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Handbook of Modules

International M.Sc.
Water Resources and
Environmental Management
(WATENV)

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Natural Sciences
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Basics

Credits
6.0

Sem.
1 (WS)
st

Organizer
R. Nogueira

Learning Objectives
I. Hydrobiology and Hydrochemistry
Hydrobiology: Define the metabolic processes involved in microbial growth; Describe the material cycles in the
environment; Distinguish between eutrophied and non eutrophied water bodies; Compare and contrast the biological
processes occurring in natural systems and wastewater treatment plants.
Hydrochemistry: Classify the elements of the Periodic Table; Distinguish chemical bonding; Identify redox, acid-base and
precipitation reactions; Describe the carbonate equilibrium.
II. Meteorology and Climatology
Fundamental knowledge about weather, climate and atmospheric phenomena. Ability to solve problems regarding the
atmospheric variables and processes, either analytically or with numerical methods.
Contents
I. Hydrobiology and Hydrochemistry
Hydrobiology:
- Microbial life
- Microbial growth
- Biogeochemical cycles
- aquatic environments
- Biological processes in wastewater treatment
Hydrochemistry:
- Atoms and elements, chemical bonds and chemical reactions
- Water and its properties, pH-value, acid, base, buffer
- Thermodynamic basics and reaction kinetics
- Electrochemical potential, redox potential, oxidation and reduction reactions
- Physical and chemical wastewater treatment processes
II. Meteorology and Climatology:
- Monitoring weather and atmosphere
- Basic physical laws of the atmosphere
- Atmospheric processes: mathematical description, diagnosis and forecast
- Climate and climate change
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Lester, J. N. Birkett, J. W., 1999. Microbiology and chemistry for environmental scientists and
engineers. E.&F.N.Spon, London.
John Houghton, 2002. The physics of atmospheres. Cambridge University Press, 3 Ed.
M.T. Madigen, J.M. Martinko, J. Parker (2012). Brook Biology of Microorganisms, 13th edition,
Pearson Prentice Hall.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

R. Nogueira, C. Silva, T. Hauf, M. Sauer

Supervisors:

R. Nogueira, C. Silva, T. Hauf, M. Sauer

Examiner:

R. Nogueira, C. Silva, T. Hauf, M. Sauer

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Environmental Hydraulics
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Basics

Credits
6.0

Sem.
1st (WS)

Organizer
I. Neuweiler

Learning Objectives
The students know the physical processes and phenomena that are relevant for surface and subsurface flow. They have
learned the fundamental principles for modelling the flow processes and can implement them for practical problems.
They have acquired simple hydro-numerical solution schemes.
Contents
I. Groundwater Hydraulics:
- Continuum description of porous media
- Darcys law
- Flow in unsaturated soil
- Continuum equation for ground water
- Application for different types of aquifers
- Well hydraulics
- Regional ground water flow
- Numerical schemes for groundwater flow
II. River Hydraulics:
- Kinematics and kinetics of flow (balance equations)
- Laminar and turbulent flow
- Flow models, similarity theory, physical modelling
- Potential theory
- Stationary, steady state open channel flow
- Normal discharge, supercritical and subcritical flow
- St Venant equations, iterative solutions for the water table
- Fundamentals of hydronumerical simulations (floods)
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Baer, J., 1979: Hydraulics of Groundwater. McGraw-Hill, New York.


Freeze, R.A. und J.A. Cherry, 1979: Groundwater. Prentice-Hall Inc. Englewood Cliffs.
Kinzelbach, W. 1986: Groundwater Modeling. Elsevier
Lamb, H., 1993. Hydrodynamics. Cambridge Mathematical Library, Cambridge University Press,
6th edition.
Chadwick, A., 2004. Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Taylor & Francis; 4th
edition.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

I. Neuweiler, T. Schlurmann

Supervisors:

I. Neuweiler, T. Schlurmann

Examiner:

I. Neuweiler, T. Schlurmann

Institute:

Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Environmental Physics in Civil Engineering


Franzius-Institute for Hydraulic, Waterways and Coastal Engineering

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Hydrology and Water Resources I
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Basics

Credits
6.0

Sem.
1 (WS)
st

Organizer
U. Haberlandt

Learning Objectives
I. Hydrology I:
Students know the fundamentals about the estimation of water balance components precipitation, evapotranspiration
and runoff, and they know different concepts for the calculation of runoff from rainfall.
II. Water resources management I:
Students know basic approaches for river basin management and can apply them for solving problems regarding floods,
droughts and water pollution.
Contents
I. Hydrology I:
- Cycle of water, energy and matter, catchment
- Precipitation: genesis, measurement, calculation
- Evaporation: types, measurement, calculation
- Stage and discharge: measurement, analysis
- Floods and droughts
- Subsurface water: soilwater, groundwater
- Rainfall runoff relationships: runoff generation, runoff transformation, flood routing
II. Water Resources Management I:
- Reservoirs, flood protection
- River design, ecology, erosion, sediment transport
- Irrigation, drainage
- Planning, project evaluation, optimisation
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Maidment, D.R. (Editor), 1992. Handbook of Hydrology. McGraw-Hill Inc.


