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April  10,  2015  

Clinton  Foundation  
1271  Avenue  of  the  Americas  42nd  Floor  
New  York,  NY  10020  
 
Dear  Secretary  Hillary  Rodham  Clinton,  
 
We,  the  undersigned  citizens  groups  from  across  the  United  States,  write  to  urge  you  to  join  the  
growing  majority  of  Americans  against  fracking.  The  increased  use  of  this  dangerous  process  has  
already  put  many  communities  in  harm’s  way,  causing  water  contamination,  negative  health  effects,  
earthquakes,  and  a  host  of  other  disastrous  impacts.  Your  use  of  the  office  of  Secretary  of  State  to  tout  
fracking  around  the  world  was  gravely  disappointing.  However,  in  light  of  overwhelming  and  rapidly  
increasing  scientific  evidence  of  harm,  we  ask  that  you  now  acknowledge  the  inherent  dangers  in  shale  
development  and  stand  with  us  and  the  countless  families  and  communities  at  risk  from  fracking  across  
the  nation.  
 
After  years  of  study,  your  home  state  of  New  York  rightly  concluded  that  the  evidence  is  clear  that  
fracking  is  not  safe  and  should  be  banned.  When  recommending  that  New  York  impose  a  ban,  
Department  of  Health  Commissioner  Dr.  Howard  Zucker  candidly  said,  “I  asked  myself,  'would  I  let  
my  family  live  in  a  community  with  fracking?'  The  answer  is  no.  I  therefore  cannot  recommend  anyone  
else's  family  to  live  in  such  a  community  either.”  This  is  a  question  you  must  answer  for  yourself,  and  
decide  whether  to  risk  the  health  and  safety  of  communities  throughout  our  country.  
 
In  the  last  few  years,  early  anecdotal  evidence  of  harm  has  been  confirmed  by  an  avalanche  of  
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peer-­reviewed  studies. ​   ​  An  analysis  by  independent  experts  of  the  more  than  400  peer  reviewed  
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studies  finds  that  the  vast  majority  of  these  studies  show  problems  and  harms. ​  For  instance,  96%  of  the  
papers  dealing  with  health  indicate  risks  or  adverse  outcomes,  92%  of  those  dealing  with  air  quality  
indicate  elevated  concentrations  of  air  pollutants,  and  73%  looking  at  water  quality  indicate  water  
contamination  or  threats.  Notably,  75%  of  all  studies  on  shale  gas  development  have  been  published  in  
the  past  two  years.  Similarly,  the  Council  of  Canadian  Academies  examined  the  existing  data  in  a  
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comprehensive  292  page  report  in  2014,  identifying  a  range  of  risks,  including  threats  to  groundwater.  
 
These  impacts  are  being  borne  by  far  too  many  Americans  across  the  country.  Water  contamination  and  
air  pollution  with  dangerous  endocrine  disruptors  and  carcinogens  are  increasingly  common.  Many  
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 Physicians  Scientists  &  Engineers  for  Healthy  Energy  STUDY  CITATATION  DATABASE  on  Shale  &  Tight  
Gas  Development:  http://www.psehealthyenergy.org/site/view/1180  
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 Concerned  Health  Professionals  of  New  York.  Compendium  of  Scientific,  Medical,  and  Media  Findings  
Demonstrating  Risks  and  Harms  of  Fracking  (Unconventional  Gas  and  Oil  Extraction).  December  11,  2014.  
Available  online:  http://concernedhealthny.org/compendium/  
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 PSE  Healthy  Energy  working  paper  statistical  analysis  of  the  peer-­reviewed  scientific  literature,  2009-­2014:  
http://www.psehealthyenergy.org/site/view/1233  
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 Council  of  Canadian  Academies.  (2014,  May  1).  ​Environmental  Impacts  of  Shale  Gas  Extraction  in  
Canada:  the  Expert  Panel  on  Harnessing  Science  and  Technology  to  Understand  the  Environmental  
Impacts  of  Shale  Gas  Extraction.​  Retrieved  June  24,  2014,  from  http://bit.ly/1nNicuf  

parents  now  have  to  worry  about  what  their  children  are  drinking  and  breathing,  often  reporting  
increased  rates  of  asthma,  difficulty  breathing,  excessive  nose  bleeds,  and  other  acute  health  problems  
linked  to  the  chemicals  from  fracking  operations.  In  Pennsylvania  for  example,  the  state  has  confirmed  
at  least  243  instances  of  water  contamination.  In  Texas,  Wyoming,  Utah,  Colorado,  and  elsewhere,  
researchers  have  found  disturbing  levels  of  ground-­level  ozone  and  volatile  organic  compounds,  
including  carcinogenic  benzene  and  formaldehyde.    
 
