetts  who  are  not  
ancestors  of  MOLLUS  members  are  also  profiled  and  pictured,  as  are  Massachusetts  
citizens  who  played  prominent  roles  on  the  home  front  (e.g.,  Julia  Ward  Howe,  William  
Lloyd  Garrison,  Frederick  Douglas,  and  more).    Each  of  the  persons  profiled  has  a  story  
worth  recounting.  
 
 

3  
 

 
"Prince  Demah,  Portrait  Painter"  from  Paula  Bagger,  director  of  the  Hingham  Historical  
Society.    Two  18th  century  portraits  that  have  been  on  display  since  the  1920s  in  the  
Hingham  Historical  Society's  house  museum,  the  Old  Ordinary,  have  now  been  
attributed  to  an  enslaved  African  American  artist.    Prince  Demah's  short  life  was  
eventful  and  included  painting  lessons  in  London,  a  brief  commercial  career  in  Boston,  
and  service  in  an  artillery  regiment  during  the  Revolution.    The  one  other  known  
painting  by  Prince  is  now  in  New  York's  Metropolitan  Museum  of  Art.    It  was  found  in  a  
family  collection  in  Worcester  County,  and  we  know  that  Prince  made  other  portraits,  
both  as  a  copyist  and  painting  from  life.    Our  area's  small  museums  and  historical  
societies  are  the  logical  place  to  look  for  more  of  his  works.  
 
"Pushing  the  Envelope:  A  Brief  History  of  the  U.S.  Postal  System  by  Viewing  Postage  
Stamps"  from  Henry  Lukas,  Education  Director  at  the  Spellman  Museum  of  Stamps  &  
Postal  History  at  Regis  College.    This  session  is  for  both  stamp  collectors  and  non-­‐
collectors.    Learn  about  the  history  of  the  U.S.  postal  system  from  colonial  times  to  the  
present  by  viewing  stamps  issued  over  the  years,  starting  in  1847.  Hear  about  the  many  
ways  mail  has  been  delivered,  including  using  the  Boston  Post  Road  (America’s  First  
Information  Highway),  the  Santa  Fe  Trail,  and  the  Pony  Express.    Discover  how  mail  was  
carried  by  trains,  planes,  ships,  catapults,  rockets,  and  even  camels.      
 
Also  learn  about  unusual  items  transported  by  the  Postal  Service  over  the  years,  
including  eggs,  baby  chicks,  bees,  pumpkins,  war  helmets,  the  Hope  Diamond,  bricks  
that  were  used  to  build  a  bank,  and    even  a  little  girl  who  mailed  herself  to  her  
grandmother  in  Idaho.  View  the  stamp  that  helped  start  a  war  and  another  that  helped  
build  the  Panama  Canal.    Find  out  the  most  popular  stamps  ever  issued  as  well  famous  
people  on  stamps  who  have  been  Postal  workers,  including  Abraham  Lincoln  and  Walt  
Disney,  plus  famous  stamp  collectors,  including  King  George  V  and  President  FDR.  Get  a  
preview  of  all  the  latest  U.S.  stamps  and  some  million  dollar  stamp  sales.        
 
"Researching  the  Old  Homesteads  of  Marlborough"  from  Chandra  Lothian,  
Marlborough  Historical  Society  Trustee.      There  were  124  paintings  of  local  homesteads  
and  landscapes  done  by  noted  artist  Ellen  M.  Carpenter  over  the  period  1875-­‐
1908.    These  paintings  appear  in  the  book,  "Historical  Reminiscences  of  the  Early  Times  
in  Marlborough,  Massachusetts,"  by  Ella  Bigelow,  published  in  1910.  Today  the  paintings  
are  easy  to  find:  They're  on  display  at  the  Marlborough  Library,  but  what  about  the  
houses?    Are  they  still  standing?    What  became  of  them?    In  this  session  Chandra  will  
discuss  her  multi-­‐year  project  to  find  all  of  them  and  create  a  site  history  for  each,  with  
photographs  taken  from  the  same  angle  and  location  as  the  original  paintings.    She  will  l  
describe  the  resources  used  for  researching  old  houses  and  sites  and  show  the  result,  
with  "Then  and  Now"  photographs.      
 