Loucks, D.P. and van Beek, E. (Editors), 2005. Water Resources Systems Planning and
Management. UNESCO publishing, Paris.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich

Supervisors:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich

Examiner:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Environmental Data Analysis
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Basics

Credits
6.0

Sem.
1 (WS)
st

Organizer
U. Haberlandt

Learning Objectives
The students know basic concepts and methods of statistics concerning environmental data analysis and can apply these
on any environmental problem. This module will also introduce the underlying principles and methods involved with
working with data containing geospatial nature and attributes. It will examine the processes involved in the capture,
storage, manipulation, process, analysis, visualization and output of digital geographic data in Geographical Information
Systems (GIS). Basic knowledge of the collection and assessment of environmental data using remote sensing
techniques. The overall focus is on environmental data, which are relevant to hydrology and water resources
management.
Contents
I. Statistics:
- Plausibility, consistence and homogeneity of data
- Descriptive statistics, probability, distribution functions
- Extreme value analysis, risk assessment, floods
- Tests, correlation, regression
- Time series analysis and synthesis.
II. Geographical Information Systems:
- Data modelling: geometry, thematics, topology
- Geospatial data analysis and geoprocessing
- Carthography: graphical variables, generalization, presentation
- Data capture and topography: digital elevation models, data interpolation, geomorphology.
III. Remote Sensing:
- Satellites and sensors
- Radar remote sensing
- Image processing.
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Haan, C.T., 2002. Statistical Methods in Hydrology. Blackwell, Ames, Iowa, USA.
Longley, Goodchild, Maguire, Rhind, 2010. Geographic Information Systems and Science
[Paperback]
CCRS, 2008. Tutorial: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing,
http://ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/resource/tutor/fundam/index_e.php

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard, Web course

Particularities:
Lecturers:

U. Haberlandt, M. Sester, S. Dalyot, U. Srgel

Supervisors:

U. Haberlandt, M. Sester, S. Dalyot, U. Srgel

Examiner:

U. Haberlandt, M. Sester, S. Dalyot, U. Srgel

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering


Institute of Photogrammetry and GeoInformation
Institute of Cartography and Geoinformatics

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Research Planning and Scientific Communication
Mode of Examination
Exercises
Research Paper
Poster Presentation

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
2

Language
English

Credits
3.0

Area of Competence
Basics

Sem.
1 (WS)
st

Organizer
M. Graf

Learning Objectives
At the end of this course, students will be able to research, write, and present scientific information. Students will carry
out a literature review on a water resources or environmental management project in their home country. Students will
also give a poster presentation on the same topic.
Contents
In this course, students should learn to:
- conduct a literature review,
- identify and avoid common mistakes made by English as a Second Language (ESL) speakers,
- write about a scientific topic in a clear and concise manner,
- structure scientific documents (understand what goes where),
- learn how to reference properly to avoid plagiarism,
- be able to create effective tables and figures,
- research and write about a water resources or environmental problem in their home country, and
- give a poster presentation on this topic.
Workload:

90 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Glasman-Deal, H. 2009. Science Research Writing for Non-native Speakers of English. Imperial
College Press, London, UK.
Hofmann, A. 2010. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and
Presentations. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Media:

PowerPoint, Whiteboard, Fieldtrip to library

Particularities:

In class exercises (15%), outline of research paper (10%), first draft of the research paper
(15%), final draft of the research paper (30%), poster presentation (30%).

Lecturers:

M. Graf

Supervisors:

M. Graf, E. Starke

Examiner:

M. Graf

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Theories and Methods of Research
Mode of Examination
Written Presentation
Written Examination

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
2

Language
English

Area of Competence
Basics

Credits
3.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
P. Hoyningen-Huene

Learning Objectives
To make students familiar with basic methodological questions and their assessment.
Contents
In the lecture section of the course, the development of the theories of scientific methods during the last century until
today is presented. In the following exercise section, students must present their own research project, explain the
methods used, and connect them to the theories of scientific methods given in the lecture section.
Workload:

90 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Chalmers, A. F., 1999: What is this Thing called Science? 3rd. ed., Indianapolis: Hackett Pub.
Co.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:

Written presentation (20%), written examination (80%)

Lecturers:

P. Hoyningen-Huene

Supervisors:

P. Hoyningen-Huene

Examiner:

P. Hoyningen-Huene

Institute:

Centre for Philosophy and Ethics of Science

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Research project and Colloquium
Mode of Examination
Homework
Presentation