In  many  states,  fracking  and  associated  toxic  wastewater  disposal  wells  are  causing  thousands  of  
earthquakes,  including  some  greater  than  magnitude  5.0  that  have  damaged  people’s  homes.  
Communities  with  fracking  have  seen  alarming  increases  in  crime,  including  assault,  drunk  driving,  
drug  abuse,  and  sex  trafficking,  as  well  as  fatal  vehicle  crashes.  These  costs  fall  on  local  communities,  
while  time  and  again,  the  number  of  jobs  promised  have  not  materialized.  Instead,  transient  workers  
come  in  for  a  short  period,  and  then  inevitably  leave  as  the  short-­term  boom  turns  to  bust,  and  local  
families  are  left  to  deal  with  the  impacts  and  contamination.    
 
Fracking  also  poses  a  major  threat  to  the  climate.  On  December  1,  2014,  you  rightfully  spoke  about  the  
threat  of  climate  change,  but  were  dangerously  wrong  in  your  assumption  that  fracking  and  natural  gas  
can  serve  as  a  bridge  to  a  cleaner  energy  economy.  Shale  development  leaks  a  great  deal  of  methane  
into  the  atmosphere,  which  is  86  times  more  potent  in  the  atmosphere  than  carbon  dioxide  over  20  
years,  according  to  the  Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate  Change.  While  the  full  picture  of  whether  
natural  gas  from  fracking  or  coal  is  slightly  worse  for  the  climate  is  still  being  determined,  it’s  clear  
that  natural  gas  is  not  a  bridge  fuel  and  will  certainly  only  make  the  climate  crisis  worse.    
 
Additionally,  in  that  same  speech  you  indicated  that  moving  away  from  fossil  fuels  would  hamper  the  
economy,  and  alluded  to  the  fact  that  “strong  leadership”  is  necessary  to  answer  the  challenge  of  
climate  change.  That  leadership  must  be  to  aggressively  increase  renewable  energy  and  efficiency,  
which  would  create  far  more  jobs  than  fossil  fuels  and  in  turn  grow  our  economy.  Unfortunately,  our  
current  system  is  rigged  for  fossil  fuels,  with  subsidies,  loopholes,  and  externalization  of  the  terrible  
costs  wrought  by  gas,  coal,  and  oil  including  negative  health  effects  and  the  increasing  costs  of  climate  
change.  This  system  must  change.    
 
Given  the  demonstrable  threats  that  fracking  poses  to  our  health,  water,  and  climate,  Americans  are  
increasingly  opposed  to  fracking.  Polls  showed  that  New  Yorkers  supported  Governor  Cuomo’s  wise  
decision  to  ban  fracking  by  an  overwhelming  57-­23  percent.  Nationally,  opposition  to  fracking  is  
quickly  growing,  with  47-­41  percent  of  Americans  opposed  to  expanded  fracking,  including  59-­29  
percent  among  Democrats,  and  53-­37  percent  among  independents.  In  spite  of  the  powerful  oil  and  gas  
industry’s  baseless  propaganda,  lobbying,  and  bullying,  Americans  are  learning  the  truth,  and  the  more  
they  do,  the  more  they  oppose  fracking.  The  negative  impacts  have  also  led  other  countries  to  enact  
bans  and  moratoria,  including  Australia,  Bulgaria,  Scotland,  France,  Germany,  Ireland,  Netherlands,  
Tasmania,  Wales,  and  parts  of  Canada,  Spain,  and  Switzerland.  
 
For  our  health,  our  water,  and  our  climate,  we  need  the  United  States  to  join  that  list  and  stop  the  
expansion  of  fracking.  We  implore  you  to  listen  to  the  science,  listen  to  the  pleas  of  mothers  and  fathers  

who  don’t  want  their  children  to  breathe  or  drink  toxic  chemicals,  and  join  the  anti-­fracking  majority.  
We  ask  that  you  join  us  in  taking  a  stand  against  fracking,  and  boldly  support  a  swift  transition  to  
renewable  energy.    
 
