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MDiv Unit Outlines

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MDIV UNIT OUTLINES

LA002 Introduction to New Testament Greek

D EPARTMENT OF B IBLE AND L ANGUAGES

Status
Elective

LANGUAGES (LA)

Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA001, nor take this unit with
or after LA004A / LA004B.

LA001 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew


Status
Elective
Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA002, nor take this unit with
or after LA003A / LA003B.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the fundamental
structures of Biblical Hebrew.
(b) To enable candidates to make proper use of
commentaries on the Hebrew text and to be able to
consult lexica and grammars for exegetical
purposes.
(c) To enable candidates to appreciate the fundamentals
of translation of the biblical texts into English.
Content
Typical areas to be covered would include:
1 The place of Hebrew among Semitic languages:
historical relationships; lexical and grammatical
correspondence.
2 The writing system: the Hebrew alphabet, PalaeoHebrew and square script; the vowel system;
Masoretic notations.
3 Grammatical essentials: for example, the roots;
noun forms and relationships the verbal aspects;
the stems of the verbal system; syntax (word
order, clause types, use of infinitives) with respect to
the use of Hebrew lexica, concordances and
commentaries based on the Hebrew text.
Bibliography
Prescribed texts and reference works:
Kittel, R. (ed.), Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
(Stuttgart: Wrttemberg Bible Society, 1990).
Holladay, W. L., A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic
Lexicon of the Old Testament (Leiden: Brill, 1989).
Joon, P. and T. Muraoka, A Grammar of Biblical
Hebrew (rev. ed.; Rome: Editrice Pontificio Instituto
Biblico, 2006).
Recommended readings:
Chisholm, R. B. Jr., From Exegesis to Exposition: A
Practical Guide to Using Biblical Hebrew (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Kelley, P. H., Biblical Hebrew: An Introductory
Grammar (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Seow, C. L., A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew (Rev.
ed.; Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).

Learning Outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the fundamental
structures of New Testament Greek.
(b) To enable candidates to make proper use of
commentaries on the Greek text and to be able to
consult lexica and grammars for exegetical
purposes.
(c) To enable candidates to appreciate the fundamentals
of translation of the biblical texts into English.
Content
Typical areas to be covered would include:
1 The emergence and character of Koine Greek.
2 The main features of accidence, grammar and
syntax; the alphabet, pronunciation; the Greek verb
(tense, aspect, voice, mood); the participle; basic
syntax (word order, emphasis, prepositional
constructions, purpose and result clauses); and
parsing with respect to the use of Greek lexica,
concordances, commentaries on the Greek text and
other grammatical and exegetical tools.
Bibliography
Prescribed texts and reference works:
Aland, B., K. Aland, et al (eds), The Greek New
Testament (4th ed.; Stuttgart: UBS, 1994).
Trenchard, W. C., A Concise Dictionary of New
Testament Greek (Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
Wallace, D. B., Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996).
Recommended readings:
Countryman, L. W., The New Testament is in Greek.
A Short Course for Exegetes (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1993).
Goodrick, E. W., Do It Yourself Hebrew and Greek
(Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 1980, 2002 repr).
Merritt, M. A., New Testament Greek for Laymen: An
Introductory Grammar (Lanham, MD: UPA,
2002).
Mounce, W. D., Greek for the Rest of Us (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).

LA003A Biblical Hebrew A


Status
Elective
Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA001 with or after this unit

MDiv Unit Outlines

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Learning Outcomes
(a) To impart to candidates a solid working knowledge
of the Hebrew language as used in the Hebrew
Bible, up to at least half way through one standard
grammar of Biblical Hebrew;
(b) To introduce students to the textual critical
apparatus of the Hebrew Bible.

LA003B Biblical Hebrew B

Content
Typical areas to be covered would include an
introduction to Biblical Hebrew through completion of
at least the first half of a standard Hebrew grammar
(e.g., Kelley, Ross, Seow).

Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA001 with or after this unit.

Bibliography
Reference works:
Brown, F., G. A. Driver and S. Briggs, A Hebrew &
English Lexicon of the Old Testament (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1974, 1996 repr).
Clines, D. J. A., The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew
(8 Vols; Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix, 1993) [Vols.
7-8 forthcoming].
Joon, P. and T. Muraoka, A Grammar of Biblical
Hebrew (rev. ed.; Rome: Editrice Pontificio Instituto
Biblico, 2006).
Koehler, L. and W. Baumgartner, (Rev. by
Baumgartner, W. and J. J. Stamm et al), The Hebrew
and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (Leiden:
Brill, 19942000).
Scott, W. R., A Simplified Guide to BHS, with H. P.
Ruger, An English Key to the Latin Words &
Abbreviations and Symbols of BHS (North Richland
Hills, TX: Bibal, 1987).
Wonneberger, R., Understanding BHS: A Manual for
the Users of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Rome:
Pontifical Biblical Institute, 1990).
Recommended readings:
Chisholm, R. B. Jr, From Exegesis to Exposition: A
Practical Guide to Using Biblical Hebrew (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Cook, J. A., and R. D. Holmstedt, Ancient Hebrew. A
Student Grammar (Toronto: University of Toronto,
2007).
Kelley, P. H., Biblical Hebrew: An Introductory
Grammar (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Martin, J. D. (ed.), Davidsons Introductory Hebrew
Grammar (27th ed.; Sheffield: Continuum, 1993).
Practico, G. D. and M. V. Van Pelt, Basics of Biblical
Hebrew and Workbook (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2001).
Ross, A. P., Introducing Biblical Hebrew (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Seow, C. L., A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew (Rev.
ed.; Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).

Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
Students must have completed LA003A.

Learning Outcomes
(a) To impart to candidates a solid working knowledge
of the Hebrew language as used in the Hebrew
Bible;
(b) To give candidates experience in translating Biblical
Hebrew: basic translation skills, including the use of
lexical aids; familiarity with textual critical
apparatus.
Content
Typical areas to be covered would include:
1 An introduction to Biblical Hebrew through
completion of a standard Hebrew grammar (e.g.,
Lambdin, Ross, Weingreen).
2 Translation of selected chapters of the Old
Testament in the light of the listed aims (e.g.,
Genesis 13, or passages of comparable length and
difficulty).
Bibliography
(For reference works and recommended readings refer
to LA003A).
Prescribed texts:
Kittel, R. (ed.), Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
(Stuttgart: Wrttemberg Bible Society, 1990).
Schenker, A., et al., Biblia Hebraica Quinta (Stuttgart:
Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2004- ) (fascicles
appearing regularly).

LA004A New Testament Greek A


Status
Elective
Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA002 with or after this unit
Learning Outcomes
(a) To impart to candidates a solid working knowledge
of New Testament Greek, its grammar and syntax,
at least up to half way through one standard
grammar of New Testament Greek.
(b) To introduce candidates to the textual apparatus
printed in the UBS Greek New Testament in an
elementary way.

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Content
Typical areas to be covered would include completion of
at least the first half of a standard introduction to New
Testament Greek (e.g. Duff, Stevens, Mounce).
Bibliography
Reference works:
Bauer, W., W. F. W. Danker, F. Arndt and F. W.
Gingrich, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New
Testament and Other Early Christian Literature
(3rd ed.; Chicago: University of Chicago, 2000).
Mounce, W. D., The Analytical Lexicon to the Greek
New Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1993).
Rogers, C. L. Jr. and C. L. Rogers, The New Linguistic
and Exegetical Key to the Greek New Testament
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1998).
Trenchard, W. C., The Students Complete Vocabulary
Guide to the Greek New Testament (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 1992).
Zerwick, M. and M. Grosvenor, An Analysis of the
Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute,
1981, 1996 repr).
Recommended readings:
Black, D. A., Learn to Read New Testament Greek
(expanded ed.; Nashville: Broadman, 1994).
Black, D. A., Its Still Greek to Me (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 1998).
Duff, J., Elements of New Testament Greek
(Cambridge: CUP, 2005).
Mounce, W. D., Basics of Biblical Greek Grammar
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Powers, B. W., Learn to Read the Greek New
Testament with Student Workbook (5th ed.;
London: SPCK, 1995).
Stevens, G. L., New Testament Greek (2nd ed.;
Lanham, MD: UPA, 1997).
Stevens, G. L., New Testament Greek Primer (Eugene,
OR: Cascade, 2004).
Wallace, D. B., The Basics of New Testament Syntax:
An Intermediate Greek Grammar (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2000).

LA004B New Testament Greek B


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
Students must have completed LA004A.
Exclusions
Students cannot also take LA002 with or after this unit
Learning Outcomes
(a) To impart to candidates a solid working knowledge
of New Testament Greek, its grammar and syntax;
(b) To complete introducing students to the textual
apparatus printed in the UBS Greek New
Testament;

(c) To give students experience in translating New


Testament Greek.
Content
Typical areas to be covered would include:
1 Completion of standard introduction to New
Testament Greek (e.g. Duff, Stevens, Mounce).
2 Translation of selected passages of the New
Testament (e.g. Mark 14, Philippians, or passages
of comparable length and difficulty).
Bibliography
(For reference works and recommended readings refer
to LA004A).
Prescribed texts:
Aland, B., K. Aland, et al (eds), The Greek New
Testament (4th ed.; Stuttgart: UBS, 2000).
Nestle, E., E. Nestle, et al., Novum Testamentum
Graece
(27th
ed.;
Stuttgart:
Deutsche
Bibelgesellschaft, 1993).

LA010 Intermediate Greek


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A and LA004B
Learning Outcomes
(a) Enhance the vocabulary range of the student so as to
ease the frustration of constant reliance on lexical
aids
(b) Further the study of the grammatical forms and to
demonstrate the exegetical significance of these
forms
(c) Further develop NT translation by set exercises
working with grammatical forms
(d) Widen exposure to Koine Greek by the means of
translation of selected texts
Content
Typical areas to be covered would include:
1 The study of Greek grammar and syntax at a level
more advanced than that undertaken in LA004.
2 Translation of at least four chapters taken from:
(a) The Septuagint (LXX); or
(b) Sections of the Greek NT not otherwise
covered in the students course; or
(c) Non-biblical early Christian literature; or
(d) The equivalent in the form of Hellenistic or
Graeco-Roman papyrus documents.
Bibliography
(Refer to LA004A and LA004B for basic texts)
Prescribed texts:
Aland, B., K. Aland, et al (eds), The Greek New
Testament (4th ed.; Stuttgart: UBS, 2000).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Nestle, E., E. Nestle, et al., Novum Testamentum


Graece
(27th
ed.;
Stuttgart:
Deutsche
Bibelgesellschaft, 1993).
Reference works:
Aland, K., K. Aland and E. F. Rhodes, The Text of the
New Testament (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1987).
Bauer, W., F. W. Danker, F. Arndt and F. W.
Gingrich, Greek-English Lexicon of the New
Testament and Other Early Christian Literature
(3rd ed.; Chicago: Univ. of Chicago, 2000).
Brooks, J. A. and C. L. Winbery, A Morphology of
New Testament Greek (Lanham, MD: UPA,
1994).
Conybeare, F. C. and St. G. Stock, Grammar of
Septuagint Greek: With Selected Readings,
Vocabularies, and Updated Indexes (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 2001; based on 1905 edition).
Fanning, B. M., Verbal Aspect in New Testament
Greek (Oxford: Clarendon, 1990).
Horsley, G. H. R., New Documents Illustrating Early
Christianity, vols.1-5 (North Ryde: AHDRC
Macquarie University, 1981-1989).
Llewellyn, S. R., New Documents Illustrating Early
Christianity, vols.6-9 (North Ryde: AHDRC
Macquarie University, 1992-2002).
Lust, J., E. Eynikel and K. Hauspie, Greek-English
Lexicon of the Septuagint, rev.ed. (Stuttgart:
Deutsche Biblegesellschaft, 2003).
McKay, K. L., A New Syntax of the Verb in New
Testament Greek (New York: Peter Lang, 1994).
Moule, C. F. D., An Idiom-Book of New Testament
Greek (2nd ed.; Cambridge: Cambridge Univ.
Press, 1959, repr. 1971).
Mounce, W. D., The Morphology of Biblical Greek
(Grand Rapids: Michigan, 1994).
Muraoka, T., A Greek-English Lexicon of the
Septuagint, Chiefly of the Pentateuch and the
Twelve Prophets (Louvain: Peeters, 2002).
Porter, S. E. and D. A. Carson, Biblical Greek
Language and Linguistics: Open Questions
Current
Research
(Sheffield:
Sheffield
Academic, 1993).
Porter, S. E., Verbal Aspect in the Greek of the New
Testament (New York: Peter Lang, 1989).
Rahlfs, A. and R. Hanhart (ed.), Septuaginta (2nd rev.
ed.;Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesesllschaft, 2006).
Wallace, D. B., Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996).
Wikgren, A., E. C. Colwell and R. Marcus, Hellenistic
Greek Texts (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago, 1947).
Young, N. H., Syntax Lists for Students of New
Testament Greek (Cambridge: CUP, 2001).
Zerwick, M., Biblical Greek Illustrated by Example
(Rome: Biblical Institute, 1981, 1996 repr).
Zerwick, M. and M. Grosvenor, Grammatical Analysis
of the Greek New Testament (3rd ed.; Rome:
Pontifical Biblical Institute, 1988).
Recommended readings:
Greenlee, J. H., Introduction to New Testament
Criticism (rev. ed.; Peabody: Hendrickson, 1995).

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Metzger, B. M. and B. D. Ehrman, The Text of the New


Testament. Its transmission, corruption and
restoration (4th ed.; New York: OUP, 2005).
Metzger, B. M., A Textual Commentary on the Greek
New Testament (2nd ed.; Stuttgart: UBS, 1994).
Mounce, W. D., Graded Reader of Biblical Greek
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996).
Porter, S. E., Idioms of the Greek New Testament (2nd
ed.; Sheffield: SAP, 1994).
Scott, B. B., Reading New Testament Greek (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1993).
Wegner, P. D., The Journey from Texts to
Translations (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1999).
Young, R. A., Intermediate New Testament Greek
(Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 1994).

LA011 Intemediate Hebrew


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Learning outcomes:
The aims of this unit are to:
(a) enhance the vocabulary range of the student so as
to ease the frustration of constant reliance on
lexical aids
(b) further the study of grammatical forms and to
demonstrate the exegetical significance of these
forms
(c) further develop OT translation by set exercises
working with the grammatical forms
(d) widen exposure to Biblical Hebrew by means of
translation of selected texts
Content:
1 Reading of a standard reference grammar
2 Translation and grammatical analysis of four
chapters such as Exodus 1-4, Joshua 1-4 Judges
13-16, Ruth 1-4 or other passages of similar
length and difficulty from, for example, the Dead
Sea Scrolls or Rabbinic texts
Bibliography
(Refer to LA003A and LA003B for basic texts)
Prescribed texts:
Kittel, R. (ed.), Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
(Stuttgart: Wrttemberg Bible Society, 1990).
Schenker, A., et al., Biblia Hebraica Quinta (Stuttgart:
Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2004- ) (fascicles
appearing regularly).
Reference works:
Brown, F., G. A. Driver and S. Briggs, A Hebrew &
English Lexicon of the Old Testament (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1974, 1996 repr).

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Clines, D. J. A., The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew


(8 Vols; Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix, 1993)
[Vols. 7-8 forthcoming].
Joon, P. and T. Muraoka, A Grammar of Biblical
Hebrew (rev. ed.; Rome: Editrice Pontificio
Instituto Biblico, 2006).
Koehler, L. and W. Baumgartner, (rev. by
Baumgartner, W. & J. J. Stamm et al), The
Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old
Testament (Leiden: Brill, 19942000).
Pelt, M. and G. D. Pratico, The Vocabulary Guide to
Biblical Hebrew (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2003).
Scott, W. R., A Simplified Guide to BHS, with H. P.
Ruger, An English Key to the Latin Words &
Abbreviations and Symbols of BHS (North
Richland Hills, TX: Bibal, 1987).
van der Merwe, C. H. J., J. A. Naud and J. H. Kroeze,
A Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar
(Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1999).
Wonneberger, R., Understanding BHS: A Manual for
the Users of Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
(Rome: Pontifical Biblical Institute, 1990).
Recommended readings:
Arnold, B. T. and J. H. Choi, A Guide to Biblical
Hebrew Syntax (Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
Tov, E., Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible
(rev.ed.; Minneapolis: Fortress, 2001).
Waltke, B. K. and M. OConnor, An Introduction to
Biblical Hebrew Syntax (Winona Lake:
Eisenbrauns, 1990).
Williams, R. J., Williams Hebrew Syntax (3rd ed.;
Toronto: University of Toronto, 2007).
Wrthwein, E. and E. F. Rhodes, The Text of the Old
Testament (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1995).

LA689 Languages Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
To be determined on a seminar-by-seminar basis,
linked to content and focus
Learning outcomes:
(a) Develop a program of study that explores in depth a
specific language topic or theme;
(b) To give candidates the opportunity to develop cooperative research skills, so that candidates can
discover new skills and implement them in their
research;
(c) Enable candidates to explore the application of the
chosen language topic so that candidates can relate
these to personal and pastoral needs, including the
translation and interpretation of biblical translations.

Content:
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but must have staff and library
support sufficient to sustain the unit. The course
coordinator is responsible for submitting for approval a
proposed unit outline along with assessment plans to the
moderator for Languages.
The unit is taught, conducted as a seminar involving
class discussion as well as lectures and individual
reading. The unit is not an individual research topic. It
is strongly recommended that the unit include set reading
not covered elsewhere in the candidates course.
1.
2.
3.

4.

The total amount of work expected is that equivalent


to an essay of approximately 6,000 words;
Candidates must demonstrate a thorough grasp of
the language issues involved;
Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of languages discerned in candidates learning;
Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology or
Ministry) may be used as the basis for this unit,
adjusted appropriately to reflect major level MDiv
study for students enrolled in the Master of Divinity.

Bibliography
None

OLD TESTAMENT (OT)


OT501 and OT502 Old Testament
Unit Descriptions:
These two units form the foundation upon which all
further study of the Old Testament builds. The primary
concern is to provide an overview of key features of
the content of the books of the Old Testament, along
with overall historical framework as provided by that
literature. Students will interact with major critical
issues, recognising that detailed consideration of these
will be given in advanced units. The study is
undertaken in the light of the various ancient contexts of
the biblical narrative, illustrated by modern
archaeological findings.
In covering the variety of literature it is not intended
that all potential issues be handled in detail. Within the
balance of the overall aims, lecturers are free to select
what issues to focus on in each book. Thus in some
cases Ancient Near Eastern background and the impact
of archaeological findings will be important, in others
significance of literary form and relevance for
interpretation, while commonly to the fore will be key
theological motifs. Lecturers will be free to select the
order in which material is covered. Also, if desired,
some discussion of books not explicitly mentioned
may be included, while maintaining relative
proportioning between Sections A and B in each unit

MDiv Unit Outlines

of approximately 60% and 40%. Examination


questions are to be set from each of Sections A and B.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates acquire an overall acquaintance
with the text of the Old Testament, as one of the two
primary documents of biblical studies and Christian
ministry;
(b) To provide candidates with an overview of the
contents of literature in the Old Testament, taking
into account the nature of that literature and major
critical issues;
(c) To give candidates an overall historical
framework within which to interpret the books of
the Old Testament;
(d) To ensure that candidates have an appreciation of
the appropriate Ancient Near Eastern background
(cultural, religious and archaeological) and its
significance for understanding the Old Testament;
(e) To provide candidates with an understanding of
major theological themes of the Old Testament and
their significance for Christian theology;
(f) To enable candidates to begin a more detailed
exploration of some aspects of Old Testament
studies;
(g) To consider the implications of the Old Testament
for Christian life and thought.
Recommended Readings:
OT501 and OT502 Old Testament
General Works
Candidates should consult relevant articles in standard
bible dictionaries, such as:
Alexander, T. D. and D. W. Baker (eds), Dictionary of
the Old Testament: Pentateuch (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2003).
Arnold, B. T. and H. G. M. Williamson (eds),
Dictionary of the Old Testament: Historical Books
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2005).
Alexander, T. D. and B. S. Rosner, et al (eds), New
Dictionary of Biblical Theology (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2000).
Bromiley, G. W. (ed.), International Standard Bible
Encyclopedia (4 Vols; Rev ed.; Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1988).
Freedman, D. N. (ed.), The Anchor Bible Dictionary (6
Vols; New York: Doubleday, 1992).
Freedman, D. N. (ed.), The Eerdmans Dictionary of the
Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Longman, T., III and P. Enns (eds), Dictionary of the
Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2008).
Sakenfeld, K., et al (eds), The New Interpreters
Dictionary of the Bible, 5 vols. (Nashville:
Abingdon, 2006- ) [Vols. 4-5 forthcoming].
Atlases
Aharoni, Y. and M. Avi-Yonah (eds), The Carta Bible
Atlas (4th ed.; Jerusalem: Carta, 2002).
Dowley, T. (ed.), The Baker Atlas of Christian History
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997).

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Mittmann, S. and G. Schmitt (eds), Tbingen Bible


Atlas (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2001).
Pritchard, J. B. and L. M. White (eds), HarperCollins
Concise Atlas of the Bible (New York:
HarperCollins, 2000).
Rainey, A. F. and R. S. Notley, The Sacred Bridge:
Cartas Atlas of the Biblical World (Jerusalem:
Carta, 2006).
Roaf, M., Cultural Atlas of Mesopotamia and the
Ancient Near East (New York: Facts on File,
1990).
Candidates should become familiar with texts related
to the Old Testament. These include:
Bienkowski, P. and A. Millard, Dictionary of the
Ancient Near East (London: British Museum/
Philadelphia: Univ. Of Pennsylvania, 2000).
Beyerlin, W., Near Eastern Religious Texts Relating to
the Old Testament (London: SCM, 1978).
Charlesworth, J. H., Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (2
Vols; New York: Doubleday; CUP, 19831985).
Hallo, W. W. and K. L. Younger Jr., The Context of
Scripture (3 Vols; Leiden: Brill, 2002).
Pritchard, J. B. (ed.), Ancient Near Eastern Texts (3rd ed.
+ supplement; Princeton: Princeton University,
19551969).
Archaeology
Aharoni, Y., Archaeology of the Land of Israel
(Philadelphia: Westminster, 1982).
Currid, J. D., Doing Archaeology in the Land of the
Bible (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1999).
Hoerth, A. J., Archaeology and the Old Testament
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Kitchen, K. A., On the Reliability of the Old Testament
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003).
Mazar, A., Archaeology of the Land of the Bible (New
York: Doubleday, 1990).
Stern, E., Archaeology of the Land of the Bible, vol. 2
(New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Walton, J. H., V. H. Matthews and M. W. Chavalas, The
IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old
Testament (Downers Grove: IVP, 2000).
Journals: Near Eastern Archaeology and Biblical
Archaeology Review
Old Testament Introduction
Brueggemann, W., An Introduction to the Old
Testament: The Canon and Christian Imagination
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003).
Collins, J. J., Introduction to the Hebrew Bible
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004).
Davies, P. and J. Rogerson, The Old Testament World
(2nd ed.; Louisville: WJK / London: T. & T. Clark,
2005).
Dumbrell, W., The Faith of Israel (2nd ed.; Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Flanders, H. J., et al, People of the Covenant (4th ed.;
New York: OUP, 1996).
Hill, A. E. and J. H. Walton, A Survey of the Old
Testament (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2000).

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66

Hill, A. E. and J. H. Walton, A Survey of the Old


Testament (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2009).
La Sor, W. S., et al, Old Testament Survey (2nd ed.;
Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Old Testament History
Albertz, R., A History of Israelite Religion in the Old
Testament Period (2 Vols; Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1992).
Bright, J., A History of Israel (4th ed, Philadelphia;
Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2000).
Coogan, M. D. (ed.), The Oxford History of the Biblical
World (New York: OUP, 1998).
Kaiser, W., A History of Israel (Nashville: Broadman &
Holman, 1998).
Miller, J. M. and J. H. Hayes, A History of Ancient
Israel and Judah (2nd ed; Philadelphia:
Westminster, 2006).
Provan, I., V. P. Long and T. Longman, III, A Biblical
History of Israel (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2003).
Old Testament Theology
Birch, B. C., et al, A Theological Introduction to the Old
Testament (Nashville: Abingdon, 1999).
Brueggemann, W., Theology of the Old Testament
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1997).
Goldingay, J., Old Testament Theology (Vols. 1 and 2;
Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003 and 2006).
House, P. R., Old Testament Theology (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 1998).
Martens, E. A., Gods Design (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Baker; Apollos, 1994).
Ollenburger, B. C. (ed.), Old Testament Theology:
Flowering and Future (Vol. I, Rev. ed.; Winona
Lake: Eisenbrauns, 2004).
Wright, C. J. H., Old Testament Ethics for the People of
God (Leicester: Inter-Varsity Press, 2004).
Wright, C. J. H., The Mission of God (Nottingham:
Inter-Varsity Press, 2006).
Old Testament Institutions and Religion
Biale, D. (ed.), Cultures of the Jews (New York:
Shocken 2002).
King, P. J. and L. E. Stager, Life in Biblical Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2002).
de Vaux, R. and J. McHugh, Ancient Israel: Its Life and
Institutions (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).

(b) To provide candidates with an overview of the


contents of literature in the Old Testament, taking
into account the nature of that literature and major
critical issues;
(c) To give candidates an overall historical
framework within which to interpret the books of
the Old Testament;
(d) To ensure that candidates have an appreciation of
the appropriate Ancient Near Eastern background
(cultural, religious and archaeological) and its
significance for understanding the Old Testament;
(e) To provide candidates with an understanding of
major theological themes of the Old Testament and
their significance for Christian theology;
(f) To enable candidates to begin a more detailed
exploration of some aspects of Old Testament
studies;
(g) To consider the implications of the Old Testament
for Christian life and thought.
Content
Section A. The Pentateuch/Torah:
1. Genesis 1-11
2. Genesis 12-50
3. Exodus
4. Leviticus/Numbers
5. Deuteronomy
Section B. Historical books/ Former Prophets
6. Joshua and Judges
7. 1 and 2 Samuel
8. 1 and 2 Kings
Bibliography
Blenkinsopp, J., The Pentateuch: An Introduction to the
First Five Books of the Bible (New York:
Doubleday, 2000).
Merrill, E., Kingdom of Priests (Grand Rapids:
BakerAcademic, 2008).
Hamilton, V. P., Handbook on the Historical Books
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Satterthwaite, P. E., and J. G. McConvlle, Exploring the
Old Testament, vol. 2: A Guide to the Historical
Books (Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2007).
Wenham, G., Exploring the Old Testament: The
Pentateuch (London: SPCK, 2003).
Classics:
Clines, D. J., The Theme of the Pentateuch (2nd ed.;
Sheffield: JSOT, 1997).

OT501 Old Testament Foundations


OT502 Old Testament Prophets and Writings
Status
Core
Learning outcomes
(a) To assist candidates acquire an overall acquaintance
with the text of the Old Testament, as one of the two
primary documents of biblical studies and Christian
ministry;

Status
Core
Learning outcomes
(a) To assist candidates acquire an overall acquaintance
with the text of the Old Testament, as one of the two
primary documents of biblical studies and Christian
ministry;

MDiv Unit Outlines

(b) To provide candidates with an overview of the


contents of literature in the Old Testament, taking
into account the nature of that literature and major
critical issues;
(c) To give candidates an overall historical
framework within which to interpret the books of
the Old Testament;
(d) To ensure that candidates have an appreciation of
the appropriate Ancient Near Eastern background
(cultural, religious and archaeological) and its
significance for understanding the Old Testament;
(e) To provide candidates with an understanding of
major theological themes of the Old Testament and
their significance for Christian theology;
(f) To enable candidates to begin a more detailed
exploration of some aspects of Old Testament
studies;
(g) To consider the implications of the Old Testament
for Christian life and thought.
Content
Section A. Prophetic Books/Latter Prophets
1. The Book of Isaiah
2. The Book of Jeremiah
3. The Book of Ezekiel
4. The Book of Daniel
5. The Twelve (at least four in detail)
Section B. The Writings
6. Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah
7. The Book of Psalms
8. Wisdom Literature
Bibliography
Berry, D. K., An Introduction to Wisdom and Poetry of
the Old Testament (Nashville: Broadman &
Holman, 1995).
Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Brueggemann, W., The Prophetic Imagination
(Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2001).
Chisholm, R., Handbook on the Prophets (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Collins, J. J., The Apocalyptic Imagination: An
Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Long, V. P., The Art of Biblical History (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1994).
McConville, G., Exploring the Old Testament Prophets
(Vol.4; London: SPCK, 2002).
Murphy, R. E., The Tree of Life (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Satterthwaite, P. E., and J. G. McConvlle, Exploring the
Old Testament, vol. 2: A Guide to the Historical
Books (Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2007).
Walton, J. H., Covenant: Gods Purposes, Gods Plan
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1994).

67

OT503 Principles of Hermeneutics


Status
Elective
This unit is a non-exegesis unit
Learning outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to the general principles of
the interpretation of the biblical documents, so that
they can begin to relate these to different problem
areas in Scripture.
(b) To enable the candidates to gain a greater
understanding of the various genres of literature in
Scripture, and how such genres should be
interpreted.
(c) To impart to candidates an awareness of
foundational considerations so that they can prepare
biblical texts for exposition and use in ministry.
Content
1 The definition, importance and scope of
hermeneutics.
2 Grammatico-historical principles of interpretation:
linguistic, literary, historical and cultural contexts;
semantics; authorial intent; the occasional character
of biblical documents.
3 The interpretative rules and principles appropriate
for the study of different literary forms and genre in
the Scriptures.
Bibliography
Recommended:
Bartholomew, C. G., C. Greene and K. Mller,
Renewing Biblical Interpretation (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2000).
Barton, J. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Biblical
Interpretation (New York: CUP, 1998).
Hayes, J. H. (ed.), Dictionary of Biblical Interpretation
(2 Vols; Nashville: Abingdon, 1999).
Kaiser, W. C. Jr. and M. Silva, An Introduction to
Biblical Hermeneutics (2nd ed., Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2007).
Lundin, R., et al, The Promise of Hermeneutics (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
Tate, W., Interpreting the Bible (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 2006).
Vanhoozer, K. J. (ed.), Dictionary of Theological
Interpretation of the Bible (Grand Rapids:
Baker/London: SPCK, 2005).
Old Testament
Brueggeman, W., A Pathway of Interpretation: The
Old Testament for Pastor and Students (Eugene,
OR: Cascade Books, 2009).
Goldingay, J., Approaches to Old Testament
Interpretation (Toronto: Clements Publishing,
2002).
Longman, T., How to Read the Psalms (Downers
Grove, IL: Intervasity Press, 2009).
Williams, M. J., The Prophet and His Message:
Reading Old Testament Prophecy Today
(Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2003).

MDiv Unit Outlines

68

New Testament
Black, D. A. and D. S. Dockery (eds), Interpreting the
New Testament: Essays on Methods and Issues
(Nashville: Broadman and Holman, 2001).
Longenecker, R. N., Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic
Period (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
Watson, F., Paul and the Hermeneutics of Faith
(London: T. & T. Clark, 2004).
Special Hermeneutics
Adam, A. K. M., Postmodern Interpretations of the
Bible: A Reader (St Louis: Chalice, 2000).
Ryken, L. et al (eds), Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Vanhoozer, K. J., Is There a Meaning in This Text?
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1998).
Classics:
Cotterell, P. and M. Turner, Linguistics and Biblical
Interpretation (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1989).
Marshall, I. H. (ed.), New Testament Interpretation:
Essays on Principles and Methods (Exeter:
Paternoster, 1977).
Neill, S. and N. T. Wright, The Interpretation of the
New Testament 18611986 (Oxford; New York:
OUP, 1988).
Osborne, G. R., The Hermeneutical Spiral: A
Comprehensive
Introduction
to
Biblical
Interpretation (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1991).

OT620 The Pentateuch (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT501
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Pentateuch, so
that they might be able to identify and outline its
main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Pentateuch with
special reference to the book of Deuteronomy, so
that candidates can explain and relate these themes
both to the book of Deuteronomy itself, and to other
books of the Pentateuch.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Pentateuch with special
reference to the Book of Deuteronomy, especially

such themes as covenant, law, land, grace, holy war,


people of God, blessing and cursing.
Exegesis of the English text of Genesis 111;
Deuteronomy 58, 12, 1618 (or comparable
passages).

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Alexander, T. D. and D. W. Baker (eds), Dictionary of
the Old Testament: Pentateuch (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2003).
Alexander, T. D., From Paradise to Promised Land (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Balentine, S. E., The Torahs Vision of Worship
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1999).
Barker, P. A., The Triumph of Grace in Deuteronomy
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2004).
Brueggemann, W., The Land: Place as Gift, Promise,
and Challenge in Biblical Faith (Philadelphia:
Fortress, 1997).
Fretheim, T. E., The Pentateuch (Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Hess, R. S. and D. T. Tsumura, I Studied Inscriptions
from Before the Flood (Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns,
1994).
Rogerson, J. W., Genesis 111 (Sheffield: JSOT, 1990).
Sailhamer, J. H., The Pentateuch as Narrative (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 1992).
Wenham, G., Exploring the Old Testament Vol. I; The
Pentateuch (London: SPCK, 2003).
Commentaries
Alter, R., Genesis: Translation and Commentary (New
York: Norton, 1996).
Brett, M. G., Genesis (London: Taylor & Francis,
2007).
Brueggemann, W., Deuteronomy (Nashville: Abingdon,
2001).
Christensen, D. L., Deuteronomy 1:1-21:9 and 21:1034:12 (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word, 20012002).
Clements, R. E., Deuteronomy in The New
Interpreters Bible, Vol.II (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Fretheim, T. E., Genesis in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. I; Nashville: Abingdon, 1994).
Hamilton, V., The Book of Genesis Chapters 117
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990).
Hartley, J. E., Genesis (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
2000).
McConville, J. G., Deuteronomy (Leicester: Apollos,
2002).
McKeown, J., Genesis (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2008).
Nelson, R. D., Deuteronomy (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2002).
Sarna, N., Genesis (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication
Society, 1989).
Turner, L. A., Genesis (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic
Press, 2000).
Waltke, B., Genesis (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2001).
Weinfeld, M., Deuteronomy 111 (New York:
Doubleday, 1991).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Wenham, G., Genesis 115 (Waco, TX: Word, 1987).


Westermann, C., Genesis 111 (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 1984).
Wright, C., Deuteronomy (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
1996).

OT621 Former Prophets (English Text)


Status
Electives
Pre/co-requisites
OT501
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Former
Prophets, so that they might be able to identify and
outline its main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Former Prophets with
special reference to the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, so
that candidates can explain and relate these themes
both to the books of 1 and 2 Samuel themselves, and
to other books of the Former Prophets.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Former Prophets, with special
reference to 1 and 2 Samuel, including such
motifs as prophecy, temple, kingship, the people
of God, the Ark of the Covenant, Deuteronomistic
History.
2 Exegesis of the English text of 1 Samuel 112; 2
Samuel 57, 1518 (or comparable passages)
Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Chisholm, R. B. and D. M. Howard, Interpreting the
Historical Books: An Exegetical Handbook (Grand
Rapids: Kregel, 2006).
Harrison, R., Old Testament Times (Grand Rapids:
Baker Books, 2005).
Satterthwaite, P. E., and J. G. McConville, Exploring
the Old Testament: Vol. 2: A Guide to the
Historical Books (Downers Grove: InterVarsity,
2007).
Commentaries
Anderson, A. A., 2 Samuel (Dallas, TX: Word, 1989).
Arnold, B. T., 1 and 2 Samuel (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2003).
Birch, B. C., 1 & 2 Samuel in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. II, Nashville: Abingdon, 1998).

