STARTING A WORD DOCUMENT

You can start an Office application using the Start menu. Once the program starts, a brief copyright screen appears and then the application window opens.

When an Office application starts, a window opens similar to the one in the diagram below, which shows the window in Word. The title bar, which appears at the top of the application window, displays the name of the current document and the name of the application. Under the title bar is the menu bar, which allows you to access various commands that are grouped according to function. Below the menu bar is a row containing two separate toolbars and the horizontal ruler (if displayed). The toolbar buttons provide shortcuts to many menu commands. A new, blank document appears in the document area. The status bar appears at the bottom of the application window and provides information such as the current location of the insertion point and the number of pages in the document. The scroll bars appear below and to the right in the document window. They (both horizontal and vertical) allow you to quickly move around in the window. The horizontal scroll bar contains the View buttons, which are shortcuts for changing the document view.

SAVING A NEW DOCUMENT
After creating a new file, you can save it to disk so that you can retrieve it at another time. When you save a file for the first time in Word, PowerPoint, or Excel, the Save As dialog box opens. In it, you enter the desired file name and location. A file name can consist of up to 255 characters; however, you should give the document a short, descriptive name. Word automatically assigns the .doc extension when you are saving a file. An Excel file is given the extension .xls, and PowerPoint adds .ppt as an extension to all files created in it.

If you want to save the document in a different drive or folder, you can use the Save in list to select the desired location. The folders and files residing in the selected location appear in the list box below the Save in box. The Places Bar on the left side of the dialog box contains shortcuts to various folders and can be used to quickly select a folder. Once a file has been saved, its name appears in the application title bar. Subsequent saves do not display the Save As dialog box. Instead, the Office application updates the changes to the existing file each time you save.

PAGE SETUP
To change the paper size for part of a document, select the pages and then change the paper size as usual. In the Apply to box, click selected text. Microsoft Word automatically inserts section breaks before and after the pages with the new paper size. If your document is already divided into sections, you can click in a section or select multiple sections, and then change the paper size.

To change the default margins, click Default after you select new margin settings. The new default settings are saved in the template on which the document is based. Each new document based on that template automatically uses the new margin settings. The feature or some of the options described in this Help topic are only available if support for right-to-left languages is enabled through Microsoft Office Language Settings.

1. On the File menu, click Page Setup, and then click the Layout tab. 2. In the Section start box, select where you want the section to begin. 3. In the Section direction box, click the appropriate direction, Right-to-left or Left-to-right.

INSERTING A CLIP ART
You can include pictures in an Office file by inserting graphic images. A picture can enhance a document by depicting an idea that may be difficult to describe or by making the document more visually appealing.

One method of adding pictures to a document is to use the Clip Gallery, which contains numerous graphics called clip art. Clip art images are a way to add interest to a document. For example, you might insert clip art into a company newsletter to illustrate a story. You insert clip art using the Insert ClipArt dialog box. You can open the Insert ClipArt dialog box by selecting the Insert menu, pointing to the Picture command, and then selecting the Clip Art command

1. On the Insert menu, point to Picture, and then click Clip Art. 2. In the Clip Art task pane, in the Search for box, type a word or phrase that describes the clip you
3. want or type in all or some of the file name of the clip. To narrow your search, do one or both of the following: a. To limit search results to a specific collection of clips, in the Search in box, click the arrow and select the collections you want to search. b. To limit search results to a specific type of media file, in the Results should be box, click the arrow and select the check box next to the types of clips you want to find. Click Go.

4.

Available clip art is divided into several thematic categories such as Animals, Cartoons, People at Work, and Sports & Leisure. You can also choose to preview a clip art image to verify that the selection is what you had in mind. If you are not sure what you are looking for, you can search for an image based on keywords. Keywords related to the selected clip art image appear as a ScreenTip when you point to the clip art image.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual Office file, please click on the link and move between the Office file and Web windows until you are satisfied you have mastered the skill. (If a dialog box appears while you are trying to open the exercise, click Open It.)