Type of Module
Basic

SWH
4

Language
English

Credits
6.0

Area of Competence
Basics

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
J. Dietrich

Learning Objectives
Students know how to plan and conduct the work for a research project and how to structure a report. Students can
present the work and results and defend their findings in a colloquium.
Contents
- Supervised planning and conduction of a small research project
- Practise of writing, presentation and defence of the findings of the conducted research project
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Research Planning and Scientific Communication

Literature:
Media:

Tuition

Particularities:

Personal supervision / homework / colloquium

Lecturers:

Supervisors of the projects

Supervisors:

J. Dietrich and supervisors of the projects

Examiner:

J. Dietrich , students and supervisors of the projects

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering


Institute of Water Quality and Management

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Hydrology and Water Resources Management II
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major WRM

Credits
6.0

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
U. Haberlandt

Learning Objectives
Students know advanced methods about the estimation of water balance components as well as flood and draught
assessment. They have also learned sophisticated approaches for river basin management and can apply their knowledge
to new problems. Students have special knowledge about the management of groundwater resources and can solve
problems regarding groundwater abstraction and pollution. In addition students have learned in practical training how to
measure important hydrological variables.
Contents:
I. Hydrology II
- Water balance components
- Rainfall-runoff modelling
- Floods and draughts
II. Water Resources Management
- Fuzzy methods, Multi Criteria Decision Making
- Dynamic optimisation, Global water problems
- EU Water framework directive
III. Geohydrology:
- Aquifer types, geohydraulics
- Groundwater management
- Groundwater pollution, remediation and protection
IV. Hydrometric Practical Training
- Measurement of discharge, soil moisture
- Measurement of some water quality parameters
- Pumping test
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Hydrology and Water Resources Management I

Literature:

Brdossy, A. and Duckstein, L., 1995. Fuzzy Rule-Based Modelling with Applications to
Geophysical, Biological and Engineering Systems. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, 232 pp.
Domenico, P. and Schwartz, F. 1990. Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology; Wiley, New York.
Loucks, D.P. and van Beek, E. (Editors), 2005. Water Resources Systems Planning and
Management. UNESCO publishing, Paris.
Maidment, D.R (Editor), 1992. Handbook of Hydrology. Mc Graw-Hill Inc.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich, G. Houben

Supervisors:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich, G. Houben

Examiner:

U. Haberlandt, J. Dietrich, G. Houben

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering


Federal Institute of Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR)

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Ecology and Water Resources
Mode of Examination
Oral Examination
Homework Presentation

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major WRM

Credits
6.0

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
J. Dietrich
A. Verworn

Learning Objectives
I. Limnology and practical training:
Students know the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystems, the biocenosis of stagnant and running waters, trophic and
saprobic levels, analysis of water bodies and methods to collect aquatic organisms according to international standards
of waterbody examination, in order to validate the condition of waters.
II. Urban water resources management:
Students know basic approaches for WRM in urban areas and can apply them for solving problems regarding water
supply, storm and waste water drainage and treatment, and river pollution.
III. Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM):
Students know the main concepts of integrative approaches in water resources management and they will be enabled to
carry out risk analyses. Water management projects in developing countries will be analyzed and presented by the
students.
Contents:
I. Limnology and practical training:
- Aquatic ecosystems: functions and physical characteristics, biocenosis
- Biogenic turnover, primary and secondary production
- Ecological examination of water bodies
- Field training of sampling methods (macrozoobenthos) and analysis
II. Urban water resources management:
- Water supply
- Storm and waste water drainage
- Pollution and river quality
- Planning and design practices
III. Integrated water resources management:
- Concepts of IWRM, risk oriented perspective
- Participation and Capacity Building
- Global water problems, socio-economic development
- Arid/semi-arid, tropical and polar climates
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Natural Sciences, Hydrology and Water Resources Management I

Literature:

Rosegrant, M.W., X. Cai, S.A. Cline (2002): World Water and Food to 2025 Dealing with
Scarcity. Int. Food Policy Research Inst., Washington DC
Wetzel, R.G. (2001): Limnology - Lake and River Ecosystems. Academic Press Inc., London,
http://www.iwrm-education.org

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

J. Bthe, A. Verworn, J. Dietrich

Supervisors:

J. Bthe, A. Verworn, J. Dietrich

Examiner:

J. Bthe, A. Verworn, J. Dietrich

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering


EcoRing Consulting Agency

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Hydrological Modelling
Mode of Examination
Oral Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major WRM

Credits
6.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
U. Haberlandt

Learning Objectives
Students can apply models for flood simulation, simulation of urban drainage systems and groundwater modelling. They
know the basics of parameterisation, calibration and validation of hydrological models. They also are familiar with
geostatistical concepts of data interpolation and simulation.
Contents:
I. Hydrological Modelling
- Theory of model technique
- Parameterisation, calibration, validation
- Flood simulation
II. Geostatistics
- Statistical model
- Structural analysis, variography
- Kriging and simulation methods
III. Modelling in Urban Hydrology
- Components of rainfall-, runoff-, polluting load modelling
- Structure and approaches for models in urban hydrology
IV. Groundwater Modelling
- Principles of groundwater flow and transport
- Structure of groundwater models and required data
- Calibration and validation of groundwater flow and transport
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Hydrology and Water Resources Management I & II