69

Brueggemann, W., 1 & 2 Samuel (Louisville:


Westminster John Knox, 1990).
Cartledge, T. W., 1 and 2 Samuel (Macon, GA: Smyth
& Helwys, 2001).
Evans, M. J., 1 & 2 Samuel (Carlisle: Paternoster,
2000).
Gerbrandt, G. E., Kingship According to the
Deuteronomistic History (Atlanta: Scholars, 1986).
Klein, R. W., 1 Samuel (Nashville: Nelson, 2008).
McCarter, P. K., 1 Samuel (New York: Doubleday,
1980).
McCarter, P. K., 2 Samuel (New York: Doubleday,
1984).
Peterson, E. H., 1 & 2 Samuel (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1999).
Polzin, R., Samuel and the Deuteronomist, 1 Samuel
(San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1989).
Tsumura, D. T., The Book of 1 Samuel (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2006).

OT622 Eighth Century Prophets (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Eighth Century
Prophets, so that they might be able to identify and
outline their main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Eighth Century
Prophets so that candidates can explain and relate
these themes to other books of the Eighth Century
Prophets.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Eighth Century Prophets,
including such motifs as prophets and covenant,
prophetic eschatology, law and cult, social justice,
election, the remnant, foreign nations.
2 Exegesis of the English text of two of the
followingJoel, Hosea, Micah, Amos, and Isaiah
1:12.4, 5:110:4 (or comparable passages).
Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Barton, J., Isaiah 139 (Sheffield: SAP, 1995).
Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).

70

MDiv Unit Outlines

Gordon, R. P. (ed.), The Place Is Too Small for Us: The


Israelite Prophets in Recent Scholarship (Winona
Lake: Eisenbrauns, 1995).
Hasel, G. F., Understanding the Book of Amos (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1991).
Meier, S. A., Themes and Transformations in Old
Testament Prophecy (Downers Grove: IVP, 2009).
Rodas, M. Daniel Carroll, Amos: The Prophet and his
Oracles (Louisville: WJK, 2002).
Classic:
Petersen, D. L., Prophecy in Israel (London: SPCK,
1987).
Commentaries
Achtemeier, E., Book of Joel in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Achtemeier, E., Minor Prophets 1 (Peabody, MA:
Hendickson, 1996).
Andersen, F. I. and D. N. Freedman, Micah (New
York: Doubleday, 2000).
Barton, J. Joel and Obadiah (Louisville: WJK, 2001).
Blenkinsopp, J., Isaiah 139 (New York: Doubleday,
2002).
Brueggemann, W., Isaiah 1-39 (Louisville: WJK,
1998)
Finley, T. J., Joel, Amos, Obadiah (Chicago: Moody,
1990).
Gitay, Y., Isaiah and His Audience (Assen: Van
Gorcum, 1991).
Goldingay, J., Isaiah (Peabody: Hendrickson, 2001).
Gowan, D. E., The Book of Amos, in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Hubbard, D. A., Joel and Amos (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1989).
Jeremias, J., The Book of Amos (Louisville: WJK,
1998).
Motyer, A., Isaiah (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Oswalt, J. N., Isaiah 139 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1986).
Paul, S., Amos (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 139 (Louisville: John Knox,
1993).
Simundson, D. J., The Book of Micah in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Smith, G. V., Amos (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1989).
Stuart, D., HoseaJonah (Waco, TX: Word, 1987).
Tucker, G.M., The Book of Isaiah 1-39, in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol.6, Nashville: Abingdon,
2001).
Webb, B. W., The Message of Isaiah (Leicester: IVP,
1996).
Wildberger, H., Isaiah 112 (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1991).
Williamson, H .G. M., Isaiah 1-5 (London: T.& T.
Clark, 2006)
Yee, G. A., The Book of Hosea, The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).

OT623 Exilic Prophecy (English Text)


Status
Electives
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Exilic Prophets,
so that they might be able to identify and outline
their main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Exilic Prophets with
special reference to either the book of Ezekiel,
Isaiah 40-55 or Jeremiah, so that candidates can
explain and relate these themes both to the book
chosen for special study, and to the other books of
Exilic Prophecy.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 Exilic prophecy, with special reference to the
theology of
either the book of Ezekiel,
or Isaiah 4055
or Jeremiah
2

Exegesis of the English text of


either Ezekiel 15, 811, 3337
or Isaiah 4055
or Jeremiah 1, 67, 1520, 2833
(or comparable passages)

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Albertz, R., The History and Literature of the Sixth
Century B.C.E. (Leiden: Brill, 2004).
Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Dumbrell, W. J., The Search for Order (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 1994).
Grabbe, L. L., Judaic Religion in the Second Temple
Period: Belief and Practice from the Exile to
Yavneh (London: Routledge, 2000).
Janowski, B., and P. Stuhlmacher (eds), The Suffering
Servant: Isaiah 53 in Jewish and Christian
Sources (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Mein, A., Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile (Oxford: OUP,
2001).
Murphy, F. J., Early Judaism: The Exile to the Time of
Jesus (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Classics:
Scott, J. M. (ed.), Exile: Old Testament, Jewish and
Christian Conceptions (Leiden: Brill, 1997).
Seitz, C., Theology in Conflict: Reactions to the Book of
Jeremiah (Berlin: de Gruyter, 1989).
Williamson, H. G. M., The Book Called Isaiah
(Oxford: Clarendon, 1994).
Commentaries
Block, D. I., The Book of Ezekiel 1-24 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1997).
Block, D. I., The Book of Ezekiel 25-48 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Childs, B. S., Isaiah (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2000).
Darr, K. P., Ezekiel in The New Interpreters Bible
(Vol.6, Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Greenberg, M., Ezekiel 1-20 and 21-37 (New York:
Doubleday, 1983, 1997).
Hanson, P. D., Isaiah 4066 (Louisville: John Knox,
1995).
Motyer, A., The Prophecy of Isaiah (Leicester: IVP,
1993).
Odell, M. S., Ezekiel (Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys,
2005).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 40-66 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Wright, C. J. H., The Message of Ezekiel (Leicester:
Inter-Varsity, 2001).
Zimmerli, W., Ezekiel 1 (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1979).
Zimmerli, W., Ezekiel 2 (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1983).
For Recommended Readings relevant to the book of
Jeremiah, see OT628; and for the book of Isaiah see
OT627.

71

apply their study to both exposition, and life and


ministry.
Content
1 Wisdom literature and traditions:
(a) Wisdom in the Old Testament and the Ancient
Near East in its social settings;
(b) Wisdom in Old Testament theology, with
special reference to the book of Job: the
doctrines of God and humanity, creation, the
fear of God, retribution and moral order
2

Exegesis of the English text of Job 12, 910, 14,


19, 28, 3842; Ecclesiastes 14, 12 (or
comparable passages)

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Blenkinsopp, J., Sage, Priest, Prophet: Religious and
Intellectual Leadership in Ancient Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2000).
Clifford, R. J. (ed.), Wisdom Literature in Mesopotamia
and Israel (Atlanta: SBL, 2007).
Curtis, E. M. and J. J. Brugaletta, Discovering the Way
of Wisdom (Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2004).
Fyall, R. S., Now My Eyes Have Seen You: Images of
Creation and Evil in Job (Leicester: Apollos,
2002).
Hunter, A., Wisdom Literature (London: SCM, 2006).
Longman, T., III and P. Enns (eds), Dictionary of the
Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2008).
Lucas, E., Exploring the Old Testament Vol. III; The
Psalms and Wisdom Literature (London: SPCK,
2003).
Murphy, R. E., The Tree of Life (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).

OT624 Wisdom Literature (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Wisdom
Literature, so that they might be able to identify and
outline its main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Wisdom Literature
with special reference to the book of Job, so that
candidates can explain and relate these themes both
to the book of Job itself, and to other books of the
Wisdom Literature.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to

Commentaries
Balentine, S .E., Job (Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys,
2006).
Clines, D. J. A., Job 120 and 21-37 (Dallas, TX:
Word, 1989, 2006).
Garrett, D., Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs
(Nashville: Broadman, 1993).
Habel, N. C., The Book of Job (London: SCM, 1985).
Hartley, J. E., The Book of Job (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1988).
Krger, T., Qoheleth (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004).
Longman, T., III, The Book of Ecclesiastes (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Murphy, R. E., Ecclesiastes (Dallas, TX: Word, 1992).
Seow, C. L., Ecclesiastes (New York: Doubleday,
1997).

72

MDiv Unit Outlines

OT625 Old Testament Apocalyptic & Post-exilic


Prophecy (English Text)
Status
Elective

Classics:
Collins, J. J., The Apocalyptic Imagination: An
Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Hanson, P. D., Old Testament Apocalyptic (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1987).

Pre/co-requisites
OT502

Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of Old Testament
Apocalyptic & Post-exilic Prophecy, so that they
might be able to identify and outline its main themes
and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Old Testament
Apocalyptic & Post-exilic Prophecy with special
reference to either the book of Daniel or Haggai,
Zechariah and Malachi, so that candidates can
explain and relate these themes both to the book
chosen for special study, and to the other books of
Old Testament Apocalyptic & Post-exilic
Prophecy.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.

OT626 The Psalter (English Text)

Content
1 Old Testament apocalyptic (its origin, development
and theology) and Post-exilic prophecy with special
reference to the theology of either the book of
Daniel or Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi.
2 Exegesis of the English text of Daniel or Zechariah

Content
1 The origin and use of the Psalms in ancient Israel:
(a) The development of the Psalter, psalm types,
psalm and cult;
(b) Theological motifs in the Psalter: the I,
kingship, lament, enemies, Zion.
2 Exegesis of the English text of Psalms 2, 8, 16,
19, 22, 24, 46, 51, 73, 74, 96, 99, 103, 110, 116,
132, 137 (or a comparable selection).

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Collins, J. J., and P. W. Flint (eds), The Book of
Daniel: Composition and Reception, 2 vols.
(Leiden: Brill, 2001).
Cook, S. L., Prophecy and Apocalypticism: Post-Exilic
Social Setting (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress,
1996).
Rowland, C., The Open Heaven (Eugene, OR: 2002).
Tigchelaar, E. J. C., Prophets of Old and the Day of the
End (Leiden: Brill, 1995).
Commentaries
Collins, J. J., Daniel (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993).
Ferguson, S., Daniel (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1988).
Goldingay, J., Daniel (Word BC; Dallas, TX: Word,
1989).
Lucas, E. C., Daniel (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2002).
Smith-Christopher, D. L., The Book of Daniel in The
New Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).

Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of the Psalter, so that
they might be able to identify and outline its main
themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Psalter.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Bullock, C. H., Encountering the Book of Psalms (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Firth, D., and P. S. Johnston (eds), Interpreting the
Psalms: Issues and Approaches (Downers Grove:
IVP Academic, 2005).
Longman, T. III and P. Enns (eds), Dictionary of the Old
Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2008).
Lucas, E., Exploring the Old Testament: Vol. III; The
Psalms and Wisdom Literature (London: SPCK,
2003).
Commentaries
Allen, L. C., Psalms 101150 (rev. ed.; Nashville:
Nelson, 2002).
Broyles, C. G., Psalms (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
1999).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Craigie, P. C., Psalms 150 (Word BC; Waco, TX:


Word, 1983).
Eaton, J., The Psalms: A Historical and Spiritual
Commentary (London: Continuum, 2005).
Gerstenberger, E. S., Psalms Part 1 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1988).
Gerstenberger, E. S., Psalms Part 2 and Lamentations
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Goldingay, J., Psalms, 3 vols: 1-41, 42-89, 90-150
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2006-08).
Hossfeld, F.-L. and E. Zenger, Psalms 2 [51-100]
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2005).
Kraus, H. J., Psalms 159 (Minneapolis: Augsburg,
1988).
Kraus, H. J., Psalms 60150 (Minneapolis: Augsburg,
1989).
Limburg, J. Psalms (Louisville: WJK, 2000).
Mays, J. L., Psalms (Louisville: John Knox, 1994).
McCann, J. C., Psalms in The New Interpreters Bible
(Vol. IV; Nashville: Abingdon, 1996).
Schaefer, K., Psalms (Collegeville: Liturgical Press,
2001).
Tate, M. E., Psalms 51100 (Word BC; Dallas, TX:
Word, 1990).
Terrien, S., The Psalms (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2003).
Wilson, G. H., Psalms, vol. 1 [1-72] (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2002).
Classics:
Kraus, H. J., Theology of the Psalms (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 1986).
McCann, J. C., A Theological Introduction to the Book
of Psalms (Nashville: Abingdon, 1993).
McCann, J. C. (ed.), The Shape and Shaping of the
Psalter (Sheffield: JSOT, 1993).
Seybold, K., Introducing the Psalms (Edinburgh: T & T
Clark, 1990).

OT627 Isaiah (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of Isaiah, so that they
might be able to identify and outline its main themes
and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Isaiah.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.

73

Content
The theology of the book and exegesis of the English
text of Isaiah, with special attention to about 18
chapters which should be evenly distributed between
chapters 139 and 4066 (e.g., 1, 6, 1112, 2427, 40
42, 5355, 61, 6566 or equivalent passages).
Bibliography
Themes and Setting
Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Childs, B. S., The Struggle to Understand Isaiah as
Christian Scripture (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2004).
Leclerc, T. L., Yahweh is Exalted in Justice: Solidarity
and Conflict in Isaiah (Minneapolis: Fortress,
2001).
McGinnis, C. M., and P. K. Tull, As Those who are
Taught: The Interpretation of Isaiah from the LXX
to SBL (Atlanta: SBL, 2006).
Williamson, H. G. M., The Book Called Isaiah
(Oxford: Clarendon, 1994).
Williamson, H. G. M., Variations on a Theme
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Exegesis:
Whole Book
Beyer, B., Encountering the Book of Isaiah (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2007).
Blenkinsopp, J., Isaiah 139, 4055, 5666 (New
York: Doubleday, 20002004).
Brueggemann, W., Isaiah 139 and 4066 (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1998).
Childs, B. S., Isaiah (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2001).
Goldingay, J., Isaiah (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
2001).
Motyer, J. A., Isaiah (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1999).
Oswalt, J. N., Isaiah 139 and 40-66 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1986 and 1998).
Watts, J. D. W., Isaiah 1-33 and 34-66 (rev. ed.;
Nashville: Nelson, 2006).
Isaiah 139
Barton, J., Isaiah 139 (Sheffield: SAP, 1995).
Beuken, W. A. M., Isaiah 28-39 (Leuven: Peeters,
2001).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 139 (Louisville: John Knox, 1993).
Tucker, G. M., Isaiah 139 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Wildberger, H., Isaiah 112, 13-27 and 28-39
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991- 2002).
Williamson, H. G. M., Isaiah 1-5 (London: T. & T.
Clark, 2006).
Isaiah 4066
Baltzer, Deutero-Isaiah (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2001).
Emerson, G. I., Isaiah 5666 (Sheffield: JSOT, 1992).
Goldingay, J., The Message of Isaiah 40-55: A
Literary-theological Commentary (London: T. &
T. Clark, 2005).

MDiv Unit Outlines

74

Goldingay, J. and D. Payne, Isaiah 40-55, 2 vols.


(London: T. & T. Clark, 2006).
Hanson, P. D., Isaiah 4066 (Louisville: John Knox,
1995).
Koole, J. L., Isaiah Part III; Vols I & II; 4048/4955
(Kampen: Kok Pharos, 1997 & 1998).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 4066 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).

OT628 Jeremiah (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of Jeremiah, so that
they might be able to identify and outline its main
themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Jeremiah.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the book of Jeremiah, including
such motifs as covenant, the confessions,
temple, kingship, the nations, judgment and hope,
and true and false prophecy.
2

Exegesis of the English text of Jeremiah 1, 67,


1520, 2833 (or comparable passages).

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions:
Diamond, A. R., K. M. OConnor and L. Stulman
(eds), Troubling Jeremiah (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Goldingay, J. (ed.), Uprooting and Planting (London:
T. & T. Clark, 2007).
Kessler, M. (ed.), Reading the Book of Jeremiah
(Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 2004).
Lalleman-de Winkel, H., Jeremiah in Prophetic
Tradition (Leuven: Peeters, 2000).
Lundbom, J., Jeremiah: A Study in Ancient Hebrew
Rhetoric (Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 1997).
Commentaries
Bracke, J. M., Jeremiah 1-29 (Louisville: WJK, 2000).
Brueggemann, W., A Commentary of Jeremiah: Exile
and Homecoming (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1998).

Carroll, R. P., Jeremiah (Philadelphia: Westminster,


1986).
Craigie, P. C., P. H. Kelley and J. F. Drinkard Jr.,
Jeremiah 125 (Dallas, TX: Word, 1991).
Fretheim, T. E., Jeremiah (Macon, GA: Smyth &
Helwys, 2002).
Holladay, W. L., Jeremiah 1 and 2 (Philadelphia;
Minneapolis: Fortress, 1986 and 1989).
Huey, F. B. Jr., Jeremiah, Lamentations (Nashville:
Broadman, 1993).
Jones, D. R., Jeremiah (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1992; repr Sheffield: SAP, 1997).
Keown, G. L., P. J. Saclise and T. G. Smothers,
Jeremiah 2652 (Waco, TX: Word, 1995).
Lundbom, J. R., Jeremiah 120 , 2136, 3752 (New
York: Doubleday, 19992004).
Miller, P. D., Jeremiah in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).

OT630 The Pentateuch (Hebrew Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT501
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Pentateuch, so
that they might be able to identify and outline its
main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Pentateuch with
special reference to the book of Deuteronomy, so
that candidates can explain and relate these themes
both to the book of Deuteronomy itself, and to other
books of the Pentateuch.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Pentateuch with special
reference to the Book of Deuteronomy, especially
such themes as covenant, law, land, grace, holy war,
people of God, blessing and cursing.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of
Genesis 1-3 and Deuteronomy 5-7 (or comparable
passages).

MDiv Unit Outlines

75

Bibliography

OT631 Former Prophets (Hebrew Text)

Theological Themes and Traditions


Alexander, T. D. and D. W. Baker (eds), Dictionary of
the Old Testament: Pentateuch (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2003).
Alexander, T. D., From Paradise to Promised Land (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Balentine, S. E., The Torahs Vision of Worship
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1999).
Barker, P. A., The Triumph of Grace in Deuteronomy
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2004).
Brueggemann, W., The Land: Place as Gift, Promise,
and Challenge in Biblical Faith (Philadelphia:
Fortress, 1997).
Fretheim, T. E., The Pentateuch (Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Hess, R. S. and D. T. Tsumura, I Studied Inscriptions
from Before the Flood (Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns,
1994).
Wenham, G., Exploring the Old Testament Vol. I; The
Pentateuch (London: SPCK, 2003).

Status
Electives

Commentaries
Alter, R., Genesis: Translation and Commentary (New
York: Norton, 1996).
Brett, M. G., Genesis (London: Taylor & Francis,
2007).
Brueggemann, W., Deuteronomy (Nashville: Abingdon,
2001).
Christensen, D. L., Deuteronomy 1:1-21:9 and 21:1034:12 (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word, 20012002).
Clements, R. E., Deuteronomy in The New
Interpreters Bible, Vol.II (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Fretheim, T. E., Genesis in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. I; Nashville: Abingdon, 1994).
Hamilton, V., The Book of Genesis Chapters 117
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990).
Hartley, J. E., Genesis (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
2000).
McConville, J. G., Deuteronomy (Leicester: Apollos,
2002).
McKeown, J., Genesis (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2008).
Nelson, R. D., Deuteronomy (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2002).
Sarna, N., Genesis (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication
Society, 1989).
Turner, L. A., Genesis (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic
Press, 2000).
Waltke, B., Genesis (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2001).
Weinfeld, M., Deuteronomy 111 (New York:
Doubleday, 1991).
Wenham, G., Genesis 115 (Waco, TX: Word, 1987).
Westermann, C., Genesis 111 (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 1984).
Wright, C., Deuteronomy (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
1996).

Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT501
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Former
Prophets, so that they might be able to identify and
outline its main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Former Prophets with
special reference to the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, so
that candidates can explain and relate these themes
both to the books of 1 and 2 Samuel themselves, and
to other books of the Former Prophets.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Former Prophets, with special
reference to 1 and 2 Samuel, including such
motifs as prophecy, temple, kingship, the people
of God, the Ark of the Covenant, Deuteronomistic
History.
2

Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of 1


Samuel 911, 2 Samuel 57 (or comparable
passages).

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Chisholm, R. B., and D. M. Howard, Interpreting the
Historical Books: An Exegetical Handbook (Grand
Rapids: Kregel, 2006).
Harrison, R., Old Testament Times (Grand Rapids:
Baker Books, 2005).
Satterthwaite, P. E., and J. G. McConville, Exploring
the Old Testament: Vol. 2: A Guide to the
Historical Books (Downers Grove: InterVarsity,
2007).
Commentaries
Anderson, A. A., 2 Samuel (Dallas, TX: Word, 1989).
Arnold, B. T., 1 and 2 Samuel (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2003).
Birch, B. C., 1 & 2 Samuel in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. II, Nashville: Abingdon, 1998).
Brueggemann, W., 1 & 2 Samuel (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1990).

MDiv Unit Outlines

76

Cartledge, T. W., 1 and 2 Samuel (Macon, GA: Smyth


& Helwys, 2001).
Evans, M. J., 1 & 2 Samuel (Carlisle: Paternoster,
2000).
Gerbrandt, G. E., Kingship According to the
Deuteronomistic History (Atlanta: Scholars, 1986).
Klein, R.W., 1 Samuel (Nashville: Nelson, 2008).
McCarter, P. K., 1 Samuel (New York: Doubleday,
1980).
McCarter, P. K., 2 Samuel (New York: Doubleday,
1984).
Peterson, E. H., 1 & 2 Samuel (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1999).
Polzin, R., Samuel and the Deuteronomist, 1 Samuel
(San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1989).
Tsumura, D. T., The Book of 1 Samuel (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2006).

OT632 Eighth Century Prophets (Hebrew Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Eighth Century
Prophets, so that they might be able to identify and
outline their main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Eighth Century
Prophets so that candidates can explain and relate
these themes to other books of the Eighth Century
Prophets.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the Eighth Century Prophets,
including such motifs as prophets and covenant,
prophetic eschatology, law and cult, social justice,
election, the remnant, foreign nations.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of
two of the followingJoel, Hosea 13, Micah 1
3, Amos 2:65:15, and Isaiah 6:19:6 (or
comparable passages).

Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel


(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Meier, S. A., Themes and Transformations in Old
Testament Prophecy (Downers Grove: IVP, 2009).
Rodas, M. Daniel Carroll, Amos: The Prophet and his
Oracles (Louisville: WJK, 2002).
Commentaries
Achtemeier, E., Book of Joel in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Achtemeier, E., Minor Prophets 1 (Peabody, MA:
Hendickson, 1996).
Andersen, F. I. and D. N. Freedman, Micah (New
York: Doubleday, 2000).
Barton, J. Joel and Obadiah (Louisville: WJK, 2001).
Blenkinsopp, J., Isaiah 139 (New York: Doubleday,
2002).
Brueggemann, W., Isaiah 1-39 (Louisville: WJK,
1998)
Finley, T. J., Joel, Amos, Obadiah (Chicago: Moody,
1990).
Goldingay, J., Isaiah (Peabody: Hendrickson, 2001).
Gowan, D. E., The Book of Amos, in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Hubbard, D. A., Joel and Amos (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1989).
Jeremias, J., The Book of Amos (Louisville: WJK,
1998).
Motyer, A., Isaiah (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Oswalt, J. N., Isaiah 139 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1986).
Paul, S., Amos (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 139 (Louisville: John Knox,
1993).
Simundson, D. J., The Book of Micah in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).
Smith, G. V., Amos (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1989).
Stuart, D., HoseaJonah (Waco, TX: Word, 1987).
Tucker, G. M., The Book of Isaiah 1-39, in The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol.6, Nashville: Abingdon,
2001).
Webb, B. W., The Message of Isaiah (Leicester: IVP,
1996).
Wildberger, H., Isaiah 112 (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1991).
Williamson, H. G. M., Isaiah 1-5 (London: T.& T.
Clark, 2006).
Yee, G. A., The Book of Hosea, The New
Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville: Abingdon,
1996).

OT633 Exilic Prophecy (Hebrew Text)

Bibliography

Status
Electives

Theological Themes and Traditions


Barton, J., Isaiah 139 (Sheffield: SAP, 1995).

Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B

MDiv Unit Outlines

Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Exilic Prophets,
so that they might be able to identify and outline
their main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Exilic Prophets with
special reference to either the book of Ezekiel,
Isaiah 40-55 or Jeremiah, so that candidates can
explain and relate these themes both to the book
chosen for special study, and to the other books of
Exilic Prophecy.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 Exilic prophecy, with special reference to the
theology of
either the book of Ezekiel,
or Isaiah 4055
or Jeremiah
2

Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of


either Ezekiel 25, 3637
or Isaiah 40, 45, 50, 5255
or Jeremiah 1, 67, 20, 3031
(or comparable passages).

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Albertz, R., The History and Literature of the Sixth
Century B.C.E. (Leiden: Brill, 2004).
Blenkinsopp, J., A History of Prophecy in Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Dumbrell, W. J., The Search for Order (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 1994).
Grabbe, L. L., Judaic Religion in the Second Temple
Period: Belief and Practice from the Exile to
Yavneh (London: Routledge, 2000).
Janowski, B., and P. Stuhlmacher (eds), The Suffering
Servant: Isaiah 53 in Jewish and Christian
Sources (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Mein, A., Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile (Oxford: OUP,
2001).
Murphy, F. J., Early Judaism: The Exile to the Time of
Jesus (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2002).
Commentaries
Block, D. I., The Book of Ezekiel 1-24 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1997).
Block, D. I., The Book of Ezekiel 25-48 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Childs, B. S., Isaiah (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2000).

77

Darr, K. P., Ezekiel in The New Interpreters Bible


(Vol.6, Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Greenberg, M., Ezekiel 1-20 and 21-37 (New York:
Doubleday, 1983, 1997).
Hanson, P. D., Isaiah 4066 (Louisville: John Knox,
1995).
Motyer, A., The Prophecy of Isaiah (Leicester: IVP,
1993).
Odell, M. S., Ezekiel (Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys,
2005).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 40-66 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Wright, C. J. H., The Message of Ezekiel (Leicester:
Inter-Varsity, 2001).
Zimmerli, W., Ezekiel 1 (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1979).
Zimmerli, W., Ezekiel 2 (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1983).
For Recommended Readings relevant to the book of
Jeremiah, see OT628; and for the book of Isaiah see
OT627.

OT634 Wisdom Literature (Hebrew Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of the Wisdom
Literature, so that they might be able to identify and
outline its main themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Wisdom Literature
with special reference to the book of Job, so that
candidates can explain and relate these themes both
to the book of Job itself, and to other books of the
Wisdom Literature.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 Wisdom literature and traditions:
(a) Wisdom in the Old Testament and the Ancient
Near East in its social settings;
(b) Wisdom in Old Testament theology, with
special reference to the book of Job: the
doctrines of God and humanity, creation, the
fear of God, retribution and moral order.
2

Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of Job


12 ,42; Ecclesiastes 13 (or comparable passages).

MDiv Unit Outlines

78

Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Blenkinsopp, J., Sage, Priest, Prophet: Religious and
Intellectual Leadership in Ancient Israel
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2000).
Clifford, R. J. (ed.), Wisdom Literature in Mesopotamia
and Israel (Atlanta: SBL, 2007).
Curtis, E. M. and J. J. Brugaletta, Discovering the Way
of Wisdom (Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2004).
Fyall, R. S., Now My Eyes Have Seen You: Images of
Creation and Evil in Job (Leicester: Apollos,
2002).
Hunter, A., Wisdom Literature (London: SCM, 2006).
Longman, T. III and P. Enns (eds), Dictionary of the
Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2008).
Lucas, E., Exploring the Old Testament Vol. III; The
Psalms and Wisdom Literature (London: SPCK,
2003).
Murphy, R. E., The Tree of Life (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Commentaries
Balentine, S. E., Job (Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys,
2006).
Clines, D. J. A., Job 120 and 21-37 (Dallas, TX:
Word, 1989, 2006).
Garrett, D., Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs
(Nashville: Broadman, 1993).
Habel, N. C., The Book of Job (London: SCM, 1985).
Hartley, J. E., The Book of Job (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1988).
Krger, T., Qoheleth (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004).
Longman, T. III, The Book of Ecclesiastes (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Murphy, R. E., Ecclesiastes (Dallas, TX: Word, 1992).
Seow, C. L., Ecclesiastes (New York: Doubleday,
1997).

OT635 Old Testament Apocalyptic & Post-exilic


Prophecy (Hebrew Text)
Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B

reference to either the book of Daniel or Haggai,


Zechariah and Malachi, so that candidates can
explain and relate these themes both to the book
chosen for special study, and to the other books of
Old Testament Apocalyptic & Post-exilic
Prophecy.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 Old Testament apocalyptic (its origin, development
and theology) and Post-exilic prophecy with special
reference to the theology of either the book of
Daniel or Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of
Daniel 1:12:4, 810, 12 or Zechariah 16, 1314
(or comparable passages).
Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Collins, J. J., and P. W. Flint (eds), The Book of
Daniel: Composition and Reception, 2 vols.
(Leiden: Brill, 2001).
Cook, S. L., Prophecy and Apocalypticism: Post-Exilic
Social Setting (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress,
1996).
Rowland, C., The Open Heaven (Eugene, OR: 2002).
Tigchelaar, E. J. C., Prophets of Old and the Day of the
End (Leiden: Brill, 1995).
Commentaries
Collins, J. J., Daniel (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993).
Ferguson, S., Daniel (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1988).
Goldingay, J., Daniel (Word BC; Dallas, TX: Word,
1989).
Lucas, E. C., Daniel (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2002).
Smith-Christopher, D. L., The Book of Daniel in The
New Interpreters Bible (Vol. 7, Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).
Classics:
Hanson, P. D., Old Testament Apocalyptic (Nashville:
Abington, 1987).
Tigchelaar, E. J. C., Prophets of Old and the Day of
the End (Leiden: Brill, 1995).

Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the books of Old Testament
Apocalyptic & Post-exilic Prophecy, so that they
might be able to identify and outline its main themes
and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Old Testament
Apocalyptic & Post-exilic Prophecy with special

OT636 The Psalter (Hebrew Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B

MDiv Unit Outlines

Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of the Psalter, so that
they might be able to identify and outline its main
themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within the Psalter.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The origin and use of the Psalms in ancient Israel:
(a) The development of the Psalter, psalm types,
psalm and cult;
(b) Theological motifs in the Psalter: the I,
kingship, lament, enemies, Zion.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of
Psalms 2, 8, 22, 46, 73, 99, 132, 137 (or a
comparable selection).
Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions
Bullock, C. H., Encountering the Book of Psalms (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Firth, D. and P. S. Johnston (eds), Interpreting the
Psalms: Issues and Approaches (Downers Grove:
IVP Academic, 2005).
Longman, T. III and P. Enns (eds.), Dictionary of the
Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2008).
Lucas, E., Exploring the Old Testament: Vol. III; The
Psalms and Wisdom Literature (London: SPCK,
2003).
Commentaries
Allen, L. C., Psalms 101150 (rev. ed.; Nashville:
Nelson, 2002).
Broyles, C. G., Psalms (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
1999).
Craigie, P. C., Psalms 150 (Word BC; Waco, TX:
Word, 1983).
Eaton, J., The Psalms: A Historical and Spiritual
Commentary (London: Continuum, 2005).
Gerstenberger, E. S., Psalms Part 1 (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1988).
Gerstenberger, E. S., Psalms Part 2 and Lamentations
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Goldingay, J., Psalms, 3 vols: 1-41, 42-89, 90-150
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2006-08).
Hossfeld, F.-L. And E. Zenger, Psalms 2 [51-100]
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2005).
Kraus, H. J., Psalms 159 (Minneapolis: Augsburg,
1988).

79

Kraus, H. J., Psalms 60150 (Minneapolis: Augsburg,


1989).
Limburg, J., Psalms (Louisville: WJK, 2000).
Mays, J. L., Psalms (Louisville: John Knox, 1994).
McCann, J. C., Psalms in The New Interpreters Bible
(Vol. IV; Nashville: Abingdon, 1996).
Schaefer, K., Psalms (Collegeville: Liturgical Press,
2001).
Tate, M. E., Psalms 51100 (Word BC; Dallas, TX:
Word, 1990).
Terrien, S., The Psalms (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2003).
Wilson, G. H., Psalms, vol. 1 [1-72] (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2002).
Classics:
Kraus, H. J., Theology of the Psalms (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 1986).
McCann, J. C. (ed.), The Shape and Shaping of the
Psalter (Sheffield: JSOT, 1993).
Seybold, K., Introducing the Psalms (Edinburgh: T & T
Clark, 1990).

OT637 Isaiah (Hebrew Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of Isaiah, so that they
might be able to identify and outline its main themes
and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Isaiah.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
The theology of the book and exegesis of six chapters
of the Hebrew text, with a minimum of at least two
chapters to be taken from each of chapters 139 and
4066 (e.g., 6, 11, 4041, 61, 66 or equivalent
passages).

MDiv Unit Outlines

80

Bibliography

OT638 Jeremiah (Hebrew Text)

Themes and Setting


Childs, B. S., The Struggle to Understand Isaiah as
Christian Scripture (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2004).
Leclerc, T. L., Yahweh is Exalted in Justice: Solidarity
and Conflict in Isaiah (Minneapolis: Fortress,
2001).
McGinnis, C. M., and P. K. Tull, As Those Who Are
Taught: The Interpretation of Isaiah from the LXX
to SBL (Atlanta: SBL, 2006).

Status
Elective

Exegesis:
Whole Book
Blenkinsopp, J., Isaiah 139, 4055, 5666 (New
York: Doubleday, 20002004).
Brueggemann, W., Isaiah 139 and 4066 (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1998).
Childs, B. S., Isaiah (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2001).
Goldingay, J., Isaiah (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson,
2001).
Motyer, J. A., Isaiah (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1999).
Oswalt, J. N., Isaiah 139 and 40-66(Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1986 and1998).
Watts, J. D. W., Isaiah 1-33 and 34-66, (rev. ed.;
Nashville: Nelson, 2006).
Webb, B. W., The Message of Isaiah (Leicester: IVP,
1996).
Isaiah 139
Barton, J., Isaiah 139 (Sheffield: SAP, 1995).
Beuken, W. A. M., Isaiah 28-39 (Leuven: Peeters,
2001).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 139 (Louisville: John Knox, 1993).
Tucker, G. M., Isaiah 139 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).
Wildberger, H., Isaiah 112, 13-27 and 28-39
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991- 2002).
Williamson, H. G. M., Isaiah 1-5 (London: T. & T.
Clark, 2006).
Isaiah 4066
Baltzer, Deutero-Isaiah (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2001).
Emerson, G. I., Isaiah 5666 (Sheffield: JSOT, 1992).
Goldingay, J., The Message of Isaiah 40-55: A
Literary-theological Commentary (London: T. &
T. Clark, 2005).
Goldingay, J. and D. Payne, Isaiah 40-55, 2 vols.
(London: T. & T. Clark, 2006).
Hanson, P. D., Isaiah 4066 (Louisville: John Knox,
1995).
Koole, J. L., Isaiah Part III; Vols I & II; 4048/4955
(Kampen: Kok Pharos, 1997 & 1998).
Seitz, C. R., Isaiah 4066 in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).

