The Land of the

Storyweavers
Written by:

Shruthi H. S.

Illustrated by:


Sugrib Kumar Juanga,
Sanatan Juanga, Ramani Ranjan Sarangi,
Sanatan Juanga, Pradip Kumar Sahoo,
Sugrib Kumar Juanga

Original Story in Juanga ‘Doong Doong, Dum Dum’ — Written by Kui Writers’ Group
Original Story in Munda ‘Daàà Jang’ — Written by Munda Writers’ Group
Original Story in Kui ‘Bati, Kakkati, Nisiti enga Sajinji’ — Written by Kui Writers’ Group
Original Story in Munda ‘Hathiko’a Susun’ — Written by Munda Writers’ Group
Original Story in Kui ‘Muddu Krika Lamba’ — Written by Kui Writers’ Group
Original Story in Saura ‘Panderan da Kulu’ — Written by Saura Writers’ Group
Original Story in Kui ‘Kale enga Dekali’ — Written by Kui Writers’ Group
Remixed Story: ‘The Land of the Storyweavers’ by Shruthi H. S.
Illustrations: Sanatan Juanga (Page 2, Page 3 and Page 4) from Doong Doong, Dum Dum
Ramani Ranjan Sarangi (Page 5, Page 6 and Page 8) from The Water Seed
Sugrib Kumar Juanga (Page 7) from Asila...Basila...Uthila...Jaucha
Sugrib Kumar Juanga (Page 9 and Page 12) from The Elephants Who Liked to Dance
Sanatan Juanga (Page 10) from The Rabbit’s Long Ears
Sugrib Kumar Juanga (Page 11) from The Fox and the Lump of Clay
Original publication by Pratham Books
Registered Office:
Pratham Books
# 621, 2nd Floor, 5th Main, OMBR Layout,
Banaswadi, Bengaluru - 560 043
T: +91 80 42052574 / 41159009
Typesetting and Layout by: Pratham Books, Bangalore

Some rights reserved. This book is CC-BY 4.0 licensed. Which means
you can download this book, remix illustrations and even make a new
story - all for free! To know more about this and the full terms of
use and attribution visit http://prathambooks.org/cc.

The Land of the
Storyweavers
Written by:

Shruthi H. S.

Illustrated by:


Sugrib Kumar Juanga,
Sanatan Juanga, Ramani Ranjan Sarangi,
Sanatan Juanga, Pradip Kumar Sahoo,
Sugrib Kumar Juanga

This story was remixed as a part of the
‘Retell, Remix and Rejoice Contest’ conducted by Pratham Books

There was once a village by the name Shikaripura where people worked hard and lived in
peace and harmony. They grew crops, looked after their animals and always had work to do.
But they were somehow dissatisfied with their lives.
2

One day when the children were playing in the street, Surya who was tending to his plants,
heard a strange voice saying something loudly.

3

He quickly ran to his friends to check if they had heard the strange voice. They too had
heard it.

4

Word spread quickly and soon all the villagers ran in the direction of the voice.
To their surprise, they saw a man reading a story out loud from a colourful story book. He
had a bag full of books in front of him. The villagers who had never heard a story before,
listened to him in wonder.
5

The people of the village were so thrilled with this unexpected guest and his stories that they
followed him around everywhere he went; he with his bag full of lovely books and they with
wondering faces and minds.
6

The people loved the stories very much. They wanted to make up their own story.
In a short while, the people of Shikaripura were weaving stories. Each was telling his/her
neighbour a story.
7

Simple stories, small stories, long stories, complex stories, “My story next!”, “Listen to my
story!” and “Once upon a time..” were all you could hear at work and play. Their imagination
came alive and spun wild stories.
8

They had a celebration in order to honour the storyteller who had brought colour to their
lives. The people of Shikaripura danced and sang and narrated more stories. The animals
too heard the stories and were surprised and pleased at the same time.
9

They loved this new idea of storytelling! In no time, they too became storyweavers. Chatter
chatter, moo moo, caw caw, bow-wow, chirp chirp, roar roar was all that could be heard from
the animal kingdom.
The jackal forgot to eat the rabbit and instead told him a story.
10

The boulder who had nothing to do and nowhere to go, listened with rapt attention
to the jackal’s story.

11

The denizens of Shikaripura were now very happy. They realised that the magic of stories
was what was needed to add colour and vigour to their lives.

12

They were grateful to the stranger who had touched their village with a magic wand. They
have decided to welcome him the next time he comes to their village with a happy, funny
story!

Shruthi H.S loves music, books, talking and
playing with children. She works with Pratham
Books and this is her first book.

All the illustrations used in this book are the work of
illustrators from Odisha. They have tried to replicate the
beautiful and traditional illustrations of tribal mural styles
of communities like Juanga, Saura, Kui and Munda.

A fairy has touched the land of Shikaripura with her
magic wand. What is in store for its people? Do they
like the gift?

www.prathambooks.org
The Land of the Storyweavers
(English)

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