1. On the Insert menu, point to Picture, and then click Clip Art. 2. In the Clip Art task pane, in the Search for box, type a word or phrase that describes the clip you
3. want or type in all or some of the file name of the clip. To narrow your search, do one or both of the following:

• •

To limit search results to a specific collection of clips, in the Search in box, click the arrow and select the collections you want to search. To limit search results to a specific type of media file, in the Results should be box, click the arrow and select the check box next to the types of clips you want to find.

4. Click Search.

CREATING WORDART OBJECTS

You can use WordArt to create a graphic text object. Such text can be used for company logos, text advertisements, and newsletters. WordArt is an application that can run only within a companion program (such as Word); it cannot run independently. As a result, WordArt cannot create its own files. Each object created in WordArt becomes a part of the Office file in which it is embedded.

To create a WordArt text object, you start WordArt, select a WordArt style and then type and format the WordArt text. Once a WordArt object is embedded in a document, you must open WordArt to make changes to the text and formatting. You can use tools available on the WordArt toolbar to format the WordArt object or make changes to the WordArt text.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual Office file, please click on the link and move between the Office file and Web windows until you are satisfied you have mastered the

skill. (If a dialog box appears while you are trying to open the exercise, click Open It.

CREATE A TABLE
Microsoft Word offers a number of ways to make a best way depends on how you like to work, and on how simple or complex the table needs to be. 1. Click where you want to create a table. want. Use this procedure to make choices about the table dimensions and format before the table is inserted into a document. 1. Click where you want to create a table. On the Table menu, point to Insert, and then click Table. Under Table size, select the number of columns and rows. Under AutoFit behavior, choose options to adjust table size. To use a built-in table format, click AutoFormat. Click where you want to create the table.

2. Click Insert Table on the Standard Toolbar Drag to select the number of rows and columns you

2. 3. 4. 5.
1.

2. On the Table menu, click Draw Table.

HEADER & FOOTER
Headers and footers are areas in the top and of each page in a document. You can insert text or graphics in headers and footers— for example, page numbers, the date, a company logo, the document's title or file name, or the author's name— that are printed at the top or bottom of each page in a document.

1. You can work in the header and footer areas by clicking Header and Footer on the View menu. On
2.

3. 4. 5.

the View menu, click Header and Footer to open the header or footer area on a page. To create a header, enter text or graphics in the header area. To create footer, click Switch between Header and Footer on the Header and Footer toolbar to move to the footer area, and then enter text or graphics. If necessary, format text by using buttons on the Formatting toolbar. When you finish, click Close on the Header and Footer toolbar

SPELLING AND GRAMMAR CHECK
Word will automatically check for spelling and grammar errors as you type unless you turn this feature off. Spelling errors are noted in the document with a red underline. Grammar errors are indicated by a green underline. To disable this feature, select Tools Options from the menu bar and click the Spelling and Grammar tab on the dialog box. Uncheck "Check spelling as you type" and "Check grammar as you type", and click OK. To use the spelling and grammar checker, follow these steps:

1. Select Tools Spelling and Grammar from the menu bar. 2. The Spelling and Grammar dialog box will notify you of the first mistake in the document and
misspelled words will be highlighted in red.

3. If the word is spelled correctly, click the Ignore button or click the Ignore All button if the word
appears more than once in the document.

4. If the word is spelled incorrectly, choose one of the suggested spellings in the Suggestions box and
click the Change button or Change All button to correct all occurrences of the word in the document. If the correct spelling is not suggested, enter the correct spelling in the Not in Dictionary box and click the Change button. If the word is spelled correctly and will appear in many documents you type (such as your name), click the Add button to add the word to the dictionary so it will no longer appear as a misspelled word.

5.

MAIL MERGE
If you need to stop working on a mail merge, you can save the main document and resume the merge later. Microsoft Word retains the data source and field information, and keeps your place in the Mail Merge task pane.

1. On the File menu, click Save As and then name and save your document as usual.

2.

3.
4.

When you're ready to resume the merge, open the document. The text of the document, along with any fields you inserted, appears. On the Tools menu, point to Letters and Mailings, and then click Mail Merge. Word displays the Mail Merge task pane, opened to the step where you left off. Continue the merge as usual.

USING MAIL MERGE
1. Set up a data document in Excel.