Pre-requisites
LA003A and LA003B
Pre/co-requisites
OT502
Learning outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with the contents and
overall structure of the book of Jeremiah, so that
they might be able to identify and outline its main
themes and teaching.
(b) To enable candidates to interact with select
theological themes within Jeremiah.
(c) To provide candidates with a variety of skills in
exegetical procedures, so that they may be able to
interpret and explain the set texts in some depth.
(d) To enable candidates to give thought and reflection
to the texts under study, so that they can begin to
apply their study to both exposition, and life and
ministry.
Content
1 The theology of the book of Jeremiah, including
such motifs as covenant, the confessions,
temple, kingship, the nations, judgment and hope,
and true and false prophecy.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text of
Jeremiah 1, 67, 20, 3031 (or comparable
passages)
Bibliography
Theological Themes and Traditions:
Diamond, A. R., K. M. OConnor and L. Stulman
(eds), Troubling Jeremiah (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Goldingay, J. (ed.), Uprooting and Planting (London:
T. & T. Clark, 2007).
Kessler, M. (ed.), Reading the Book of Jeremiah
(Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 2004).
Lalleman-de Winkel, H., Jeremiah in Prophetic
Tradition (Leuven: Peeters, 2000).
Lundbom, J., Jeremiah: A Study in Ancient Hebrew
Rhetoric (Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 1997).
Commentaries:
Bracke, J. M., Jeremiah 1-29 (Louisville: WJK, 2000).
Brueggemann, W., A Commentary of Jeremiah: Exile
and Homecoming (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1998).
Carroll, R. P., Jeremiah (Philadelphia: Westminster,
1986).
Clements, R. E., Jeremiah (Atlanta: John Knox, 1988).
Craigie, P. C., P. H. Kelley and J. F. Drinkard Jr.,
Jeremiah 125 (Dallas, TX: Word, 1991).
Fretheim, T. E., Jeremiah (Macon, GA: Smyth &
Helwys, 2002).
Holladay, W. L., Jeremiah 1 and 2 (Philadelphia;
Minneapolis: Fortress, 1986 and 1989).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Huey, F. B. Jr., Jeremiah, Lamentations (Nashville:


Broadman, 1993).
Jones, D. R., Jeremiah (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1992; repr Sheffield: SAP, 1997).
Keown, G. L., P. J. Saclise and T. G. Smothers,
Jeremiah 2652 (Waco, TX: Word, 1995).
Lundbom, J. R., Jeremiah 120 , 2136, 3752 (New
York: Doubleday, 19992004).
Miller, P. D., Jeremiah in The New Interpreters
Bible (Vol. VI; Nashville: Abingdon, 2001).

OT646 Archaeology and the Bible


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To familiarise candidates with major archaeologists
whose work has had a bearing on the study of the
Old and New Testaments;
(b) To develop an understanding of the history and
techniques (including archaeological methods,
processes and practices) associated with the modern
study of the lands in which the Biblical story is set;
(c) To explore significant archaeological sites,
epigraphic material and artefacts that have
influenced the historical and cultural understanding
of the Bible;
(d) To enable candidates to reflect on the relationship
between archaeological context, artefact, epigraphic
material, historical interpretation and the text of the
Bible.
Content
1 The unfolding story of archaeology in the Middle
East from 1800 to the present, including the major
archaeologists.
2 The context of archaeological activity in Bible
lands
3 The development of archaeological technique,
practice, and interpretive method.
4 Approaches to historical geography and the study
of the landscape.
5 The study of significant archaeological sites,
epigraphic material and artefacts of a part or
whole of the lands of the Bible.
6 The analysis and comparative study of
archaeological finds and approaches to dating
material.
7 Issues in the interrelationship of archaeology and
the Bible, including the reliability and significance
of archaeology, historical controversies, and the
value and limitations of using archaeology in
biblical studies.
Bibliography
Charlesworth, J. H., Jesus and Archaeology (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans, 2006).
Currid, J. D., Doing Archaeology in the Land of the
Bible (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1999).

81

Davis, T. W., Shifting Sands: The Rise and Fall of


Biblical Archaeology (Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2004).
Dever, W. G., What Did the Biblical Writers Know &
When did They Know It? (Grand Rapids,
Michigan: Eerdmans, 2001).
Drower, M. S., Flinders Petrie: A Life in Archaeology
(London: Victor Gollanz, 1985).
Finkelstein, I., The Archaeology of the Israelite
Settlement (Jerusalem: Israel Exploration Society,
1988).
Franken, H. J. and C. A. Franken-Battershill, A Primer
of Old Testament Archaeology (Leiden: E. J. Brill,
1963).
Hoffmeier, J. K., The Archaeology of the Bible
(Oxford: Lion Hudson, 2008).
Hoffmeier, J. K. and A. Millard (eds), The Future of
Biblical Archaeology. Reassessing Methodologies
and Assumptions (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2004).
Hoerth, A. J., Archaeology and the Old Testament
(Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker, 2009).
Kitchen, K. A., On the Reliability of the Old Testament
(Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans, 2003).
Laughlin, J. C. H., Archaeology and the Bible
(London: Routledge, 2000).
McRay, J, Archaeology and the New Testament
(Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker, 2008).
Matthews, V. H., Studying the Ancient Israelites. A
Guide to Sources and Methods (Grand
Rapids/Nottingham: Baker/Apollos, 2007).
Mazar, A., Archaeology of the Holy Land of the Bible:
10,000-586 BCE (New York: Doubleday, 1990).
Moorey, P. R. S., A Century of Biblical Archaeology
(Cambridge: Lutterworth, 1991).

OT689 Old Testament Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
OT301 and OT302, plus any other unit deemed
necessary for the given seminar
Learning outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to study biblical texts in
Hebrew or English not covered in the candidates
course, so that candidates can have the opportunity
to interpret select texts in depth.
(b) To give candidates the opportunity to develop cooperative research skills, so that candidates can
discover new skills and implement them in their
research.
(c) To assist candidates in the understanding of Old
Testament insights so that candidates can relate
these to personal and pastoral needs.
Content
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but must have staff and library

MDiv Unit Outlines

82

support sufficient to sustain the unit. The course


coordinator is responsible for submitting for approval a
proposed unit outline along with assessment plans to the
moderator for Old Testament.
The unit is taught, conducted as a seminar involving
class discussion as well as lectures and individual
reading. The unit is not an individual research topic. It
is strongly recommended that the unit include set reading
of approximately 15 chapters from OT texts in Hebrew
or 25 chapters in English not covered elsewhere in the
candidates course.
1
2
3

The total amount of work expected is that equivalent


to an essay of approximately 6,000 words;
Candidates must demonstrate a thorough grasp of
the Old Testament issues involved;
Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of Old Testament perspectives discerned in
candidates learning;
Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology)
may be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted
appropriately to reflect major level undergraduate
study for students enrolled in the undergraduate
degrees.

Bibliography
General Works
Students should consult relevant articles in standard
Bible dictionaries, such as:
Boring, M. E., et al (eds), Hellenistic Commentary to
the New Testament (Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).
Evans, C. A. and S. E. Porter (eds), Dictionary of New
Testament Background (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
2000).
Ferguson, E. (ed.), Encyclopedia of Early Christianity
(London: Garland, 1990).
Freedman, D. N. (ed.), Anchor Bible Dictionary (6
Vols; New York: Doubleday, 1992).
Freedman, D. N. (ed.), The Eerdmans Dictionary of the
Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Green, J. B. (ed.), Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1992).
Hawthorne, G., R. P. Martin and D. G. Reid (eds),
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 1993).
Keck, L. E., et al (eds), The New Interpreters Bible
(Nashville: Abingdon, 1994).
Martin, R. P. and P. H. Davids (eds), Dictionary of the
Later New Testament and Its Developments
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1997).
Also note the resources available at The New
Testament Gateway, http://www.ntgateway.com

Bibliography
None

NEW TESTAMENT (NT)


NT501 and NT502
These two units form the foundation upon which all
further study of the New Testament builds. They are
thus concerned not so much with the critical issues of
New Testament studies, as with enabling candidates to
grasp a firm understanding both of the ministry of Jesus
and of the contents, themes and theology of the various
books of the New Testament.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to understand the ministry of
Jesus in its historical, cultural, religious and political
environment.
(b) To give candidates an understanding of the
evangelists as Christian theologians, with their own
distinctive theologies and outlooks.
(c) To teach candidates the features of the theology and
expansion of the early church, particularly as they
are reflected in the Acts of the Apostles.
(d) To study the background to and the teaching of
selected epistles of the New Testament.
(e) To help candidates reflect on the significance of the
New Testament portions studied, for their own lives
and ministry.

Atlases
Bisco, T. (ed.), Holman Bible Atlas: A Complete Guide
to the Expansive Geography of Biblical History
(Nashville: Broadman & Holman Reference, 1999)
Braybrooke, M and J Harpur (eds), The Collegeville
Atlas of the Bible (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical
Press, 1999)
Classics:
Aharoni, Y. and M. Avi-Yonah The Macmillan Bible
Atlas (3rd ed.; London: Macmillan, 1993).
Pritchard, J. B. (ed.), The Times Atlas of the Bible
(New York: Times, 1987).
New Testament Introduction
Achtemeier, P. J., J. B. Green and M. M. Thompson,
Introducing the New Testament: Its Literature and
Theology (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Beale, G. K. and D. A. Carson, Commentary on the
New Testament Use of the Old Testament. (Grand
Rapids: Baker Academic, 2007).
Brown, R. E., An Introduction to the New Testament
(New York: Doubleday, 1997).
Carson, D. A. and D. J. Moo. An Introduction to the
New Testament. (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2005).
de Silva, D. A., An Introduction to the New Testament:
Contexts, Methods & Ministry Formation
(Leicester: Apollos, IVP, 2004).
Ehrman, B. D., The New Testament: A Historical
Introduction to the Early Christian Writings (4th
ed.; New York: Oxford University Press, 2007).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Johnson, L. T., The Writings of the New Testament: An


Interpretation (rev. ed.; Minneapolis: Fortress,
2002).
Koester, H., Introduction to the New Testament (2 Vols,
2nd ed.; New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1995, 2000).
McDonald, L. M. and S. E. Porter (eds), Early
Christianity and Its Sacred Literature (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 2000).
Schnelle, U., The History and Theology of the New
Testament (London: SCM, 1998).
Theissen, G., Fortress Introduction to the New
Testament, trans. John Bowden (Minneapolis:
Fortress Press, 2003).
New Testament Theology
Brown, C. (ed.), The New International Dictionary of
New Testament Theology (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1999).
Hurtado, L., Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in
Earliest Christianity. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2003).
Jeremias, J. and K. C. Hanson, Jesus and the Message
of the New Testament. (Minneapolis: Fortress,
2002).
McKnight, S. and G. R. Osborne, The Face of New
Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Matera, F. J., New Testament Theology. (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 2007).
Schreiner, T. R., New Testament Theology:
Magnifying God in Christ. (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2008).
Classics:
Caird, G. B and L. D. Hurst, New Testament Theology.
(Oxford: Clarendon, 1994).
Dunn, J. D. G., Unity and Diversity in the New
Testament (London: SCM, 1990).
New Testament Histories and Background Documents
Barnett, P., Jesus and the Rise of Early Christianity: A
History of New Testament Times (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 1999).
Elwell, W. A. and R. W. Yarborough, Encountering the
New Testament and Readings from the FirstCentury World [with CD-ROM] (2nd ed.; Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2005).
Feldman, L. H. and M. Reinhold, Jewish Life and
Thought Among Greeks and Romans: Primary
Readings (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Horsley, G. H. R. (ed.) et al, New documents
Illustrating Early Christianity (9 Vols; Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 19812002).
Klauck, H.J., The Religious Context of Early
Christianity: A Guide to Graeco-Roman Religions
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 2000).
Neusner, J. and W. S. Green (eds), Dictionary of
Judaism In The Biblical Period (Peabody, MA:
Hendrickson, 1999).
Roller, M. B., Dining Posture in Ancient Rome: Bodies,
Values, and Status (Princeton: Prince University
Press, 2006) .

83

Saldarini, A. J., Pharisees, Scribes, and Sadducees in


Palestinian Society: A Sociological Approach
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Scott, J. J., Jewish Backgrounds of the New Testament
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2000).
Schnabel, E. J., Early Christian Mission. Vol.1: Jesus
and the Twelve. Vol. 2: Paul and the Early
Church. (Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press,
2004).
Vermes, G., The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English
(New York: Penguin, 1998).
Classic:
Barrett, C. K., New Testament Background: Selected
Documents (Revised & expanded; San Francisco:
HarperSanFrancisco, 1995).
The Ministry of Jesus and the Gospels
Barton, S. C., (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the
Gospels, Cambridge Companions to Religion
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).
Becker, J., Jesus of Nazareth (New York: Walter de
Gruyter and Co, 1998).
Blomberg, C. L., The Historical Reliability of the
Gospels. (Downers Grove: IVP, rev. 2007).
Bockmuehl, M., The Cambridge Companion to Jesus
(Cambridge: CUP, 2001).
Bock, D. L., Studying the Historical Jesus: A Guide to
Sources and Methods (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2002).
Bolt, P. G., The Cross from a Distance: Atonement in
Marks Gospel (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Borg, M. J., Jesus (New York: Happer One,2008).
Blomberg, C. L., Jesus and the Gospels (Leicester:
Apollos, 2002 repr).
Dunn, J. D. G., Jesus Remembered. (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2003).
Harding, M. and A. Nobbs (eds), The Content and
Setting of the Gospel Tradition (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2010).
Hultgren, A. J., The Parables of Jesus: A Commentary
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Malina, B. J.and R. L. Rohrbaugh, Social-Science
Commentary on the Synoptic Gospels, (2nd ed.;
Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2003).
Stanton, G. N., The Gospels and Jesus, Oxford Bible
Series, (2nd ed.; New York: Oxford University
Press, 2002).
Stegemann, E. and W. Stegemenn, The Jesus
Movement: A Social History of Its First Century
(Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1999).
Strauss, M. L., Four Portraits, One Jesus: An
Introduction to Jesus and the Gospels. (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2007).
Theissen, G., The Gospels in Context: Social and
Political History in the Synoptic Tradition, trans.
Linda Maloney (London; New York: T&T Clark,
1999).
Theissen, G. and D. Winter, The Quest for the
Plausible Jesus: The Question of Criteria
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

84

Classics:
Meier, J. P., A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical
Jesus (4 Vols, New York: Doubleday, 1991, 1994,
2000, 2001).
Stanton, G., Gospel Truth?: New Light on Jesus and
the Gospels (London: HarperCollins, 1995).
Wright, N. T., Jesus and the Victory of God (London:
SPCK, 1994).
The Churches in Acts
Barrett, C. K., A Critical and Exegetical Commentary
on the Acts of the Apostles (ICC, rev.), 2 vols.
(Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1994-1998).
Bock, D. L., Acts (BECNT) (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2007).
Collins, J. J., Between Athens and Jerusalem: Jewish
Identity in the Hellenistic Diaspora, (2nd ed.; Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Acts of the Apostles (New York:
Anchor, Doubleday, 1997).
Hengel, M., Acts and the History of Earliest
Christianity (repr; Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock,
2003).
Oakes, P. (ed.), Rome in The Bible and The Early
Church (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Pelikan, J., Acts (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2006).
Schnabel, E. J., Early Christian Mission. Vol. 2: Paul
and the Early Church. (Downers Grove, Ill.:
InterVarsity Press, 2004).
Thompson, A. J., One Lord, One People: The Unity of
the Church in Its Literary Setting (London: T. & T.
Clark, 2008).
Witherington, B., The Acts of the Apostles: A Socio
Rhetorical Commentary (Carlisle: Paternoster,
1998).
Woods, E. J., The Finger of God and Pneumatology in
LukeActs (Sheffield: SAP, 2001).
Classics:
Cassidy, R. J., Society and Politics in the Acts of the
Apostles (New York: Orbis, 1987).
Spencer, F. S., The Portrait of Philip in Acts: A Study of
Roles and Relations (Sheffield: JSOT, 1992).
Winter, B. W. (Gen. Ed.), Book of Acts in its First
Century Setting (6 Vols; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
19931996).

NT501 The Content and Setting of the Gospel


Tradition
Status
Core
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to understand the ministry of
Jesus in its historical, socio-cultural, religious and
political environment.
(b) To give candidates an understanding of the
evangelists as Christian theologians, with their own
distinctive theologies, styles and outlooks.

(c) To introduce candidates to a range of critical


methods as applied to Gospel studies for the
purpose of illuminating the meaning and
significance of the Gospel traditions.
(d) To help candidates reflect on the significance of the
Gospels in our contemporary context and for their
own lives and ministry.
Content
Jesus life and ministry, with special reference to the
following:
1 The historical, religious and political setting of
Palestine as part of the Roman Empire.
2 The Markan outline and emphases.
3 Distinctive features of the Gospels of Matthew,
Luke and John.
4 The Kingdom of God in the proclamation of Jesus.
5 The parables and their interpretation.
6 The ethics of Jesus, including the Sermon on the
Mount.
7 The miracles of Jesus and their significance.
8 The titles of Jesus in the Gospels.
9 The passion and resurrection narratives.
Bibliography
Barton, S. C., (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the
Gospels, Cambridge Companions to Religion
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).
Bauckham, R. (ed.), The Gospels for All Christians:
Rethinking the Gospel Audiences (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Becker, J., Jesus of Nazareth (New York: Walter de
Gruyter and Co, 1998).
Blomberg, C. L., Jesus and the Gospels (Leicester:
Apollos, 2002 repr).
Bockmuehl, M., The Cambridge Companion to Jesus
(Cambridge: CUP, 2001).
Bock, D. L., Studying the Historical Jesus: A Guide to
Sources and Methods (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2002).
Bock, D. L. and G. J. Herrick. Jesus in Context:
Background Readings for Gospel Study. (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2005).
Bolt, P. G., The Cross from a Distance: Atonement in
Marks Gospel (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Borg, M. J., Jesus (New York: Happer One,2008).
Dungan, D. L., A History of the Synoptic Problem,
Anchor Bible Reference Library (New York:
Doubleday, 1999).
Edwards, J. R., The Gospel According to Mark (PNTC).
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Gnilka, J., Jesus of Nazareth: Message and History
(Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1997).
Harding, M. and A. Nobbs (eds), The Content and
Setting of the Gospel Tradition (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2010).
Hultgren, A. J., The Parables of Jesus: A Commentary
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Malbon, E. S., Hearing Mark: A Listener's Guide
(Harrisburg: Trinity Press International, 2002).
Rhoads, D., J. Dewey and D. Michie, Mark as Story: An
Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel (2nd ed.
Minneapolis:Fortress Press, 1999).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Seccombe, D., The King of Gods Kingdom: A Solution


to the Puzzle of Jesus (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2002).
Stanton, G. N., The Gospels and Jesus, Oxford Bible
Series, (2nd ed.; New York: Oxford University
Press, 2002).
Stein, R. H., Studying the Synoptic Gospels. (2nd Ed.;
Grand Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Strauss, M. L., Four Portraits, One Jesus: An
Introduction to Jesus and the Gospels. (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2007).
Wright, N. T., Jesus and the Victory of God.
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Wright, N. T., The Resurrection of the Son of God.
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003).

NT502 The Early New Testament Church


Status
Core
Learning Outcomes
This is one of two foundational units that form the basis
for all further study of the New Testament. There are
two focal points in this unit: to consider the Book of
Acts as a presentation of history, theology and narrative;
and to investigate the contents, themes and theology of
the various books of the New Testament.
Candidates will develop an understanding of key
developments in the growth of the earliest church,
together with an awareness of emerging patterns and
common themes alongside exceptional and notable
events. In analysing and exploring these texts, candidates
will develop an increased ability to recognise and
employ inter-disciplinary skills and perspectives.
Candidates will also gain an ability to summarise and
outline relevant information from Acts and various
epistles, with an increased capacity to synthesise and
review significant themes, perspectives and
interpretations associated with the material in view.
Content
Section A
The beginnings and expansion of the church as reflected
in the New Testament documents, with special attention
to the Acts of the Apostles. Topics to be covered
include:
1 The Jerusalem church
2 Early Christian preaching
3 Stephen and the Hellenists
4 The Pauline mission and churches
5 The Council of Jerusalem
6 Schism, heresy and external threat in the early
church.
Section B
The main issues confronted in and the teaching of at least
seven major New Testament epistles.

85

Note: Sections A & B are weighted approximately


equally.
Bibliography
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Acts of the Apostles (New York:
Anchor, Doubleday, 1997).
Hengel, M., Acts and the History of Earliest
Christianity (repr; Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock,
2003).
Marshall, I. H. and D. Peterson (eds), Witness to the
Gospel: The Theology of Acts (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Schnabel, E. J., Early Christian Mission, Vol 2: Paul
and the Early Church (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity Press, 2004).
Winter, B. W. (Gen. Ed.), Book of Acts in its First
Century Setting (6 Vols; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1993-1996).
Witherington, B., The Acts of the Apostles: A Socio
Rhetorical Commentary (Carlisle: Paternoster,
1998).
Woods, E. J., The Finger of God and Pneumatology in
LukeActs (Sheffield: SAP, 2001).
Classics:
Goulder, M., St Peter Verses St Paul: A Tale of Two
Missions (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
1995).
Hemer, C. J., The Book of Acts in the Setting of
Hellenistic History (ed. By C.H. Gempf; Winona
Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 1990).
Spencer, F. S., The Portrait of Philip in Acts: A Study of
Roles and Relations (Sheffield: JSOT, 1992).

NT620NT638 New Testament Studies at Advanced


Level Units
These units entail detailed studies of both the theology
and the exegesis of various elements in the New
Testament literature, building upon the foundation laid in
NT501 and 502.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text of certain books of the New Testament, with
reference to a wider body of biblical and extra
biblical sources of relevance to the passage in view
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism, with an
increased capacity to draw on inter-disciplinary
skills and perspectives
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon particular
aspects of the theology of certain New Testament
writers, with an enhanced capacity to contextualize
the documents: e.g. historical, socio-cultural,
canonical and textual contexts. Insights gained
will increase the ability to develop some measure
of synthesis, with more developed application of
classification and analytical models

MDiv Unit Outlines

86

(d) Candidates will also develop a more independent


capacity to evaluate, critique, propose and defend
propositions and interpretive perspectives
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry, with contemporary application on the
basis of analytical skills and the ability to recontextualise.
Notes
(a) Candidates are required to learn to make appropriate
use of a range of the exegetical methods of modern
critical scholarship.
Candidates who pursue
exegesis in the Greek text are also urged to include
OT647 in their studies, as Greek exegesis will
expect an acquaintance with the issues in the major
textual variants.
(b) Candidates may not take any unit in which they
repeat material completed in another unit. This is
relevant to units NT621/631, NT622/632,
NT626/636, NT627/637 and NT628/638.
(c) Greek exegesis units require the completion of
LA004A and LA004B.
(d) Candidates cannot take the Greek and English text
options in the same unit.
Recommended Readings:
In addition to Bibliography listed with each unit, the
following are also recommended:
Fee, G. D., New Testament Exegesis: A Handbook for
Students and Pastors (3rd ed.; Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 2002).
Guthrie, G. H. and J. S. Duvall, Biblical Greek Exegesis
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1998).
Horrell, D. G. (ed.), Social-Scientific Approaches to
New Testament Interpretation (Edinburgh: T. &
T. Clark, 1999).
Lacocque A. and P Ricoeur, Thinking Biblically:
Exegetical and Hermeneutical Studies (Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 1998).
Metzer, B. M and B. D. Ehrman, The Text of the
Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption, and
Restoration, (4th ed.; New York: Oxford
University Press, 2005).
Porter, S. E., Handbook to Exegesis of the New
Testament (Leiden: Brill, 1997).
Resseguie, J. L., Narrative Criticism of the New
Testament: An Introduction (Grand Rapids, MI:
Baker Academic, 2005).
Classics:
Green, J. (ed.), Hearing The New Testament: Strategies
for Interpretation (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1995).
Neill, S.and N. T. Wright, The Interpretation of the New
Testament, 1861-1986 (Rev.: New York: Oxford
University Press, 1988)
Robbins, V., Exploring the Texture of Texts: A Guide to
Socio-Rhetorical Interpretation (Valley Forge, PA:
Trinity Press International, 1996).

NT620 The Synoptic Gospels (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT501
Learning Outcomes
This unit entails detailed studies of both the theology and
the exegesis of various elements in the Synoptic Gospels,
building upon the foundation laid in NT501 and 502.
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text of the Synoptic Gospels.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon the distinctive
character, styles, themes and interrelationship of the
Synoptic Gospels
(d) To appreciate the literary forms and socio-cultural
context of the Synoptic Gospels
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.
Content
Candidates are required to learn to employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship. Candidates may
not take any unit in which they repeat material
completed in another unit.
1. The theology and critical issues in modern study of
the Gospel chosen.
2. Exegesis of the English text of Luke 1424 (or a
comparable block of chapters from a Synoptic
Gospel).
Bibliography
General Works
Black, D. A. and D. R. Beck (eds), Rethinking the
Synoptic Problem (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic 2001).
Bockmuehl, M. and D. A. Hagner (eds), The Written
Gospel. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2005).
Blomberg, C. L., Jesus and the Gospels (Leicester:
Apollos, 2002 repr).
Burridge, R. A., Four Gospels One Jesus (2nd &
updated ed.; London: SPCK, 2005).
Burridge, R. A., What Are the Gospels?: A
Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Goodacre, M., The Synoptic Problem: A Way Through
the Maze (Sheffield: SAP, 2001).
Goodacre, M., The Case Against Q (Harrisburg, PA:
TPI, 2002).
McKnight, S. and G Osborne (eds.), The Face of New
Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research
(Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, and Leicester:
Apollos, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Classic:
Sanders, E. and M. Davies, Studying the Synoptic
Gospels (London: SCM, 1989).
Studies on Luke
Bartholomew, G. C., J. B. Green, and A.C. Thiselton,
(eds), Reading Luke: Interpretation, Reflection,
Formation, Scripture and Hermeneutic 6 (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2005).
Bovon, F., Luke the Theologian: Fifty-five Years of
Research (1950-2005) (Waco: Baylor University
Press, 2006).
Byrne, B., The Hospitality of God: A Reading of
Lukes Gospel (Strathfield: Liturgical Press,
2000).
Forbes, G. W., The God of Old: The Role of the Lukan
Parables in the Purpose of Lukes Gospel
(Sheffield: SAP, 2000).
Hur, J., A Dynamic Reading of the Holy Spirit in LukeActs JSNTS 211 (London: Continuum, 2004).
Marshall, I. H., Luke: Historian & Theologian (repr &
updated; Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Classics:
Bailey, K. E., Poet and Peasant and Through Peasant
Eyes: A Literary-Cultural Approach to the
Parables in Luke (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1983).
Turner, M., Power from on High: The Spirit in Israel's
Restoration and Witness in Luke-Acts (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996).
Commentaries
Bock, D. L., Luke (2 Vols; Grand Rapids: Baker,
1994,1996).
Bovon, F., Luke 1: A Commentary on the Gospel of
Luke 1:1-9:50 (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2002).
Green, J. B., The Gospel of Luke (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1997).
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Gospel According to Luke (2 Vols;
New York: Doubleday, 1979, 1985).
Johnson, L. T., The Gospel of Luke (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1991).
Talbert, C. H., Reading Luke: A Literary and
Theological Commentary on the Third Gospel
(New York: Crossroad, 1988).

NT621 Paul and Corinthian Christianity (English


Text)
Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if Corinthians has been taken
in unit NT628/638.

87

Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from the Corinthian correspondence.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
socio-cultural considerations.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes in 1 and 2 Corinthians, and Pauls pastoral
theology viewed in context of issues facing the
Corinthian church.
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today.
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship.
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.
1 The church at Corinth: its foundation, the influences
upon its life, and the theological and ethical issues
reflected in the Pauline letters.
2 Exegesis of the English text of 1 Corinthians 17,
1115 (or a comparable block of chapters from 1
and 2 Corinthians).
Bibliography
Theological and General Studies
Adams, E. and D. G. Horrell (eds), Christianity at
Corinth: The Quest for the Pauline Church
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2004).
Cheng, A. T., Idol Food in Corinth: Jewish Background
and Pauline Legacy (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Furnish, V. P., The Theology of the First Letter to the
Corinthians (Cambridge: CUP, 1999).
Hafemann, S., Suffering and Ministry in the Spirit:
Pauls Defence of His Ministry in 1 Corinthians
2:143:3 (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2000).
Welborn, L. L., Paul, the Full of Chirst (London/New
York: T&T Clark, 2005).
Winter, B. W., After Paul Left Corinth: The Influence
of Secular Ethics and Social Change (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Classics:
Banks, R., Paul's Idea of Community (Rev. ed.;
Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Forbes, C. B., Prophecy and Inspired Speech in Early
Christianity and its Hellenistic Environment
(Tbingen: Mohr, 1995).
Martin, D. B., The Corinthian Body (New Haven: Yale
University, 1995).
Pickett, R., The Cross in Corinth: The Social
Significance of the Death of Jesus (Sheffield: SAP,
1997).
Savage, T. B., Power through Weakness: Pauls
Understanding of the Christian Ministry in 2
Corinthians (New York: CUP, 1996).
Theissen, G., The Social Setting of Pauline
Christianity: Essays on Corinth. (Philadelphia:
Fortress Press, 1982).

MDiv Unit Outlines

88

Welborn, L. L., Politics and Rhetoric in the


Corinthians Epistles (Macon, GA: Mercer
University, 1996).
Commentaries
Collins, R. F., First Corinthians (Collegeville:
Liturgical, 1999).
Dunn, J. D. G., 1 Corinthians (Sheffield: Continuum,
2003).
Garland, D., 1 Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Horsley, R. A., 1 Corinthians (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Keener, C. S., 1- 2 Corinthians (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 2005).
Thiselton, A. C., The First Epistle to the Corinthians
(NIGTC). (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Classics:
Fee, G. D., The First Epistle to the Corinthians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1987).
Hays, R. B., First Corinthians (Louisville: John Knox,
1997).
Witherington, B., Conflict and Community in Corinth: A
SocioRhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2
Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994).

NT622 The Epistle to the Hebrews (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if Hebrews has been taken
in unit NT628/NT638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from the Epistles to the Hebrews.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
socio-cultural considerations.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes in Hebrews, and the writers pastoral and
exhortatory expression.
(d) To explore the imagery and scriptural allusions as
integrated and applied within the text of Hebrews.
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today.
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship.
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.

1
2

An introduction to Hebrews, including questions of


authorship, date, destination.
The theology of the epistle, including such themes
as the old and new covenants, sacrifice, perfection,
apostasy, the use of the Old Testament, Christology,
cross and ascension, and eschatology.
Exegesis of the English text of Hebrews 113.

Bibliography
General Studies
Hagner, D. A., Encountering the Book of Hebrews
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Schenck, K. L., Understanding the Book of Hebrews
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003).
Classic:
Isaacs, M. E., Sacred Space: An Approach to the
Theology of the Epistle to the Hebrews (Sheffield:
SAP, 1992).
Commentaries
Attridge, H., The Epistle to the Hebrews .(Philadelphia:
Fortress, 1989).
de Silva, D. A., Perseverance in Gratitude: A Socio
Rhetorical Commentary on the Epistle to the
Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Guthrie, G. H., Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1998).
Johnson, L. T., Hebrews: A Commentary (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 2006).
Koester, C. R., Hebrews (New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Lane, W. L., Hebrews (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
1991).
Pfitzner, V. C., Hebrews (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997).
Witherington, B., III. Letters and Homilies for Jewish
Christians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on
Hebrews, James and Jude. (Downers Grove, IL:
InterVarsity, 2007).
Classic:
Lane, W. L., Hebrews: A Call to Commitment
(Peabody: Hendrickson, 1985).

NT623 The Pastoral Epistles (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if the Pastoral Epistles have
been taken in NT628/NT638
Learning Outcomes
(a) Critically evaluate the issues of of authorship,
setting and purpose of the Pastoral Epistles.
(b) Demonstrate skills in appropriate exegetical
methodology, employing the various interpretive

MDiv Unit Outlines

methods of biblical criticism and socio-cultural


consideration to significant portions of the
correspondence, with reference to a wider body of
biblical and extra biblical sources of relevance to
the passage on view.
(c) Understand the significant themes in the Pastoral
Epistles, viewed in the context of the issues facing
the churches that are recipients of the letters
drawing on interdisciplinary skills and
perspectives.
(d) Understand the implications of the content of the
Pastoral Epistles for contemporary leadership,
ministry and ministry preparation on the basis of
analytical skills and the ability to contextualize.
Content
1 An introduction to the Pastoral Epistles to be
studied, including questions of authorship, date,
destination and occasion with attention to the wider
social and cultural context of the recipient churches.
2 Exegesis of the English text of the whole of the
Pastoral Epistles.
3 Exploration of the theology of the Pastoral Epistles
including their understanding of Christ, salavation,
the church and ministry
4 Contemporary implications of the Pastoral Epistles
for leadership, ministry, cross-cultural ministry and
ministry preparation including engagement with the
text on specific issues students are facing in their
ministry.
Bibliography
Recommended:
Campbell, A., Do the work of an Evangelist EQ 64
(1992), 117-29.
Donfried, K. P. and I. H. Marshall, The Theology of the
Shorter Pauline Epistles (Cambridge: CUP, 1993).
Ellis, E. E., Pauline Theology: Mininstry and Society.
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989).
Harding, M., What Are They Saying About the Pastoral
Epistles? (New York : Paulist Press, 2001).
Harding, M., Tradition and Rhetoric in the Pastoral
Epistles. Studies in Biblical Literature 3. (New York:
Peter Lang, 1998).
Kidd, R. M., Wealth and Beneficence in the Pastoral
Epistles. SBLDS 122. (Atlanta: Scholars, 1990).
Kostenberger, A. J. and T. L. Wilder, Entrusted with the
Gospel: Pauls Theology in the Pastoral Epistles.
(B&H Publishing, 2010).
Marshall, I. H., The Christology of the Pastoral
Epistles. SNT(SU) 13 (1988), 157-77.
Marshall, I. H., Faith and Works in the Pastoral
Epistles. SNT(SU) 9 (1984), 203-18.
Prior, M., Paul the Letter Writer and the Second Letter
to Timothy. JSNTS 23 (Sheffield: JSOT, 1989).
Towner, P. H., Christology in the letters to Timothy
and Titus in Contours of Christology in the New
Testament. R. N. Longenecker (ed.) McMaster New
Testament Studies 7. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2005), 219-44.

