TEACHER’S GUIDE VOL. 10, NO.

4 OCTOBER 1, 2004

tfkclassroom.com

TEACHING THE COVER STORY ON

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
THIS WEEK
SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS
(cover story) Individuals, Groups and Institutions SUMMARY
On September 21, the National Museum of the American Indian opened its doors to festivities and celebrations. For many American Indians, the museum represents a national recognition of their cultural and historical contributions. Rotating exhibits in the museum will tell stories of Indian tribes through Native voices and artifacts. tance to American Indians. • More than 40 uncarved rocks and boulders, called grandfather rocks, rest on the museum grounds. There are also four cardinal-direction markers, which are stones from native communities in Hawaii, Canada, Maryland and Chile. • There are 562 federally recognized tribal governments in the United States. Of the U.S. population, 1.5% is American Indian.

SKILLS
Reflective Writing, page 3 Reading for Details, page 4

FAST FACTS
• The National Museum of the American Indian occupies the last remaining site on the National Mall. • The museum building and grounds were designed by Native people. • Limestone blocks from Minnesota were used in the museum’s exterior walls. • More than 30,000 trees, shrubs and other plants, some of which are native to the Potomac area, surround the building. The plants, including medicinal varieties and crops such as corn, beans and squash, were selected for their impor-

RESOURCES
Children of Native America Today by Yvonne Wakim Dennis (Charlesbridge, 2003). Explores the diversity of Native American communities. Thirteen Moons on Turtle’s Back by Joseph Bruchac (Putnam, 1997). Poems that celebrate the seasons. nmai.si.edu An online tour of current exhibits at the National Museum of the American Indian. pbs.org/circleofstories Learn about and listen to the tales of Native storytellers.

GO PLACES WITH TFK
This week, find two free issues of Go Places with TFK: Puerto Rico as well as a Teacher’s Guide. See page 8 for details on how to subscribe.

NONFICTION LITERACY STRATEGIES
BEFORE READING Build Background/Make Predictions • Before reading this week’s cover story, write Native American on the board. Make a list of ways that Native Americans have contributed to our country. The list might include food, music, language and tales. Discuss: Why is it important to have a museum that honors American Indians? START A DISCUSSION Critical Thinking • The National Museum of the American Indian is located in what city? • What is the purpose of this museum? • What is a tribe? • What things could you see on a visit to the museum? Refer students to the “Native Art” activity on page 4 for additional ideas. BUILD READING FLUENCY Paired Oral Reading • Create a class list of read-aloud techniques. Then pair students. Have one student in each pair read aloud a coverstory passage to his or her partner. Have the partner summarize what was read. Direct students to take turns.
q ‚

VISIT TFK’S ALL NEW ELECTION SITE
at timeforkids.com /election

CUSTOMER SERVICE
800-950-5954

TEACHING THIS WEEK’S ISSUE
Share the following facts and activities based on this week’s articles. Cover Story (p. 2) American Indian dress: Tell students that the men pictured on the cover and on page 2 are Cheyenne chiefs. The twin boys pictured on page 2 are from the Mashantucket-Pequot tribe of Connecticut. Point out that these men and boys are wearing traditional ceremonial clothes, including headdresses. The beadwork design along the top of page 2 is based on a headdress from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. Discuss: What information can you learn about these Native American tribes from how members dress during important ceremonies? Press release: Have students write a press release announcing the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Ask students to include facts about the museum and why this is an important event. A BIG BUG ATTACK! (p. 3) • Locusts are bugs that begin life the size of big ants. • Adult locusts are about two inches long. They are about the size of other grasshoppers. • There are locusts on every continent except Antarctica. • Locust groups lay thousands of eggs, creating new generations of insects every three months. • Locusts have strong back legs that they use for jumping. • Locusts “sing” by rubbing their back wings and legs together. • Locusts eat crops such as wheat and barley. Problem and solution: As students read the story about locusts, have them take notes on a t-chart labeled “Problem” on the left-hand side and “Solution” on the right-hand side. Identifying insects: Before students read the locust story, discuss what they know about insects. Tell students that locusts are insects. All insects have six legs and three main body parts: the head, the thorax (middle part of the body to which legs and wings are attached) and the abdomen (stomach). Insects may have one or two pairs of wings. Activity: Have students draw a picture of a locust based on the photos in the magazine.