4  
 

 
"Risky  Business:  Living  History  Events  in  Traditional  Museums"  from  Elizabeth  Sulock,  
Manager  of  Public  Outreach  and  Living  History  at  the  Newport  Historical  Society,  
and  Kirsten  Hammerstrom,  Director  of  Collections  at  the  Rhode  Island  Historical  
Society.    Despite  being  known  for  traditional  educational  programming  like  lectures,  
walking  and  house  tours,  and  exhibitions,  these  two  organizations  recently  collaborated  
to  present  successful  site-­‐specific,  first-­‐person  immersive  living  history  programs.    The  
Newport  Historical  Society  (NHS)  used  the  city  itself  as  the  backdrop  and  setting  for  the  
Stamp  Act  Protest  commemorating  the  1765  Stamp  Act  riots  in  that  town.    In  
Providence,  the  Rhode  Island  Historical  Society  (RIHS)  presented  its  third  annual  What  
Cheer  Day  with  costumed  interpreters  occupying  the  John  Brown  House  Museum  as  
Brown  family  members  and  servants,  bringing  to  life  a  Saturday  in  1800.    We'll  walk  
through  the  preparation  for  these  programs,  the  risks  and  rewards,  and  what  was  
learned  along  the  way.    There  will  also  be  a  discussion  of  other  initiatives  and  ways  
others  may  wish  to  present  living  history  programs  in  traditional  museum  settings.  
 
"Roman  Legionary"  from  Andy  Volpe:  Art  &  History.    Discusses  the  ancient  Roman  
Legionary  soldier,  including  a  brief  history  of  the  evolution  of  the  soldier,  aspects  of  his  
daily  life,  and  details  on  his  arms  and  armor  utilizing  replicas  of  archaeological  
artifacts.    Andy  has  presented  on  the  Romans  since  2002  through  the  former  Higgins  
Armory  Museum,  which  closed  in  2013  and  whose  arms  and  armor  collection  and  
programs  moved  to  Worcester  Art  Museum.  
 
“The  Salem  Witch  Trials:  The  Accused,  Their  Accusers,  and  the  American  
Experience"  Salem  witch  trials  experts  Marilynne  Roach  and  Emerson  “Tad”  Baker  
discuss  their  recent  books,  as  well  as  America’s  on-­‐going  fascination  with  Salem  and  
witchcraft.  Roach,  who  appeared  on  the  Daily  Show  in  January  2014  is  most  recently  the  
author  of  Six  Women  of  Salem:  the  Untold  Story  of  the  Accused  and  Their  Accusers  in  the  
Salem  Witch  Trials.  Baker,  a  history  professor  at  Salem  State  University,  is  the  author  
of  A  Storm  of  Witchcraft:  The  Salem  Trials  and  the  American  Experience.    
 
"Saving  the  Reality:  A  Local  Museum's  Mission  to  Preserve  One  of  the  World's  Most  
Significant  WWII  Collections"  from  Travis  Roland,  Assistant  Curator  of  the  Museum  of  
World  War  Two  in  Natick.    Considered  by  many  to  house  the  most  comprehensive  
collection  of  WW  II  artifacts  and  documents  in  the  world,  the  museum  is  home  to  over  
8,000  original  artifacts,  from  personal  items  of  famous  world  leaders,  to  once  Top  Secret  
Invasion  Plans  of  Normandy  and  Iwo  Jima,  to  treaties  that  literally  changed  the  course  of  
history  and  the  world.    Includes  a  virtual  journey  of  the  museum  and  discussion  of  ts  
mission  of  making  sure  that  the  sacrifices  of  those  who  came  before  and  are  rapidly  
dwindling  from  this  earth  are  not  forgotten.    We'll  find  out  why  famous  actor  Tom  
Hanks  calls  the  collection,  “The  Holy  Grail  of  World  War  Two  artifacts,”  and  how  it  
appeals  to  people  from  all  walks  of  life.    

5  
 

 
“The  1775  Dysentery  Epidemic,  Looking  at  the  Little  Picture”  from  Judy  
Cataldo.    Overlooked  even  by  town  histories,  the  1775  dysentery  epidemic  impacted  
many  families.      And  although  the  epidemic  didn’t  change  the  outcome  of  the  war,  this  
talk  will  examine  how  it  changed  the  lives  of  many  who  fought  in  it.      
 