89

Towner, P. H., Gnosis and Realised Eschatology in


Ephesus (of the Pastoral Epistles) and the Corinthian
Enthusiasm. JSNT 31 (1987), 95-124.
Witherington, B. III. A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary
on Titus, 1-2 Timothy and 1-3 John. Letters and
Homilies for Hellenized Christians, Volume 1.
(Downers Grove: IVP, 2006).
Young, F., The Theology of the Pastoral Letters
(Cambridge: CUP, 1994).
Commentaries
Bassler, J. M., 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).
Fee, G. D., 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus. New International
Biblical Commentary. (Peabody, MA: Henrikson,
1988).
Fiore, B., The Pastoral Epistles: First Timothy, Second
Timothy, Titus. (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press,
2007).
Johnson, L. T., The First and Second Letters to Timothy
(New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Knight, G. W. III., Commentary on the Pastoral
Epistles. NIGTC. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1992).
Marshall, I. H., The Pastoral Epistles (Edinburgh: T. &
T. Clark, 1999).
Mounce, W. D., The Pastoral Epistles (Waco: Word,
2000).
Quinn, J. D., The Letter to Titus. (New York:
Doubleday, 1990).
Quinn, J. D and W. C. Wacker, First and Second Letters
to Timothy (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 2000).
Towner, P. H., The Letters to Timothy and Titus (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).
Cultural Context
Baugh, S. M., A Foreign World: Ephesus in the First
Century in A. J. Kostenberger et. al. Women in the
Church: A Fresh Analysis of 1 Timothy 2.9-15. (Grand
Rapids, Baker, 1995). pp. 13-52.
Harding, M., Early Christian Life and Thought in Social
Context : A Reader. (London : T & T Clark, 2003).
Osiek, C. and D. L. Balch, Families in the New
Testament World: Households and House Churches.
(Louisville, KY: John Knox, 1997).
Theissen, G., The Social Setting of Pauline Christianity.
(Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982).
Verner, D. C., The Household of God: The Social World
of the Pastoral Epistles. (SBLDS 71. Chico, CA:
Scholars, 1983).
Winter, B. W., Roman Wives, Roman Widows: The
Appearance of New Women and the Pauline
Communities. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003).

NT624 The Fourth Gospel (English Text)


Status
Elective

MDiv Unit Outlines

90

Pre/co-requisites
NT501
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from Johns Gospel.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
structural analysis.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes and stylistic features in Johns Gospel, and
indications of the writers purpose in writing.
(d) To explore the interplay between narrative,
encounter, sign and teaching in the text of Johns
Gospel.
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today.
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship.
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.
1

The theology of the Fourth Gospel, including such


topics as:
Christology;
pneumatology;
the
church;
eschatology; salvation/life/judgement; sacraments;
faith and signs.
The critical issues in the Fourth Gospel, such as:
authorship; dating; provenance; formation of and
historical background to the gospel; John and the
synoptic gospels and the gospel tradition.
Exegesis of the English text of John 18, 1416
(or a comparable block of chapters).

Bibliography
General Studies
Carter, W., John: Storyteller, Interpreter, Evangelist
(Peabody: Hendrickson, 2006).
Ferreira, J., Johannine Ecclesiology (Sheffield: SAP,
1998).
Fortna, R. T. and T. Thatcher (eds), Jesus in Johannine
Tradition (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
2001).
Lincoln, A. T., The Gospel According to Saint John.
(Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2005).
Malina, B. J. and R. L. Rohrbaugh, Social Science
Commentary on the Gospel of John (Minneapolis:
Fortress Press, 1998).
Orton, D. E., The Composition of Johns Gospel:
Selected Studies from Novum Testamentum
(Leiden: Brill, 1999).
Painter, J., R. A. Culpepper and F. Segovia (eds), Word,
Theology and Community in John (St. Louis:
Chalice, 2002).
Thatcher, T., Why John Wrote a Gospel: Jesus,
Memory, History (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2006).

Classics:
Ashton, J., (ed.), The Interpretation of John (2nd ed ;
Edinburgh: T & T Clark,1997).
Culpepper, R. A. and C. C. Black (eds), Exploring the
Gospel of John (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 1996).
Porter, S. E. and C. A. Evans (eds), The Johannine
Writings: A Sheffield Reader (Sheffield: SAP,
1995).
Pryor, J. W., John: Evangelist of the Covenant People:
The Narrative and Themes of the Fourth Gospel
(Downers Grove: InterVarstiy Press, 1992).
Smalley, S. S., John: Evangelist & Interpreter (Exeter:
Paternoster, 1998).
Smith, D. M., The Theology of the Gospel of John
(Cambridge: CUP, 1995).
Commentaries
Brown, R. E. and F. J. Maloney, An Introduction to the
Gospel of John (New York: Doubleday, 2003).
Kruse, C. G., The Gospel according to John (rev.;
Leicester: InterVarsity, 2004).
Keener, C. S., The Gospel of John: A Commentary (2
Vols; Peabody: Hendrickson, 2003).
Lincoln, A. T., The Gospel According to Saint John.
(Peabody: Hendrickson, 2005).
Kstenberger, A. J., John (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Moloney, F. J., The Gospel of John (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1998).
Classics:
Carson, D. A., The Gospel According to John
(Leicester: IVP, 1991).
Ridderbos, H., The Gospel of John: A Theological
Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).
Schnackenburg, R., The Gospel According to St. John (2
vol.; New York: Seabury Press, 1968, 1980).
Witherington, B., Johns Wisdom: A Commentary on
the Fourth Gospel (Lousville: Westminster John
Knox, 1995).

NT625 Pauline Theology and Romans (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
NT629
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to study the theology of the
Apostle Paul as it is reflected in his epistles. As an
integrating unit, it is recommended that candidates
have studied a Pauline Epistle at advanced level.
(b) To gain an understanding of the purpose, literary
shape, rhetorical form and argument of Pauls letter
to the Romans.

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) To develop an understanding of the new


perspective on Paul, with a capacity to critically
evaluate its strengths and weaknesses.
(d) To consider questions of coherence in Pauline
theology, and differing socio-cultural and
rhetorical contexts.
Content
1 Pauline theology: its integrating ideas and its major
themes (e.g. Christology, eschatology, ecclesiology,
Paul and the law, centrum Paulinum).
2 The major issues in contemporary study and the
central themes of Romans.
3 Exegesis of the English text of eight chapters from
Romans 111.
Bibliography
Pauline Theology
Bassler, J., Navigating Paul: An Introduction to Key
Theological Concepts (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2007).
Dunn, J. D. G., The Theology of Paul the Apostle
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Dunn, J. D. G. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to St.
Paul (Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
Esler, P. F., Conflict and Identity in Romans: The
Social Setting of Paul's Letter (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 2003).
Fee, G. D., Pauline Christology: An ExegeticalTheological Study (Peabody: Hendrickson, 2007).
Fitzmyer, J. A., Pauline Theology in The New Jerome
Biblical Commentary (Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Prentice Hall, 1990).
Gorman, M. J., Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A
Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Horsley, R. A., Paul and Empire: Religion and Power
in Roman Imperial Society (Harrisburg, PA: TPI,
1997).
Westerholm, S., Perspectives Old and New on Paul
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Wright, N. T., The Climax of the Covenant (Edinburgh:
T & T Clark, 1991).
Classics:
Fee, G. D., Gods Empowering Presence (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Pate, C. M., The End of the Age Has Come: The
Theology of Paul (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1995).
Penna, R., Paul the Apostle (Vols I & II; Collegeville,:
Liturgical, 1996).
Sanders, E. P., Paul and Palestinian Judaism (London:
SCM, 1977).
Stowers, S. K., Rereading of Romans: Justice, Jews and
Gentiles (New Haven: Yale University, 1994).
Wright, N. T., The Climax of the Covenant: Christ and
the Law in Pauline Theology (Minneapolis:
Fortress Press, 1992).
Romans Studies and Commentaries
Byrne, B., Romans (Collegeville: Liturgical, 1996).

91

Chae, D. JS., Paul as Apostle to the Gentiles: His


Apostolic SelfAwareness and its Influence on the
Soteriological Argument of Romans (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1997).
Dunn, J. D. G., Romans 2 vols. (Dallas: Word, 1988).
Jewett, R. K., Romans: A Commentary. Hermeneia
(Ed. E. J. Epp; Augsburg: Fortress Press, 2006).
Moo, D. J., The Epistle to the Romans (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1996).
Schreiner, T. R., Romans (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Soderlund, S. K. and N. T. Wright (eds), Romans and
the People of God (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Westerholm, S., Understanding Paul: The Early
Christian Worldview of the Letter to the Romans
(2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Witherington, B., Pauls Letter to the Romans: A
Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2004).
Classics:
Cranfield, C. E. B., Romans: A Shorter Commentary
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1985).
Donfried, K. P., The Romans Debate (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 1991).
Nanos, M. D., The Mystery of Romans: The Jewish
Context of Paul's Letter (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1996).
Stendahl, K., The Final Account: Pauls Letter to the
Romans (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995).
Walters, J. C., Ethnic Issues in Pauls Letter to the
Romans: Changing SelfDefinitions in Earliest
Roman Christianity (Valley Forge: TPI, 1993).
Wedderburn, A. J. M., The Reasons for Romans
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1991).

NT626 General Epistles (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if 1 Peter has been taken in
unit NT628/638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to interpret and exegete a
range of non-Pauline books of the New Testament.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon particular
aspects of the theology of certain New Testament
writers.
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.

92

MDiv Unit Outlines

Content
1 An introduction to the Epistles to be studied,
including questions of authorship, date, destination.
2 The theology of the Epistles to be studied, including
their relationship to the gospel traditions (written
and oral) and other theologians of the early church.
3 This unit require coverage of two of James , 1 Peter,
1-3 John. The full English text be required from the
two chosen.
Bibliography
James
Johnson, L. T., The Epistle of James (New York:
Doubleday, 1995).
Laws, S., The Epistle of James (San Francisco: Harper
& Row, 1980).
Martin, R. P., James (Waco: Word, 1988).
Bauckham, R., James (Oxford: Routledge, 1999).
Moo, D. J., James (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Penner, T. C., The Epistle of James and Eschatology:
Rereading an Ancient Christian Letter (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996)
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for Jewish
Christians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on
Hebrews, James and Jude. (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 2007).
Classics:
Adamson, J. B., James: The Man and His Message
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989).
Davids, P. H., The Epistle of James (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1982).
1 and 2 Peter, Jude
Elliott, J. H., 1 Peter (New York: Doubleday, 2000).
Horrell, D. G., The Epistles of Peter and Jude (London:
Epworth, 1998).
Senior, D. P. and D. J. Harrington, 1 Peter, Jude and 2
Peter (Collegeville: Liturgical, 2003).
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for
Hellenized Christians, vol. 2: A Socio-Rhetorical
Commentary on 1-2 Peter. (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 2007).
Classics:
Achtemeier, P. J., 1 Peter (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Davids, P. H., The Letters of Second Peter and Jude
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).
Michaels, J. R., 1 Peter (Dallas: Word, 1988).
Neyrey, J. H., 2 Peter, Jude (New York: Doubleday,
1993).
Johannine Epistles
Painter, J., 1, 2 and 3 John (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 2002).
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for
Hellenized Christians, vol. 1: A Socio-Rhetorical
Commentary on Titus, 1-2 Timothy and 1-3 John.
(Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2006).

Classics:
Burge, G. M., Letters of John (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1996).
Lieu, J., The Theology of the Johannine Epistles
(Cambridge: CUP, 1991).
Schnackenburg, R., The Johannine Epistles. (New
York: Crossroad, 1992).
Strecker, G., The Johannine Letters (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1993).
Thompson, M. M., 1-3 John (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 1992).

NT627 New Testament Apocalyptic (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusion
This unit may not be taken if Revelation has been taken
in unit NT628/638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To explore evidence for the literary, socio-cultural,
political and historical context reflected in
Revelation
(b) To gain an understanding of broad structural form
of Revelation, and the variety of interpretations
addressing the eschatological perspectives reflected
in Revelation
(c) To consider the interplay between godly worship,
warnings and idolatry
(d) To gain an appreciation for the sweep of Gods
purposes, and the employment of prophetic and
apocalyptic genres
Content
1 The historical, social and theological roots of New
Testament Apocalyptic writings, especially the
Book of Revelation.
2 The theology of the Book of Revelation, including
such themes as Christology, doctrine of God,
judgement and hope.
3 Exegesis of the English text of Revelation 115, 19
21.
Bibliography
General Studies
Allison, D. C., Jesus of Nazareth: Millenarian Prophet
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998).
Bloomquist, L. G. and G. Carey, Vision and
Persuasion:
Rhetorical
Dimensions
of
Apocalyptic Discourse (St Louis, MO: Chalice,
1999).
McGinn,
B.
(ed.),
The
Encyclopedia
of
Apocalypticism. Vol. II: Apocalypticism in
Western History and Culture (New York:
Continuum, 1998).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Classics:
Collins, J. J., The Apocalyptic Imagination (New York:
Crossroad, 1989).
Russell, D. S., Divine Disclosure: An Introduction to
Jewish Apocalyptic (London; SCM, 1992).

93

Learning Outcomes
To enable candidates to study further the theology and
major issues of two substantial blocks of New Testament
material.
Content

Commentaries and Studies on Revelation


Barr, D. L., Tales of the End: A Narrative
Commentary on the Book of Revelation (Santa
Rosa, CA: Polebridge, 1998).
Beale, G. K., Johns Use of the Old Testament in
Revelation (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Court, J. M., The Book of Revelation and the
Johannine Apocalyptic Tradition (Sheffield: SAP,
2000).
Duff, P. B., Who Rides the Beast? Prophetic Rivalry
and the Rhetoric of Crisis in the Churches of the
Apocalypse (Oxford, New York: OUP, 2001).
Friesen, S. J., Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of
John: Reading Revelation in the Ruins (Oxford,
New York: OUP, 2001).
Hemer, C., The Letters to the Seven Churches of Asia
in Their Local Setting. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2001).
Keener, C. S. Revelation (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2000).
Koester, C. R., Revelation and the End of All Things
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Malina, B. J. and J. J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary
on the Revelation (Minneapolis: Fortress Press,
2000).
Witherington, B., Revelation (Cambridge; New York:
CUP, 2003).
Classics:
Bauckham, R., The Theology of Revelation (Cambridge;
New York: CUP, 1996).
Kraybill, J. N., Imperial Cult and Commerce in
Apocalypse (Sheffield: SAP, 1996).
Malina, B. J., On the Genre and Message of Revelation:
Star Visions and Sky Journeys (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 1995).
Thompson, L. L., The Book of Revelation: Apocalypse
and Empire (New York: OUP, 1990).

The major issues in contemporary study and the


central themes of any two of
(a) Acts
(b) 1 and/or 2 Corinthians
(c) Galatians
(d) Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon
(e) 1 and 2 Thessalonians
(f) Pastoral Epistles
(g) Hebrews
(h) 1 Peter
(i) Revelation

Exegesis of the English text of 1112 chapters


drawn from two of the following:
(a) Acts
(b) 1 Corinthians
(c) 2 Corinthians
(d) Galatians
(e) Ephesians
(f) 1 Thessalonians
(g) 2 Timothy & Titus
(h) Hebrews
(i) 1 Peter
(j) Revelation

Bibliography
Acts
Barrett, C. K., Acts (2 Vols; New York: T & T Clark,
2004).
Dunn, J. D. G., The Acts of the Apostles (London:
Epworth, 1996).
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Acts of the Apostles (New York:
Doubleday, 1998).
Gaventa, B., Acts (Nashville: Abingdon, 2003).
Witherington, B., The Acts of the Apostles: A Socio
Rhetorical Commentary (Carlisle: Paternoster,
1998).

NT628 Other Writings (English Text)


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
No material may be chosen in this unit that duplicates
material in units NT621/631, NT622/632, NT626/636 or
NT627/637.

1 and 2 Corinthians
Barnett, P. W., The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).
Collins, R. F., First Corinthians (Collegville, MN:
Liturgical, 1999).
Dunn, J. D. G., 1 Corinthians (Sheffield: Continuum,
2003).
Garland, D,. 1 Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Harris, M., The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005).
Horsley, R. A., 1 Corinthians (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Thiselton, A. C., The First Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).

94

MDiv Unit Outlines

Galatians
Fung, R. K. Y., Galatians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1988).
Longenecker, R. N., Galatians (Waco: Word, 1990).
Martyn, J. L., Galatians (New York: Doubleday, 1997).
Witherington, B., Grace in Galatia: A Commentary on
Pauls Letter to the Galatians (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon
Dunn, J. D. G., The Epistles to the Colossians and
Philemon (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Fee, G. D., Pauls Letter to the Philippians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995).
OBrien, P. T., The Letter to the Ephesians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
OBrien, P. T., The Epistle to the Philippians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991).
1 and 2 Thessalonians
Green, G. L., The Letters to the Thessalonians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Wanamaker, C. A., The Epistles to the Thessalonians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990).
Witherington, B., 1 and 2 Thessalonians: A SocioRhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2006).

Best, E., 1 Peter (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).


Boring, M. E., 1 Peter (Nashville: Abingdon, 1999).
Elliott, J. H., 1 Peter (New York: Doubleday, 2001).
McKnight, S., 1 Peter (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1996).
Revelation
Aune, D. E., Revelation (3 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
19971999).
Barr, D. L., Tales of the End: A Narrative
Commentary on the Book of Revelation (Santa
Rosa, CA: Polebridge, 1998).
Bauckham, R., The Climax of Prophecy (Edinburgh: T
& T Clark, 1998).
Beale, G. K., Revelation (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Court, J. M., The Book of Revelation and the
Johannine Apocalyptic Tradition (Sheffield: SAP,
2000).
Harrington, W. J., Revelation (Collegeville, MN:
Michael Glazier, 1993).
Osborne, G. R., Revelation (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2002).
Witherington, Ben, Revelation (Cambridge; New York:
CUP, 2003).

NT629 Romans (English Text)

The Pastoral Epistles


Bassler, J. M., 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).
Johnson, L. T., The First and Second Letters to Timothy
(New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Marshall, I. H., The Pastoral Epistles (Edinburgh: T. &
T. Clark, 1999).
Mounce, W. D., The Pastoral Epistles (Waco: Word,
2000).
Towner, P. H., The Letters to Timothy and Titus (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).
Young, F., The Theology of the Pastoral Letters
(Cambridge: CUP, 1994).
Hebrews
Bruce, F. F., Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1994).
de Silva, D. A., Perseverance in Gratitude: A SocioRhetorical Commentary on the Epistle to the
Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Ellingworth, P., The Epistle to the Hebrews (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993).
Hagner, D. A., Encountering the Book of Hebrews
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Hughes, G., Hebrews and Hermeneutics (Cambridge:
CUP, 2004).
Koester, C., The Epistle to the Hebrews (New York:
Doubleday, 2001).
Lane, W. L., Hebrews (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
1991).
Pfitzner, V. C., Hebrews (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997).
1 Peter
Achtemeier, P. J., 1 Peter (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1996).

Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
NT625/635
Learning Outcomes
To enable candidates to study the theology of the
Apostle Paul as it is reflected in this epistle.
To gain an understanding of the purpose, literary shape,
rhetorical form and argument of Pauls letter to the
Romans
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text of Romans
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon the distinctive
character, styles, themes and interrelationship of
Romans
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.
Content
1 Introductory issues:
(a) the themes and purpose(s) of Romans in the
context of the Pauline mission;
(b) the major issues in contemporary study of the
book of Romans; and

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) the bearing of contemporary approaches to


Pauline theology on the interpretation of
Romans.
Exegesis of the English text of Romans 1-11 (or
equivalent passages).

Bibliography
General studies
Chae, D. JS., Paul as Apostle to the Gentiles: His
Apostolic SelfAwareness and its Influence on the
Soteriological Argument of Romans (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1997).
Esler, P. F., Conflict and Identity in Romans
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003).
Gathercole, S. J., Where is Boasting? (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Miller, J. C., The Obedience of Faith, the
Eschatological People of God, and the Purpose of
Romans (Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical
Literature, 2000).
Oakes, P. (ed.), Rome in The Bible and The Early
Church (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Soderlund, S. K. and N. T. Wright (eds), Romans and
the People of God (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Commentaries
Bray, G. (ed.), Romans (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
1998).
Byrne, B., Romans (Sacra Pagina; Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1996).
Moo, D. J., Romans (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Stuhlmacher, P., Romans (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1994).
Talbert, C. H., Romans (Macon, GA: Smith & Helwys,
2002).
Witherington, B., Paul's Letter to the Romans: A
Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2004).
Classics:
Boers, H., The Justification of the Gentiles (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Donfried, K. P. (ed.), The Romans Debate (Rev.
Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1991).
Wedderburn, A. J. M., The Reasons for Romans
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1991).

NT630 The Synoptic Gospels (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT501

95

Learning Outcomes
This unit entails detailed studies of both the theology and
the exegesis of various elements in the Synoptic Gospels,
building upon the foundation laid in NT501 and 502.
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text of the Synoptic Gospels.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon the distinctive
character, styles, themes and interrelationship of the
Synoptic Gospels.
(d) To appreciate the literary forms and socio-cultural
context of the Synoptic Gospels.
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship. Candidates who
pursue exegesis in the Greek text are also urged to
include OT647 in their studies, as Greek exegesis will
expect an acquaintance with the issues in the major
textual variants
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.
1. The theology and critical issues in modern study of
the gospel chosen.
2. Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of Luke
1924 (or a comparable block of chapters from a
synoptic gospel).
Bibliography
General Works
Black, D. A. and D. R. Beck (eds), Rethinking the
Synoptic Problem (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic 2001).
Bockmuehl, M. and D. A. Hagner (eds), The Written
Gospel. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2005).
Blomberg, C. L., Jesus and the Gospels (Leicester:
Apollos, 2002 repr).
Burridge, R. A., Four Gospels One Jesus (2nd &
updated ed.; London: SPCK, 2005).
Burridge, R. A., What Are the Gospels?: A
Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography (2nd
& updated ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Goodacre, M., The Synoptic Problem: A Way Through
the Maze (Sheffield: SAP, 2001).
Goodacre, M., The Case Against Q (Harrisburg, PA:
TPI, 2002).
McKnight, S. and G Osborne (eds.), The Face of New
Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research
(Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, and Leicester:
Apollos, 2004).
Classic:
Sanders, E. and M. Davies, Studying the Synoptic
Gospels (London: SCM, 1989).

MDiv Unit Outlines

96

Studies on Luke
Bartholomew, G. C., J. B. Green, and A. C. Thiselton,
(eds), Reading Luke: Interpretation, Reflection,
Formation, Scripture and Hermeneutic 6 (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2005).
Bovon, F., Luke the Theologian: Fifty-five Years of
Research (1950-2005). (Waco: Baylor University
Press, 2006).
Byrne, B., The Hospitality of God: A Reading of
Lukes Gospel (Strathfield: Liturgical Press,
2000).
Forbes, G. W., The God of Old: The Role of the Lukan
Parables in the Purpose of Lukes Gospel
(Sheffield: SAP, 2000).
Hur, J., A Dynamic Reading of the Holy Spirit in LukeActs JSNTS 211 (London: Continuum, 2004).
Marshall, I. H., Luke: Historian & Theologian (repr &
updated; Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Turner, M., Power from on High: The Spirit in Israel's
Restoration and Witness in Luke-Acts (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996).
Classics:
Bailey, K. E., Poet and Peasant and Through Peasant
Eyes: A Literary-Cultural Approach to the
Parables in Luke (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1983).
Turner, M., Power from on High: The Spirit in Israel's
Restoration and Witness in Luke-Acts (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996).
Commentaries
Bovon, F., Luke 1: A Commentary on the Gospel of
Luke 1:1-9:50 (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2002).
Green, J. B., The Gospel of Luke (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1997).

Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if Corinthians has been taken
in unit NT628/638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from the Corinthian correspondence.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
socio-cultural considerations.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes in 1 and 2 Corinthians, and Pauls pastoral
theology viewed in context of issues facing the
Corinthian church.
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today.
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship. Candidates who
pursue exegesis in the Greek text are also urged to
include OT647 in their studies, as Greek exegesis will
expect an acquaintance with the issues in the major
textual variants.
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.
1

The church at Corinth: its foundation, the influences


upon its life, and the theological and ethical issues
reflected in the Pauline letters.
Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of 1
Corinthians 14, 1215 (or a comparable block of
chapters from 1 and 2 Corinthians).

Bibliography
Classics:
Bock, D. L., Luke (2 Vols; Grand Rapids: Baker,
1994,1996).
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Gospel According to Luke (2 Vols;
New York: Doubleday, 1979, 1985).
Johnson, L. T., The Gospel of Luke (Collegeville:
Liturgical, 1991).
Nolland, J., Luke (3 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word, 1990,
1993).
Talbert, C. H., Reading Luke: A Literary and
Theological Commentary on the Third Gospel
(New York: Crossroad, 1988).

NT631
Text)

Paul and Corinthian Christianity (Greek

Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502

Theological and General Studies


Adams, E. and D. G. Horrell (eds), Christianity at
Corinth: The Quest for the Pauline Church
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2004).
Cheng, A. T., Idol Food in Corinth: Jewish Background
and Pauline Legacy (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Furnish, V. P., The Theology of the First Letter to the
Corinthians (Cambridge: CUP, 1999).
Hafemann, S., Suffering and Ministry in the Spirit:
Pauls Defence of his Ministry in 1 Corinthians
2:143:3 (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2000).
Welborn, L. L., Paul, the Full of Chirst (London/New
York: T&T Clark, 2005).
Winter, B. W., After Paul Left Corinth: The Influence
of Secular Ethics and Social Change (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Classics:
Banks, R., Paul's Idea of Community (Rev. ed.;
Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Chow, J. K., Patronage and Power: Studies on Social
Networks in Corinth (Sheffield: SAP, 1992).
Clarke, A. D., Secular and Christian Leadership in
Corinth; A SocioHistorical and Exegetical Study
of 1 Corinthians 16 (Leiden: Brill, 1993).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Forbes, C. B., Prophecy and Inspired Speech in Early


Christianity and Its Hellenistic Environment
(Tbingen: Mohr, 1995).
Litfin, D., St Pauls Theology of Proclamation: 1
Corinthians 14 and GrecoRoman Rhetoric
(Cambridge: CUP, 1994).
Martin, D. B., The Corinthian Body (New Haven: Yale
University, 1995).
Pickett, R., The Cross in Corinth: The Social
Significance of the Death of Jesus (Sheffield: SAP,
1997).
Savage, T. B., Power through Weakness: Pauls
Understanding of the Christian Ministry in 2
Corinthians (New York: CUP, 1996).
Theissen, G., The Social Setting of Pauline
Christianity: Essays on Corinth. (Philadelphia:
Fortress Press, 1982).
Welborn, L. L., Politics and Rhetoric in the
Corinthians Epistles (Macon, GA: Mercer
University, 1996).
Commentaries
Collins, R. F., First Corinthians (Collegeville:
Liturgical, 1999).
Dunn, J. D. G., 1 Corinthians (Sheffield: Continuum,
2003).
Garland, D., 1 Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Harris, M. J., The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005).
Horsley, R. A., 1 Corinthians (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Keener, C. S., 1- 2 Corinthians (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 2005).
Thiselton, A. C., The First Epistle to the Corinthians
(NIGTC). (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Thrall, M. E., A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on
the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (2 Vols.
Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1994-2000).
Classics:
Fee, G. D., The First Epistle to the Corinthians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1987).
Hays, R. B., First Corinthians (Louisville: John Knox,
1997).
Witherington, B., Conflict and Community in Corinth: A
SocioRhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2
Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994).

NT632 The Epistle to the Hebrews (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502

97

Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if Hebrews has been taken
in unit NT628/638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from the Epistles to the Hebrews.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
socio-cultural considerations.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes in Hebrews, and the writers pastoral and
exhortatory expression.
(d) To explore the imagery and scriptural allusions as
integrated and applied within the text of Hebrews.
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today.
Content
1 An introduction to Hebrews, including questions of
authorship, date, destination.
2 The theology of the epistle, including such themes
as the old and new covenants, sacrifice, perfection,
apostasy, the use of the Old Testament, Christology,
cross and ascension, and eschatology.
3 Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of
Hebrews 18, 12.
Bibliography
General Studies
Hagner, D. A., Encountering the Book of Hebrews
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Schenck, K. L., Understanding the Book of Hebrews
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003).
Classic:
Isaacs, M. E., Sacred Space: An Approach to the
Theology of the Epistle to the Hebrews (Sheffield:
SAP, 1992).
Commentaries
de Silva, D. A., Perseverance in Gratitude: A Socio
Rhetorical Commentary on the Epistle to the
Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Guthrie, G. H., Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1998).
Johnson, L. T., Hebrews: A Commentary (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 2006).
Koester, C. R., Hebrews (New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Pfitzner, V. C., Hebrews (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997).
Witherington, B., III. Letters and Homilies for Jewish
Christians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on
Hebrews, James and Jude. (Downers Grove, IL:
InterVarsity, 2007).
Classics:
Attridge, H., The Epistle to the Hebrews .(Philadelphia:
Fortress, 1989).
Ellingworth, P., The Epistle to the Hebrews (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993).

MDiv Unit Outlines

98

Lane, W. L., Hebrews: A Call to Commitment


(Peabody: Hendrickson, 1985).
Lane, W. L., Hebrews (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
1991).

NT633 The Pastoral Epistles (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A and LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT302
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if the Pastoral Epistles have
been taken in NT628/NT638
Learning Outcomes
(a) Critically evaluate the issues of of authorship,
setting and purpose of the Pastoral Epistles.
(b) Demonstrate skills in appropriate exegetical
methodology, employing the various interpretive
methods of biblical criticism and socio-cultural
consideration to significant portions of the
correspondence, with reference to a wider body of
biblical and extra biblical sources of relevance to
the passage on view.
(c) Understand the significant themes in the Pastoral
Epistles, viewed in the context of the issues facing
the churches that are recipients of the letters
drawing on interdisciplinary skills and
perspectives.
(d) Understand the implications of the content of the
Pastoral Epistles for contemporary leadership,
ministry and ministry preparation on the basis of
analytical skills and the ability to contextualize.
Content
1 An introduction to the Pastoral Epistles to be
studied, including questions of authorship, date,
destination and occasion with attention to the wider
social and cultural context of the recipient churches.
2 Exegesis and translation of 8 chapters, including at
least one chapter from each of the Pastoral Epistles.
3 Exploration of the theology of the Pastoral Epistles
including their understanding of Christ, salavation,
the church and ministry
4 Contemporary implications of the Pastoral Epistles
for leadership, ministry, cross-cultural ministry and
ministry preparation including engagement with the
text on specific issues students are facing in their
ministry.

Donfried, K. P. and I. H. Marshall, The Theology of the


Shorter Pauline Epistles (Cambridge: CUP, 1993).
Ellis, E. E., Pauline Theology: Mininstry and Society.
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989).
Harding, M., What Are They Saying About the Pastoral
Epistles? (New York : Paulist Press, 2001).
Harding, M., Tradition and Rhetoric in the Pastoral
Epistles. Studies in Biblical Literature 3. (New York:
Peter Lang, 1998).
Kidd, R. M., Wealth and Beneficence in the Pastoral
Epistles. SBLDS 122. (Atlanta: Scholars, 1990).
Kostenberger, A. J. and T. L. Wilder, Entrusted with the
Gospel: Pauls Theology in the Pastoral Epistles.
(B&H Publishing, 2010).
Marshall, I. H., The Christology of the Pastoral
Epistles. SNT(SU) 13 (1988), 157-77.
Marshall, I. H., Faith and Works in the Pastoral
Epistles. SNT(SU) 9 (1984), 203-18.
Prior, M., Paul the Letter Writer and the Second Letter
to Timothy. JSNTS 23 (Sheffield: JSOT, 1989).
Towner, P. H., Christology in the letters to Timothy
and Titus in Contours of Christology in the New
Testament. R. N. Longenecker (ed.) McMaster New
Testament Studies 7. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2005), 219-44.
Towner, P. H., Gnosis and Realised Eschatology in
Ephesus (of the Pastoral Epistles) and the Corinthian
Enthusiasm. JSNT 31 (1987), 95-124.
Witherington, B. III., A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary
on Titus, 1-2 Timothy and 1-3 John. Letters and
Homilies for Hellenized Christians, Volume 1.
(Downers Grove: IVP, 2006).
Young, F., The Theology of the Pastoral Letters
(Cambridge: CUP, 1994).
Commentaries
Bassler, J. M., 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).
Fee, G. D., 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus. New International
Biblical Commentary. (Peabody, MA: Henrikson,
1988).
Fiore, B., The Pastoral Epistles: First Timothy, Second
Timothy, Titus. (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press,
2007).
Johnson, L. T., The First and Second Letters to Timothy
(New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Knight, G. W. III., Commentary on the Pastoral
Epistles. NIGTC. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1992).
Marshall, I. H., The Pastoral Epistles (Edinburgh: T. &
T. Clark, 1999).
Mounce, W. D., The Pastoral Epistles (Waco: Word,
2000).
Quinn, J. D., The Letter to Titus. (New York:
Doubleday, 1990).
Quinn, J. D. and W. C. Wacker, First and Second
Letters to Timothy (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 2000).
Towner, P. H., The Letters to Timothy and Titus (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).

Bibliography
Recommended:
Campbell, A., Do the work of an Evangelist EQ 64
(1992), 117-29.

Cultural Context
Baugh, S. M., A Foreign World: Ephesus in the First
Century in A. J. Kostenberger et. al. Women in the

MDiv Unit Outlines

Church: A Fresh Analysis of 1 Timothy 2.9-15 (Grand


Rapids, Baker, 1995). pp. 13-52.
Harding, M., Early Christian Life and Thought in Social
Context : A Reader (London : T & T Clark, 2003).
Osiek, C. and D. L. Balch, Families in the New
Testament World: Households and House Churches
(Louisville, KY: John Knox, 1997).
Theissen, G., The Social Setting of Pauline Christianity.
(Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982).
Verner, D. C., The Household of God: The Social World
of the Pastoral Epistles (SBLDS 71. Chico, CA:
Scholars, 1983).
Winter, B. W., Roman Wives, Roman Widows: The
Appearance of New Women and the Pauline
Communities (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003).

NT634 The Fourth Gospel (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT501
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to exegete large sections of the
text from Johns Gospel
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism and
structural analysis
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon significant
themes and stylistic features in Johns Gospel, and
indications of the writers purpose in writing
(d) To explore the interplay between narrative,
encounter, sign and teaching in the text of Johns
Gospel
(e) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for the contemporary world and
issues that challenge the church of today
Content
Candidates are required to learn and employ exegetical
methods of modern critical scholarship. Candidates who
pursue exegesis in the Greek text are also urged to
include OT647 in their studies, as Greek exegesis will
expect an acquaintance with the issues in the major
textual variants.
Candidates may not take any unit in which they repeat
material completed in another unit.
1

The theology of the Fourth Gospel, including such


topics as:
Christology;
pneumatology;
the
church;
eschatology; salvation/life/judgement; sacraments;
faith and signs.

99

The critical issues in the Fourth Gospel, such as:


authorship; dating; provenance; formation of and
historical background to the gospel; John and the
synoptic gospels and the gospel tradition.
Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of John
13, 56, 1516 (or a comparable block of
chapters).