ANSWERS
TFK CHALLENGE (P. 4) 1. festival 2. Shark Tale 3. nearly Answer: fall NATIVE ART (P. 4) 1. D 2. C, E 3. B BONUS: Answers may vary.

Teacher’s Guide
OBJECTS TELL STORIES (P. 3) Answers may vary. NEWS CLUES (P. 4) 1. C 2. B 3. Answers may vary. 4. C 5. C 6. Answers may vary. 7. A 8. B

NEWS SCOOP TEACHER’S GUIDE Teacher’s Guide Editor Jackie Wlodarczak Teacher’s Guide Associate Editor Brenda Iasevoli Art Director Stephen Blue TIME FOR KIDS National Teacher Board (News Scoop) Holly Albrecht, WI Joan Anthony, NE

Get your students involved in learning about and trick-or-treating for UNICEF.
Visit www.unicefusa.org or call 1-8004-UNICEF to order collection boxes for each of your students. Visit www.unicefusa.org /youthaction to find

Andi Bosar, OR Marian Evans, TX Ryann Kelso, IL Karen Lawson, OH Marsha Lewis, NC Christine Libeu, CA Margaret Lozuk, CA Karen Mauro, NY Julie Morgan, NE Mary Paskvan, MN Jeff Reed, PA Jana Underwood, TX Rubylinda Zickaffose, FL
TIME FOR KIDS (ISSN 1084-0168) is published weekly during the school year (Sept.-May), except school holidays. $3.95 per student subscription by Time Inc. Principal Office: Time & Life Building, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020-1393. Ann S. Moore, Chairman, CEO; Richard Atkinson, Treasurer; John S. Redpath Jr., Secretary. Periodical postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. © 2004 Time Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Subscribers: If the postal authorities alert us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within two years. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to TIME FOR KIDS, P.O. Box 30609, Tampa, FL 33630-0609. Subscription queries: 800-9505954. TIME FOR KIDS is a registered trademark of Time Inc. Mailing list: We make a portion of our mailing list available to reputable firms. If you prefer that we not include your name, please call, or write us at P.O. Box 60001, Tampa, FL 33630, or send us an e-mail at privacy@timecustomersvc.com.

NATIVE (p. 2): grown, produced or coming from a certain place MONUMENT(p. 2): something built to keep alive the memory of a person, a group of people or an event TRIBES (p. 2): a group of people made up of many families that share the same birth, culture and leadership REPRESENT (p. 2): to be a sign or symbol of LOCUST (p. 3): a type of grasshopper EXPERT (p. 3): a person with special skill in or knowledge of a subject CHEMICALS (p. 3): substances or materials that are not found in nature, but are created by humans

• Materials that encourage young people to explore, discuss and take action on issues that affect them. • Additional age-appropriate activities and resources to connect your learning objectives with UNICEF activities.

Go Places with TFK
See pages 5 and 6 of this Teacher’s Guide for activities that support the Go Places with TFK: Puerto Rico issue. To subscribe, call 800-777-8600 or visit tfkclassroom.com/addGP.

COMING NEXT WEEK:

The Great Reading Road Trip from Toyota Sienna. A student magazine, a classroom poster and family guide to encourage kids and families to read together q ƒ

Comments? E-mail teachersguides@timeforkids.com

Name
REFLECTIVE WRITING

Date

OBJECTS TELL STORIES
A Picture of the Object What It Is Made Of How My Family Uses It

You can see about 8,000 objects at the National Museum of the American Indian. They were made by different groups of Indians, called tribes. The objects help to tell the story of how Native people live, work and play today and how they did so in the past. Think about objects that tell a story about you and your family. Choose two objects. Use them to fill in the chart below.
Why It Is Important to Our Family

Name of the Object

3

Storytelling is important to many Native American tribes. Members tell stories about the history of their tribe and how people in their tribe live. Choose one object from the chart. Ask a family member to tell you the story of how this object first came into your family.

Copyright © 2004 TIME FOR KIDS News Scoop Edition. This page may be photocopied for use with students. • Vol. 10, No. 4 • October 1, 2004

Name

Date
READING FOR DETAILS

NEWS CLUES
Use the story “Celebrating Native Cultures” (p. 2) to help you answer these questions.

5. Which of the following is not a fact
about locusts? A They eat crops. B They can be found in parts of Africa. C They live in areas that are wet and cool.