Literature:

Beven, K., 2001. Rainfall-Runoff Modelling: The Primer. John Wiley & Sons, 360 pp.
Deutsch, C.V. and Journel, A.G., 1992. GSLIB: Geostatistical software library and user's guide.
Oxford University Press, New York, 340 pp.
Goovaerts, P., 1997. Geostatistics for natural resources evaluation. Oxford University Press,
New York, Oxford, 483 pp.
Bear, J. and Verruijt, A., 1987. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Pollution. D. Reidel Publishing
Company, Dordrecht, 414 pp.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

U. Haberlandt, S. van der Heijden, T. Krger

Supervisors:

U. Haberlandt, S. van der Heijden, T. Krger

Examiner:

U. Haberlandt, S. van der Heijden, T. Krger

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Special Topics in WRM
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
2

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major WRM

Credits
3.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
U. Haberlandt,
A. Denecke

Learning Objectives
The students acquire the ability to manage and analyse empirical data within the statistical software R. Different
statistical methods will be presented and the interpretation of the results will be discussed. Furthermore, the creation of
graphs within R will be covered.
Contents:
- General introduction to R
- Data management and statistical calculations with R
- Interpretation of the results
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Environmental Data Analysis

Literature:

Adler, Joseph (2012): R in a nutshell, a desktop quick reference. 2nd ed., OReilly, Sebastopol,
CA.
Fox, John: The R Commander: A Basic-Statistics Graphical User Interface to R. Journal of
Statistical Software, Sept. 2005, Vol. 14, Iss. 9.

Media:

PowerPoint, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

A. Denecke

Supervisors:

A. Denecke

Examiner:

A. Denecke

Institute:

Institute of Water Resources Management, Hydrology and Agricultural Hydraulic Engineering

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Sanitary Engineering
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major San.Eng

Credits
6.0

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
K.H. Rosenwinkel

Learning Objectives
This course deals with the basic topics of waste water management, which consist of water supply, sewage technology
and waste management. The course seeks to impart knowledge about basic methods and dimensioning approaches of
waste water management. The route of the water, starting with the catchment, over its treatment up to the collection
and draining of the produced waste water is shown and explained.
Basic methods of mechanical-biological waste water and sludge treatment are added to this overview, as well as an
introduction into waste management.
Contents:
I. Water supply
- Basics of water supply
- Methods of water treatment
- Distribution, storage and conveyance of water

II. Sewage technology


III.

Waste water onset and draining, sewage network


Rain water treatment and rating
Waste water consistence
Requirements on waste water treatment
Methods of waste water treatment and dimensioning approaches
Concepts for WWTPs and decentralized areas, sludge treatment
Waste management
Introduction into waste management
Waste types and quantities, as well as collection and transportation
Waste recycling

Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Natural Sciences

Literature:

Grigg, N. S., 2002. Water, wastewater, and storm water infrastructure management. Lewis,
Boca Raton.
Twort, A.C. et al., 2000. Water supply. Arnold, London.
v. Sperling, M., 2007. Basic principles of wastewater treatment. IWA Publication, London.
Water treatment handbook, Vol. 1, Vol. 2, 1991. Degrmont, Rueil-Malmaison.

Media:

PowerPoint, blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Supervisors:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Examiner:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Solid Waste Management
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major San.Eng

Credits
6.0

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
D. Weichgrebe

Learning Objectives
The course shows how to manage and treat waste in the sense of sustainability. At the beginning waste and the
responsibilities for waste will be defined and the general conditions as well as the specific waste amounts discussed.
Then waste management techniques and processes like collection, transportation, sorting, treatment, recycling and
disposal will be illustrated. With regard to process engineering mechanical, biological treatment (composting, digestion),
the combination (MBT, MBSt) and thermal waste treatment (wte, combustion, gasification, etc.) as well as reuse and
disposal of the output are exposed in particular and related to each other. Besides of process description, design data
and conditions, legal emission criteria as well as output quality are discussed. Furthermore control, principles and
requirements of landfills construction and emissions plus the handling of contaminated sites are taught. Modern
recycling techniques for glass, paper, plastics, wood, metal and construction waste are also part of this course as the
evaluation (e.g. ecobalancing) and elaboration of administrative waste management concepts. The lecture orientates on
contemporary practical examples and will be consolidated in tutorials in form of calculation examples.
Contents:
- Introduction and definition of waste and related legislation
- Description and composition of wastes, waste volume and waste products
- Collection, transportation and specific treatment of waste
- Biological, mechanical-biological and thermal waste treatment incl. immission control
- Construction, handling and management of landfills and abandoned polluted areas incl. the treatment of their
emissions (leachate and landfill gas)
- Recycling of glass, paper, plastics, wood, metal and construction waste
- Evaluation of waste treatment and management concepts
- Waste management concepts.
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Weichgrebe, D., 2013. presentations handout