General Studies
Carter, W., John: Storyteller, Interpreter, Evangelist
(Peabody: Hendrickson, 2006).
Ferreira, J., Johannine Ecclesiology (Sheffield: SAP,
1998).
Fortna, R. T. and T. Thatcher (eds), Jesus in Johannine
Tradition (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
2001).
Lincoln, A. T., The Gospel According to Saint John.
(Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2005).
Malina, B. J. and R. L. Rohrbaugh, Social Science
Commentary on the Gospel of John (Minneapolis:
Fortress Press, 1998).
Orton, D. E., The Composition of Johns Gospel:
Selected Studies from Novum Testamentum
(Leiden: Brill, 1999).
Painter, J., R. A. Culpepper & F. Segovia (eds), Word,
Theology and Community in John (St. Louis:
Chalice, 2002).
Thatcher, T., Why John Wrote a Gospel: Jesus,
Memory, History (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2006).
Classics:
Ashton, J., (ed.), The Interpretation of John (2nd ed ;
Edinburgh: T & T Clark,1997).
Culpepper, R. A. and C. C. Black (eds), Exploring the
Gospel of John (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 1996).
Porter, S. E. and C. A. Evans (eds), The Johannine
Writings: A Sheffield Reader (Sheffield: SAP,
1995).
Pryor, J. W., John: Evangelist of the Covenant People:
The Narrative and Themes of the Fourth Gospel
(Downers Grove: InterVarstiy Press, 1992).
Smalley, S. S., John: Evangelist & Interpreter (Exeter:
Paternoster, 1998).
Smith, D. M., The Theology of the Gospel of John
(Cambridge: CUP, 1995).
Commentaries
Brown, R. E. and F. J. Maloney, An Introduction to the
Gospel of John (New York: Doubleday, 2003).
Kruse, C. G., The Gospel according to John (rev.;
Leicester: InterVarsity, 2004.
Keener, C. S., The Gospel of John: A Commentary (2
Vols; Peabody: Hendrickson, 2003).
Lincoln, A. T., The Gospel According to Saint John.
(Peabody: Hendrickson, 2005).
Kstenberger, A. J., John (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Moloney, F. J., The Gospel of John (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1998).

MDiv Unit Outlines

100

Classics:
Carson, D. A., The Gospel According to John
(Leicester: IVP, 1991).
Ridderbos, H., The Gospel of John: A Theological
Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).
Schnackenburg, R., The Gospel According to St. John, 2
vol. (New York: Seabury Press, 1968, 1980).
Witherington, B., Johns Wisdom: A Commentary on
the Fourth Gospel (Lousville: Westminster John
Knox, 1995).

NT635 Pauline Theology and Romans (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
NT629/639
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to study the theology of the
Apostle Paul as it is reflected in his epistles. As an
integrating unit, it is recommended that candidates
have studied a Pauline Epistle at advanced level.
(b) To gain an understanding of the purpose, literary
shape, rhetorical form and argument of Pauls
letter to the Romans.
(c) To develop an understanding of the new
perspective on Paul, with a capacity to critically
evaluate its strengths and weaknesses.
(d) To consider questions of coherence in Pauline
theology, and differing socio-cultural and rhetorical
contexts.
Content
1 Pauline theology: its integrating ideas and its major
themes (e.g. Christology, eschatology, ecclesiology,
Paul and the law, centrum Paulinum).
2 The major issues in contemporary study and the
central themes of Romans.
3 Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of six
chapters from Romans 18.
Bibliography
Pauline Theology
Bassler, J., Navigating Paul: An Introduction to Key
Theological Concepts (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2007).
Dunn, J. D. G., The Theology of Paul the Apostle
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Dunn, J. D. G. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to St.
Paul (Cambridge: CUP, 2003).

Esler, P. F., Conflict and Identity in Romans: The


Social Setting of Paul's Letter (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 2003).
Fee, G. D., Pauline Christology: An ExegeticalTheological Study (Peabody: Hendrickson, 2007).
Fitzmyer, J. A., Pauline Theology in The New Jerome
Biblical Commentary (Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Prentice Hall, 1990).
Gorman, M. J., Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A
Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Horsley, R. A., Paul and Empire: Religion and Power
in Roman Imperial Society (Harrisburg, PA: TPI,
1997).
Westerholm, S., Perspectives Old and New on Paul
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Wright, N. T., The Climax of the Covenant (Edinburgh:
T & T Clark, 1991).
Classics:
Fee, G. D., Gods Empowering Presence (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Pate, C. M., The End of the Age Has Come: The
Theology of Paul (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1995).
Penna, R., Paul the Apostle (Vols I & II; Collegeville,:
Liturgical, 1996).
Sanders, E. P., Paul and Palestinian Judaism (London:
SCM, 1977).
Stowers, S. K., Rereading of Romans: Justice, Jews and
Gentiles (New Haven: Yale University, 1994).
Wright, N. T., The Climax of the Covenant: Christ and
the Law in Pauline Theology (Minneapolis:
Fortress Press, 1992).
Romans Studies and Commentaries
Byrne, B., Romans (Collegeville: Liturgical, 1996).
Chae, D. JS., Paul as Apostle to the Gentiles: His
Apostolic SelfAwareness and its Influence on the
Soteriological Argument of Romans (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1997).
Dunn, J. D. G., Romans 2 vols. (Dallas: Word, 1988).
Gathercole, S. J., Where is Boasting? (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Jewett, R. K., Romans: A Commentary. Hermeneia
(Ed. E.J. Epp; Augsburg: Fortress Press, 2006).
Miller, J. C., The Obedience of Faith, the
Eschatological People of God, and the Purpose of
Romans (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature,
2000).
Moo, D. J., The Epistle to the Romans (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1996).
Schreiner, T. R., Romans (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Soderlund, S. K. and N. T. Wright (eds), Romans and
the People of God (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Stowers, S. K., Rereading of Romans: Justice, Jews and
Gentiles (New Haven: Yale University, 1994).
Westerholm, S., Understanding Paul: The Early
Christian Worldview of the Letter to the Romans
(2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

101

Witherington, B., Paul's Letter to the Romans: A


Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2004).
Wright, N. T., Romans in The New Interpreter's
Bible (Vol. X; Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).

Classics:
Cranfield, C. E. B., Romans: A Shorter Commentary
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1985).
Cranfield, C. E. B., The Epistle to the Romans 2 vols.
(Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark. 1975-79).
Donfried, K. P., The Romans Debate (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 1991).
Hay, D. M. and E. E. Johnson (eds), Pauline Theology
III: Romans (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995).
Nanos, M. D., The Mystery of Romans: The Jewish
Context of Paul's Letter (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1996).
Stendahl, K., The Final Account: Pauls Letter to the
Romans (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995).
Walters, J. C., Ethnic Issues in Pauls Letter to the
Romans: Changing SelfDefinitions in Earliest
Roman Christianity (Valley Forge: TPI, 1993).
Wedderburn, A. J. M., The Reasons for Romans
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1991).

James
Bauckham, R., James (Oxford: Routledge, 1999).
Moo, D. J., James (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Penner, T. C., The Epistle of James and Eschatology:
Rereading an Ancient Christian Letter (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996).
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for Jewish
Christians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on
Hebrews, James and Jude. (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 2007).

NT636 General Epistles (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A and LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if 1 Peter has been taken in
unit NT628/NT638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to interpret and exegete a
range of non-Pauline books of the New Testament.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.
(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon particular
aspects of the theology of certain New Testament
writers.
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.
Content
1 An introduction to the Epistles to be studied,
including questions of authorship, date, destination.
2 The theology of the Epistles to be studied, including
their relationship to the gospel traditions (written
and oral) and other theologians of the early church.

This unit requires coverage of two of James, 1 Peter,


1-3 John. Four chapters in Greek be required from
each of the two chosen.

Bibliography

Classics:
Adamson, J. B., James: The Man and His Message
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989).
Davids, P. H., The Epistle of James (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1982).
Johnson, L. T., The Epistle of James (New York:
Doubleday, 1995).
Laws, S., The Epistle of James (San Francisco: Harper
& Row, 1980).
Martin, R. P., James (Waco: Word, 1988).
1 and 2 Peter, Jude
Elliott, J. H., 1 Peter (New York: Doubleday, 2000).
Horrell, D. G., The Epistles of Peter and Jude (London:
Epworth, 1998).
Schreiner, T. R., 1, 2 Peter, Jude (Nashville: Broadman
& Holman, 2003).
Senior, D. P. and D. J. Harrington, 1 Peter, Jude and 2
Peter (Collegeville: Liturgical, 2003).
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for
Hellenized Christians, vol. 2: A Socio-Rhetorical
Commentary on 1-2 Peter. (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 2007).
Classics:
Achtemeier, P. J., 1 Peter (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Davids, P. H., The First Epistle of Peter (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1990).
Davids, P. H., The Letters of Second Peter and Jude
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).
Michaels, J. R., 1 Peter (Dallas: Word, 1988).
Neyrey, J. H., 2 Peter, Jude (New York: Doubleday,
1993).
Johannine Epistles
Painter, J., 1, 2 and 3 John (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 2002).
Witherington, B. III., Letters and Homilies for
Hellenized Christians, vol. 1: A Socio-Rhetorical
Commentary on Titus, 1-2 Timothy and 1-3 John.
(Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2006).
Classics:
Burge, G. M., Letters of John (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1996).

MDiv Unit Outlines

102

Lieu, J., The Theology of the Johannine Epistles


(Cambridge: CUP, 1991).
Schnackenburg, R., The Johannine Epistles. (New
York: Crossroad, 1992).
Smalley, S. S., 1, 2, 3 John (Waco: Word, 1984).
Strecker, G., The Johannine Letters (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1993).
Thompson, M. M., 1- 3 John (Downers Grove:
InterVarsity, 1992).

NT637 New Testament Apocalyptic (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if Revelation has been taken
in unit NT628/NT638.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To explore evidence for the literary, socio-cultural,
political and historical context reflected in
Revelation;
(b) To gain an understanding of broad structural form
of Revelation, and the variety of interpretations
addressing the eschatological perspectives reflected
in revelation ;
(c) To consider the interplay between godly worship,
warnings and idolatry;
(d) To gain an appreciation for the sweep of Gods
purposes, and the employment of prophetic and
apocalyptic genres.
Content
1 The historical, social and theological roots of New
Testament Apocalyptic writings, especially the
Book of Revelation.
2 The theology of the Book of Revelation, including
such themes as Christology, doctrine of God,
judgement and hope.
3 Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of
Revelation 1, 47, 1214, 2021 (or a comparable
block of chapters).
Bibliography
General Studies
Allison, D. C., Jesus of Nazareth: Millenarian Prophet
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998).
Bloomquist, L. G. and G. Carey, Vision and
Persuasion:
Rhetorical
Dimensions
of
Apocalyptic Discourse (St Louis, MO: Chalice,
1999).
McGinn,
B.
(ed.),
The
Encyclopedia
of
Apocalypticism. Vol. II: Apocalypticism in

Western History and Culture (New York:


Continuum, 1998).
Classics:
Brown, A. R., The Cross and Human Transformation:
Pauls Apocalyptic Work in 1 Corinthians
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995).
Collins, J. J., The Apocalyptic Imagination (New York:
Crossroad, 1989).
Russell, D. S., Divine Disclosure: An Introduction to
Jewish Apocalyptic (London; SCM, 1992).
Commentaries and Studies on Revelation
Barr, D. L., Tales of the End: A Narrative
Commentary on the Book of Revelation (Santa
Rosa, CA: Polebridge, 1998).
Beale, G. K., Johns Use of the Old Testament in
Revelation (Sheffield: SAP, 1999).
Beale, G. K., The Book of Revelation (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1999).
Court, J. M., The Book of Revelation and the
Johannine Apocalyptic Tradition (Sheffield: SAP,
2000).
Duff, P. B., Who Rides the Beast? Prophetic Rivalry
and the Rhetoric of Crisis in the Churches of the
Apocalypse (Oxford, New York: OUP, 2001).
Friesen, S. J., Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of
John: Reading Revelation in the Ruins (Oxford,
New York: OUP, 2001).
Hemer, C., The Letters to the Seven Churches of Asia
in Their Local Setting. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2001).
Keener, C. S., Revelation (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2000).
Koester, C. R., Revelation and the End of All Things
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Malina, B. J. and J J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary
on the Revelation (Minneapolis: Fortress Press,
2000)
Witherington, B., Revelation (Cambridge; New York:
CUP, 2003).
Classics:
Aune, D., Revelation, 3 Vols (Waco: Word Books,
1997).
Bauckham, R., The Theology of Revelation (Cambridge;
New York: CUP, 1996).
Kraybill, J. N., Imperial Cult and Commerce in
Apocalypse (Sheffield: SAP, 1996).
Malina, B. J., On the Genre and Message of Revelation:
Star Visions and Sky Journeys (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 1995).
Thompson, L. L., The Book of Revelation: Apocalypse
and Empire (New York: OUP, 1990).

NT638 Other Writings (Greek Text)


Status
Elective

MDiv Unit Outlines

Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
No material may be chosen in this unit that duplicates
material in units NT621/631, NT622/632, NT626/636 or
NT627/637.
Learning Outcomes
To enable candidates to study further the theology and
major issues of two substantial blocks of New Testament
material
Content
1 The major issues in contemporary study and the
central themes of any two of
(a) Acts
(b) 1 and/or 2 Corinthians
(c) Galatians
(d) Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon
(e) 1 and 2 Thessalonians
(f) Pastoral Epistles
(g) Hebrews
(h) 1 Peter
(i) Revelation
2

Translation and exegesis of 78 chapters of the


Greek text of two of the following:
(a) Acts 13, 17
(b) 1 Corinthians 1215
(c) 2 Corinthians 13
(d) Galatians 13
(e) Ephesians 13
(f) 1 Thessalonians 14
(g) 2 Timothy or Titus
(h) Hebrews 14
(i) 1 Peter 13
(j) Revelation 13, 20

Bibliography
Acts
Barrett, C. K., Acts (2 Vols; New York: T & T Clark,
2004).
Dunn, J. D. G., The Acts of the Apostles (London:
Epworth, 1996).
Fitzmyer, J. A., The Acts of the Apostles (New York:
Doubleday, 1998).
Gaventa, B., Acts (Nashville: Abingdon, 2003).
1 and 2 Corinthians
Barnett, P. W., The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).
Collins, R. F., First Corinthians (Collegville, MN:
Liturgical, 1999).
Dunn, J. D. G., 1 Corinthians (Sheffield: Continuum,
2003).
Garland, D,. 1 Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).

103

Harris, M., The Second Epistle to the Corinthians


(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005).
Horsley, R. A., 1 Corinthians (Nashville: Abingdon,
1998).
Thiselton, A. C., The First Epistle to the Corinthians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Witherington, B., Conflict and Community in Corinth: A
SocioRhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2
Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994).
Galatians
Fung, R. K. Y., Galatians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1988).
Longenecker, R. N., Galatians (Waco: Word, 1990).
Martyn, J. L., Galatians (New York: Doubleday, 1997).
Witherington, B., Grace in Galatia: A Commentary on
Pauls Letter to the Galatians (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon
Dunn, J. D. G., The Epistles to the Colossians and
Philemon (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Fee, G. D., Pauls Letter to the Philippians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995).
OBrien, P. T., The Letter to the Ephesians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
OBrien, P. T., The Epistle to the Philippians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991).
1 and 2 Thessalonians
Green, G. L., The Letters to the Thessalonians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Wanamaker, C. A., The Epistles to the Thessalonians
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990).
Witherington, B., 1 and 2 Thessalonians (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2006).
The Pastoral Epistles
Bassler, J. M., 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1996).
Johnson, L. T., The First and Second Letters to Timothy
(New York: Doubleday, 2001).
Marshall, I. H., The Pastoral Epistles (Edinburgh: T. &
T. Clark, 1999).
Mounce, W. D., The Pastoral Epistles (Waco: Word,
2000).
Towner, P. H., The Letters to Timothy and Titus (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006).
Young, F., The Theology of the Pastoral Letters
(Cambridge: CUP, 1994).
Hebrews
Bruce, F. F., Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1994).
de Silva, D. A., Perseverance in Gratitude (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Ellingworth, P., The Epistle to the Hebrews (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993).
Hagner, D. A., Encountering the Book of Hebrews
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Hughes, G., Hebrews and Hermeneutics (Cambridge:
CUP, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

104

Koester, C., The Epistle to the Hebrews (New York:


Doubleday, 2001).
Lane, W. L., Hebrews (2 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
1991).
Pfitzner, V. C., Hebrews (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997).
1 Peter
Achtemeier, P. J., 1 Peter (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1996).
Best, E., 1 Peter (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Boring, M. E., 1 Peter (Nashville: Abingdon, 1999).
Elliott, J. H., 1 Peter (New York: Doubleday, 2001).
McKnight, S., 1 Peter (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1996).
Revelation
Aune, D. E., Revelation (3 Vols; Dallas, TX: Word,
19971999).
Barr, D. L., Tales of the End: A Narrative
Commentary on the Book of Revelation (Santa
Rosa, CA: Polebridge, 1998).
Bauckham, R., The Climax of Prophecy (Edinburgh: T
& T Clark, 1998).
Beale, G. K., Revelation (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Court, J. M., The Book of Revelation and the
Johannine Apocalyptic Tradition (Sheffield: SAP,
2000).
Harrington, W. J., Revelation (Collegeville, MN:
Michael Glazier, 1993).
Osborne, G. R., Revelation (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2002).
Witherington, B., Revelation (Cambridge; New York:
CUP, 2003).

NT639 Romans (Greek Text)


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
LA004A, LA004B
Pre/co-requisites
NT502
Exclusions
NT625/635.
Learning Outcomes
To enable candidates to study the theology of the
Apostle Paul as it is reflected in this epistle.
To gain an understanding of the purpose, literary shape,
rhetorical form and argument of Pauls letter to the
Romans.
(a) To enable candidates to exegete and consider the
range of interpretive options in key sections of the
text of Romans.
(b) To develop in candidates the skills of appropriate
exegetical methodology, employing the various
interpretative methods of biblical criticism.

(c) To assist candidates to reflect upon the distinctive


character, styles, themes and interrelationship of
Romans.
(d) To help candidates think through the implications
of their studies for New Testament exposition in
ministry.
Content
1 Introductory issues:
(a) the themes and purpose(s) of Romans in the
context of the Pauline mission;
(b) the major issues in contemporary study of the
book of Romans; and
(c) the bearing of contemporary approaches to
Pauline theology on the interpretation of
Romans.
2 Translation and exegesis of the Greek text of
Romans 1-8 (or equivalent passages).
Bibliography
General studies
Chae, D. JS., Paul as Apostle to the Gentiles: His
Apostolic SelfAwareness and its Influence on the
Soteriological Argument of Romans (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1997).
Esler, P. F., Conflict and Identity in Romans
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003).
Gathercole, S. J., Where is Boasting? (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Miller, J. C., The Obedience of Faith, the
Eschatological People of God, and the Purpose of
Romans (Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical
Literature, 2000).
Oakes, P. (ed.), Rome in The Bible and The Early
Church (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Soderlund, S. K. and N. T. Wright (eds), Romans and
the People of God (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Commentaries
Bray, G. (ed.) Romans (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
1998).
Byrne, B., Romans (Sacra Pagina; Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1996).
Moo, D. J., Romans (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Stuhlmacher, P., Romans (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1994).
Talbert, C. H., Romans (Macon, GA: Smith & Helwys,
2002).
Witherington, B., Paul's Letter to the Romans: A
Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2004).
Classics:
Boers, H., The Justification of the Gentiles (Peabody,
MA: Hendrickson, 1994).
Donfried, K. P. (ed.), The Romans Debate (Rev.
Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1991).
Wedderburn, A. J. M., The Reasons for Romans
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1991).

MDiv Unit Outlines

NT645 The Bible in Context


Status
Elective
Learning outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to spend a significant period of
time in one or more of the lands associated with
biblical history.
(b) To assist candidates to gain an appreciation of the
geographical and topographical factors and
perspectives in the understanding of the biblical
narratives.
(c) To help candidates appreciate the impact of
archaeological findings on the understanding of the
biblical narratives.
Content
This unit is available to candidates who spend a period of
time in one or more of the lands associated with the
biblical documents. The criteria for eligibility for credit
for the unit shall be:
1 A minimum of 80 hours work, including lectures,
field trips and/or an archaeological dig, in an
integrated programme conducted by a person or
teaching body endorsed by the candidates approved
institution.
2 Assessment should include a substantial project
(including captioned diagrams and/or photographs)
relating a significant section of the biblical
documents to the land(s) visited by the candidate.
3 The project could include a daily journal as part of
the documentary evidence for it.

105

proposed unit outline along with assessment plans to the


moderator for New Testament.
The unit is taught, conducted as a seminar involving
class discussion as well as lectures and individual
reading. The unit is not an individual research topic. It
is strongly recommended that the unit include set reading
of approximately 15 chapters of Greek or 25 chapters of
English New Testament texts.
1
2
3

The total amount of work expected is that equivalent


to an essay of approximately 6,000 words;
Candidates must demonstrate a thorough grasp of
the New Testament issues involved;
Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of New Testament perspectives discerned in
candidates learning;
Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology)
may be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted
appropriately to reflect major level undergraduate
study for candidates enrolled in the undergraduate
degrees.

Bibliography
The texts and readings will be as necessary for the
particular topic set.

DEPARTMENT

OF

CHRISTIAN THOUGHT

THEOLOGY (TH)
Bibliography
None

NT689 New Testament Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
NT501 and NT502, plus any other unit deemed
necessary for the given seminar
Learning Outcomes
(a) To provide candidates with the opportunity to study
in depth biblical texts in Greek or English not
covered in the candidates course;
(b) To give candidates the opportunity to develop cooperative research skills;
(c) To assist candidates in the application of New
Testament insights to personal and pastoral needs.
Content
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but they must have staff and library
support sufficient to sustain the unit. The course
coordinator is responsible for submitting for approval a

In all Theology units, in addition to the primary biblical


documents, candidates will be expected to be familiar
with the relevant sections of the three Creeds and of
confessional documents such as the 39 Articles and the
Westminster Confession.
Learning Outcomes
These units, taken as a whole, are designed to
(a) Assist candidates in gaining an integrated Christian
theological perspective and methodology;
(b) Introduce candidates to the main areas of
theological study, so as to provide a solid
foundation for further theological exploration and
reflection;
(c) Help candidates reflect on the various aspects of
Christian faith, thus gaining insights on the great
questions of life;
(d) Deepen candidates understanding of what
relationship with God entails and implies.
General Recommended Readings:
Primary Texts
Leith, J. (ed.), Creeds of the Churches (3rd ed.; Atlanta:
John Knox, 1982).
Pelikan, J. (ed.), Creeds & Confessions of Faith in the
Christian Tradition (New Haven: Yale University,
2003).

106

MDiv Unit Outlines

Orientations to Systematic Theology


Ford, D. F., Theology: A Very Short Introduction
(Oxford: OUP, 1999).
Grenz, S. and R. E. Olson, Who Needs Theology?
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1996).
Hill, C., Making Sense of Faith: An Introduction to
Theology (Sydney: EJ Dwyer, 1995).
McGrath, A. E., Understanding Doctrine (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 1990).
Muller, R., The Study of Theology (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1991).
General texts
Barth, K., Church Dogmatics (Vols IIV; New York:
Harper, 19561970).
Bloesch, D., Essentials of Evangelical Theology (Rev.
ed.; Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2006).
English, D. and G. Fackre (eds), An Introduction to the
Christian Faith (Oxford: Lion, 1992).
Erickson, M., Christian Theology (2nd ed.; Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1998).
Ford, D. F., Modern Theologians: An Introduction to
Christian Theology Since 1918 (3rd ed.;
Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1997).
Grenz, S., Theology for the Community of God (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Guthrie, S. C., Christian Doctrine (Rev ed.; Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1994).
Hodgson P. and R. King, Christian Theology: An
Introduction to its Traditions and Tasks (Rev. ed.;
Minneapolis: Fortress, 1994).
Livingston, J. C. and F. S. Fiorenza (eds), Modern
Christian Thought (2 Vols, Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000).
McGrath, A. E., Christian Theology: An Introduction
(3rd ed.; Oxford; Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2001).
McGrath, A. E., Historical Theology: An Introduction
to the History of Christian Thought (Oxford;
Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998).
Migliore, D., Faith Seeking Understanding (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1992).
Olson, R. E., The Story of Christian Theology: Twenty
Centuries of Tradition and Reform (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 1999).
Placher, W. C. (ed.), Essentials of Christian theology
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003).
Reymond, R., A New Systematic Theology of the
Christian Faith (Nashville: Thomas Nelson,
1998).
The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit
Badcock, G., Light of Truth and Fire of Love (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997).
Bloesch, D., The Holy Spirit: Works & Gifts (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2000).
Ferguson, S., The Holy Spirit (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1996).
Krkkinen, V.-M., Pneumatology: The Holy Spirit in
Ecumenical, International, and Contextual
Perspective (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Keener, C., Gift and Giver: The Holy Spirit for Today
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2001).

Moltmann, J., The Spirit of Life: A Universal


Affirmation (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1992).
McIntyre, J., The Shape of Pneumatology: Studies in
the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (Edinburgh: T & T
Clark, 1997).
Pinnock, C., Flame of Love: A Theology of the Holy
Spirit (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1996).
Smail, T., A. Walker and N. Wright, Charismatic
Renewal: the Search for a Theology (London:
SPCK, 1995).
Suurmond, J.-J., Word and Spirit at Play: Towards a
Charismatic Theology (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1995).
Welker, M., God the Spirit (Minneapolis: Fortress,
1994).

TH504 Introduction to Systematic Theology


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
The purpose of this unit is to introduce students to the
study of Systematic Theology
At the end of the unit students should be:
(a) able to critically assess the role and method of
Systematic Theology and its relation to other
disciplines;
(b) able to make a critical assessment of different
theological traditions and their distinctive
approaches to systematic theological reflection;
(c) able to present and defend their own theological
reflections in one topic area of theology and
defend the theological method which they have
used;
(d) motivated to continue to use Systematic Theology
as part of their own Christian thinking in both
formal and informal study.
Content
1 What is Systematic Theology? A critical assessment
of various descriptions of Systematic Theology.
2 The theological foundations of Systematic
Theology- redemptive revelation including
Scripture and the work of the Spirit, Doctrine of
God, Christology, Anthropology, Ecclesiology.
3 Role of Systematic Theology in the church and
the academy and the place of formal and lay
theology.
4 An examination of case studies and student
exercises in theological reflection dealing with the
following areas
the relation of Systematic theology and
scripture and the role of exegesis and Biblical
theology in Systematic Theology;
the role of Christian tradition, historical
theology, and creeds and confessions in
Systematic Theology;
the relation of loci within Systematic
Theology;

MDiv Unit Outlines

the role of reason and philosophy in


Systematic Theology;
the relationship of Systematic Theology to
non-theological disciplines (e.g. science,
anthropology, psychology, religious studies);
contextualisation;
the relation of practical theology, ethics,
evangelism and Public Theology to
Systematic Theology.
A survey of at least three (3) different theological
traditions:
Roman Catholicism
Orthodoxy
Lutheran
Reformed
Anglican
Anabaptist
Free Church
Wesleyan
Evangelical
Pentecostal
Non-western theology
The study of a topic or topics in Systematic
Theology nominated by the college with explicit
reference to theological method and in interaction
with the theological traditions which have been
examined.
An introduction to at least two recent
developments in Systematic Theology such as:
Feminist theology
Post-liberal theology
Post-metaphysical theology
Liberation theology
Process theology
Radical Orthodoxy
Eco-theology
Open theism
Emerging church

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Clark, D. K., To Know and Love God: Method for
Theology. (Wheaton: Crossway Books, 2003).
Stackhouse, J. Jr., (ed.), Evangelical Futures: A
Conversation on Theological Method (Grand
Rapids, Baker, 2000).
Webster, J. Introduction: Systematic Theology pp
1-15 in J. Webster, K. Tanner, I. Torrance (eds),
The Oxford handbook of Systematic Theology
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).
Recommended:
Ford, D. F. (ed.), The Modern Theologians : An
Introduction to Christian Theology in the
Twentieth Century. 2 Volumes (Oxford : Basil
Blackwell, 1989).
Frame, J. M., Salvation Belongs to the Lord: An
Introduction to Systematic Theology (Phillipsburg:
P&R Publishing, 2006).

107

Franke, J. R., The Character of Theology: An


Introduction to its Nature, Task, and Purpose
(Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2005).
Gunton, C. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to
Christian Doctrine. (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1997).
Healy, N. M., What is Systematic Theology?
International Journal of Systematic Theology 11/
1, ( January 2009), 24-39
Larsen. T. and D. J. Treier, The Cambridge
Companion to Evangelical Theology (Cambridge :
Cambridge University Press, 2007).
McGowan A. T. B. (ed),
Always Reforming:
Explorations in Systematic Theology (Leicester :
Apollos, 2006).
McGrath, A. E., Christian Theology: An Introduction.
(Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2001).
Migliore, D., Faith Seeking Understanding: An
Introduction to Christian Theology. 2nd ed. (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Olson, R. E., Reformed and Always Reforming: the
Postconservative Approach to Evangelical
Theology (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic,
2007).
Olson, R. E., Mosaic of Christian Beliefs. (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2002).
Schwarz, H., Theology in a Global Context The Last
Two Hundred Years (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans
2005).
Stone, H. W. and J. O. Duke, How to Think
Theologically. (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Vanhoozer, K. J., The Cambridge Companion to
Postmodern Theology (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 2003).
Vanhoozer, K. J., The Drama of Doctrine: A
Canonical-Linguistic Approach to Christian
Theology (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
2005).
Warrington, K., Pentecostal Theology: A Theology of
Encounter (London : T&T Clark, 2008).
Classics:
Barth, K., Evangelical Theology: An Introduction G.
Foley (trans). (London : Weidenfeld and Nicolson,
1968).
Bavinck, H., Reformed Dogmatics. Volume 1.
Prolegomena J. Bolt (ed.), J. Vriend, (trans)
(Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2003).
Calvin, J., Institutes of the Christian Religion, 2 vols.
trans. F. Battles (trans) J. McNeill (ed.),
(Philadelphia: Westminster, 1960).
Catechism of the Catholic Church (San Francisco:
Ignatius Press, Rev. ed. 2000).
Dulles, A., The Craft of Theology: From Symbol to
System, (Crossroad, 1995).
Frei, H. W., The Eclipse of Biblical Narrative: A Study
in
Eighteenth
and
Nineteenth
Century
Hermeneutics (New Haven: Yale University
Press, 1974).
Frei, H. W., Types of Christian Theology G. Hunsinger
and W. C Placher (eds) (New Haven: Yale
University Press, 1992).

MDiv Unit Outlines

108

Kolb, R. and T. J. Wengert (eds), The Book of


Concord: The Confessions of the Evangelical
Lutheran Church Translated by C. Arand et al
(trans) (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2000).
Kung, H., Theology for the Third Millenium: An
Ecumenical View (Anchor, 1990).
Langford, T. A., (ed) Wesleyan Theology: A
Sourcebook (Durham,: Labyrinth Press, 1984).
McGrath, A. E., Genesis of Doctrine: A Study in the
Foundation of Doctrinal Criticism (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1997).
Nichols, A., The Shape of Catholic Theology: An
Introduction to Its Sources, Principles and
History, (Liturgical Press, 1991).
Pannenberg, W., An Introduction to Systematic
Theology (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991).
Richard, L., The Fabric of Theology. A Prolegomenon
to Evangelical Theology, (Eerdmans, 1993).
Schleiermacher, F., The Christian Faith H.R.
Mackintosh and J.S. Stewart (eds) (Edinburgh :
T.&T. Clark, 1960).
The Westminster Confession of Faith and Larger and
Shorter Catechisms (Glasgow, Free Presbyterian
Publications, 1981).
Woodridge J. and T. E McComiskey (eds), Doing
Theology in Today's World, (Zondervan, 1991).
Young, P. D., Feminist Theology /Christian Theology:
In Search of a Method, (Fortress, 1990).

TH505 Foundational Christian Beliefs


Status
Elective
Exclusions
TH401404 or TH601604.
This unit can only be taken by Grad Dip Div or Grad
Dip Chr St students.

6
7
8

The doctrine of the Holy Spirit


The doctrine of the Church
Eschatology

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Barth, K., Dogmatics in Outline (London: SCM,
2001).
Erickson, M. J., Christian Theology (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2nd ed. 2003).
Frame, J., Salvation Belongs to the Lord: An
Introduction to Systematic Theology (Phillipsburg
NJ: P&R, 2006).
Grudem, W., Systematic Theology, (Downers Grove
IL: IVP, 2007).
Gunton, C. E., The Christian Faith (Oxford; Malden,
MA: Blackwell, 2002).
Jinkins, M., Invitation to Theology (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2001).
McGrath, A., Christian Theology: An Introduction
(London: Wiley-Blackwell 3rd ed. 2006).
Migliore, D., Faith with Understanding, (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2nd ed. 2004).
Milne, B., Know the Truth, (Downers Grove IL: IVP,
2nd ed. 1998).
Oden, T. C., Classic Christianity: A Systematic
Theology, (New York: Harper Collins, 2009).
Recommended:
Bloesch, D. G., Christian Foundations series, vol.1-7
(Downers Grove IL: IVP, 1994-2005).
Bray, G., Creeds, Councils and Christ (Fearn: Mentor,
1997).
Seitz, C. R. (ed.), Nicene Christianity: The Future for
a New Ecumenism (Grand Rapids: Baker-Brazos,
2002).

TH601 The Knowledge of God

Learning Outcomes
The purpose of the course is to give an overview of
the central doctrines of Christian faith following the
outline given in the Creeds. It is designed to provide
a single semester outline of theology for candidates
for the Graduate Diploma of Divinity.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:
(a) Name and outline the content of the major
theological loci as set out in the Creeds;
(b) Describe why it is useful to be able to describe
beliefs; and
(c) Locate their own beliefs in the wider spread of
Christian understandings.
Content
1 Why beliefs matter, and why the Creeds were
created
2 The doctrine of God the Father
3 The doctrine of God the Creator
4 The doctrine of God the Son
5 The doctrine of Jesus the Saviour

Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cps of foundational OT and/or NT study, plus 4cps of
CH or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) Assist candidates in gaining an integrated Christian
theological perspective and methodology;
(b) Introduce candidates to the main areas of
theological study, so as to provide a solid
foundation for further theological exploration and
reflection;
(c) Help candidates reflect on the various aspects of
Christian faith, thus gaining insights on the great
questions of life;
(d) Deepen students understanding of what relationship
with God entails and implies.
(e) Apply the above to the loci of human knowledge of
God and Gods relationship with the world.

MDiv Unit Outlines

On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:


1. Identify and describe the content of the major
theological loci;
2. Explain the interaction and interdependence
between at least some of these loci;
3. Demonstrate how different approaches to
describing knowledge of God affect how Christian
life is lived;
4. Demonstrate how knowledge of God and
knowledge about Gods world are interrelated;
and
5 Identify and illustrate how this knowledge is
appropriated in their own life and the life of their
community.
Content
Foundation
1. The main loci of theological knowledge and their
interaction
2. Connections between the content of theology and
the practice of faith
Section A : The Knowledge of God
1 The concepts of revelation and inspiration;
2 The place and nature of Scripture and natural
theology
3 The issues raised by reason, authority and
experience.
Section B : God and the World
1 Creation and providence
2 Humanity as created
3 Sin and evil
Bibliography
In all Theology units, in addition to the primary biblical
documents, candidates will be expected to be familiar
with the relevant sections of the three Creeds and of
confessional documents such as the 39 Articles and the
Westminster Confession.
Prescribed: student should become familiar with the
relevant sections of one of the following:
Erickson, M. J., Christian Theology (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2nd ed. 2003).
Frame, J., Salvation Belongs to the Lord: An
Introduction to Systematic Theology (Phillipsburg
NJ: P&R, 2006).
Grenz, S. J., Theology for the Community of God
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Grudem, W., Systematic Theology (Downers Grove
IL: IVP, 2007).
Krkkinen, V.-M., The Doctrine of God: A Global
Introduction. (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
McGrath, A., Christian Theology: An Introduction
(London: Wiley-Blackwell 3rd ed. 2006).
Migliore, D., Faith with Understanding (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2nd ed. 2004).