1. You can tell from reading this story
that the National Museum of the American Indian A includes objects and ideas from Native Americans. B is a museum that many people are happy to see open. C Both A and B

6. What kinds of problems are locusts
causing in some African countries? ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ Use the story “A Hit for History” (p. 3) to help you answer these questions.

2. The National Museum of the
American Indian is in what city? A Maryland B Washington, D.C. C Hawaii

3. If you could visit the museum, what
would you hope to see? ______________________________________ ______________________________________ Use the story “A Big Bug Attack!” (p. 3) to help you answer these questions.

7. Who is Barry Bonds?
A He is a baseball player. B He is a basketball player. C He is a writer.

4. Locusts are
A seeds. B plants. C bugs.
4

8. Why is Barry Bonds in the news?
A He wrote a new book. B He hit his 700th home run. C He joined a new baseball team.

Copyright © 2004 TIME FOR KIDS News Scoop Edition. This page may be photocopied for use with students. • Vol. 10, No. 4 • October 1, 2004

RESOURCES
Books
Can You Count Ten Toes? by Lezlie Evans (Houghton Mifflin, 1999). Count to 10 in 10 languages.

TEACHER’S GUIDE FOR

PUERTO RICO
READING TIPS
• Pronunciation Guide Padial (p. 2): (pah-dee-ahl) Eduardo (p. 2): (ay-dwar-doh) Guaynabo (p. 2): (gweye-nah-boh) • Words to Watch tropical (p. 2): very hot, often with a high degree of moisture or humidity culture (p. 2): shared beliefs and values of a particular group of people diverse (p. 5): made up of many different elements or kinds of things a commonwealth. Ask: Why do you think some Puerto Ricans want the island to become a state? Why do you think some Puerto Ricans want the island to remain a commonwealth? • Equator: Point out to students that Puerto Rico is located close to the equator. (See the locator globe on page 4.) Ask: How do you think the location of Puerto Rico affects its climate? (The closer a place is to the equator, the hotter the place’s climate.)

Juan Bobo Goes to Work, retold by Marisa Montes (HarperCollins, 2000). A hero of Puerto Rican folklore follows simple tasks and ends up in silly situations. Shake It, Morena! by Carmen T. Bernier-Grand (Millbrook, 2002). A collection of several games, songs and stories from Puerto Rico.

Websites
musicofpuertorico.com/index .htm Learn about the music of Puerto Rico through audio clips. southernregion.fs.fed.us /caribbean/ Information on El Yunque

MUSIC
• Making maracas: Tell students that Puerto Rico’s native people, the Taíno Indians, used objects that they found in nature, such as tree trunks and fruits called gourds, to make their own instruments. They filled the objects with stones or dried beans and shook them to create music. Activity: Have students make their own maracas by filling plastic bottles with different objects, such as beans, rice, paper clips, pencils, buttons or small rocks. Discuss the difference in the sounds each instrument makes.

ANSWER KEY
Fun Facts (p. 4) 1. Answers may vary. 2. Answers may vary. 3. Spanish and English Map It Out! (p. 5) 1. San Juan 2. Atlantic 3. Cordillera Central 4. Culebra and Vieques 5. Rio de Camuy Juan Bobo Goes to Work (p. 7) Answers may vary. Puerto Rican Heroes (p. 8) 1. Tito Puente 2. Antonia Novello 3. false 4. 31 years ago BONUS: Answers may vary. Teacher’s Guide • The Colors of Puerto Rico Answers on page
illustration by susan low

EXTENSION ACTIVITIES
GEOGRAPHY
• Land: Before looking at the map of Puerto Rico, discuss the definition of an island. Ask: What is an island? Have students name examples of islands. Then have students look at the map of Puerto Rico on pages 4 and 5. Ask: How can you tell that Puerto Rico is an island? (It is surrounded by water on all sides.) Have students look at the map key. Ask: What types of land features are found in Puerto Rico? Tell students that a marsh is soft, wet ground with grasses or tall plants called cattails. Karst is a limestone region with caves and underground streams.

ART
• Border art: Tell students that the borders on pages 2 and 3 are based on the pastel-painted houses in Old San Juan. The border on pages 4 and 5 shows the plants and animals of El Yunque rain forest. The plants include the giant fern and the brightly colored heliconia f lower. The animals include the Puerto Rican parrot and the coquí, a small frog. The border on pages 6 and 7 is based on the colorful masks that are worn by some Puerto Ricans during parades and carnivals. The masked figures often dance to music or playfully frighten others. The border on page 8 is based on Taíno rock carvings.