Lens et al., 2004. Resource Recovery and Reuse in Organic Solid Waste Management. IWA
Publication, Padstow.
Cheremisinoff, N.P, 2003. Handbook of solid waste management and waste minimization
technologies. Butterworth Heinemann, Amsterdam.
Forbes R. McDougall et al (2001) Integrated solid waste management : a life cycle inventory,
Blackwell Science, Oxford
UBA 2011 CD-ROM Best Practice Municipal Waste Management

Media:

PowerPoint, Whiteboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

D. Weichgrebe

Supervisors:

D. Weichgrebe

Examiner:

D. Weichgrebe

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Water Supply and Industrial Wastewater
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major San.Eng

Credits
6

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
K.H. Rosenwinkel

Learning Objectives
Water is widely used in the industrial sector for different purposes as processing, washing, diluting, cooling and
transporting a product having an enormous impact on water resources. Hence, industrial water management including
an adequate supply of high quality water and wastewater treatment is a considerable ecological and economical
challenge. Students will learn in this course the basic principles of industrial water management. They will learn the
main processes of industrial water and wastewater treatment and they will be able to design and dimension industrial
water and wastewater treatment facilities. Additionally, students will get an overview of the aims of productionintergrated environmental protection measures in different industries as the reuse of production-, washing- and rinsing
water.
Contents:
I. Industrial water supply and treatment:
- Industrial water demand
- Water quality requirements of different industries and for different purposes like cooling and process water
- Treatment processes like filtration, adsorption, ion-exchange, softening and desalination
II. Industrial wastewater treatment:
- Concentrations and loads of different industrial wastewaters
- Specific industrial wastewater treatment processes (chemical, physical, aerobic and anaeorobic biological processes)
- Design and dimension of industrial wastewater treatment plants
- Production-intergrated environmental protection measures in different industries
- Industrial water management in specific industries
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Natural Sciences, Sanitary Engineering

Literature:

Metcalf & Eddy, Inc. et al. (2002): Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse. 4. Auflage,
McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math, NJ.
Barnes, D. et al. (1984): Survey in industrial wastewater treatment: Food and allied industries,
Vol. 1, Pitman Advanced Publishing Program, Boston.
Byers, W. et al. (2003): Industrial water management: A Systems Approach. Wiley, NJ.
Lehr, J., Keeley, J. (2005): Water Encyclopedia: Domestic,

Media:

PowerPoint, blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Supervisors:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Examiner:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Special Topics in Sanitary Engineering
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
2

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major San.Eng

Credits
3.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
K.H. Rosenwinkel

Learning Objectives
Basic approaches for water supply plants and effluent disposal plants as well as for sludge treatment will be presented in
this course. Tutorials for dimensioning of wastewater treatment plants engross the mind of theoretical knowledge. Some
examples will cover the design and dimensioning of full scale plants.
Furthermore, economical efficiency calculation for planning and investment decisions in the urban water management
will be educated.
Contents:
- Tutorials for the dimensioning of municipal waterworks
- Process engineering in wastewater treatment
- Design and dimensioning of wastewater treatment plants
- Process engineering in sludge treatment
- Investment and operating costs
- Ascertainment of costs
- Financial, mathematical processing of costs (levelised costs)
- Comparison of costs
- Sensitivity analyses and determination of critical values
Workload:

90 h

Prerequisites:

Natural Sciences, Sanitary Engineering

Literature:

Literature will be provided by the guest lecturers

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:

One Excursion included

Lecturers:

H. Scheer, P. Hartwig

Supervisors:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Examiner:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Modelling in Sanitary Engineering
Mode of Examination
Homework
Oral Examination

Type of Module
Mandatory

SWH
2

Language
English

Area of Competence
Major San.Eng

Credits
6.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
K.H. Rosenwinkel

Learning Objectives
The goal of this course is to show the methods of biological and technical modelling of wastewater treatment processes
and to give an overview how it is used in sanitary engineering. By building up wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)
models and simulation of different operation settings the students gain their first experience with the modelling
software SIMBA classroom. After finishing this course the students should know the main processes of sanitary
engineering (sewer, wastewater treatment, sludge treatment) and to depict it in a model. The course is especially for
those students, how would like to deepen their study in the field of modelling within e.g. their master thesis.
Contents:
- Basics of the modelling technique, model building and model types
- Use of the simulation software SIMBA classroom
- Representing the main processes of sanitary engineering (sewer, WWTP) by transferring it into a model
- Natural scientific basics and proceedings to discover chemical-physical and biological parameters
- From model idea to dynamic simulation calculation based on the example of wastewater treatment/WWTP
- Building up a biological model for given boundary conditions
- Mathematical formulation of processes
- Performance of example calculations
Workload:

150 h

Prerequisites:

Natural Sciences, Sanitary Engineering

Literature:

Henze et al. (1995): Wastewater treatment, Biological and Chemical Processes, SpringerVerlag.
Schtze (2002): Modelling, simulation and control of urban wastewater systems, SpringerVerlag.
Water Environment Federation (2002): Basic laboratory procedures for wastewater
examination, Alexandria.