109

Recommended:
The Knowledge of God
Achtemeier, P., Inspiration and Authority: Nature and
Function of Christian Scripture (Peabody, MA:
Hendrickson, 1999).
Adam, P., Written for Us (Leicester UK: IVP, 2008).
Bloesch, D., A Theology of Word and Spiri: Authority
& Method in Theology (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
2005).
Gunton, C. G., A Brief Theology of Revelation
(London/New York: Continuum: T. & T. Clark
2005).
Harris, G. E., Revelation in Christian Theology, The
Churchman 120/1 (2006) 11-34.
Jensen, P., The Revelation of God, Contours of
Christian Theology (Downers Grove IL: IVP,
2002).
Niebuhr, H. R., The Meaning of Revelation
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2006,
Library of Theological Ethics reprint edition of
MacMillan Coy 1941).
Packer, J. I., Honouring the Written Word of God
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 1999).
Sherman, S. S., Revitalizing Holistic Theological
Epistemology: Evangelical Approaches to the
Knowledge of God, Princeton Theological
Monographs, (Princeton: Pickwick Publications,
2008).
Vanhoozer, K. J., First Theology: God, Scripture &
Hermeneutics, (Downers Grove IL: IVP, 2002).
God and the World
Blocher, H., Original Sin: Illuminating the Riddle
(Downers Grove IL: 2000).
Davies, O., The Creativity of God: World, Eucharist,
Reason (Cambridge/New York: CUP, 2004).
Feinberg, J. S., Many Faces of Evil (Wheaton:
Crossway, 2004).
Krkkinen, V.-M., The Doctrine of God: A Global
Introduction. (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Kaufman, G. D., In the BeginningCreativity
(Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2004).
Keller, J. A., Problems of Evil and the Power of God
(Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2007).
McFadyen, A., Bound to Sin: Abuse, Holocaust, and the
Christian Doctrine of Sin (New York: CUP, 2000).
Pannenberg, W., Anthropology in Theological
Perspective, (London/New York: T & T Clark
2004).
Pinnock, C. H., Most Moved Mover: A Theology of
Gods Openness (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic,
2001).
Piper, J., and J. Taylor, Suffering and the Sovereignty
of God, (Wheaton: Crossway, 2006).
Weinandy, T. G., Does God Suffer? (Edinburgh: T &
T. Clark, 2000).
Wright, N. T., Evil and the Justice of God, (London:
SPCK/ Downers Grove IL:IVP, 2006).
Classic:
Dulles, A., Models of Revelation (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1992).

110

MDiv Unit Outlines

TH602 The Doctrine of God and the Work of Christ


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cps of foundational OT and/or NT study, plus 4cps of
CH or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) Assist candidates in gaining a grounding in the
triune nature of God;
(b) Introduce candidates to the characteristics of each of
the three persons and their work;
(c) Help students develop an integrated understanding
of the work of Christ; and
(d) Deepen candidates understanding of what the work
of Christ means for them.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:
1. Describe the major characteristics of God in
Christian thought;
2. Outline the historical development of trinitarian
thought;
3. Describe the major characteristics of the person
and work of Father and the Holy Spirit;
4. Describe the major issues of the person and
aspects of the work of Christ and show how these
undergird Christian ministry;
5. Compare and critique the various theological
interpretations of the work of Christ with
reference to their own context; and
6. Identify how their own life demonstrates their
understanding of the work of Christ.
Content
Section A : The Christian Doctrine of God
1 The being and attributes of God;
2 The Person of Christ, his humanity and deity;
3 The Holy Spirit;
4 The Holy Trinity;
Section B : The Work of Christ
1 His incarnation and ministry;
2 The death and resurrection of Jesus;
3 His ascension and session.
Bibliography
In all Theology units, in addition to the primary biblical
documents, candidates will be expected to be familiar
with the relevant sections of the three Creeds and of
confessional documents such as the 39 Articles and the
Westminster Confession.
Prescribed: student should become familiar with the
relevant sections of one of the following:
Erickson, M. J., Christian Theology (Grand Rapids:
Baker,2nd ed. 2003).
Frame, J., Salvation Belongs to the Lord: An
Introduction to Systematic Theology (Phillipsburg
NJ: P&R, 2006).
Grenz, S. J., Theology for the Community of God
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).

Grudem, W., Systematic Theology (Downers Grove


IL: IVP, 2007).
Krkkinen, V-M., The Doctrine of God: A Global
Introduction. (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
McGrath, A., Christian Theology: An Introduction
(London: Wiley-Blackwell 3rd ed. 2006).
Migliore, D., Faith with Understanding (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2nd ed. 2004).
Oden, T. C., Classic Christianity: A Systematic
Theology (New York: Harper Collins, 2009).
Recommended:
The Doctrine of God
Bloesch, D., God the Almighty (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 2005).
Erickson. M. J., God the Father Almighty (Grand
Rapids: Baker Academic, 2006).
Cole, G., He Who Gives Life: The Doctrine of the Holy
Spirit (Wheaton: Crossway, 2007).
Crisp, O., Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation
Reconsidered (Cambridge: CUP 2007).
George, T., God the Holy Trinity (Grand Rapids:
Baker Academic, 2006).
Grenz, S. J., Rediscovering the Triune God: the Trinity
in Contemporary Theology (Minneapolis:
Augsburg Fortress Press, 2004).
Gunton, C. E., Act and Being: Towards a Theology of
the Divine Attributes (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2003).
Gunton, C. E., Father, Son and Holy Spirit: Toward a
Fully Trinitarian Theology (London/New York:
T. and T. Clark, 2003).
Johnston, E. A., She Who Is (New York:
Crossroad,2002).
Krkkinen,
V.-M.,
Christology.
A
Global
Introduction (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Letham, R., The Holy Trinity: In Scripture, History,
Theology, and Worship (Phillipsburg NJ: P & R,
2004).
Torrance, T. F., The Christian Doctrine of God: One
Being, Three Persons (Edinburgh/New York: T &
T Clark,1996, Paperback ed. 2001).
The Work of Christ
Bloesch, D., Jesus Christ: Savior and Lord (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2005).
Boersma, H., Violence, Hospitality and the Cross:
Reappropriating the Atonement Tradition (Grand
Rapids: Baker Academic, 2004).
Ford, D. F. and M. Higton (eds), Jesus (Oxford; New
York: OUP, 2002).
Gunton, C. (ed), The Theology of Reconciliation:
Essays in Biblical and Systematic Theology
(London/New York: T. & T. Clark, 2003).
Hill, C. E. and F. A. James (eds.), The Glory of the
Atonement: Biblical, Theological and Practical
Perspectives (Downers Grove: IVP, 2004).
Holmes, S., The Wondrous Cross (Carlisle: Paternoster,
2007).
Marshall, I. H., Aspects of the Atonement: Cross and
Resurrection in the Reconciliation of Humanity
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2008).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Mattes, M. C., The Role of Justification in Contemporary


Theology (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Peterson, D. (ed.), Where Wrath and Mercy Meet
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2001).
Sherman, R. J., King, Priest and Prophet :A Trinitarian
Theology of Atonement (Edinburgh: T.& T. Clark ,
2004).
Stott, J., The Cross of Christ (Leicester UK/Downers
Grove IL: IVP, 20th Anniversary edition, 2007).

1.

2.

3.

4.
Classics:
Aulen, G., A G Herbert (trans), Christus Victor: A
Historical Study of the Three Main Types of the
Idea of the Atonement (London: SPCK 1965
reprint of 1931 ed.).
Brunner, E., (trans. Olive Wyon), Mediator: A Study of
the Central Doctrine of the Christian Faith
(Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1947 (1st
ed. (1927).
Moltmann, J., The Crucified God (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1993).
Moltmann, J., The Trinity and the Kingdom of God
(London: SCM, 1981).
Morris, L., The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross
(London: Tyndale, 1960).
Morris, L., The Lord From Heaven (Rev. ed.;
London:IVP, 1995).
Owen, J., The Death of Death in the Death of Christ,
in W. H. Goold (ed), The Works of John Owen
(London/ Edinburgh: Johnstone and Hunter,1852
Vol X, III, VI, 2 61-264).
Schillebeeckx, E., Jesus (New York: Crossroad, 1990).
Wand, J. W. C., The Atonement (London: SPCK,
1963).
Wright, N. T., Jesus and the Victory of God (London:
SPCK, 1996).

TH603 The Doctrines of Grace and Eschatology


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cps of foundational OT and/or NT study, plus 4cps of
CH or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) Assist candidates in gaining a grounding in the
outworking of the grace of the triune God and the
implications of this for Christian hope;
(b) Introduce candidates to the implications of the work
of grace in human life and particularly to the work
and ministry of the Holy Spirit;
(c) Help students appreciate the nature of the Kingdom
of God and Christian eschatology; and
(d) Deepen candidates understanding of what the work
of the Spirit means for them.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:

5.

111

Define the major historical understandings of the


Gospel of God, Kingdom of God and the return of
Christ;
Describe the place of repentance, faith,
forgiveness, justification, election and grace in the
economy of God and the life of Christians;
Describe the major understandings of the work of
the Spirit, especially in regeneration, sanctification
and fellowship;
Compare and critique the various historical and
theological interpretations of the Kingdom of
God, future and present judgement, and the final
consummation of all things in Christ; and
Identify how their own life demonstrates the grace
of God and points to future hope.

Content
Section A : The Doctrine of Grace
1 The Gospel of God;
2 Repentance, faith, forgiveness, justification, election
and grace;
3 The work of the Spirit: regeneration, sanctification
and fellowship;
Section B : Eschatology
1 The kingdom present and future;
2 Judgement present and future;
3 Consummation of all things in Christ;
4 Death, intermediate state, resurrection;
5 Heaven and hell.
Bibliography
Suitable textbooks include:
Erickson, M. J., Christian Theology (Grand Rapids,
MI: Baker, 1992).
Grenz, S. J., Theology for the Community of God
(Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2000).
McGrath, A. E., Christian theology: An Introduction
(Oxford: Blackwell, 2002).
Reymond, R. L. A New Systematic Theology of the
Christian Faith. (Nelson, 1998)
Prescribed Reading
In addition to the primary biblical documents, candidates
will be expected to be familiar with the relevant sections
of the three Creeds and of confessional documents such
as the 39 Articles and the Westminster Confession.
A The Doctrines of Grace
Recommended:
Basinger, D. (ed.), The Case For Freewill Theism.
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1996).
Bird, M. F., The Saving Righteousness of God: sTudies
on Paul, Justification and the New Testament.
(Eugene: Wipf & Stock, 2007).
Bloesch, D. G., The Holy Spirit: Works and Gifts.
(Downers Grove, IL. : InterVarsity Press, 2000).
Boice, J. M. and P. G. Ryken, The Doctrines of Grace:
Rediscovering the Evangelical Gospel. (Wheaton,
IL: Crossway, 2002).

112

MDiv Unit Outlines

Boice, J. M., Whatever Happened to the Gospel of


Grace? (Wheaton: Crossway, 2001).
Carson, D. A. and J. D. Woodbridge (eds),
Hermeneutics, Authority and Canon. (Leicester:
IVP, 1986.
Carson, D. A. and J. D. Woodbridge (eds), Scripture
and Truth (Leicester: IVP, 1983).
Cole, G. A., He Who Gives Life: The Doctrine of the
Holy Spirit. (Wheaton: Crossway, 2007).
Eveson, P., Justification By Faith Alone. (Leominster,
UK: Day One, 1998).
Frame, J., Evangelical Reunion. (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1991).
Ferguson, S., The Holy Spirit. (Leicester: IVP, 1996).
Horton, M., Four Views on Eternal Security. (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Jensen, P., At the Heart of the Universe. (Wheaton, IL:
Crossway, 1997).
Kruse, C. G., Paul, the Law and Justification.
(Leicester: Apollos, 1996).
Lane, A. N. S., Justification by Faith in CatholicProtestant Dialogue: An Evangelical Assessment.
(Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 2002).
McCormack, B. (ed.), Justification in Perspective.
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2006).
Oden, T., The Justification Reader. (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2002).
Peterson, D., Possessed by God: A New Testament
Theology of Sanctification and Holiness. New
Studies in Biblical Theology. (Leicester: Apollos,
1995).
Pinnock, C. H. (ed.), Grace Unlimited. (Eugene: Wipf
& Stock, 1999).
Pinnock, C. H. (ed.), The Grace of God, the Will of
Man. (Grand Rapids: Academie, 1989).
Piper, J., Counted Righteous in Christ: Should We
Abandon
the
Imputation
of
Christs
Righteousness? (Leicester: IVP, 2003).
Piper, J., The Future of Justification: A Response to
N.T. Wright. (Wheaton, IL : Crossway Books,
2007).
Schreiner, T. R. and Ware, B. A. (eds.). Still
Sovereign: Contemporary Perspectives on
Election. Foreknowledge and Grace (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2000).
Seifrid, M., Christ our Righteousness:
Pauls
Theology of Justification. (Leicester: Apollos,
2000).
Smith, R., Justification in the New Perspective on
Paul. Reformed Theological Review 58 (1999):
16-30.
Smith, R., A Critique of the New Perspective on
Justification. Reformed Theological Review 58
(1999): 98-113.
Smith, R., Justification and Eschatology: A Dialogue
with The New Perspective on Paul. Reformed
Theological Supplement Series 1. May 2001).
Sproul, R. C., Justification by Faith Alone. (Orlando:
Ligonier Ministries, 1998).
Treier, M., Justification: Whats at Stake in the
Current Debates. (Downers Grove: IVP, 2004).

Whats the Good News? Nine Evangelical Leaders


Define the Gospel. Christianity Today 44/2
(2000): 46-51
Classics:
Augustine, The Spirit and the Letter Augustine:
Later Works. L.C.C. (ed John Burnaby;
Philadelphia: Westminster, 1955.)
Barth, K., Chapter VII The Election of God Church
Dogmatics. II.2; (trans G.W. Bromiley et al;
Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1957).
Calvin, J., Volume 3 The way in which we receive
the grace of Christ: what benefits come to us from
it and what effects follow Institutes of the
Christian Religion. (Edited by John T McNeill. 2
vols, Library of Christian Classics. Philadelphia:
Westminster Pr, 1960).
Edwards, J., Treatise on Grace. Pages 149-197 in
Writings on the Trinity, Grace and Faith. (Ed
Sang Hyun Lee. New Haven: Yale University
Press, 2003).
Erasmus, D., On the Freedom of the Will Luther and
Erasmus: Free Will and Salvation. L.C.C. (Eds E.
Gordon Rupp & Philip S. Watson; Philadelphia:
Westminster, 1969).
Luther, M., On the Bondage of the Will Luther and
Erasmus: Free Will and Salvation. L.C.C. (eds E.
Gordon Rupp and P. S. Watson; Philadelphia:
Westminster, 1969).
Luther, M., The Two Kinds of Righteousness Martin
Luther: Selections from His Writings. (Ed John
Dillenberger; New York: Doubleday, 1961).
Pink, A. W., The Sovereignty of God. (Edinburgh:
Banner of Truth, 1928, 1959).
Hoekema, A. A., Saved by Grace. (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1989).
B. Eschatology
Recommended:
Bauckham, R. (ed.), God Will be All in All: The
Eschatology of Jrgen Moltmann. (Edinburgh:
T&T Clark, 1999).
Bauckham R. and T. Hart, Hope Against Hope.
(London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1997).
Beasley-Murray, P., The Message of the Resurrection:
Christ Is Risen! The Bible Speaks Today: Bible
Themes Series. (Leicester: IVP, 2000).
Bloesch, D. G., Essentials of Evangelical Theology,
Volume 2: Life, Ministry, & Hope. (London:
Harper & Row, 1978).
Bloesch, D. G., The Last Things: Resurrection,
Judgment, Glory. (Downers Grove: IVP, 2004).
Cameron, N. M. de S. (ed.) Universalism and the
Doctrine of Hell: Papers Presented at the Fourth
Edinburgh Conference in Christian Dogmatics,
1991. (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1992).
Carson, D. A., On Banishing the Lake of Fire, The
Gagging of God, (Leicester: IVP, 1996) pp. 515536.
Daley, B. E., The Hope of the Early Church: A
Handbook of Patristic Eschatology. (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1991).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Doyle, R. C., Eschatology and the Shape of Christian


Belief. (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1999).
Dumbrell, W., The Search for Order: Biblical
Eschatology in Focus. (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1994).
Fudge, E., et. al., Two views of hell. (Downers Grove:
IVP, 2000).
Johnston, P., Shades of Sheol: Death and Afterlife in
the Old Testament. (Leicester: IVP, 2002).
Kik, M., The Eschatology of Victory. (Philadelphia:
Presbyterian and Reformed, 1971).
Knig, A., The Eclipse of Christ in Eschatology.
(Blackwood: New Creation Publications Inc,
1999).
Milne, B., The Message of Heaven and Hell: Grace
and Destiny. The Bible Speaks Today: Bible
Themes Series. (Leicester: IVP, 2002).
O'Donovan, O., Resurrection and Moral Order.
(Leicester: IVP, 1986).
Petterson, A., Antecedents of the Christian Hope of
Resurrection. Reformed Theological Review 59/1
and 59/2 (2000): 1-15, 53-64.
Shedd, W. G. T., The Doctrine of Endless Punishment.
(Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1986).
Vos, G., The Pauline eschatology. (Phillipsburg, NJ:
Presbyterian & Reformed, 1986).
Wright, N. T., Jesus and the Victory of God. (London:
SPCK, 1996).
Wright, N. T., New Heavens, New Earth. (Cambridge:
CUP, 1999).
Classics:
Aquinas, T., Treatise on the Resurrection and
Treatise on the Last Things Q69-99 Supplement
to the Summa Theologica. (Benziger Bros. edition,
1947).
Augustine, The City of God. Nicene and Post
Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church. (Vol II;
ed. Philip Schaff; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1979).
Barth, K., Commentary on chapter 13, The Epistle to
the Romans. (6th ed. London OUP, 1933).
Berkouwer, G. C., The Return of Christ. (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1966).
Calvin, J., Chapter IX, Meditation on the Future
Life. Institutes of the Christian Religion. (Edited
by John T McNeill. 2 vols, Library of Christian
Classics. Philadelphia: Westminster Pr, 1960).
Cullmann, O., Salvation in History (New York: Harper
and Row, 1967).
Dodd, C. H., The Parables of the Kingdom (London:
Fontana, 1961).
Edwards, J., The History of Redemption: Including a
History of the Jews to the Destruction of
Jerusalem ([London]: Religious Tract Society,
[18--]).
Harris, M. J., Raised Immortal: Resurrection and
Immortality in the New Testament (Basingstoke:
Marshall Morgan & Scott, 1983).
Hoekema, A. A., The Bible and the Future (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1979).
Ladd, G. E., The Presence of the Future (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1974).

113

Moltmann, J., Theology of Hope: On the Ground and


the Implications of a Christian Eschatology
(Trans James W. Leitch. London: SCM, 1967).
Moltmann, J., The Coming of God: Christian
Eschatology (London: SCM, 1996).
Moltmann, J., Trinity and the Kingdom of God
(London: SCM, 1981).
Schweitzer, A., The Quest of the Historical Jesus: A
Critical Study of Its Progress from Reimarus to
Wrede (London: Black, 1926).

TH604 Church, Sacraments and Ministry


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cps of foundational OT and/or NT study, plus 4cps of
CH or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) Assist candidates in gaining an integrated Christian
theological perspective and methodology in areas of
church life and ministry;
(b) Help students to reflect on their own place in Gods
work and purposes.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:
1. Describe and critique the options for connecting
and differentiating Church and Kingdom;
2. Describe the major characteristics and contrast the
various ways of describing the nature of the
church, its ministry and mission ;
3. Identify the place of sacraments and prayer in the
life of the Christian people, drawing out
implications for the students own context; and
4. Reflect on how this knowledge and experience
shapes their own Christian life and the life of their
community.
Section A: The People of God
1 Kingdom and church
2 The church: its nature, authority and mission
3 Marks: notes, visibility and invisibility
4 The nature and forms of ministry
5 Denominations
Section B: Prayer, Worship and Sacraments
1 Word and Sacrament: efficacy and validity, the
number of sacraments
2 Christian initiation
3 The Lords Supper
4 Christian Worship
5 Prayer
Bibliography
Prescribed Textbook: Students should become familiar
with the relevant sections of one of the following:

114

MDiv Unit Outlines

Erickson, M. J., Christian Theology (Grand Rapids:


Baker, 2nd ed. 2003).
Frame, J., Salvation Belongs to the Lord: An
Introduction to Systematic Theology (Phillipsburg
NJ: P&R, 2006).
Grenz, S. J., Theology for the Community of God
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Grudem, W., Systematic Theology (Downers Grove
IL: IVP, 2007).
Krkkinen, V.-M., The Doctrine of God: A Global
Introduction. (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
McGrath, A., Christian Theology: An Introduction
(London: Wiley-Blackwell 3rd ed. 2006).
Migliore, D., Faith with Understanding (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2nd ed. 2004).
Oden, T. C., Classic Christianity: A Systematic
Theology (New York: Harper Collins, 2009).
Recommended:
The People of God
Avis, P. (ed.), The Christian Church: An Introduction
to the Major Traditions (London: SPCK, 2002).
Goosen, G., Bringing Churches Together (Geneva:
WCC, 2001).
Harper, B., and P. L. Metzger, Exploring Ecclesiology:
An evangelical and Ecumenical Introduction
(Grand Rapids: Brazos/ Baker, 2009).
Husbands, M. and D. J. Treier (eds), The Community
of the Word: Toward an Evangelical Ecclesiology
(Downers Grove IL: IVP, 2005).
Krkkinen, V.-M., An Introduction to Ecclesiology.
Ecumenical, Historical & Global Perspectives
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Kung, H., The Church, (London: Continuum, new ed.
2001).
Laniak, T., Shepherds After My Own Heart (Downers
Grove IL: IVP, 2006).
Longenecker, R. N., Community Formation in the
Early Church and in the Church Today (Peabody
MA, Hendrickson, 2002).
McLaren, B., The Church on the Other Side: Doing
Ministry in the Postmodern Matrix (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, rev. ed. 2006).
Newbigin, L., The Household of God, Biblica Classics
Library (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2002).
Snyder, H., The Community of the King, (Downers
Grove IL: IVP, 2004).
Stackhouse, J. G. (ed.), Evangelical Ecclesiology:
Reality or Illusion? (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Wright, C. J. H., The Mission of God: Unlocking the
Bibles Grand Narrative (Downers Grove IL: IVP,
2006).
Prayer, Worship and Sacraments
Armstrong, J. H. (ed.), Understanding Four Views of
Baptism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan: 2007).
Bloesch, D. G., The Church: Sacraments, Worship,
Ministry, Mission (Downers Grove IL: IVP,
2006).
Chan, S., Liturgical Theology: The Church as
Worshipping Community (Downers Grove IL:
IVP, 2006).

Goldsworthy, G., Prayer and the Knowledge of God


(Leicester: IVP, 2004).
Kasper, W., Sacrament of Unity: The Eucharist and
the Church (New York: Crossroad, 2004).
Peterson, D., Engaging with God: A Biblical Theology
of Worship (Downers Grove IL: IVP,2002).
Vander Zee, L. J., Christ, Baptism, and the Lords
Supper : Recovering Sacraments for Evangelical
Worship (Downers Grove IL: IVP, 2004).
Welker, M., What Happens in Holy Communion?
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Classics:
ARCIC, The Church as Communion (London: SPCK,
1991).
Banks, R., Pauls Idea of Community (Peabody, MA:
Hendrickson, 1994).
Beasley-Murray, P., Anyone For Ordination?
(Tunbridge Wells: MARC, 1993).
Dulles, A., Models of the Church (New York: Image,
1987).
Schrotenboer, P., An Evangelical Response to Baptism,
Eucharist & Ministry (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1992)
Volf, M., After our Likeness: The Church as Image of
the Trinity (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).

TH610 The Westminster Confession


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) examine in detail the Westminster Confession of
Faith in its 17th century context;
(b) consider the continuing significance of the
Confession in the life of Presbyterian Church of
Australia;
(c) encourage students to develop their own
theological thinking in interaction with the
Confession.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:
1. Describe the historical development and 17th
Century importance of the Westminster
Confession of Faith;
2. Outline the content and form of the Confession
and explain why this is so and its significance;
3. Describe and critique the various views of the
significance of the Confession in the Church
today, with particular reference to the Presbyterian
Church of Australia; and
4. Identify how this knowledge is and could be
appropriated in their own life and the life of their
community.
Content
1 Confessions of the Continental Reformation and
the British Reformation; the Scots Confession and
the Irish Articles
2 The historical circumstances of the Westminster
Assembly

MDiv Unit Outlines

The relation of the Westminster Confession to


other Westminster Documents
4 The adoption of the Westminster Confession by
the Church of Scotland and its relation to later
Scottish theology; moderatism, evangelicalism
and modernism; the adoption of the Confession by
Presbyterian churches in the nineteenth century
5 The structure of the Westminster Confession
6 Chapter 1 on the doctrine of Scripture, the use
Confession makes of Scripture and the theological
methodology used by the Confession.
7 A detailed examination of theological topics in the
Confession
8 The covenantal and decreetal schema of the
Confession
9 The Confessions view of church and state
10 The Basis of Union of the Presbyterian Church of
Australia and the place of the Westminster
Confession in the denomination
Bibliography
Prescribed:
The various primary documents referred to in the
Content section above.
Recommended:
Carson, J. and D. Hall, To Glorify and Enjoy God
(Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1994).
Duncan, L. (ed.), The Westminster Confession into the
21st Century (Fearn: Mentor, 2003).
Letham, R., The Westminster Assembly: Reading its
Theology in Historical Context, (Phillipsburg NJ:
P & R Publishing, 2009).
Milne, D. J. W., The Westminster Confession of Faith
for the Twenty-first Century (Sydney: Presbyterian
Church of Australia, 2001).
Reymond, R. L., A New Systematic Theology of the
Christian Faith (Nashville: Thomas Nelson,
rev.ed. 1998).
Torrance, T. F., Scottish Theology (esp. 125-53;
Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1996).

TH620 Theological Issues of the Reformation


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) Assist candidates to examine part of the rich
theological heritage of the Reformation;
(b) Provide an introduction to the Reformation heritage
in the light of contemporary approaches to the
central issues in theology raised in the sixteenth
century;
(c) Enable candidates to reflect theologically in areas of
direct relevance to Christian ministry.
On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:

2
3

115

Describe the historical importance of the major


theological developments of the Reformation and
show how they are interconnected;
Outline the continuing importance and
significance of some of these issues;
Describe the significance of at least one of these
issues for the Church today, and critique its use in
the life and ministry of at least on part of the
church Australia; and
Identify how this knowledge is and could be
appropriated in their own life and the life of their
community.

Content
Section A:
1 Justification: Augustine; Luther; Trent; Hooker;
Newman; contemporary ecumenical discussion (for
example, Salvation and the Church).
2 Grace and election: Augustine; Luther, Calvin and
Arminius; Wesley and Whitefield; contemporary
approaches.
3 Sacraments: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin and Cranmer;
contemporary ecumenical discussions (for example,
Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry).
Section B:
The study of TWO major documents of the Reformation,
in particular considering their relevance in contemporary
Christian ministry.
One document is to be chosen from each of the
following sections:
Group A: Cranmer Homily on Salvation
Luther, The Freedom of a Christian Man
Luther, Two Kinds of Righteousness
Zwingli, Commentary on True and False
Religion
Group B: Calvin, Institutes III, 2124; IV, 1419
Cranmer, A Defence of the True and
Catholic Doctrine of the Sacrament
Luther, Sermons on the Catechism, sections
on sacraments.
Bibliography
Recommended:
In addition to works listed in Groups A and B of
Section B above,
Avis, P. D., The Church in the Theology of the
Reformers (Eugene OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers,
2002).
Boice, J. M., Whatever Happened to the Gospel of
Grace? Rediscovering the Doctrines That Shook
the World (Wheaton: Crossway, 2001).
Davis, T. J., This is My Body: The Presence of Christ
in Reformation Thought (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2008).
Hill, C. E., and F. A. James, Glory of the Atonement,
(Downers Grove Il: IVP, 2004).
Krkkinen, V.-M., An Introduction to Ecclesiology.
Ecumenical, Historical & Global Perspectives
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Kasper, W., Sacrament of Unity: The Eucharist and
the Church (New York: Crossroad, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

116

Lindberg, C., The Reformation Theologians: An


Introduction to the Theology of the Early Modern
Period, The Great Theologians (Oxford:
Blackwell, 2002).
McCormack, B., Justification in Perspective (Grand
Rapids: Baker Academic, 2006).
McGrath, A. E., Reformation Thought: An
Introduction (Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 3rd
edition 1999).
Pinnock, C. H. (ed.) Grace Unlimited (Eugene OR:
Wipf & Stock, 1999).
Schreiner, T. R. and B. A. Ware (eds.), Still Sovereign:
Contemporary
Perspectives
on
Election,
Foreknowledge and Grace (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2000).
Stackhouse, J. G. (ed.), Evangelical Ecclesiology:
Reality or Illusion? (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Welker, M., What Happens in Holy Communion?
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Classics:
ARCIC, Clarifications (London: SPCK; CTS, 1993).
Dulles, A., Models of the Church (New York: Image,
1987).
Barth, K., Chapter VII The Election of God, Church
Dogmatics. II.2 (trans G.W. Bromiley et al;
Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1957).
McGrath, A. E., Iustitia Dei: A History of the Doctrine
of Justification (New York: Cambridge University
Press, 2nd ed. 1998).
Schrotenboer, P., An Evangelical Response to Baptism,
Eucharist & Ministry (Carlisle: Paternoster,
1992).

TH621 God as Trinity


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) Acquaint candidates with the rich heritage of the
doctrine of God in selected Church fathers;
(b) Provide candidates with an opportunity to reflect in
some depth on the central doctrine of the Christian
Faith, the doctrine of the Trinity;
(c) Enable candidates to recognise the pastoral
implications of Trinitarian spirituality.
Unit Outline
1. A study of the doctrine of the Trinity as presented
in the following Fathers: Athanasius, The
Cappadocian Fathers, Augustine of Hippo
2. An examination of the relevance of the doctrine of
the Trinity to faith and life. In this regard texts of
the above Fathers are to be studied in company
with TWO of the modern writers.

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Augustine, On the Holy Trinity in Nicene and PostNicene Fathers of the Christian Church,Series1,
Vol.3 (Edinburgh: T & T Clark/ Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans,
1979-).
CCEL
online,
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf103.html
Athanasius see Hardy, Edward R., (ed.), Christology of
the Later Fathers, Library of Christian Classics 3,
Louisville KY: Westminster John Knox, 2006,
reprint of 1954 ed.). Also good for the
Cappadocians.
Barth, K., Church Dogmatics (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1994, I.1).
Nazianzen, G. Five Theological Orations, NPNF S2,
vol.7,
CCEL
online,
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf207.i.html
Rahner, K., Remarks on the Dogmatic Treatise De
Trinitate, in Theological Investigations IV,
London: Darton, Longman & Todd 1966, 77-102.
Rahner, K., Towards an Understanding of the Doctrine
of the Trinity in Rahner, Foundations of the
Christian Faith: An Introduction to the Idea of
Christianity (London: Darton Longman & Todd,
1978, 133-137).
Zizioulis, J. B., The Doctrine of the Holy Trinity: The
Significance of the Cappadocian Contribution, in
Christoph Schwobel (ed.), Trinitarian Theology
Today: Essays on Divine Being and Act,
(Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark 1995, 44-60).
Recommended:
Ayres, L., Nicaea and Its Legacy: An Approach to
Fourth-Century Trinitarian Theology (Oxford:
OUP, 2004).
Beeley, C. A., Gregory of Nazianzus on the Trinity
and the Knowledge of God: In Your Light we See
Light (New York/London: OUP, 2007).
Boff, L., Holy Trinity: Perfect Community (Maryknoll,
NY: Orbis, 2000).
Brmmer, V., Atonement, Christology and the Trinity :
Making Sense of Christian Doctrine, (Aldershot:
Ashgate Publishing, 2005).
Coppedge, A., The God who is Triune: Revisioning the
Christian Doctrine of God (Downers Grove IL:
IVP, 2007).
Crisp, O., Problems with Perichoresis, Tyndale
Bulletin 56/1 (2005) 119-140.
Davis, S. T., et al (eds), The Trinity: An
Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Trinity,
(Oxford: OUP, 2002; Oxford Scholarship Online,
2003, www.oxfordscholarshp.com).
Del C., R., Person and Being in John Zizioulas
Trinitarian Theology: Conversations with Thomas
Torrance and Thomas Aquinas, Scottish Journal
of Theology 54 (2000) 70-86.
Dunzl, F., trans. John Bowden, A Brief History of the
Doctrine of the Trinity in the Early Church
(London/New York: T & T Clark, 2007).
Fiddes, P., Participating in God: A Pastoral Doctrine
of the Trinity (Westminster: John Knox,2000).

MDiv Unit Outlines

George, T., God the Holy Trinity (Grand Rapids:


Baker Academic, 2006).
Grenz, S. J., Rediscovering the Triune God: the Trinity
in Contemporary Theology (Minneapolis:
Augsburg Fortress Press, 2004).
Grenz, S. J., The Social God and thee Relational Self:
A Trinitarian Theology of the Imago Dei
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2001).
Gunton, C. E., Father, Son and Holy Spirit: Toward a
Fully Trinitarian Theology (London/New York:
T. and T. Clark, 2003)
Gunton, C. E., The Promise of Trinitarian Theology
(London/New York: T & T Clark, 3rd ed. 2003).
Hanson, R. P., Search for the Christian Doctrine of
God: The Arian Controversy (Grand Rapids:
Baker Academic, 2006).
Heim, M., The Depth of the Riches: A Trinitarian
Theology of Religious Ends (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2001).
Krkkinen, V-M., The Trinity: Global Perspectives
(Louisville/London: Westminster John Knox
Press, 2007).
Kay, B., Trinitarian Spirituality: John Owen and the
Doctrine of God in Western Devotion
(Waynesboro GA: Paternoster, 2007).
Johnston, E. A., She Who Is (New York: Crossroad,
2002).
Jowers, D. W., The Theology of the Cross as
Theology of The Trinity: A Critique of Jurgen
Moltmanns
Staurocentric
Trinitarianism,
Tyndale Bulletin 52.2 (2001) 245-266.
Letham, R., The Holy Trinity: In Scripture, History,
Theology, and Worship (Phillipsburg NJ: P & R,
2004).
Leupp, R. T., The Renewal of Trinitarian Theology:
Themes, Patterns, and Explorations (Downers
Grove IL: IVP, 2008).
Metzger, P., Trinitarian Soundings in Systematic
Theology (London/New York: T. and T. Clark,
2005).
Molnar, P. D., Divine Freedom and the Doctrine of the
Immanent Trinity: In Dialogue with Karl Barth
and Contemporary Theology (London/New York:
T. T. Clark, 2002).
Molnar, P., The Trinity and the Freedom of God,
Journal for Christian Theological Research 8
(2003) 59-66.
Olson, R., and H. Christopher, The Trinity (Grand
Rapids/ Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2002).
Seamands, S. A., Ministry in the Image of God: The
Trinitarian Shape of Christian Service (Downers
Grove Il: IVP, 2005).
Sherman, R. J., King, Priest and Prophet : A
Trinitarian Theology of Atonement (Edinburgh:
T.& T. Clark , 2004).
Smail, T. A., Like Father, Like Son: The Trinity
Imaged in our Humanity (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2006).
Sokolowski, R., Christian Faith and Human
Understanding: Studies on the Eucharist, Trinity,
and the Human Person (Washington DC: CUA
Press, 2006).