"Soldiers  in  Our  Homes:  The  French  and  Indian  War  &  Quartering  in  Albany,  New  York,  
1756-­‐1763"  from  Elizabeth  M.  Covart,  Ph.D.,  Independent  Scholar,  
(@lizcovart).    Explores  how  the  French  and  Indian  War  and  the  act  of  military  quartering  
caused  the  people  of  Albany,  New  York  to  confront  the  British  Empire  in  close,  intimate  
terms.  This  talk  will  reveal  the  lasting  implications  of  this  confrontation  and  how  it  
helped  the  people  of  Albany  decide  whether  they  would  become  Patriots,  Loyalists,  or  
remain  neutral  during  the  American  War  for  Independence.  
 
“The  Swastika,  the  Spy,  and  the  Black  Sun:  One  Historian's  Quest  into  the  Murky  
Depths  of  Post-­‐WWII  Fascism,”  from  Sam  Clark,  PhD.  student  and  Crown  Fellow  at  
Brandeis  University.    In  1960,  a  man  lay  dead  in  his  San  Francisco  jail  cell  after  having  
evidently  taken  his  own  life  with  a  cyanide  capsule.    Days  before,  the  FBI  had  arrested  
this  strange  character  after  airport  security  discovered  that  his  luggage  was  full  of  
multiple  passports,  each  with  a  different  alias  and  country  of  origin.      
This  session  seeks  to  answer  pressing  questions,  including,  Who  was  this  man  and  
where  did  he  come  from?    And  why  should  historians  care?    At  the  time,  authorities  did  
not  know  that  this  man  was  at  the  epicenter  of  post-­‐WWII  fascism,  an  ideology  whose  
followers  were  thought  to  have  been  wiped  out  with  the  defeat  of  the  Axis  
powers.    However,  the  history  of  post-­‐WWII  fascism  reveals  the  growth  of  an  
international  web  of  organizations  that  has  influenced  the  20th  century,  right  up  
through  the  present  day.  Although  extreme-­‐right  movements  tend  to  exist  on  the  
fringes  of  global  society,  this  presentation  shows  that  they  should  not  be  ignored.  
 
"This  Side  of  Paradise:  The  Tragedy  and  Triumph  of  a  Small  Town  in  
MetroWest"  from  Peter  Golden.    From  its  primordial  origins  as  a  Native  American  
fishing  camp  to  the  present,  Natick,  Massachusetts  has  experienced  a  series  
of  astonishing  events  and  extraordinary  transformations.    This  session  will  explore  the  
genesis  of  this  unique  community  and  the  lessons  it  has  for  all.  
 
"Were  the  Early  Suffragists  Racist?  A  Look  Into  The  Early  Movement  Prior  to  The  
Emancipation  Proclamation"  from  Colleen  Janz,  Executive  Director,  Susan  B  Anthony  
Birthplace  Museum.    This  session  will  review  the  movement  and  the  role  race  played  in  
the  political  posturing  during  this  crucial  time  of  women's  history  by  examining  various  
figures,  quotes  and  events.  
 
 
 

6  
 

 

Roundtables  
 
"Ideas  for  Programming,  Outreach,  and  Operations  of  Smaller  History  Organizations:  
What  Worked,  What  Didn't,  and  What  We  Learned  From  It"—  All  are  invited  to    
participate  and  share  specific  initiatives  or  programs  and  what  they  learned  from  them  
that  others  can  take  away  and  apply  to  their  site  or  organization.    With  Annie  Murphy,  
executive  director  of  the  Framingham  History  Center  and  others.  
 
"Maybe  We  Should  Stop  Calling  it  'History:'  A  Roundtable  Discussion  on  Making  
History  Relevant  for  Today"  with  Neil  Licht.    All  are  invited  to  participate.    Today,  many  
are  baffled  by  the  chaotic  state  of  our  world.  Long-­‐trusted  roadmaps  and  moral  beliefs  
that  we  were  once  taught  were  the  path  to  the  good  life,  no  longer  seem  to  apply.  
Young  and  old,  we’re  worried  about  our  future  and  the  future  of  our  children  and  
grandchildren.      
 
Those  of  us  who  have  a  passion  for  history  know  that  understanding  history  can  help  us  
understand  our  world  and,  with  that  knowledge,  we  can  shape  our  future.    But  to  many,  
history  is  boring.    It’s  about  the  past,  just  names  and  dates  to  be  studied  for  a  test  in  
school  and  then  forgotten.    This  roundtable  will  give  us  a  forum  to  discuss  and  
brainstorm  ways  to  help  others  see  that  history  is  in  fact  relevant,  and  that  studying  
history  can  help  one  make  sense  of  the  world  and  understand  the  impact  of  the  
decisions  that  individuals,  communities,  and  countries  make.      
 