Media:

PowerPoint, blackboard, modelling software

Particularities:
Lecturers:

Yvonne Schneider, Benjamin Vogel

Supervisors:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Examiner:

K.H. Rosenwinkel

Institute:

Institute of Water Quality and Management

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Soil Mechanics for Hydraulic Structures
Mode of Examination
Written/Oral Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
2

Language
English

Area of Competence
Supplement

Credits
3.0

Sem.
1 (WS)
st

Organizer
M. Achmus

Learning Objectives
I. Hydraulic structures:
Students know fundamentals about the construction and design of dams and barrages and about the possibilities to gain
waterpower.
II. Soil Mechanics:
Students know the fundamentals of soil types and soil behaviour and can apply them for the determination of
settlements and bearing capacity of foundations.
Contents:
I. Hydraulic structures:
- Construction and design of dams and barrages
- Waterpower Engineering
II. Soil Mechanics:
- Soil types and soil features
- Methods of field and laboratory investigations
- Shear strength, compressibility and permeability of soils
- Design of foundations
Workload:

90 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Novak, P., Moffat, A.I.B., Nalluri, C., Narayanan, R., 1992. Hydraulic Structures, Chapman &
Hall, London.
Kutzner, C., 1997. Earth and Rockfill Dams, Principles of Design and Construction, A. A.
Balkema, Rotterdam.
Das, B.M., 2008. Advanced Soil Mechanics. Taylor & Francis, London.
Mitchell, J.K., Soga, K., 2005. Fundamentals of soil behavior. Wiley, Hoboken/NJ.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:

Lectures/ Exercises

Lecturers:

M. Achmus, K. Abdel-Rahman

Supervisors:

M. Achmus, K. Abdel-Rahman

Examiner:

M. Achmus, K. Abdel-Rahman

Institute:

Institute of Soil Mechanics, Foundation Engineering and Waterpower Engineering

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Water, Soils and Vegetation
Mode of Examination
Written & Oral Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
4

Language
English

Credits
6.0

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
R. Pott

Learning Objectives
I. Soils and Environment:
Introduction to functions of soils, the geological and mineralogical basics of soils, soil components and factors and
processes of soil formation. Students know the fundamentals of measuring and numerical modelling of soil water
dynamics in the unsaturated zone and solute transport in soils and they have knowledge of the leaching of different
solutes from soils into the groundwater.
II. Life in Water:
Students are introduced to the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on water vegetation. The course
starts with an overview of groundwater, rivers, lakes, springs, and brackish waters, and the associated vegetation types.
The middle portion of the course addresses pollution and autopurification of streams, with trophic level increases by
nutrient pollution regarded in detail. The indicator function of hydrophytes for the extent of water pollution as well as
further important parameters like pH and oxygen levels is furthermore included in this chapter. Later on, the focus is on
water chemistry and water physics and their impact on hydrophyte communities: The origin and cycles of major
elements and compounds in aquatic ecosystems, primary production, energy budget, and water movement. The final
chapter is about anthropogenic changes to aquatic ecosystems, and the severe problems caused by many of these
intrusions, which partially led to renaturation efforts.
Contents:
I. Soils and Environment:
- Inorganic and organic components of soils
- Basic parameters of bulk soils
- Soil formation factors and processes
- Water retention and hydraulic conductivity of soils
- Soil water dynamics: measurement, numerical modelling
- Hydro-pedotransfer functions for predicting percolation rate
- Solute transport through the unsaturated zone
- Leaching of nitrate and trace elements from soils
II. Life in Water:
- Groundwater, rivers, lakes, springs and brackish waters and their associated vegetation types
- Pollution and autopurification of streams
- Trophic levels: Oligotrophic, dystrophic, mesotrophic, eutrophic and hypertrophic types
- Bioindication of aquatic macrophytes and plant
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Bohne, K. (2005): An introduction into applied soil hydrology. Lecture notes in GeoEcology.
Catena Verlag.
Kutilek, M. & D. Nielsen (1994): Soil hydrology: Textbook for students of soil science. Catena
Verlag.
Pott, R. (1995): Die Pflanzengesellschaften Deutschlands, 2. Aufl., Verlag Eugen Ulmer,
Stuttgart
Pott, R. (1996): Biotoptypen Schtzenswerte Lebensrume Deutschlands und angrenzender
Regionen, Verlag Eugen Ulmer, Stuttgart
Pott, R. (2005): Allgemeine Geobotanik, Biogeosysteme und Biodiversitt, Springer Verlag,
Berlin, Heidelberg, New York
Pott, R. & J. Hppe (2007): Spezielle Geobotanik. Pflanze-Klima-Boden, Springer Verlag, Berlin,