Sincerely,  
 
 
350NJ  
Rosemary  Dreger  Carey  
New  Jersey  

Lehigh  Valley  Gas  Truth  
Julie  Ann  Edgar,  Organizer  
Pennsylvania  

Alliance  for  a  green  Economy  
Jessica  Azulay,  Program  Director  
New  York  

MakeCCsafe  
Suzanne  DeBenedittis,  Phd  Director  
California  

Athens  County  Fracking  Action  Network  
Heather  Cantino,  Steering  Committee  Chair  
Ohio  

Mamaki  
Tara  Drolkar,  Member  
New  York  

Aytzim:  Ecological  Judaism  
David  Krantz,  President  
National  

Maryland  Environmental  Health  Network  
Rebecca  Ruggles,  Director  
Maryland  

Berks  Gas  Truth  
Karen  Feridun  
Pennsylvania  

Michigan  Citizens  for  Water  Conservation  
Peggy  Case,  President  
Michigan  

Berkshire  Environmental  Action  Team  (BEAT)  
Jane  Winn,  Executive  Director  
Massachusetts  

Milford  Doers/Residents  of  Crumhorn  Mtn  
Otto  Butz,  Director  
New  York  

Bisbee  and  Cochise  County  People  for  
Community  and  Environmental  Rights  
Maggie  Kohanek,  Chair  
Arizona  

New  Paltz  Defense  Against  Fracking  
Rosalyn  Cherry,  Member  
New  York  

Breast  Cancer  Action  
Karuna  Jaggar,  Executive  Director  
National  

New  York  Society  for  Ethical  Culture  
Phyllis  Kreuttner,  Member  
New  York  

Capital  District  Against  Fracking  
Siobhan  Burke,  Founding  Member  
New  York  

New  Yorkers  Against  Fracking  
Mark  Ruffalo,  Advisory  Body  Member  
New  York  

Catskill  Mountainkeeper  
Wes  Gillingham  Program  Director  
New  York  

NJ  State  Industrial  Union  Council  
Carol  E  Gay,  President  
New  Jersey  

 
 
 

 
 

Center  for  Biological  Diversity  
William  Snape,  Senior  Counsel  
National  

North  American  Climate,Conservation  and  
Environment(NACCE)  
Jerry  Rivers  
National  

Chesapeake  Sustainable  Business  Council  
Neil  Seldman  
Maryland  

NY  State  Council  of  Churches  
The  Rev.  Brooke  Newell,  Director  of  Social  Witness  
New  York  

Citizen  Action  of  NY  
Isaac  Silberman-­Gorn,  Community  Organizer  
New  York  

Otsego  2000  
Ellen  Pope,  Executive  Director  
New  York  

Citizens  For  Clean  Water  
Vera  Scroggins,  Director  
Pennsylvania  

Our  Health,  Our  Future,  Our  Longmont  
Kaye  Fissinger,  President  
Colorado  

Clean  Water  for  North  Carolina  
Hope  Taylor,  Executive  Director  
North  Carolina  

Pennsylvania  Alliance  for  Clean  Air  and  Water  
Jenny  Lisak,  Co-­Director  
Pennsylvania  

Columbus  Community  Bill  of  Rights  
Greg  Pace,  Organizer  
Ohio  

Preserve  Rural  Randolph  
Sandra  Engle  
Ohio  

Community  Watersheds  Clean  Water  Coalition  
Fay  Muir,  President  
New  York  

Progressive  Democrats  of  America  
Conor  Boylan,  Executive  Director  
National  

Community-­Vision  Partners,  Benefit  LLC  
Stephen  Shaff  
Maryland  

PSR,  AZ  
Barbara  H  Warren,  MD,  Director  
Arizona  

Concerned  Citizens  of  Covert  
Janette  Chauncey,  Webmaster  
New  York  

R-­CAUSE  (Rochesterians  Concerned  About  
Unsafe  Shale-­gas  Extraction  
Anna  Sears,  Co-­Founder  
New  York  

Concerned  Citizens  of  Danby  
Eric  Banford  
New  York  

Rainforest  Action  Network  
Amanda  Starbuck,  Climate  &  Energy  Program  
Director  
National  

Concerned  Citizens  of  Medina  County  
Kathie  Jones,  Co-­Founder  
Ohio  

Reach  Out  America  
Patricia  Katz,  Green  Committee  Chair  
New  York  

Concerned  Citizens  of  Rural  Broome  
John  Bijarney,  Founding  Member  
New  York  

Rochester  Defense  Against  Fracking  
Toby  Stover,  Founding  Member  
New  York  

 

 

Cortlandt  W.A.T.C.H.  
Susan  McDonnell,  President  
New  York  

Rochester  People's  Climate  Coalition  
George  Payne,  Leadership  Team  
New  York  

Delaware  Riverkeeper  Network  
Tracy  Carluccio,  Deputy  Director  
Pennsylvania  

Russian  Riverkeeper  
Kate  Wilson,  Executive  Assistant  
California  

Democracy  for  New  York  City  
Richard  Wallner,  Political  Director  
New  York  

SAFE  
Charles  Paprocki,  Board  Member  
Illinois  

Don't  Frack  Michigan  
Joanne  Cromley,  Co-­Chair  
Michigan  

SASD  
Michael  Chojnicki,  President  
New  York  

Earth  First  Initiative  
Nancy  Denker,  Founder  
National  

Save  Nevada's  Water  Ban  Fracking  In  Nevada  
Christian  Gerlach,  Executive  Director  
Nevada  