117

Torrance, T. F., The Christian Doctrine of God: One


Being, Three Persons (Edinburgh/New York: T &
T Clark,1996, Paperback ed. 2001).
Weinandy, T. G., Does God Suffer? (Edinburgh: T &
T Clark, 2000).
Classics:
Jenson, R., Justification as a Triune Event, Modern
Theology 11/4 (1995) 421-427.
LaCugna, C. M., God for Us: The Trinity and the
Christian Life (New York: Harper SanFransisco,
1993).
Moltmann, J., The Trinity and the Kingdom: The
Doctrine of God (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993).
Moltmann, J., The Crucified God: The Cross of Christ
as the Foundation and Criticism of Christian
Theology , R. A. Wilson and John Bowden (trans.)
(London: SCM/New York: Harper and Row,
1974).
Sherman, R. J., Toward a Trinitarian Theology of The
Atonement, Scottish Journal of Theology 52
(1999) 346-374.
Schwobel, C., Trinitarian Theology Today: Essays on
Divine Being and Act (Edinburgh: T.& T. Clark,
1995).
Torrance, T. F., The Atonement and the Holy
Trinity, in The Mediation of Christ (Edinburgh:
T&T Clark, 1992; 99-125).
Torrance, A. J., Persons in Communion: An Essay on
Trinitarian Description and Human Participation
with Special Reference to Volume One of Karl
Barths Church Dogmatics (Edinburgh: T & T
Clark, 1996).
Torrance, J. B., Worship, Community, and the Triune
God of Grace (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1996).
Volf, M., After our Likeness: The Church as Image of
the Trinity (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Wainwright, G., The Doctrine of the Trinity: Where
the Church Stands or Falls, Interpretation 45
(1991) 117-132.
Wright, N. T., Jesus and the Victory of God (London:
SPCK, 1996).
Zizioulas, J. B., Being as Communion: Studies in
Personhood and the Church (Crestwood: St
Vladimirs Seminary Press 1985).

TH689 Theology Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
To be determined on a seminar-by-seminar basis, linked
to content and focus
Learning Outcomes
1 Provide candidates with the opportunity to study in
depth a topic or theme of interest;
2 Provide candidates with an opportunity to develop
co-operative research skills;

MDiv Unit Outlines

118

Enable candidates to explore the application of


theological insights to personal and pastoral needs.

specialisation, so that candidates are not expected to


study each general topic in detail.

On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:


1. Describe and critically evaluate the major
characteristics, concerns and implications of the
theological topic or theme studied;
2. Outline and appraise how cooperative theological
research skills work in practice and show how these
were used in the research undertaken; and
3. Appraise the value of study in this area for pastoral
or missional tasks and personal faith and spirituality.

General Recommended Readings:


These works are useful for a variety of units in the
Church History Field, especially the Survey units
CH501 and CH502.

Content
Detailed study in a topic or them of theological
interest.
(a) The total amount of work expected is that equivalent
to an essay of approximately 6,000 words;
(b) Candidates must demonstrate a thorough grasp of
the theological issues involved;
(c) Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of theological perspectives discerned in candidates
learning;
(d) Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology)
may be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted
appropriately to reflect major level undergraduate
study for candidates enrolled in the undergraduate
degrees.
Bibliography
The texts and readings will be as necessary for the
particular topic set.

Primary Documents
Bettenson, H. and C. Maunder (eds), Documents of the
Christian Church (3rd ed.; Oxford: OUP, 1999).
Coakley, J. W. and A. Sterk (eds), Readings in World
History (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2004).
Library of Christian Classics.
Secondary References
Chidester, D., Christianity: A Global History (London:
Penguin, 2000).
Cross, F. L. and E. A. Livingstone (eds), The Oxford
Dictionary of the Christian Church (London:
OUP, 1997).
Gonzalez, J. L., The Changing Shape of Church
History (Louisville, MO: Chalice, 2002).
Harris, R. and H. Mayr-Harling, Christianity: Two
Thousand Years (Oxford: OUP, 2001).
Hastings, A. (ed.), A World History of Christianity.
(London: Cassell, 1999).
Hillerbrand, H. J. (ed.), The Encyclopedia of
Protestantism (New York: Routledge, 2003).
Kung, H., The Catholic Church: A Short History
(London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2001).
Norris, F. W., Christianity: a Short Global History
(Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 2002).
Yates, T., The Expansion of Christianity (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).

CHURCH HISTORY (CH)


CH501 The Church to 1550
CH501 and CH502 Church History
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Survey the major developments in the history of the
Christian churches, so that they understand the
major trends in this history;
(b) Analyse the problems, opportunities and attitudes of
past Christians in their interaction with the societies
in which they lived and the manner in which
individual incidents relate to the major trends that
emerge in the history of the churches;
(c) Evaluate the contribution of selected people and
movements to the development of the churchs
thought and structures;.
(d) Interpret primary historical documents in their social
context.
It should be noted that these are survey units. Students
are required to study the whole syllabus, which includes
selected key people or case studies for more focussed
study (listed in italics in the Unit Outlines). Assessment
procedures shall allow for a certain amount of

Status
Core
Exclusions
CH505
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Survey the major developments in the history of the
Christian churches to 1550, so that they understand
the major trends in this history;
(b) Analyse the problems, opportunities and attitudes of
past Christians in their interaction with the societies
in which they lived and the manner in which
individual incidents relate to the major trends that
emerge in the history of the churches;
(c) Evaluate the contribution of selected people and
movements to the development of the churchs
thought and structures;
(d) Interpret primary historical documents in their social
context.

MDiv Unit Outlines

119

(d)

Assessment will include a written examination


worth 50% and further written work of 3000
words also worth 50%.
It is recommended that students be required to
answer only 3 questions in a two-hour
examination, one question from each of the
three sections of the paper.
Examiners should feel free to set selections
from documents for comment in examinations if
they consider it appropriate.
Lecturers may choose to assess parts of the
syllabus by instruments other than examination.
Lecturers may assess reports on documents
separately from examinations or essays. For
example, three assessment instruments may be
used: examination (50%), essay (40%),
document report (10%).

Content
Section A: The Church in Imperial Rome:
1
Christians in society: the spread of Christianity
to 312
Justin Martyr OR Tertullian
2
The challenge of other religions and ideologies,
especially Judaism and Gnosticism.
Irenaeus OR Athenagoras.
3
Caesar: enemy or friend? Decius, Diocletian,
Constantine.
Pliny & Trajan OR Cyprian.
4
Wrestling with the faith: Origen, Arianism,
Chalcedon
Origen OR Athanasius.
5
Worship and popular religion in a collapsing
society: 4th and 5th century trends: asceticism,
pilgrimage, liturgy, icons.
Augustine of Hippo.

(e)

(f)

(g)
(h)

Bibliography:
Section B: The Church as Christendom
6
The conversion of Europe 600900. The Holy
Roman Empire.
Boniface of Crediton OR Alcuin of York.
7
Christendom triumphant: the Western church in
the 13th and 14th centuries. The development of
scholasticism.
Innocent III OR Thomas Aquinas.
8
Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades.
9
Christendom challenged; protest and spiritual
renewal mysticism. The conciliar movement.
Francis of Assisi OR Thomas a Kempis.
Section C: The Continental Churches and Reform
10 Reform precursors; renaissance and new
learning.
John Hus OR Erasmus
11 Reformation as massive change:
(a) in Germany (15171530)
(b) in Geneva (15361564)
Martin Luther & John Calvin
(c) Anabaptist groups
Menno Simons
12 The Counter Reformation: Trent; the Jesuits; the
papacy reformed.
Ignatius Loyola OR Teresa of Avila
Notes:
(a)
(b)

(c)

Colleges are required to teach at least 10 out of


the 12 topics above.
Lecturers should feel free to substitute a major
figure in the place of those named, and, since
history at this level requires the use of primary
sources, all major figures should be studied
wherever possible through their own writings.
Lecturers should feel free to exchange with
lecturers from other colleges advice on
documents which have worked well for them.
Les Ball, Church History Moderator, has made
available for all colleges an 8-page guide on
how to study a document.

As well as the works listed in General Recommended


Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
The Church in Imperial Rome
Bryan, C., Render to Caesar: Jesus, the Early Church,
and the Roman Superpower (Oxford: OUP.,
2005).
Davidson, I. J., The Birth of the Church: From Jesus to
Constantine AD 30-312 (Baker History of the
Church, Vol 1; Grand Rapids/ Oxford:
Baker/Monarch, 2004).
Evans, G. R. (ed.), The First Christian Theologians:
An Introduction to Theology in the Early Church
(Mulden: Blackwell, 2004).
Frend, W. H. C., From Dogma to History: How our
Understanding of the Early Church Developed
(London: SCM, 2003).
Hall, S. G., Doctrine and Practice in the Early Church
(London: SPCK, 2005).
McKechnie, P., The First Christian Centuries.
Perspectives on the Early Church (Leicester:
Apollos, 2001).
The Church as Christendom
Bassett, P., The Medieval Church (Baker History of
the Church, Vol 3; Grand Rapids/ Oxford:
Baker/Monarch, 2006).
Brown, P., The Rise of Western Christendom: Triumph
and Diversity, AD200-1000 (2nd ed.; Oxford:
Blackwell, 2003).
Cusack, C. M., Conversion Among Germanic Peoples
(London: Cassell, 1998).
Davidson, I. J., A Public Faith: From Constantine to
the Medieval World: AD 312-600 (Baker History
of the Church, Vol 2; Grand Rapids/ Oxford:
Baker/Monarch, 2005).
Madden, T. F. (ed.), The Crusades: the Essential
Readings (Oxford: Blackwell, 2002).
Milne, K., A Short History of the Church of Ireland
(Dublin: Columbia, 2003).
Riley-Smith, J., The Crusades A History (2nd ed.;
London: Continuum, 2005).

MDiv Unit Outlines

120

Wood, I. N., The Missionary Life: Saints and the


Evangelisation of Europe, 400-1050 (New York:
Longman, 2001).
The Continental Churches and Reform
Cottret, B., Calvin: A Biography (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
Heinze, R. W., Reform and Conflict: From the
Medieval World to the Wars of Religion AD 13501648 (Baker History of the Church, Vol 4; Grand
Rapids/ Oxford: Baker/Monarch, 2005).
Mullett, M., The Catholic Reformation (New York:
Routledge, 1999).
Scribner, R. W. and C. Scott Dixon, The German
Reformation (2nd ed.; Basingstoke: Macmillan,
2003).

CH502 The Church from 1550 to Modern Times


Status
Core
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) survey the major developments in the history of the
Christian churches from 1550 to the modern times,
so that they understand the major trends in this
history;
(b) analyse the problems, opportunities and attitudes of
past Christians in their interaction with the societies
in which they lived and the manner in which
individual incidents relate to the major trends that
emerge in the history of the churches;
(c) evaluate the contribution of selected people and
movements to the development of the churchs
thought and structures;
(d) interpret primary historical documents in their social
context.
Content
Section A: Reform, Revolution and Renewal
1
Reformation:England and Scotland (15331588)
Thomas Cranmer OR John Knox
2
Puritanism in England and America (1563
1662)
Oliver Cromwell OR RichardBaxter OR John
Winthrop OR Roger Williams
3
Revolutionary Learning & Radical Politics
3.1 Deism and the Enlightenment
3.2 Jansenism
3.3 The Church in the French Revolution
John Locke OR Blaise Pascal
Lecturers must focus on at least 2 of the topics
Section B: Change & Renewal
4
Renewal:
4.1 Pietism,
4.2 the Evangelical Revival in Britain
4.3 the Great Awakening in America
4.4 The Oxford Movement

John Wesley OR George Whitefield OR


Jonathan Edwards OR John Henry
Newman
Lecturers must focus on at least 2 of the topics
Responding to the changing Social Order:
5.1 Frontier Religion in America
5.2 The abolition of slavery
5.3 Christian Socialism
5.4 Salvation Army
5.5 Women in the Church
Francis
Asbury
OR
William
Wilberforce OR F. D. Maurice OR
William & Catherine Booth OR
Lecturers must focus on at least 2 of the topics
Responding to challenges to Faith
6.1 The Rise of Biblical Criticism
6.2 Science and Religion
6.3 The First Vatican Council
6.4 Fundamentalism
Friedrich Schleiermacher OR Charles
Darwin OR Pius IX OR John Gresham
Machen
Lecturers must focus on at least 2 of the topics

Section C: The Church Universal


7
Christianity as a World Religion:
7.1 The birth of modern missions,
7.2 Christian missions in India OR China
OR the Pacific OR Africa (nineteenth
century)
7.3 Christian missions & the rise of
nationalism (twentieth century)
7.4 Ecumenical movements
7.5 Vatican II
7.6 The History of Pentecostalism
William Carey OR David Livingstone
OR Hudson Taylor OR J. R. Mott OR
John XXIII
Lecturers must focus on at least 3 of the topics
8
Christians in a Totalitarian State: the church in
Germany (1931-1950) OR The Soviet Union
(1917-1990)
Dietrich Bonhoeffer OR Alexander Solzhenitsyn
9
A history of the church in Australia:
9.1 Building a Christian Country 17881901
9.2 The Church in Secular Australia 1901
to the present
9.3 Ministry to Indigenous communities
Lecturers must focus on at least 1 of the topics
Notes:
(a) Students are expected to cover all nine areas
covered in the syllabus outline. But there are
considerable options within all sections, and
lecturers should take full advantage of this
flexibility to design a coherent program which
best addresses the needs of students and the
philosophy of the college offering the unit.
(b) Students taking this unit will be expected to
engage seriously with primary sources. The names
of prominent figures in Christian history, named
above in italics, are to encourage lecturers to set

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)
(g)

documents for study written by or about those


people. Lecturers should feel free to substitute a
major figure in the place of those named.
Lecturers should feel free to exchange with
lecturers from other colleges advice on documents
which have worked well for them. The ACT
Church History Moderator has made available for
all colleges an 8-page guide on how to study a
document.
Assessment will include a written examination
worth 50% and further written work of 3000
words also worth 50%.
It is recommended that students be required to
answer only 3 questions in a two-hour
examination, one question from each of the three
sections of the paper.
Examiners should feel free to set selections from
documents for comment in examinations if they
consider it appropriate.
Lecturers may choose to assess parts of the
syllabus by instruments other than examination.
Lecturers may assess reports on documents
separately from examinations or essays. For
example, three assessment instruments may be
used: examination (50%), essay (40%), document
report (10%).

Bibliography:
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
Secondary References
Chidester, D., Christianity: a Global History (London:
Penguin, 2000).
Cross, F. L. and E. A. Livingstone (eds), The Oxford
Dictionary of the Christian Church (London:
OUP, 1997).
Harris, R. and H. Mayr-Harling, Christianity: Two
Thousand Years (Oxford: OUP, 2001).
Hillerbrand, H. J. (ed.), The Encyclopedia of
Protestantism (New York: Routledge, 2003).
Norris, F. W., Christianity: a short global history
(Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 2002).
Yates, T., The Expansion of Christianity (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Reform and Revolution
Brown, J., The English Puritans (Fearn: Christian
Heritage, 1998).
Dickens, A. G., The English Reformation (2nd ed.;
University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State
University, 1989).
Kellar, C., Scotland, England & the Reformation
1534-61 (Oxford: Clarendon, 2003).
Pearse, M., The Great Restoration: the Religious
Radicals of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth
Centuries (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Change and Renewal
Askew, T. A. and R. V. Pierard, The American Church
Experience: A Concise History (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2004).

121

Harding, A., The Countess of Huntingdons


Connexion: a Sect in Eighteenth-Century England
(Oxford: OUP, 2003).
Heitzenrater, R. P., Wesley and the People Called
Methodists (Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).
Herring, G., What was the Oxford Movement?
(London: Continuum, 2002).
Kent, J., Wesley and the Wesleyans: Religion in
Eighteenth Century Britain (Cambridge: CUP,
2002).
Kimbrough, S. T. Jr (ed.), Orthodoxy and Wesleyan
Spirituality (Crestmead, NY: St. Vladimirs
Seminary Press, 2002).
Knight, F., The Church in the Nineteenth Century
(London: I. B. Tauris, 2008).
Noll, M. A., Americas God: from Jonathan Edwards
to Abraham Lincoln (Oxford/NY: OUP, 2002).
Noll, M. A., The Old Religion in the New World: the
history of North American Christianity (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Numbers, R. L., Science and Christianity in Pulpit and
Pew (NY: OUP, 2007).
Pearse, M., The Age of Reason: from the Wars of
Religion to the French Revolution, 1670-1789
Oxford: Monarch, 2007).
Rosnan, D., The Evolution of the English Churches,
1500-2000 (Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
Sorkin, D. J., The Religious Enlightenment:
Protestants, Jews, and Catholics from London to
Vienna (Princeton: Princeton University Press,
2008).
The Church Universal
Bellito, C. M., Renewing Christianity: A History of
Church Reform from Day One to Vatican II (New
York: Paulist, 2001).
Bergen, D. L., Twisted Cross: the German Christian
Movement in the Third Reich (Chapel Hill, NC:
University of North Carolina, 1996).
Breward, I., A History of the Churches in Australasia
(Oxford: OUP, 2001).
Briggs, J., M. A. Oduyoye and G. Tsetsis (eds),
History of the Ecumenical Movement Vol III:
1968-2000 (Geneva: WCC, 2004).
Gilley, S. and B. Stanley (eds), World Christianities,
c1815-1914 (Cambridge/NY: CUP, 2006).
Holmes, D. J. and B. W. Bickers, A Short History of
the Catholic Church (3rd ed.; London: Burns &
Oates, 2002).
Kung, H., The Catholic Church (London: Orion,
2002).
Moffett, S. H., A History of Christianity in Asia (Vol.
I, 2nd Rev. ed.; Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1998).
OMalley, J. W., Trent and all that: renaming
Catholicism in the Early Modern Era (Cambridge,
MA: Harvard University, 2000).
Rittner, C. and J. K. Roth (eds), Pope Pius XII and the
Holocaust (London: Leicester University, 2002).

122

MDiv Unit Outlines

CH505 Early Church History (30451)


Status
Elective
Exclusions
CH501
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) explain the theological, structural and pastoral
developments of the Early Church, especially in
terms of the Churchs interaction with its social,
political and cultural context;
(b) analyse the theological, political and ecclesiastical
developments of the Early Church;
(c) evaluate contemporary theological, political and
ecclesiastical issues in light of their historical
development;
(d) interpret primary historical documents in terms of
both their social context and their significance for
today.
Content
1 The First Churches
2 The Apostolic Fathers and Apologists
3 The Early Theological Issues
4 The Expansion and Development of the Church
5 Church and Empire to Constantine
6 The Interaction of Church and Society after
Constantine
7 The Christological and Trinitarian Controversies
8 Augustine and his times
Bibliography
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
Primary Documents
Augustine, Confessions (Books IVIII, Trans. E. M.
Blaiklock; London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1987).
Bettenson, H. (ed.), The Early Christian Fathers
(London: OUP, 1956).
Bettenson, H. (ed.), The Later Christian Fathers
(London: OUP, 1970).
Harding, M. (ed.), Early Christian Life and Thought in
Social Context: a Reader (London; New York: T
& T Clark, 2003).
Kelly, J. N. D., Early Christian Creeds (London; New
York: Longman, 1972).
Stevenson, J. (ed.), Creeds, Councils and
Controversies (Rev. Ed.; London, SPCK, 1989;
7th impression, 2003).
Stevenson, J. and W. H. C. Frend (eds), A New
Eusebius (Rev. Ed.; London: SPCK, 1987)
The Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers (2 series).
Secondary References
Ayres, L., Nicaea and its Legacy: an Approach to
Fourth-Century Trinitarian Theology (Oxford:
OUP, 2004).

Brown, P., Augustine of Hippo: A Biography


(Berkeley: University of California, 2000).
Cary, P., Augustines Invention of the Inner-Self
(Oxford: OUP, 2000).
Chadwick, H., The Church in Ancient Society: from
Galilee to Gregory the Great (Oxford; New York:
OUP, 2001).
Davidson, I. J., The Birth of the Church: From Jesus to
Constantine AD 30-312 (Baker History of the
Church, Vol 1; Grand Rapids/ Oxford:
Baker/Monarch, 2004).
Davidson, I. J., A Public Faith: From Constantine to
the Medieval World: AD 312-600 (Baker History
of the Church, Vol 2; Grand Rapids/ Oxford:
Baker/Monarch, 2005).
Dunn-Wilson, D., A Mirror for the Church: Preaching
in the First Five Centuries (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2005).
Dunzl, F., A Brief History of the Doctrine of the
Trinity in the Early Church (trans. John Bowden;
T .& T Clark, 2007).
Eusebius of Caesarea, Eusebius: The Church History:
A New Translation with Commentary (Trans. Paul
L. Maier; Grand Rapids: Regel, 1999).
Frend, W. H. C., From Dogma to History (London:
SCM, 2003).
Hall, S. G., Doctrine and Practice in the Early Church
(London: SPCK, 2005).
Harrison, C., Augustine: Christian Truth and
Fractured Humanity (Oxford: OUP, 2002).
Hilhorst, A. (ed.), The Apostolic Age in Patristic
Thought (Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2004).
Kesick, V., Formation and Struggles: the Church
AD33-450 (Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimirs
Seminary Press, 2007; Vol 1 AD32-200)
McKechnie, P., The First Christian Centuries.
Perspectives on the Early Church (Leicester:
Apollos, 2001).
Rankin, D., From Clement to Origen: the Social and
Historical Context of the Church Fathers
(Aldershot, Hants/Burlington, VT: Ashgate,
2006).
Wedderburn, A. J. M., A History of the First
Christians (London; New York: T & T Clark,
2004).
Williams, R., Arius: Heresy & Tradition (London:
SCM, 2001).
Young, F. M. and M. M. Mitchell (eds), Origins to
Constantine (Cambridge/NY: CUP, 2006).

CH609 Australian Church History


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx

MDiv Unit Outlines

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Analyse the major developments and issues in the
history of the Church in Australia, with particular
reference to the introduction and consolidation of
Christianity in Australia;
(b) Evaluate contemporary elements of Christian life,
thought, ministry and worship in Australia in terms
of their historical development;
(c) Apply lessons learnt from the history of the
churches in Australia to their ministry;
(d) Apply their experience of Australian churches to
develop spiritual life.
Content
Section A
1 The Church as the Convict Chaplaincy (17881833)
(a) British background, early New South Wales
and Van Diemens Land settlements.
(b) Colonial chaplaincy: moral and penal reform
problems; relations with civil authorities.
(c) Establishment disputes, recognition of nonAnglican churches; the Church Acts.
(d) Policies on education; convicts and
emancipists; transportation;
(e) Missions to the Aborigines.
2 The Churches consolidate (18331880)
(a) Development from chaplaincy to organised
religion with an indigenous ministry.
(b) Denominationalism
and
sectarianism;
liberalism and secularism; voluntarism.
(c) The churches in an expanding community; the
Gold rushes and their influence.
(d) The abolition of State Aid; the churches, State
education and the universities.
(e) The beginnings and consolidation of one
denomination in Australia.
3 The Churches confronted by the twentieth century
(18801960)
(a) Denominational consolidation: relations with
Home churches; new religious forms.
(b) Socio-political issues 18801914: Sunday;
Temperance; Federation.
(c) The churches and World War I: conscription
and sectarianism.
(d) The churches and the 1920s and the
Depression.
(e) The churches and World War II; the Jewish
question.
(f) The impact of post-war immigration; White
Australia; the Catholic Groupers; secularism.
4 The Churches today (1960)
(a) The rise of the Bible College movement; the
charismatic movement; sectarianism and mass
media religion; para-church groups (e.g.
Scripture Union, IVF, YMCA, Bible Society).
(b) The ecumenical movement and the Australian
Council of Churches;
(c) Missions to Aborigines and overseas.
(d) The churches involvement in debates over
community issues (eg state aid, divorce,
abortion, IVF, conscription; nuclear power,
capital punishment, conservation, poverty).

123

(e) Issues with the churches (e.g. church union,


women in ministry, baptism).
Section B
5 The study and analysis of set texts:
Woolmington, J. (ed.), Religion in Early Australia:
the Problem of Church and State (Sydney: Cassell,
1976) and Aborigines in Australian History
(Sydney: Cassell, 1973).
In addition, students are to study each topic in close
relation to primary documents:
Austin, A. G. (ed.), Select Documents in Australian
Education 17881900 (Melbourne: Pitman, 1963).
Clark, C. M. H. (ed.), Select Documents in Australian
History, 17881900, (2nd ed.; Sydney: Angus &
Robertson, 1965).
Crowley, F. K. (ed.), Modern Australia in Documents
Vol. I: 19011939 (Melbourne: Wren, 1973).
Crowley, F. K. (ed.), Modern Australia in Documents
Vol. II: 1939-1970 (Melbourne: Wren, 1973).
OFarrell, P. J., Documents in Australian Catholic
History (2 Vols; Melbourne: Chapman, 1969).
Bibliography
Documents
Collections of documents on Australian church history
now available on the web, include documents on the
Anglican
Church
of
Australia
at
www.anglican.org.au/archive/ and for the Pentecostal
churches, see aps.webjournals.org
General Works
Piggin, S., Evangelical Christianity in Australia:
Spirit, Word and World (Melbourne, Oxford:
OUP, 1996). Second edition is entitled: Spirit of a
Nation: The Story of Australias Christian
Heritage (Sydney: Strand, 2003).
Thompson, R. C., Religion in Australia: a History (2nd
ed.; Melbourne: OUP, 2002).
Reference Works
Dickey, B. (ed.), Australian Dictionary of Evangelical
Biography (Adelaide: Evangelical
History
Association, 1994).
Pike, D. (ed.), Australian Dictionary of Biography
(Melbourne: Melbourne University, 1961-).
Books covering more than one period
Breward, I., A History of the Churches in Australasia
(Oxford: OUP, 2001).
Carey, H. M., Believing in Australia: A Cultural
History of Religions (Sydney: Allen & Unwin,
1996).
Harris, J., One Blood, 200 Years of Aboriginal
Encounter with Christianity, a Story of Hope
(Sydney: Albatross, 1990).
Hutchinson, M., S. Piggin and E. Campion (eds),
Reviving Australia: Essays in the Historical of
Revival and Revivalism in Australian Christian

MDiv Unit Outlines

124

Experience (Sydney: Centre for the Study of


Australian Christianity, 1994).
Kaye, B. (ed.), Anglicanism in Australia (Melbourne:
Melbourne University, 2002).
Kaye, B. et al (eds), Wonderfully and Confessedly
Strange: Australian Essays in Anglican
Ecclesiology (Melbourne: MUP, 2006).
Manley, K., From Woolloomooloo to Eternity (SBHT
Vol. 16; Carlisle: Paternoster, 2006).
OBrien, A., Gods Willing Workers (Sydney:
University of New South Wales, 2006).
O'Farrell, P. J., The Catholic Church and Community in
Australia (Melbourne: Nelson, 1977).
West, J., Daughters of Freedom (Sydney: Albatross,
1997).
Convict Chaplaincy:
Grocott, A. M., Convicts, Clergymen and Churches:
Attitudes of Convicts and Ex-Convicts towards the
Churches and Clergy in New South Wales from
1788 to 1851 (Sydney: SUP, 1980).
Hughes, R., The Fatal Shore (London: Collins Harvall,
1987).
The Churches Consolidate (18331880)
Hutchinson, M. and E. Campion (eds), Long Patient
Suffering: Studies in the Role of Women in
Australian Christianity (Sydney: Centre for the
Study of Australian Christianity, 1994).
Phillips, W., James Jefferis: Prophet of Federation
(Melbourne: Australian Scholarly, 1993).
The Churches Confronted by the 20th Century:
Habel, N. C. (ed.), Religion and Multiculturalism in
Australia: Essays in Honour of Victor C. Hayes
(AASR, 1992).
Lawton, W. J., The Better Time to Be: Utopian Attitudes
to Society Among Sydney Anglicans, 1885 to 1914
(Sydney: UNSW, 1990).
Zwartz, M., Fractured Families (Melbourne: Parenesis,
2005).
Churches Today:
Black, A. (ed.), Religion in Australia (Sydney: Allen &
Unwin, 1991).
Hughes, P., Religion: A View From the Australian
Census
(Melbourne:
Christian
Research
Association, 1993).
Kaldor, P., et al, Views From the Pews Australian
Church Attenders Speak Out (Adelaide: OpenBook,
1995).
Kaye, B., A Church Without Walls: Being Anglican in
Australia (Melbourne: HarperCollins, 1995).
Loos, N., White Christ Black Cross: the Emergence of a
Black Church (Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press,
2007).
Maddox, M., God Under Howard: The Rise of the
Religious Right in Australian Politics (Crows Nest,
NSW: Allen & Unwin, 2005.)
Porter, M., The New Puritans (Melbourne: MUP, 2006).

CH621 The Continental Reformation


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx
Exclusions
CH624
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Analyse the causes and nature of the Continental
Reformation;
(b) Evaluate the theological and ecclesiastical outcomes
of the Reformation, especially in relation to todays
variety of churchly expressions;
(c) Apply lessons learnt from the history of the
Reformation to their ministry;
(d) Interpret a variety of primary historical and
theological documents of the Reformation in terms
of both their social context and their significance for
today.
Content
Section A
Candidates study six of the following topics:
1 Medieval religious and intellectual questioning of
the Church; the Avignon Captivity; the Conciliar
Movement.
2 Political, ecclesiastical, economic and social setting
of the Reformation and the Renaissance.
3 Martin Luther and the Reformation in Germany.
4 Huldrych Zwingli and the Swiss Reformation.
5 The Radical Reformation and the Anabaptists.
6 John Calvin and the Reformation in Geneva.
7 The Counter Reformation; the Jesuits, the Council
of Trent.
8 Calvinism in France and the Netherlands.
Section B
9 The study and analysis of TWO special texts
related to the topic areas above, chosen from the
following:
M Luther, Three Treatises of 1520
J Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, Bk IV
H Bullinger, Of the Holy Catholic Church
B Thompson, Liturgies of the Western Church, chs
IIIVII
Bibliography
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
Primary Documents
Dixon, C. S. (ed.), The German Reformation: The
Essential Readings (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999).
Lindberg, C., The European Reformations Sourcebook
(Oxford: Blackwell, 2000).
McNeill, J. T. (ed.), Calvin: Institutes of the Christian
Religion (2 Vols; London: SCM, 1961).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Naphy, W. G., Documents of the Continental


Reformation (New York: Macmillan, 1996).
Selections from works of Luther, Zwingli, Bullinger in
Library of Christian Classics.
Secondary References
Birely, R., The Re-fashioning of Catholicism, 14501700: a Reassessment of the Counter Reformation
(New York: Macmillan, St Martins, 1999).
Cottret, B., Calvin: A Biography (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
Dixon, C. S., The Reformation in Germany (Oxford:
Blackwell, 2002).
Evans, G. R., John Wyclif: Myth and Reality (Oxford:
Lion, 2005).
Gabler, U., Huldrych Zwingli: His Life and Work
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1986).
Gritsch, E. W., A History of Lutheranism
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 2002).
Hillerbrand, H. J, The Division of Christendom:
Christianity in the Sixteenth Century (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 2007).
Jenkins, A. K., Biblical Scholarship and the Church: a
Sixteenth-Century Crisis of Authority (Aldershot,
Hants: Ashgate, 2007).
Kittelson, J. M., Luther the Reformer: The Story of the
Man and his Career (Minneapolis: Fortress,
2003).
Matheson, P., The Imaginative World of the Reformation
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 2001).
Mullett, M., The Catholic Reformation (New York:
Routledge, 1999).
Nestingen, J. A., Martin Luther: A Life (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 2003).
Nohl, F., Luther: Biography of a Reformer (St Louis,
MO: Concordia, 2003).
Pearse, M., The Great Restoration: the Religious
Radicals of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth
Centuries (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Reymond, R. L., John Calvin: His Life and Influence
(Fearn: Christian Focus, 2004).
Scribner, R. W. and C. S. Dixon, The German
Reformation (2nd ed.; Basingstoke: Macmillan
2003).
Wengert, T. J. (ed.), Harvesting Martin Luthers
Reflections on theology, ethics, and the church
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Wright, A. D., the Counter-Reformation: Catholic
Europe and the Non-Christian World (Aldershot,
Hants/Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005).

CH622 The Reformation in Britain


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx
Exclusions
CH624

125

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Analyse the causes and nature of the Reformation in
Britain;
(b) Evaluate the theological and ecclesiastical outcomes
of the Reformation in Britain, especially in relation
to todays variety of churchly expressions;
(c) Apply lessons learnt from the history of the
Reformation in Britain to their ministry;
(d) Interpret a variety of primary historical and
theological documents of the Reformation in Britain
in terms of both their social/political context and
their significance for today.
Content
Section A
1 The context of the Reformation in Britain.
2 Roman Catholicism to Catholicism: the English
Church during the reign of Henry VIII.
3 Protestantism: the English Church during the reign
of Edward VI.
4 Catholicism revisited: the English Church and Mary
I.
5 The Elizabethan Settlement.
6 Puritans and Recusants.
7 The Reformation in Scotland: John Knox; the rise
of the Presbyterian Movement.
Section B
The study and analysis of TWO special texts related to
the topic areas above:
8 The study and analysis of ONE of the following
texts:
Parliamentary Acts, in G.R. Elton, The Tudor
Constitution, Documents 174185.
John Jewel, An Apologie for the Church of
England.
Homilies 1,3,4,5 of The First Book of Homilies
John Knox, The Reformation in Scotland
9 The study and analysis of ONE of the following
texts:
Richard Hooker, Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity IIII
Thomas Cranmer, A Defence of the True and
Catholic Doctrine of the Sacrament.
Bibliography
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
Primary Documents
Bray, G. (ed.), Documents of the English Reformation
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1994).
Elton, G. E. (ed.), The Tudor Constitution (2nd ed.;
Cambridge: CUP, 1983).
King, J. N (ed.), Voices of the English Reformation: a
Sourcebook (Fredericksburg: University of
Pennsylvania Press, 2004).
Selections from The Work of Thomas Cranmer and
The Book of Common Prayer (1552).

MDiv Unit Outlines

126

Secondary References
Bernard, G. W., The Kings Reformation: Henry VIII
and the Re-making of the English Church (New
Haven: Yale University Press, 2005).
Brown, J., The English Puritans (Fearn, Ross-Shire:
Christian Heritage, 1998).
Dickens, A. G., The English Reformation (2nd ed.;
University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State
University, 1989).
Duffy, E., The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional
Religion in England, c1400-1580 (2nd ed.; New
Haven/London: Yale University Press, 2005).
Duffy, E., The Voices of Morebath: Reformation and
Rebellion in an English Village (New Haven and
London: Yale University Press, 2001.
Heal, F., Reformation in Britain and Ireland (Oxford,
New York: OUP, 2003).
Jones, N., The English Reformation: Religion and
Cultural Adaptation (Oxford: Blackwell, 2002).
Kellar, C., Scotland, England & the Reformation
1534-61 (Oxford: Clarendon, 2003).
MacCulloch, D., Thomas Cranmer (Yale: Yale
University, 1996).
Marshall, P. (ed.), The Impact of the English
Reformation, 1500-1640 (London; New York: St
Martins, 1997).
Marshall, P. and A. Ryrie (eds), The Beginnings of
English Protestantism (Cambridge: CUP, 2002).
Mason, R. A. (ed.), John Knox and the British
Reformations (Aldershot, Brookfield, VT:
Ashgate, 1998).
Newton, D., Papists, Protestants and Puritans, 15501714 (Cambridge: CUP, 1998).
Rosman, D. M., The Evolution of the English
Churches, 1500-2000 (New York: CUP, 2003).
Tyack, N. (ed.), Englands Long Reformation, 15001800. (London; Bristol, PA: UCL, 1998).
Wooding, L. E. C., Rethinking Catholicism in
Reformation England (Oxford; New York:
Clarendon; OUP, 2000).