2. Open Word and select Mail Merge from the Tools menu. 3. The Mail Merge Helper appears. 4. Select Create under Main Document. 5. You can select a Form Letter, Mailing Labels, Envelopes, or a Catalog. For this tutorial select
Form Letters.

6. Click on Active Window to use the currently open document. 7. Then select Open Data Source from the Get Data pull down list. 8. Change the Files of type to MS Excel Worksheets.
9. Find the Excel files you created in step 1.

10. Select Entire Spreadsheet. 11. Next you will need to Edit the Main Document. 12. The Merge tool bar will be visible. Type what text you want and when you need to insert
information from the data source, select the Insert Merge Field pull down and choose the fields you wish to insert. 13. Finish typing the letter using field names to represent actual data.

14. When you have finished click on the Mail Merge Helper button on the tool bar. 15. Click on the Merge button. 16. Then select Merge to: New Document and click on the Merge button.
17. You now have a letter prepared for each person in your data file.

Using WordArts
1. To display the Word Art Gallery , choose Insert, Picture, WordArt or click the WordArt icon on the Drawing toolbar. 2. Double-Click a WordArt style. 3. Word opens the Edit WordArt dialog box. 4. Type the text you want and it will replace the sample text. 5. Choose a font, font size, and style. 6. Click OK to close the WordArt Gallery and see your text.

1.

USING BASIC WORKBOOK SKILLS IN EXCEL:

Creating a New Workbook In EXCEL:
When you start Excel, you begin with a new workbook. Excel labels this workbook as Book1 in the application title bar. Additional new workbooks can be created at any time. When you create a new, blank workbook, it opens with pre-existing settings and formatting known as default settings. These defaults are saved in a template. All workbooks are based on templates. Template defaults include margin settings, numeric format, and font. A new workbook is based on the Workbook template. This template is an all-purpose template used to create new workbooks and other templates. Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Click the New button

on the Standard toolbar.

A new, blank workbook opens in the workbook window. Saving a New Workbook: After creating a new workbook, you can save it to disk so that you can retrieve it at another time. When you save a workbook for the first time, Excel opens the Save As dialog box in which you enter the desired file name and location. A file name can consist of up to 255 characters; however, you should give the workbook a short descriptive name. Excel automatically assigns the .xls extension when you are saving a file. If you want to save the workbook in a different drive or folder, you can use the Save in list to select the desired location. The folders and files

residing in the selected location appears in the list box below the Save in box. The Places Bar on the left side of the dialog box contains shortcuts to various folders and can be used to quickly select a folder. Once a workbook has been saved, its file name appears in the application title bar. Subsequent saves do not open the Save As dialog box. Instead, Excel updates the changes to the existing file each time you save the workbook.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Click the Save button on the Standard toolbar.

The Save As dialog box opens with the text in the File name text box selected.
2. Type the desired file name.

The file name appears in the File name text box.
3. Select the Save in list.

A list of available drives appears.

4. Select the drive where you want to save the workbook.

A list of available folders appears.
5. Select the folder where you want to save the workbook.

The desired folder is selected.

Closing a Workbook:
When you have finished working on a workbook, you can close it to remove it from the workbook window. If you close a workbook that has not been saved and changes were made to it, Excel prompts you to save it. You can choose to save the changes made to the workbook, or you can close the workbook without saving the changes. Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Select the File menu.

The File menu appears.
2. Select the Close command.

The workbook closes and the application window remains open.

Opening an Existing Workbook:
You can view or edit an existing workbook by opening it from disk. You do not need to remember the file name because the Open dialog box displays a list of folders and files in the current drive and folder. You can select the desired workbook from the list, or you can type the name of the workbook you want to open. If the workbook resides in a different drive or folder, you can use the Look in list to select the correct location. The folders and files residing in the selected location appear in the list box below the Look in box. In addition to using the Look in list to open workbooks, the Open dialog box contains a Places Bar on the left side of the dialog box. The Places

Bar contains shortcuts to various folders containing commonly used files, as well as desktop options, and recently opened files. If you want to protect the original version of a workbook from modifications, you can use the Open list to open a copy of a workbook or a workbook as read-only. You can also have more than one workbook open at a time.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Click the Open button 2. Select the Look in

on the Standard toolbar. The Open dialog box opens. list. A list of available drives appears. A list of available folders appears.