Module Handbook M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management, Date: 25.03.2014

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Heidelberg, New York


Pott, R. & D. Remy (2000): Gewsser des Bnnenlandes, Verlag Eugen Ulmer, Stuttgart
Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

R. Pott, W.H.M. Duijnisveld

Supervisors:

R. Pott, W.H.M. Duijnisveld

Examiner:

R. Pott, W.H.M. Duijnisveld

Institute:

Institute of Geobotany
Federal Institute of Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR)

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Flow and Transport Processes
Mode of Examination
Exercises
Written Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
4

Language
English

Credits
6.0

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
T. Graf

Learning Objectives
The students know the physical processes and phenomena that are relevant for transport of solutes, particles and heat in
water and air flow. They know how to implement the most important processes in a transport model and have tested the
models for relevant problem in environmental engineering.
Contents:
- Balance equations, equations of states
- Fully mixed systems
- Diffusion, heat conduction
- Advective transport, convection, advection-diffusion equation, boundary conditions, analytical solutions
- Method of spatial moments
- Taylor Aris dispersion and macrodispersion
- Chemical reactions, phase transitions, sorption
- Coupling of flow and transport: density driven flow
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

Environmental Hydraulics

Literature:

Rausch, R., Schfer, W., Therrien, R. & Wagner, C., 2005: Solute transport modelling, Gebrder
Borntraeger, Berlin.
Domenico, P. A. & Schwartz, F. W. 1998: Physical and chemical hydrogeology, John Wiley &
Sons Inc., New York

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:

Mid-term Exam (15%), end-term exam (25%), exercises (60%)

Lecturers:

T. Graf

Supervisors:

T. Graf

Examiner:

T. Graf

Institute:

Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Environmental Physics in Civil Engineering

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Wetland Ecology and Management
Mode of Examination
Research Paper
Oral Presentation
Written Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
2

Language
English

Credits
3.0

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Sem.
2nd (SS)

Organizer
M. Graf

Learning Objectives
This course is divided into three parts: wetland ecology, wetland ecosystems, and wetland management. In the first part,
wetland ecology, we will learn about the ecology of natural wetlands. Subjects such as wetland hydrology,
biogeochemistry, and biological adaptations will be covered. In the second part, wetland ecosystems, we will learn about
different wetlands, such as coastal wetlands, freshwater wetlands, and peatlands. The final section of the course,
wetland management, will focus on issues, such as wetland restoration, treatment wetlands, and wetland protection.
Two fieldtrips are planned. One is a full day fieldtrip to visit restored and natural peatlands in the area of Hannover (ca.
1.5 hours from Hannover). The second fieldtrip will be a half-day fieldtrip to visit a constructed wetland at Hannover
Airport.
Contents:
I. Introduction to wetlands: definition and importance
II. Wetland Environment:
- Hydrology
- Biogeochemistry
- Biological adaptations (plants and animals)
III. Wetland Ecosystems:
- Coastal wetlands
- Freshwater marshes and swamps
- Peatlands
IV. Wetland management:
- Restoration
- Types of treatment wetlands
- Processes for pollutant removal
- Wetland design
- Threats and degradation of wetlands
Workload:

90 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Kadlec, R.H. & Wallace, S.D. 2009. Treatment Wetlands, 2nd Edition. CRC Press, Boca Raton,
Florida, USA.
Keddy, P.A. 2010. Wetland Ecology, 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
Mitsch, W.J. and Gosselink, J.G. Wetlands, 4th Edition. Wiley & Sons

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:

Research Paper (30%), written Examination (40%), oral Presentation (30%)

Lecturers:

M. Graf, E. Starke

Supervisors:

M. Graf, E. Starke

Examiner:

M. Graf

Institute:

Institute of Environmental Planning

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Environmental Economics
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
4

Language
English

Credits
6.0

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
H. Waibel

Learning Objectives
I. Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects:
Students know the principles of cost benefit analysis and will be able to apply concepts of investment analysis to project
in the field of natural resources management and agriculture.
II. Global Environmental Economics:
Students learn about the problems, objectives and instruments related to global environmental policies and economics,
and they have a solid knowledge about different approaches for assessing environmental goods and services.
Contents:
I. Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects
- Definition of project and project cycle
- Basics of welfare theory
- Principles of Cost Benefit Analysis
- Discounting and Compounding
- Investment Criteria
- Principles of valuation
- Financial and Economic Analysis
II. Global Environmental Economics
- Environmental externalities and polluter pays principle
- Basic concepts as solutions to environmental problems
- Quantification of environmental goods and services
- Discussion of emission trading systems and the Kyoto protocol
- Trade context and regional and international agreements about global environmental goods
Workload:

180 h

Prerequisites:

none

Literature:

Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects :


Gittinger, J. P. (1982). Economic Analysis of Agricultural Projects.
Curry, S. and J. Weiss (1993): Project Analysis in Development Countries.
Further literature will be provided.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

U. Grote; H. Waibel

Supervisors:

U. Grote; H. Waibel

Examiner:

U. Grote; H. Waibel

Institute:

Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics


Institute of Environmentals Economics and World Trade

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Environmental and Coastal Management
Mode of Examination
Written Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
4

Language
English

Credits
6.0

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
T. Schlurmann

Learning Objectives
I. Environmental Planning:
Students know fundamentals about landscape ecology and methodologies in landscape planning and nature
conservation. Students learn about the most important instruments of implementation of environmental objectives.
Students apply knowledge and know pros and cons of different implementation strategies.
II. Integrated Coastal Zone Management:
Students know basic approaches and design tools for coastal management purposes regarding the dynamic, continuous
and iterative process designed to promote sustainable management of coastal zones. Students are capable to solve
problems regarding coastal floods, hydrology and pollution, and are acquainted with the fundamentals of policies and
administration processes.
Contents:
I. Environmental Planning:
- Fundamentals of landscape ecology and nature conservation (Reich)
- conceptual framework for ecological networks,
- agricultural land-use and nature conservation
- stream restoration and nature conservation
- Fundamentals of landscape planning (v. Haaren)
- General strategies and instruments of nature conservation
- Environmental impact assessment and Impact regulation
- Implementation of environmental objectives in nature reserves
- Implementation of environmental objectives on farmland: Financing of eco services by farmers and foresters
- Communication in planning and implementation; (example: environmental advice to farmers)
Parallel to lecture work an application on a case study in a seminar is carried out (exercises).
II. Integrated Coastal Zone Management:
- Economics and ecology of coastal zones
- Stakeholders, coastal environment and measures to protect/defend/sustain the coastlines
- Design of infrastructures and measures to maintain
Workload:

180h

Prerequisites:

Environmental Hydraulics, Hydrology and Water Resources Management

Literature:

Selected publications will be provided at the beginning of the course (v. Haaren, Reich).
Dean, R. and R. Dalrymple, 1991. Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers & Scientists. Advanced
Series on Ocean Engineering, Vol. 2, World Scientific Publishing Company.
Clark, J.D., 1996. Coastal Zone Management Handbook. CRC-Press.

Media:

PowerPoint, Overhead, Blackboard

Particularities:
Lecturers:

von Haaren, Reich, Schlurmann

Supervisors:

von Haaren, Reich, Schlurmann

Examiner:

von Haaren, Reich, Schlurmann

Institute:

Franzius-Institute for Hydraulic, Waterways and Coastal Engineering


Institute of Environmetnal Planning

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M.Sc. Water Resources and Environmental Management


Hydropower Engineering
Mode of Examination
Oral Examination

Type of Module
Elective

SWH
4

Language
English

Area of Competence
Supplementary

Credits
6.0

Sem.
3 (WS)
rd

Organizer
Hildebrandt/Klameth

Learning Objectives
In this course the students acquire extended knowledge about weir and dam construction as well as subsoil sealing. The
students achieve general competences in planning, designing and dimensioning of hydro dams and their foundations.
Furthermore, they obtain basic knowledge about economical energy aspects, hydropower station components, - design
and utilisation as well as usage of hydro power in coastal areas.
Contents:
- Different types and operation modes of hydropower plants
- Design guidelines, principles of construction and dimensioning concepts for barrages
- River power plants and storage power plants
- Design of turbines
- Hydraulic design of flood spillways
- Dam structures, operation and verification of stability
- FE-analyses of dams
- Construction of earth-fill dams and subsoil sealing
Workload:

150 h

Prerequisites:

Environmental Hydraulics, Soil Mechanics for Hydraulic Structures

Literature:

Siddiqui, I. H. (2009): Dams and reservoirs: planning and engineering. Oxford Univ. Press
R. Fell (2005): Geotechnical engineering of dams. Balkema
Hammond, R. (1958): Water power engineering and some electrical problems

Media:

White board, Powerpoint Slides

Particularities:
Lecturers:

A. Hildebrandt, M. Klameth, K. Abdel-Rahman

Supervisors:

T. Schlurmann, M. Achmus

Examiner:

A. Hildebrandt, M. Klameth

Institute:

Franzius-Institute for Hydraulic, Waterways and Coastal Engineering


Institute of Soil Mechanics, Foundation Engineering and Waterpower Engineering

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