SOCIAL STUDIES
• Commonwealth: Explain to students that Puerto Rico is not a state but a commonwealth. Puerto Rico belongs to the United States, but it maintains a separate, limited government. Puerto Ricans who live on the island are considered U.S. citizens, but they do not have the same rights as Americans who live in the states. For example, islanders cannot vote for President of the United States. Discuss: Tell students that some Puerto Ricans want their island to become a state, and others want it to remain

timeforkids.com /gppuertorico
Kids can take an online sightseeing tour and explore events in Puerto Rico’s history. They can also e-mail a country postcard to a friend and hear sound clips of a Native language. After their visit, kids can test their knowledge with our challenge quiz.

To order with your News Scoop subscription, call 800-777-8600 or visit tfkteachers.com/addGP. Visit timeforkids.com/goplaces for the Go Places with TFK website.

Name ......................................................................................................... Date ..........................................

THE COLORS OF PUERTO RICO
Many people around the world wear colorful masks in parades and celebrations. In Puerto Rico, the masks can be of animals, scary creatures or imaginary characters. Use the key to learn the Spanish words for some colors. Then color the spaces in the picture below.

ver de

ne gr o

d ver

e

azul

naranjado azul amarillo verde negro verde negro amarillo marrón morado rojo naranjado

rojo

rojo

amarillo

marrón negro

negro

verde (vair-deh) green marrón (mah-ron) brown rojo (ro-ho) red morado (mo-rah-do) purple

azul (ah-sool) blue amarillo (ah-mah-rih-yoh) yellow naranjado (nah-rahn-hah-doh) orange negro (neh-grow) black

Copyright © 2004 TIME FOR KIDS News Scoop Edition. This page may be photocopied for use with students. • Vol. 10, No. 4 • October 1, 2004

For more resources, visit timeforkids.com/gppuertorico.

Whisk your students away to Europe, Africa and other fascinating destinations!

ONLY
per studen t

95¢
GO PLACES WITH TFK celebrates the wonderful differences—and similarities—
of cultures around the world. It’s the perfect supplement to TIME FOR KIDS. And it costs JUST 95¢ a student for the entire school year. So order today!

• Incredible photos that grab kids’ attention • Fast facts about geography, history and more • Full-color maps, charts and graphs • Fables and stories that bring cultural heritage to life • Profiles of children living in other places • Eight pages in every issue—complete with a Teacher’s Guide
Puerto Rico 2004-2005 DESTINATIONS: South Korea Italy Ecuador Nigeria Iceland

Order now!
By mail:
Use the card at right.

RUSH
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
FIRST-CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 22 TAMPA, FL
POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES

By Phone:
Call 800-777-8600.

Go Online:
tfkclassroom.com/addGP

GO PLACES WITH TFK
PO BOX 69752 TAMPA FL 33661-9752

www.tfkclassroom.com www.tfkclassroom.com

BONUS:
®

Two free issues of Go Places with TFK: Puerto Rico and a Teacher’s Guide.

This Week

• A Place of Honor: The new National Museum of the American Indian opened last week in Washington, D.C. • Look inside for your free sample issues of Go Places with TFK: Puerto Rico. See below for ordering information.

2 FREE ISSUES INSIDE

GO PLACES WITH TFK Special Classroom Offer
Yes! I want GO PLACES WITH TFK, a fun-filled passport to international culture for my whole class. Add it to my classroom subscription and bill me just 95¢ per student for this year’s five remaining issues.
IMPORTANT: Your order must be received by October 13, 2004, to receive all five issues.
CONTACT NAME SCHOOL NAME ADDRESS CITY 04ATKIAD STATE ZIP

ATTENTION, POSTMASTER AND SCHOOL SECRETARY:
DO NOT BREAK OPEN PACKAGE! PLEASE DELIVER AT ONCE TO THE TEACHER ABOVE.

TKALTS9

Mail this card today or call toll-free: 800-777-8600.
GO PLACES WITH TFK is published six times a year, September through May. Only available with TFK orders of 10 or more. Normal 8% shipping and handling charges apply. Call to request additional copies of PUERTO RICO.

FIRM BUNDLE