3. Select the drive where the workbook you want to open is located. 4. Select the folder where the workbook you want to open is located.

A list of available files appears.

5. Select the name of the workbook you want to open.

The file name is selected.

Using Data Entry Shortcuts:
Excel includes shortcuts to help you perform certain data entry tasks. The AutoComplete and Pick From List features are shortcuts that save you time when entering labels into a worksheet. The AutoComplete feature helps speed up entry into a column containing text by completing the entry after you have typed a few characters. It is common to have to repeat entries when you are entering text into a column. For a column titled Region, possible entries might include New York, Boston, Chicago, etc. These entries are likely to be repeated more than once. As you type entries into a column, Excel automatically compiles a list of the entries. When you type the first few letters of a repeated entry in that column, Excel finishes typing the entry for you. If you do not want to use the entry that Excel suggests, you simply continue typing. The Pick From List feature is a quick way to enter text into a column because it allows you to select an entry from a list. Excel automatically compiles a list of the text entries in a column. When activated, the Pick From List feature displays a list of the available entries for the active column in alphabetical order. You can then select an entry from the list instead of having to retype each entry. Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps.

Practice the Skill
1. Move to the cell in which you want to use the AutoComplete feature.

The active cell moves accordingly.
2. Type the first letter(s) of the entry you want to repeat.

The completed entry appears in the formula bar and in the active cell.

3. Press [Enter].

The text is entered into the active cell.
4. Right-click the cell in which you want to use the Pick From List

feature. A shortcut menu appears.
5. Select the Pick From List command.

A list of available entries for the active column appears.
6. Select the entry you want to appear in the cell.

The entry appears in the active cell.

Renaming an Existing Workbook:
Once a file has been saved to disk, Excel updates the existing file with any changes each time you subsequently save the workbook. There may be times, however, when you want to save the current workbook with a different workbook name, to a different location, or as another file type. This option allows you to modify a workbook and save the changes, but still keep the original workbook intact. You can save an existing workbook with a different file name, location, or file type using the Save As dialog box. When you save an existing file with a new name, the original file automatically closes and the file appears in the workbook window with its new name. Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Select the File menu.

The File menu appears.
2. Select the Save As command.

The Save As dialog box opens with the text in the File name text boxselected.
3. Type the desired file name.

The text appears in the File name text box.

4. To change the file type, select the Save as type list.

A list of available file types appears.
5. Select the desired file type.

The file type appears in the Save as type text box.
6. Select the Save in list.

A list of available drives appears.
7. Select the drive in which you want to save the new workbook.

A list of available folders appears.
8. Select the folder in which you want to save the new workbook.

The folder is selected.
9. Select Save.

The Save As dialog box closes and the workbook is saved with the new name to the selected location.

Selecting a Cell using the Keyboard:
When you open Excel, a blank workbook appears in the application window. You will notice a thick black border around the first cell in the upper left corner of the worksheet. This cell is known as the active cell. When data is entered, it appears in the active cell. You can use the keyboard to select a cell and make it the active cell. When you press certain arrow keys or a combination of keys, the cell pointer moves to a new cell, making it the active cell. The following table lists ways in which you can use the keyboard to move to a cell: Keystroke [Left] [Right] [Up] [Down] [Page Up] [Page Down] [Alt+Page Up] [Alt+Page Down] Action Moves the active cell one cell to the left. Moves the active cell one cell to the right. Moves the active cell one cell up. Moves the active cell one cell down. Moves the active cell up one screen. Moves the active cell down one screen. Moves the active cell one screen to the left. Moves the active cell one screen to the right.

[Ctrl+Home] [Ctrl+End]

Moves the active cell to the upper left cell in the active worksheet. Moves the active cell to the lower right cell in the active worksheet.