 
Panels  
 
"Don't  let  History  Get  STEAMrolled:  Practical  Approaches  to  Getting  Kids  Engaged  
with  History”  Panelists  include  Patricia  Violette,  Executive  Director  of  the  Shirley-­‐Eustis  
House;  Paul  Wexler,  a  history  teacher  at  Needham  High  School  who  has  been  using  
National  History  Day  as  a  way  to  engage  students;  Kyle  Jenks,  who  wrote,  produced  and  
directed  a  play  about  Colonial  history  in  the  Mohawk  Valley  of  upstate  NY  for  middle  
school  children;  Rayshauna  Gray,  a  Cambridge-­‐based  blogger  from  Chicago  and  
volunteer  with  Boston's  Museum  of  African  American  History;  Jason  Rodriguez,  writer  
and  editor,  and  creator  of  "Colonial  Comics."  Moderator:  Lee  Wright,  The  History  List.  
 
"Sharing  Your  Passion  for  History:  Blogs,  Podcasts,  Books,  and  More"—  The  goal  of  this  
panel  is  to  inspire  others  to  share  their  passion  for  history  using  traditional  and  new  
media,  including  blogs,  podcasts,  and  digital  apps.    Panelists  include  Liz  Covart  
(@lizcovart),  Early  American  Historian,  Blogger,  and  Host  of  "Ben  Franklin's  World:  A  
Podcast  About  Early  American  History”  and  others.      Come  participate  on  the  panel  or  
listen,  ask  questions,  and  learn  from  others.  

7  
 

 
 

Logistics  



 

The  wi-­‐fi  is  “USES  566”  and  the  password  is  “HarrietTubman”  
We’re  using  #HistoryCamp  on  Twitter  and  elsewhere.    Please  Tweet  and  post  to  
Facebook  and  elsewhere.    
The  restrooms  on  the  first  floor  require  the  key  at  the  front  desk;  restrooms  on  
the  other  floors  do  not.  
If  you  find  that  you’re  in  the  wrong  presentation,  quietly  step  out  and  find  
another.    There  are  so  many  good  sessions,  there’s  no  reason  to  sit  through  one  
that  isn’t  interesting.    
After  History  Camp,  check  HistoryCamp.org  for  presentations.    We’ll  embed  the  
ones  that  are  posted  on  Slideshare.net  that  are  tagged  historycamp2015.  

 

If  you’re  speaking  .  .  .  

 
 
 

Check  out  your  room  during  registration,  and  if  you’re  using  the  projector,  try  
out  the  set  up  with  your  laptop.    There  isn’t  an  A/V  person  to  go  around  and  
help,  and  the  time  between  sessions  will  be  tight.  
When  you  present,  end  your  session  (presentation  and  Q&A)  with  at  least  5  
minutes  to  go  so  that  the  next  speaker  can  set  up.    If  you  figured  out  how  to  use  
the  projector,  you  might  stay  long  enough  to  help  them,  if  they  need  it.    
Please  upload  your  presentation  to  SlideShare  (slideshare.net)  and  use  the  tags  
“historycamp”  and  “historycamp2015”  to  help  others  find  your  presentation.    
We’ll  search  for  those  tags  and  embed  presentations  in  HistoryCamp.org  so  that  
others  can  find  them.    You  can  also  embed  your  Slideshare  presentation  in  your  
LinkedIn  profile  and  Tweet  out  a  link  to  your  presentation.  

Thanks  to  .  .  .  





You,  for  helping  create  History  Camp  2015  today,  and  to  those  who  contributed  
financially  to  cover  the  costs,  those  who  presented,  everyone  who  helped  get  
the  word  out  in  advance,  and  all  who  helped  throughout  the  day.  
The  staff  at  United  South  End  Settlements  for  providing  a  home  for  History  Camp  
this  year.  
Michelle  Novak  (mnd.nyc),  for  the  cool  History  Camp  logo.  
David  Alderman  (www.davidalderman.weebly.com),  for  this  year’s  great  t-­‐shirt  
design.  
Jacob  Sconyers,  for  the  helpful  new  HistoryCamp.org  site.  
Katherine  Wright,  for  helping  “cater”  History  Camp  today.  

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