Elder  Creek  Center  For  The  Land  
Brien  Brennan,  Co-­founder  
California  

Sharon  Springs  Against  Hydrofracking  
Lisa  Zaccaglini  
New  York  

Family  Farm  Defenders  
John  E.  Peck,  Executive  Director  
National  

Sierra  Club  Atlantic  Chapter  
Carl  Arnold  
New  York  

Fleased  
Ellen  Harrison,  Director  
New  York  

Sisters  of  St.  Francis  of  Philadelphia  
Nora  M.  Nash,  Director  of  Corporate  Social  
Responsibility  
Pennsylvania  

Food  and  Water  Watch  
Wenonah  Hauter,  Executive  Director  
National  

Solutions  Grassroots  
Lee  Ziesche  
National  

Forest  Grove  Oregon  Citizens  Against  the  (LNG  
related)  Pipelines,  FGOCAP  
Paul  Sansone,  Spokesperson  
Oregon  

South  East  Communities  Against  Pollution  
(SECAP)  
Russell  S.  Donnelly  
Maryland  

Frac  Sand  Sentinel  
Patricia  Popple  
Wisconsin  

Southern  Cayuga  Anti-­Fracking  Alliance  
Michael  Gorr,  Coordinator  
New  York  

FracDallas  
Marc  W.  McCord,  Director  
Texas  

Southern  Illinoisans  Against  Fracturing  Our  
Environment  
Tabitha  Tripp,  Interim  Director  
Illinois  

 

 

Frack  Action  
Julia  Walsh,  Founder  and  Campaign  Director  
New  York  

Southwest  Ohio  No  Frack  Forum  
Joanne  Gerson  
Ohio  

Frack  Files  
Robert  Wikler  
Colorado  

Stencils  Against  Fracking  
Sarah  Craig  
California  

Frack  Free  Geauga  
Kathy  Flora,  Member  
Ohio  

Stop  the  Algonquin  Pipeline  Expansion  
Susan  Van  Dolsen,  Co-­Founder  
New  York  

FreshWater  Accountability  Project  Ohio  
Lea  Harper,  Managing  Director  
Ohio  

Stop  the  Frack  Attack  Advisory  Council  
Jill  Wiener,  Member  
National  

Friends  of  Butternuts  
Carol  Blankenship  
New  York  

Sustainable  Akron  
Marcia  Wolff  
Ohio  

Friends  of  Sustainable  Sidney  
Albert  Crudo  
New  York  

Sustainable  Otsego  
Adrian  Kuzminski,  Moderator  
New  York  

Friends  of  the  Earth  
Kate  DeAngelis,  Climate  and  Energy  Campaigner  
National  

Sustainable  Tompkins  
Gay  Nicholson,  President  
New  York  

Gas  Free  Seneca  
Yvonne  Taylor,  Co-­Founder  
New  York  

The  River  Project  
Melanie  Winter,  Director  
California  

Gasland  
Josh  Fox,  Director  
National  

Town  of  Oneonta  Concerned  Citizens  
Nicole  Camarata,  Founding  Member  
New  York  

Glenmary  Commission  on  Justice  
Betsy  Dwyer,  Director  
National  

United  for  Action  
Beth  Kelley,  Board  Member  
New  York  

Grail  Climate  Action  Circle  
Joy  Garland,  Co-­Chair  
New  York  

Vestal  Residents  for  Safe  Energy  
Pat  Roberts,  Facilitator  
New  York  

Grassroots  Environmental  Education  
Patricia  Wood  
New  York  

Water  Equality  
Daniel  Morrissey,  Founder  
New  York  

Green  America  
Fran  Teplitz  
National  

WESPAC  Foundation  
Nada  Khader,  Executive  Director  
New  York  

 

 

Hydrorelief  Web  
K.  Roberts  
New  York  

West  80s  Neighborhood  Association  
Melissa  Elstein,  Secretary  
New  York  

Idaho  Concerned  Area  Residents  for  the  
Environment  -­  ICARE  
Alma  Hasse,  Executive  Director  
Idaho  

Westchester  for  Change  
Elizabeth  Saenger,  Co-­Organizer  
New  York  

Interfaith  Sacred  Earth  Coalition  of  the  
Susquehanna  Valley  (PA)  
The  Rev.  Dr.  Leah  Schade,  Founder  
Pennsylvania  

WildEarth  Guardians  
Tim  Ream,  Climate  and  Energy  Campaign  Director  
National  

Lakewood  Fracktivists  
Eleanor  J.  Jefferson  
Colorado