Scrolling using the Mouse:
You can use the mouse to move the active cell to a new cell; however, the cell to which you want to move is not always visible on the screen display. On larger worksheets, all the data may not fit on the screen display at once. The horizontal and vertical scroll bars allow you to scroll the display so that you can view other parts of the worksheet. If you drag the scroll box in a scroll bar, the column letter or row number in the current view appears in a ScreenTip next to the scroll bar. This feature assists you in determining when to stop scrolling. Scrolling does not change the location of the active cell. You change the location of the active cell by clicking in the desired cell. Any commands executed affect the active cell, not the cells in the part of the worksheet you are viewing. For example, if you click in cell A1, and then scroll to cell A50 and press the [Delete] key, the contents of cell A1 will be deleted, not cell A50.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an
actual file, please click on the link to the left and move between the Excel and Web windows until you are satisfied you have mastered the skill. (If a dialog box appears while you are trying to open the exercise, click Open It.) Practice the Skill 1. Open the Sample Data Workbook and use Sheet 1.
2. Click in the cell to which you want to move the cell pointer.

The active cell moves accordingly.
3. Click in the horizontal scroll bar to scroll the display one screen to the

right. The display scrolls one screen to the right.

4. Click the right arrow

on the horizontal scroll bar to scroll the display

one column to the right. The display scrolls one column to the right.
5. Drag the horizontal scroll box to the left end of the scroll bar to scroll

the display to the left. The column letter in the current view appears in a ScreenTip next to the scroll bar as you drag and the display scrolls to the left.
6. Click in the vertical scroll bar to scroll the display down one screen.

The display scrolls down one screen.
7. Click the bottom arrow

on the vertical scroll bar to scroll the display

down one row. The display scrolls down one row.
8. Drag the vertical scroll box to the top of the scroll bar to scroll the

display up. The row number in the current view appears in a ScreenTip next to the scroll bar as you drag and the display scrolls up.

Entering Text into Cells:
In Excel, text is defined as letters or any combination of numbers and letters. For example, Expenses, 2nd Qtr, and BN9847 are all treated as text. Text automatically aligns to the left in a cell. If the text is too long to fit within a cell, it appears as if it has spilled over into the next cell. When text is entered into the adjacent cell, the long text entry appears as if characters have been deleted. They are not actually deleted and will appear if you widen the column that contains the long text entry. Text is always entered into the active cell. Therefore, you should be sure that the active cell is the appropriate cell before you start typing. If you press the [Enter] key after you finish typing an entry, the active cell automatically moves down one cell. When you are typing text into a cell, you are in enter mode. When you are in enter mode, the word Enter appears on the status bar at the bottom of the application window.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Move to the cell into which you want to enter text.

The active cell moves accordingly.
2. Type the text.

The text appears in the formula bar and in the active cell.
3. Press [Enter] to exit enter mode.

The text is entered into the cell and the active cell moves down to the next cell.
4. Repeat the steps above to enter additional text.

The text appears in the appropriate cells in the worksheet.

Entering Numbers into Cells:
Numeric entries contain only numbers, such as 75, 197, and 206. For example, an address such as 17 Maple Avenue is considered a text entry even though it begins with a number. You can type a minus sign before a number or enclose a number in parentheses to indicate a negative value. You can also type a period to indicate a decimal point and enter decimals. If you enter a decimal that ends in zero (0) such as 345.50, however, the ending zero will be dropped, and the number will display as 345.5. A cell must be formatted for decimal places to display a number with a decimal ending in zero.

Numbers can exist as independent values, or they can be used in formulas to calculate other values. You can type dates into a worksheet. Excel treats dates as numbers so that it can perform calculations; such as determining how many days a bill is past due. When you enter date text into a cell, Excel formats the entry as a date and stores it as a serial number that represents that date on the calendar.

Read through the steps: If you would like to complete these steps in an actual file, create a new file in Excel and then proceed through the steps. Practice the Skill
1. Move to the cell into which you want to enter a number.

cell.
2. Repeat the steps above to enter additional numbers.

The numbers appear in the appropriate cells in the worksheet. The active cell moves accordingly.
3. Type the number.

The number appears on the formula bar and in the active cell.
4. Press [Enter] to exit enter mode.

The number is entered into the cell and the active cell moves down to the next

2.

CREATING SIMPLE FORMULAS:

Using Formulas: Formulas are used to perform calculations on values entered into the cells of a worksheet. They consist of the addresses of the cells containing the values and the appropriate mathematical operators. Formulas begin with an equal sign (=) because they contain cell addresses. The equal sign prevents Excel from interpreting the formula as text, since cell addresses begin with letters. For example, to add the numbers in cells A1 and A2, you would type the formula =A1+A2. You enter the formula in the cell where you want the result to appear. Because formulas use cell addresses, they automatically recalculate when the value of a cell used in a formula changes. When a cell containing a formula is selected, the actual formula appears in the formula bar. The calculated results of the formula appear in the cell. The mathematical operators that can be used in a formula are listed in the following table:

Operator Performs + (plus sign) Addition (minus sign) Subtraction * (asterisk) Multiplication / (slash) Division ( ) Controls the order of operation. Calculations within parentheses (parentheses) are performed first. Converts the number into a percentage. For example, when you % (percent) type 10%, Excel reads the value as .10. Exponentiation. For example, when you type 2^3, Excel reads ^ (caret) the value as 2*2*2. When more than one operator appears in a formula, it is calculated using the standard mathematical order of precedence. This order determines which operations are carried out first. The order of precedence is as follows: parentheses, exponentiation, multiplication and division, addition and subtraction.

For example, the result of (8*7)+2 is 58 and the result of 8*(7+2) is 72.

Using the AutoSum Button:
Excel has built-in functions that are shortcuts for formulas. One of these is the SUM function, which calculates the total of the values in a range of cells. Using this function is easier than typing a formula and each individual cell address. For example, it is easier to use the SUM function to add the numbers in cells A1 through A7 than to type the formula =A1+A2+A3+A4+A5+A6+A7. Since the SUM function is used frequently, there is an AutoSum button on the toolbar that enters the formula in the active cell for you. The AutoSum button is an easy way to sum values in a row or column of a worksheet. When you click the AutoSum button, a suggested range for the function is selected. This suggested range can be changed. If you click the AutoSum button at the end of a row, the row of values to the left of the active cell is selected. If you click the AutoSum button at the bottom of a column, the column of values above the active cell is selected. If there are values both above and to the left of the active cell, the column of values above the active cell is selected. Practice the Skill
1. Open the Sample Data Workbook and select the Expenses tab.

Write an AutoSum Formula to add the Utility expenses for the month of January. 2. Select the cell into which you want to enter the formula.
3. Click Cell C6. 4. Click the AutoSum button.

A suggested range (C2:C5) surrounded by a blinking marquee is selected.

5. Press [Enter].

The result of the formula appears in the cell. Using Basic Functions: The AutoSum button assists you in summing up values in a row or column. This button automatically places the SUM function into a cell for you. There are times, however, when the suggested range provided by the AutoSum feature is not the range you want because the AutoSum feature only works with consecutively filled cells. For example, you may want to place the sum of the numbers contained in cells A1 through A20 in cell A21, but cells A7 and A12 are blank. The suggested range provided by the AutoSum feature would not be correct in this case. Therefore, in some cases, you may find it easier to simply enter the proper range yourself. Besides the SUM function, you can also enter AVERAGE, MAX, MIN, and COUNT functions. All the functions are entered with the same syntax, including beginning the function with an equal sign (=), typing the name of the function, and entering the first and last cells in the range enclosed in parentheses. These functions are listed in the following table:

Functions: Syntax SUM Description =SUM(A1:A20) Provides the sum of all the numbers in a range. =AVERAGE(A1:A20) Returns the average of a range of numbers. If a cell in the range is empty, it is not included in calculating the average. If a cell in the range contains the number zero, it is included in calculating the average. =MAX(A1:A20) Returns the highest value in a range of numbers. =MIN(A1:A20)

AVERAGE

MAX MIN

COUNT

Returns the lowest value in a range of numbers. =COUNT(A1:A20) Returns the number of cells that contain numbers.

Practice the Skill
1. Open the Sample Data Workbook and select the Expenses tab.

Write a Simple Formula to calculate the Sum of all Electric payments.
2. Select the cell into which you want to enter the formula.

Click Cell I2 (The letter "I" then 2).
3. Type the desired formula.

=SUM(C2:H2)
4. Press [Enter].

The result of the formula appears in the cell.

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