CH624 The Reformation in Europe & Britain


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx
Exclusions
CH621 and CH622.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Analyse the causes and nature of the Reformation in
Europe and Britain;
(b) Evaluate the theological and ecclesiastical outcomes
of the Reformation in Europe and Britain, especially
in relation to todays variety of churchly
expressions;

(c) Apply lessons learnt from the history of the


Reformation in Europe and Britain to their ministry;
(d) Interpret a variety of primary historical and
theological documents of the Reformation in Europe
and Britain in terms of both their social/political
context and their significance for today.
Content
Section A: The Reformation in its Historical
Contexts
The study of at least five of the following topics:
1 The Medieval and Renaissance background.
2 Martin Luther and the German Reformation
3 Huldrych Zwingli; the Anabaptists
4 John Calvin and the Reformation in Geneva
5 The English Church under Henry VIII, Edward VI
and Mary I
6 The Elizabethan Settlement; Cranmer; Puritanism;
Hooker
7 The Catholic Reformation: Council of Trent and the
Jesuits
8 The Reformation in Scotland
Section B: The Reformation Primary Sources
9 The study and analysis of TWO of the following
texts:
Luther, Three Treatises of 1520
Zwingli, Of the Clarity and Certainty of the Word of
God
Hubmaier, On Free Will
Calvin, Ecclesiastical Ordinances, Institutes (part of
Book IV)
Elton, The Tudor Constitution (document numbers
174-185; 190-209)
The First Book of Homilies (Homilies 1, 3, 4, 5)
Bibliography
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
General
Hillerbrand, H. J. (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of
the Reformation (New York: OUP, 1996).
MacCulloch, D., Reformation: Europes House
Divided, 1490-1700 (London: Penguin, 2003).
Europe
Primary Documents
Dixon, C. S. (ed.), The German Reformation: The
Essential Readings (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999).
Lindberg, C., The European Reformations Sourcebook
(Oxford: Blackwell, 2000).
McNeill, J. T. (ed.), Calvin: Institutes of the Christian
Religion (2 Vols; London: SCM, 1961).
Selections from works of Luther, Zwingli, Bullinger in
Library of Christian Classics.
Secondary References
Cottret, B., Calvin: A Biography (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
Dixon, C. S., The Reformation in Germany (Oxford:
Blackwell, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Evans, G. R., John Wyclif: Myth and Reality (Oxford:


Lion, 2005).
Gabler, U., Huldrych Zwingli: His Life and Work
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1986).
Hillerbrand, H. J., The Division of Christendom:
Christianity in the Sixteenth Century (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 2007).
Jenkins, A. K., Biblical Scholarship and the Church: A
Sixteenth-Century Crisis of Authority (Aldershot,
Hants: Ashgate, 2007).
Mullett, M., The Catholic Reformation (New York:
Routledge, 1999).
Nohl, F., Luther: Biography of a Reformer (St Louis,
MO: Concordia, 2003).
Pearse, M., The Great Restoration: The Religious
Radicals of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth
Centuries (Carlisle: Paternoster, 1998).
Reymond, R. L., John Calvin: His life and Influence
(Fearn: Christian Focus, 2004).
Wright, A. D., The Counter-Reformation: Catholic
Europe and the Non-Christian World (Aldershot,
Hants/Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005).
Britain
Primary Documents
Bray, G. (ed.), Documents of the English Reformation
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1994).
Elton, G. E. (ed.), The Tudor Constitution (2nd ed.;
Cambridge: CUP, 1983).
King, J. N (ed.), Voices of the English Reformation: a
Sourcebook (Fredericksburg: University of
Pennsylvania Press, 2004).
Secondary References
Bernard, G. W., The Kings Reformation: Henry VIII
and the Re-making of the English Church (New
Haven: Yale University Press, 2005).
Dickens, A. G., The English Reformation (2nd ed.;
University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State
University, 1989).
Duffy, E., The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional
Religion in England, c1400-1580 (2nd ed.; New
Haven/London: Yale University Press, 2005).
Duffy, E., The Voices of Morebath: Reformation and
Rebellion in an English Village (New
Haven/London: Yale University Press, 2001).
Jones, N. L., The English Reformation: Religion and
Cultural Adaptation (Oxford: Blackwell, 2002).
Kellar, C., Scotland, England & the Reformation
1534-61 (Oxford: Clarendon, 2003).
MacCulloch, D., Thomas Cranmer (Yale: Yale
University, 1996).
Newton, D., Papists, Protestants and Puritans, 15501714 (Cambridge: CUP, 1998).

CH625 History of Evangelical Christianity


Status
Elective

127

Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) Analyse the development of the evangelical
movement in the aftermath of the 16th century
reformations within the context of Christianity of
the last two millennia;
(b) Identify and analyse the interactions between
social, economic and intellectual forces and
evangelical faith;
(c) Express evangelical Christianity in its own social
and theological context;
(d) Interpret a variety of historical theological
documents in terms of their intellectual and
ecclesiastical contexts, in the development of
historiographical skills.
Content
Section A: The Evangelical Movement in its
Historical Contexts
1 Beyond the Reformation: Puritanism, Pietism and
Jansenism
2 The Enlightenment: friend or foe to the
evangelical movement?
3 The Wesleys, Whitefield, and the rise of
Methodism
4 Settler societies and the Great Awakenings in the
USA
5 Civil War, revivalism, and the end of the
American Evangelical consensus
6 The Oxford Movement, the Evangelical Party and
the Clapham Sect
7 The impact of biblical criticism (science,
liberalism, neo-Orthodoxy and fundamentalism)
8 The Australian colonies and evangelical ministry
9 Evangelicalism and ecumenism, world missions,
and totalitarianism
10 English Evangelicalism in the 20th century
11 Australian Evangelicalism in the 20th century
12 Pressure points in Evangelicalism today: eg.,
ecclesiology,
millennial
expectations,
pentecostalism and postmodernity
Section B: The Evangelical Movement Primary
Sources
Study of NOT LESS THAN TWO of the following
documents:
Dietrich Bonhoeffer, The cost of discipleship.
William Carey, An Enquiry into the Obligations of
Christians to use Means for the Conversion of the
Heathens.
Jonathan Edwards, Treatise of the Religious Affections
(selections).
John Dunmore Lang, The question of questions 1841.
The Lausanne Covenant (1974).
J. Gresham Machen, Christianity and Liberalism.
James Packer, Fundamentalism and the Word of God.
John Stott, A plea for evangelical unity.
John Stott, The Cross of Christ.
John Wesley, 44 Sermons (selections).
Charles Simeon, Preface to Horae Homileticae

128

MDiv Unit Outlines

William Wilberforce, A Practical View of the


Prevailing Religious System (Selections)
Mark Noll (ed.), The Princenton Theology 1812-1921
(Selections)
Charles Spurgeon, Lectures to my students (Selections)
Charles Finney, Lectures on revivals (Selections)
Bibliography
As well as the works listed in General Recommended
Readings, the following provide more detailed
treatments of sections of this unit.
Bebbington, D., Evangelicalism in Modern Britain: a
History From the 1730s to the 1980s (London:
Unwin Hyman, 1989).
Dudley-Smith, T., John Stott: the Making of a Leader
(Leicester: IVP, 1999).
Harding, A., The Countess of Huntingdons
Connexion: a Sect in Eighteenth-Century England
(Oxford: OUP, 2003).
Kimbrough, S. T. Jr (ed.), Orthodoxy and Wesleyan
Spirituality (Crestmead, NY: St. Vladimirs
Seminary Press, 2002).
Marsden, G. M., Fundamentalism and American
Culture: the Shaping of 20th century
Evangelicalism (Oxford: OUP, 1980).
Marsden, G. M., Jonathan Edwards: A Life (New
Haven: Yale University, 2003).
Murray, I. H., Evangelicalism Divided, A Record of
Crucial Change in the Years 1950 to 2000
(Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 2000).
Noll, M. A., A History of Christianity in the United
States and Canada (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Noll, M. A., The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind
(Grand Rapids, Mi.: Eerdmans, 1994).
Noll, M. A. and R. F. Thiemann (eds), Where Shall My
Wond'ring Soul Begin? The Landscape of
Evangelical Piety and Thought (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
Piggin, S., Evangelical Christianity in Australia:
Spirit, Word and World (Melbourne, Oxford:
OUP, 1996). Second edition is entitled: Spirit of a
Nation: The Story of Australias Christian
Heritage (Sydney: Strand, 2003).
Piggin, S., Firestorm of the Lord: the History of and
Prospects for Revival in the Church and the
World (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2000).
Rack, H. D., Reasonable Enthusiast: John Wesley and
the Rise of Methodism (3rd ed.; London: Epworth,
2002).
Ramm, B., The Evangelical Heritage: a Study in
Historical Theology (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1981,
2000).
Randall, I. M., Evangelical Experiences: a Study of the
Spirituality of English Evangelicalism 1918-1939
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 1999).
Treloar, G. R. and R. D. Linder (eds), Making History
for God: Essays on Evangelicalism, Revival and
Mission in Honour of Stuart Piggin (Sydney:
Robert Menzies College, 2004).
Ward, W. R., The Protestant Evangelical Awakening
(Cambridge: CUP, 1992).

CH645 Reformation History in Context


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps CH5xx
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to spend a significant period
of time in one or more of the lands associated with
a key period of Church History, such as the
English and/or European Reformations of the 16th
century
(b) To assist candidates gain an appreciation of
geographical, political, social and linguistic
perspectives relating to the period visited
(c) To help candidates appreciate the built
environment as a means of understanding
theological and ecclesiastical worldviews
Content
This unit is available to candidates who spend a period of
time in one or more of the lands associated with the
Reformation. The criteria for eligibility for credit for the
unit shall be:
1 A minimum of 80 hours work, including lectures,
seminars and field trips in an integrated programme
conducted by a person or teaching body endorsed by
the candidates approved institution.
2 Assessment should include a substantial project
(including captioned diagrams and/or photographs)
relating to an understanding of the historical
background to the site(s) visited by the candidate as
part of the documentary evidence for it.
3 Study and review of a number of books on the
period relevant to the site(s) visited to be
completed before the tour commences.
Bibliography
Collinson, P., The Reformation. Universal History.
(London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 2003).
Estep, W. R., The Anabaptist Story: An Introduction to
Sixteenth-Century Anabaptism. (3rd ed. Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Gbler, U., Huldrych Zwingli: His Life and Work.
(Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1986).
Lindberg, C., The European Reformations. (Oxford:
Blackwell, 1996).
MacCulloch, D., Reformation: Europe's House
Divided 1490-1700. (London: Penguin, 2004).
McGrath, A. E., A Life of John Calvin: A Study in the
Shaping of Western Culture. (Oxford: Blackwell,
1990).
Moeller, B. Imperial Cities and the Reformation:
Three Essays. (Durham: Labyrinth Press, 1982).
Oberman, H. A., Luther: Man between God and the
Devil. (New York, NY: Doubleday, 1992).
Rupp, G., Luther's Progress to the Diet of Worms.
(New York: Harper & Row, 1964).
Scribner, R. W., The German Reformation. Studies in
European History. (Basingstoke: Macmillan,
1986).

MDiv Unit Outlines

CH689 Church History Seminar


Status
Elective

Pre-requisites
To be determined on a seminar-by-seminar basis,
linked to content and focus
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, candidates should be able to:
(a) study in depth a particular historical theme or topic;
(b) develop co-operative research skills;
(c) apply historical insights to social and pastoral issues.
Content
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but they must have staff and
library support sufficient to sustain the unit. The
lecturer concerned is to submit a proposed unit outline
along with assessment plans for approval by the
moderator for Church History.
Bibliography
Given the nature of this unit, specialised reading lists
will be generated according to the individual topic for
study.

129

(a) Framework: creation, sin, covenant, prophecy


and wisdom;
(b) Ethical themes in the Old Testament;
New Testament Ethics:
(a) Sermon on the Mount, Pauline ethics, 1 Peter,
James.
(b) Ethical themes: Kingdom and eschatology,
righteousness/justice, love command.

Section B: Philosophical Ethics


1 Introducing Ethics as a discipline: its nature and
function.
2 Types of Ethical Theories:
(a) Theories of Obligation: deontological &
teleological;
(b) Theories of Virtue: traits, character, motivation,
disposition;
(c) The relationship between obligation and virtue.
Section C: Ethical Issues
Candidates choose two of the following areas for study:
Divorce and re-marriage
Sexual morality: fidelity, adultery, homosexuality
Sexism and racism
Wealth and poverty
Cohabitation
Note
Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 40%,
30% and 30%.

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS (PE)

Bibliography

PE501 Introduction to Christian Ethics

Prescribed:
Atkinson, D. H. and D. H. Field (eds), New Dictionary
of Ethics and Pastoral Theology (Leicester: IVP,
1995).
Banner, M., Christian Ethics and Contemporary
Moral Problems (Cambridge; New York: CUP,
1999).
Colwell, J. E., Living the Christian Story (Edinburgh:
T&T Clark, 2001).
Reuschling, W. C., Reviving Evangelical Ethics : The
Promises and Pitfalls of Classic Models of
Morality (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2008).
Wright, C. J. H., Old Testament Ethics for the People
of God (Leicester: IVP, 2004).

Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to identify, explain and utilise
the framework and major themes of biblical ethics;
(b) To enable candidates to understand and appraise the
key questions, theories and tools of philosophical
ethics in order to increase skills in ethical reasoning
and decision making;
(c) To raise candidates awareness of the various
historical traditions of theological ethics and to
enable integration of biblical and philosophical
approaches;
(d) To enable candidates to appraise various approaches
to some contemporary ethical questions in the light
of the Bible, various historical and theological
approaches and the contemporary context.
Content
Section A: Biblical Ethics
1 Using the Bible in Ethics:
(a) Methodological issues raised in moving from
the Bible to modern ethical issues.
(b) A brief survey of how the Bible has been used
in ethics.
2 Old Testament Ethics:

Recommended:
Section A: Biblical Ethics
1. Using the Bible in Ethics
Clark, D. C. and R. V. Rakestraw (eds), Readings in
Christian Ethics 2 Vols. (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1994).
Cosgrove, C. H., Appealing to Scripture in Moral
Debate (Grand Radpis: Eerdmans, 2002).
Fedler, K. D., Exploring Christian Ethic: Biblical
Foundations
for
Morality.
(Louisville:
Westminster John Knox Press, 2006).

130

MDiv Unit Outlines

Hill, M., The How and Why of Love: An Introduction


to Evangelical Ethics (Kingsford: Matthias Media,
2002).
Rogerson, J. W., Davies M. and Carroll M. Daniel R.
(ed), The Bible in Ethics (Sheffield: Academic
Press, 1995).
Siker, J. S., Scripture and Ethics: Twentieth Century
Portraits (New York: OUP, 1997).
2. Old Testament Ethics
Barton, J., Understanding Old Testament Ethics
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press 2003).
Middleton, J. R., The Liberating Image: the imago dei
in Genesis 1 (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2005).
Sloane, A., At Home in a Strange Land: Using the Old
Testament in Christian Ethics (Peabody:
Hendrickson, 2008).
Wenham, G. J., Story as Torah (Edinburgh T&T
Clark, 2000).
3. New Testament Ethics
Burridge, R. A., Imitating Jesus: An Inclusive
Approach to New Testament Ethics (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007).
Hayes, R. B., Moral Vision of the New Testament (San
Fransisco; HarperSanFransisco, 1996).
Lohse, E., Theological Ethics in the New Testament
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991).
Longenecker, R. N., New Testament Social Ethics for
Today (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1984).
Matera, F. J., New Testament Ethics (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 1996).
Stassen G. H. and D. P. Gushee, Kingdom Ethic:
Following Jesus in Contemporary Context
(Downers Grove ; IVP, 2002).
Strickland, W.G. (ed.), The Law, the Gospel and the
Modern Christian: Five Views (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1993).
Verhey, A., The Great Reversal: Ethics and the New
Testament (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1984).
Section B: Philosophical Ethics
Layman, S. C., Shape of the Good (Notre Dame, IN:
University of Notre Dame, 1994).
Messer, N., SCM Studyguide to Christian Ethics
(London: SCM, 2006).
Rachels J. and S. Rachels, The Elements of Moral
Philosophy, (Columbus: McGraw-Hill Co., 6th ed.
2009).
Reuschling, W. C., Reviving Evangelical Ethics: The
Promises and Pitfalls of Classic Models of
Morality (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2008).
Vardy, P. and P. Grosch, The Puzzle of Ethics
(London: HarperCollins, 1999).
Section C: Issues
Marriage, cohabitation, divorce and re-marriage
Forster, G., Cohabitation and Marriage: A Pastoral
Response (London: Marshall Pickering, 1994).
Instone-Brewer, D., Divorce and Remarriage in the
Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Instone-Brewer, D., Divorce and Remarriage in the
Church (Carlisle; Paternoster, 2003).

Sexual morality: fidelity, adultery, homosexuality


Balswick, J. K. and J. O. Balswick, Authentic Human
Sexuality: An Integrated Christian Approach
(Downers Grove: IVP, 1999).
Cahill, L. S., Sex, Gender, and Christian Ethics. (New
York: Cambridge University Press, 1996).
Court, J. H., Pornography: A Christian Critique
(Downers Grove /Exeter: IVP /Paternoster Press,
1980).
Gaddy, C. W., Adultery and Grace - Tthe Ultimate
Scandal (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Grenz, S. J., Sexual Ethics: An Evangelical
Perspective (Louisville: WJK, 1997).
Isherwood, L. (ed.), The Good News of the Body:
Sexual Theology and Feminism. (New York: New
York University Press, 2000).
Kstenberger A. J., God, Marriage and Family:
Rebuilding the Biblical Foundation (Wheaton:
Crossway Books, 2004).
Preece, G., Sex and the City of God: a narrative
theology of sexuality in the context of creation,
fall and redemption Zadok Paper S125 Winter
2003.
Smith, A., C. Rissel, J. A. Grulich and R. de Visser,
Australian Study of Health and Relationships
(2003) http://www.latrobe.edu.au/ashr/
Via, D. O., and R. A. J. Gagnon, Homosexuality and
the Bible: Two Views (Minneapolis: Augsburg
Fortress, 2003).
Webb, B. G. (ed.), Theological and Pastoral
Responses to Homosexuality Explorations 6
(Adelaide: Openbook, 1994).
Sexism and racism
Cronin, K., Rights and Christian Ethics (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1992).
Hays, J. D., From Every People And Nation: A
Biblical Theology Of Race (Leicester/ Downers
Grove,: Apollos/ IVP, 2003).
Montgomery, J. W., Human Rights and Human
Dignity (Grand Rapids: Zondervan/Probe, 1986).
Wealth and poverty
Cavanaugh, W. T., The Myth of Globalization as
Catholicity pp. 97-121 in W. T. Cavanaugh
Theopolitical Imagination: Christian Practices of
Space and Time. (Edinburgh and New York: T &
T Clark, 2002).
Childs, J. M., Greed: Economics and Ethics in
Conflict. (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2000).
Claar, V. V., and R. J. Klay, Economics in Christian
Perspective: Theory, Policy and Life Choices.
(Downers Grove: IVP; 2007).
Hay, D. A., Economics Today: A Christian Critique.
(Vancouver: Regent College, 2004).
Long, D. S., N. R. Fox and T. York, Calculated
Futures: Theology, Ethics, and Economics.
(Waco: Baylor, 2007).
Ray, D. K., (ed.) Theology that Matters: Ecology,
Economy, and God. (Minneapolis: Fortress,
2006).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Schweiker, W., and C. T. Mathewes (eds), Having:


Property and Possession in Religious and Social
Life (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Sider, R. J., and S. Mott, Economic Justice: A
Biblical Paradigm pp. 180-204 in S. B. Rae &.
K. L Wong (eds), Beyond Integrity: A JudeoChristian Approach to Business Ethics (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2004).
Stapleford, J. E., Bulls, Bears & Golden Calves:
Applying Christian Ethics in Economics (Downers
Grove: IVP; 2002).
Van Til, K. A., Less Than Two Dollars a Day: A
Christian View of World Poverty and the Free
Market (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans; 2007).
Classics:
Birch B. C. and L. L. Rasmussen, Bible and Ethics in
the Christian Life (Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1976).
Bonhoeffer, D., Ethics (New York: Macmillan, 1965).
Finnis, J., Natural Law and Natural Rights. (Oxford:
Clarendon Press, 1980).
Hauervas, S., On Keeping Theological Ethics
Theological (1983) pp51-74 in S. Hauerwas, J.
Berkman, M. G. Cartwright The Hauerwas reader
(Durham: Duke University Press: 2001).
Meilaender, G. C., Faith and Faithfulness: Basic
Themes in Christian Ethics. (Notre Dame:
University of Notre Dame Press, 1991).
Meilaender, G. C., The Theory and Practice of Virtue
(Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press,
1984).
Mitchell, B., Law, Morality, and Religion in a Secular
Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970).
Niebuhr, R., The Nature and Destiny of Man: I.
Human Nature (New York: Charles Scribners
Sons, 1941).
ODonovan, O., Resurrection and Moral Order
(Leicester: IVP, 2nd edition. 1986).
Ramsey, P., Basic Christian Ethics (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 1950).
Yoder, J. H., The Politics of Jesus (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1972).

PE510 Christian Worldview


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to develop (i) an
understanding of worldviews in general (ii) the
ability to assess specific views in particular, and
(iii) skills in explaining and justifying a Christian
worldview;
(b) To equip candidates to critically assess the
implications of a Christian worldview as applied
to a variety of areas relevant to Christian ministry
and life;
(c) To provide candidates the opportunity to apply in
detail a Christian worldview to one particular area
of study.

131

Content
Section A: What is a worldview?
The functions of worldviews in human thought and
action, how a world view is formed and how it is
changed or transformed, non-Christian worldviews, a
review of the history of reflection on worldviews.
Reflection on issues involved in the development of a
Christian worldview from Scripture, including the
place of Christian scholarship.
Section B
The description of a Christian worldview, with
consideration of the possible variety among Christian
worldviews and the similarity and differences of
theology and worldview, and the general principles
underlying its application to Christian life and
ministry. A brief review of the history of reflection on
worldviews.
Section C
Reflection on the expression of a Christian worldview
in the Christian life and in various vocations and
disciplines.
Application of a Christian worldview to at least three
of the following:
(i) history, (ii) science, (iii) the study of human
culture, (iv) literature and the arts, (v) education, (vi)
apologetics, (vii) cross cultural ministry, (vii)
economics, (viii) politics, (ix) law, (x) health, (xi)
recreation, (xii) technology, and (xiii) media and/or
communication.
One of the topics in Section C (or another not covered
in the list above and approved by the lecturer) should
be the subject of a self-study unit for each student, and
this unit should form a significant part of the
assessment.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Hiebert, P. G., Transforming Worldviews: An
Anthropological Understanding of How People
Change (Baker Academic, 2008).
Naugle, D. K., Worldview: The History of a Concept
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Sire, J., Naming the Elephant: Worldview as a
Concept (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Recommended:
On worldview
Dockery, D., Shaping a Christian Worldview (Nashville:
Broadman & Holman, 2002).
Eckman, J. P., The Truth About Worldviews: A Biblical
Understanding
of
Worldview
Alternatives
(Wheaton: Crossway, 2004).
Holmes, A. F., Contours of a World View (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans; 1983).

132

MDiv Unit Outlines

Meade, D. R. Unlocking Worldview as the Means of


Empowering Evangelistic Evangelical Missions
Quarterly, 43/ 4 Oct 2007, 476-482
Padgett, A. G., The Relationship between Theology and
Philosophy: Constructing a Christian Worldview
pp25-44 in J. Beilby (ed) For Faith and Clarity
(Grand Rapids : Baker Academic, 2006).
Palmer, M. D. (ed), Elements of a Christian Worldview
(Springfield: Logion, 1998).
Sire, J., The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview
Catalog (Downers Grove: IVP, 4th ed 2004).
Tarnas, R., The Passion of the Western Mind (London:
Pimlico, 1996).
Wolters, A. M., Creation Regained (Downers Grove:
IVP, 2nd Ed 2005).
Topics
Banks R. and B. M. Ledbetter, Reviewing Leadership A
Christian Evaluation of Current Approaches (Grand
Rapids: Baker Academic, 2004).
Begbie, J. S., Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in
the World of Music (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic, 2007) .|
Bouma-Prediger, S., For the Beauty of the Earth: A
Christian Vision for Creation Care (Grand Rapids:
Baker Academic 2001).
Cavanaugh,W. T., Being Consumed: Economics and
Christian Desire (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008).
Claar, V. V. and R. Klay, Economics in Christian
Perspective: Theory, Policy, and Life Choices
(Downer Grove: IVP, 2007).
Deane-Drummond, C. E., Biology and Theology
(London: SCM, 2001).
Detweiler, C., A Matrix of Meanings, Finding God in
Pop Culture (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic
2003).
Dyrness, W.A., Visual Faith: Art, Theology, and
Worship in Dialogue (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic, 2001).
Halteman, J., The Clashing Worlds of Economics and
Faith (Scottdale: Herald, 1995).
Johnson, T. E. and D. Savidge, Performing the Sacred,
Theology and Theatre in Dialogue (Grand Rapids :
Baker Academic, 2009).
Johnston, R. K., Reel Spirituality: Theology and Film in
Dialogue, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic,
2006).
McConnell, M. W. et al, Christian Perspectives on Legal
Thought (New Haven: Yale University, 2001).
McGrath, A. E., The Foundations of Dialogue in Science
and Religion (London: Blackwell, 1996).
McIlroy, D., A Biblical View of Law and Justice
(Waynesboro: Paternoster, 2004).
Perks, S., Christian Philosophy of Education Explained
(Moscow: Canon, 1992).
Stahl, W. A., God and the Chip: Religion and the
Culture of Technology (Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier
University, 1999).
Staub, D., The Culturally Savvy Christian: A Manifesto
for Deepening Faith and Enriching Popular Culture
in an age of Christianity Lite (San Francisco; John
Wiley & Sons, 2007).

Veith, G., State of the Arts: From Bezalel to


Mapplethorpe (Wheaton: Crossway, 1991).
Vroom, H. M., A Spectrum of Worldviews: An
Introduction to Philosophy of Religion in a
Pluralistic World, M. Greidanus & A. Greidanus
(trans) (Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2006).
Warren, M., Seeing Through the Media: A Religious
View of Communications and the Media
(Harrisburg, PA: TPI, 1997)
Wells, R. (ed.), History and The Christian Historian
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998)
Classics:
Bratt, J. D., Abraham Kuyper: A Centennial Reader
(Eerdmans/Paternoster, 1998).
Dooyeweerd, H., A new Critique of Theoretical Thought
2 Vol. David H. Freeman, William S. Young and H.
de Jongste (trans) (Ontario: Paideia, 2nd English ed.
1984).
Hasker, W., Metaphysics: Constructing a Worldview
(Downers Grove: IVP, 1983)
Hoffecker W. A. and G. S. Smith (eds), Building a
Christian Worldview (2 Vols; Phillipsburg: P&R,
1986, 1988).
Jordan, J., Through New Eyes: Developing a Biblical
View of the World (Brentwood: Wolgemuth &
Hyatt, 1988).
Kuyper, A., Lectures on Calvinism (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1931).
Moreland, J. P. and W. L. Craig, Philosophical
Foundations for a Christian Worldview (Downers
Grove: IVP, 2003).
Orr, J., The Christian View of God and the World: As
Centring in the Incarnation (Edinburgh: Andrew
Elliott, 1892).
Ruegsegger, R. W. (ed.) Reflections on Francis
Schaeffer (Grand Rapids: Academic, 1986).
Schaeffer, F. The Complete Works of Francis Schaeffer 5
vols (Westchester: Crossway, 1982).
Walsh, B. J., and R. J. Middleton, The Transforming
Vision (Downers Grove: IVP, 1984).

PE602 Theological Ethics


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH
Co-requisites
If PE501 has not been taken as a prerequisite the
lecturer should deal with the issue of hermeneutics and
the use of the Bible in Christian Ethics.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to develop their own
theological foundations for the task of ethics and to
be able to critically assess alternative approaches;

MDiv Unit Outlines

(b) To equip candidates to explore and critically assess


the connections between theological and
philosophical ethics;
(c) To provide candidates with the skills to assess the
key issues and the theological and philosophical
aspects of some contemporary ethical questions.
Content
Section A: Theological Ethics
1 A Theological Outline for Christian Ethics.
(a) The relationship between biblical, historical
and systematic theology and ethics;
(b) Theological foundations for Christian ethics:
revelation, Trinity, character of God, command
of God, action of God.
2 An Outline of Christian Ethics
(a) Ethical virtues, principles and values drawn
from the Bible and theology;
(b) Developing a theory of ethics incorporating the
following elements: Christian character,
principles,
world-view
and
contextual
significance.
Section B: Philosophical Ethics
3 Major themes in philosophical ethics; religion and
ethics, objectivism and subjectivism, divine
command theory, moral knowledge (its basis and
nature), the is/ought controversy, value theory, the
place and freedom of the will.
4 Continuities and discontinuities between theological
and philosophical ethics.
Section C: Ethical Issues
5 Candidates choose two of the following topics for
study, with special reference to the dialogue
between philosophical and theological ethics:
Abortion and Euthanasia
Bio-ethicsgenetic engineering, IVF, surrogacy.
Work and Leisure
Note
Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 40%,
30% and 30%.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Meilaender, G. and W. Werpehowski (eds), The Oxford
Handbook of Theological Ethics (Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2005).
ODonovan, O., Resurrection and Moral Order
(Leicester/Grand
Rapids:
Apollos/Eerdmans,
1994).
Reuschling, W. C., Reviving Evangelical Ethics: The
Promises and Pitfalls of Classic Models of Morality
(Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2008).
Section A: Theological Ethics
Banner M. C. and A. J. Torrance, The Doctrine of God
and Theological Ethics (London and New York:
T&T Clark, 2006).

133

Brawley, R. (ed.), Character Ethics and the New


Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2007).
Brock, B., Singing the ethos of God (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2007).
Brown, W. P., The Ten Commandments: The
Reciprocity of Faithfulness. (Louisville: John Knox
Press, 2004).
Burridge, R. A., Imitating Jesus: An Inclusive Approach
to New Testament Ethics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2007).
C. Bartholomew, J. Chaplin, R. Song and A.Wolters
(eds), A Royal Priesthood? : The Use of the Bible
Ethically and Politically : A Dialogue with Oliver
O'Donovan (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2002).
Carroll, R., M. Daniel and J. E. Lapsley (eds),
Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral
Dimensions of Scripture (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2007).
Carson T. L. and P. K. Moser (eds), Morality and the
good life (New York: Oxford University Press,
1997).
Chiba, S., G. Hunsberger and J. Ruiz, Christian Ethics
in Ecumenical Context (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1995).
Colwell, J. E., Living the Christian Story (Edinburgh:
T&T Clark, 2001).
Cosgrove, C. H., Appealing to Scripture in Moral
Debate (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Dutney, A., Playing God: Ethics and Faith (Sydney:
HarperCollins, 2001).
Grabill, S. J., Rediscovering the Natural Law in
Reformed Theological Ethics (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2006).
Grenz, S., The Moral Quest, (Downers Grove: IVP,
1997).
Hauerwas, S., Christians Among the Virtues:
Theological Conversations with Ancient and
Modern Ethics (Notre Dame: University of Notre
Dame, 1997).
Hill, M., Biblical Theology and Ethics pp91-109 in
R.J. Gibson (ed) Interpreting God's plan (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1998).
Hogan, L. (ed.), Applied Ethics in a World Church
(Maryknoll: Orbis, 2008).
Keeling, M., The Mandate of Heaven: The Divine
Command and the Natural Order (Edinburgh: T &
T Clark, 1995).
McDonald, J., Christian Values: Theory and Practice in
Christian Ethics Today (Edinburgh: T & T Clark,
1995).
Meilaender, G. C., The Theory and Practice of Virtue
(Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press,
1984).
Meilander, G., Faith and Faithfulness (Notre Dame:
University of Notre Dame, 1991).
Mouw, R., The God Who Commands (Notre Dame:
University of Notre Dame, 1990).
Murphy, N., et al, Virtues & Practices in the Christian
Tradition (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame,
2003).
Ogletree, T. W., The Use of the Bible in Christian
Ethics (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1984).

134

MDiv Unit Outlines

Rogerson, J. W., M. Davies and M. D. Carroll Rodas


(ed.) The Bible in Ethics (Sheffiled: Sheffield
Academic Press, 1995).
S. Hauerwas and S. Wells (eds), The Blackwell
Companion to Christian Ethics (Oxford: Blackwell,
2004).
Siker, J. S., Scripture and Ethics: Twentieth-century
Portraits (New York: Oxford University Press,
1997).
Tdt, H. E., Authentic Faith (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2007).
Wells, S., God's Companions: Reimagining Christian
Ethics (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006).
Wogaman, P., Christian Ethics: A Historical
Introduction (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
1993).
Section B: Philosophical Ethics
Darwall, S. (ed.), Consequentialism (Oxford: Blackwell,
2003).
Darwall, S. (ed.), Deontology (Oxford: Blackwell,
2003).
Darwall, S. (ed), Virtue ethics (Oxford: Blackwell,
2003).
Gascoigne, R., Freedom and Purpose (Sydney: EJ
Dwyer, 1993).
Gula, R. M., Reason Informed by Faith (New York:
Paulist, 1997).
Kenny, A., A New History of Western Philosophy 4 vols
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
MacIntyre, A., Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry
(Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame,
1990).
Porter, J., Natural and Divine Law (Ottawa: Novalis,
1999).
Preston, N., Understanding Ethics (Annadale:
Federation Press, 2nd ed. 2001).
Rachels J. and S. Rachels, The Elements of Moral
Philosophy, (Columbus: McGraw-Hill Companies,
6th ed. 2009).
Section C: Ethical Issues
Abortion and Euthanasia
Beckwith, F. J., Abortion and the Sanctity of Human
Life (Joplin, MO: College, 2000).
Dyck, A., Lifes Worth: The Case Against Assisted
Suicide (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Gill, R., Health Care and Christian Ethics (Cambridge:
Cambridge Univ Pr, 2006).
Gula, R. M., Euthanasia: Moral and Pastoral
Perspectives (New York: Paulist, 1994).
Johnston, G. F. (ed.), Abortion from the Religious and
Moral Perspective: An Annotated Bibliography
(Westport and London: Greenwood, 2003).
Nichols, A., Life and Death Decisions (Melbourne:
Acorn, 1997).
Preece, G. R. (ed.), Rethinking Peter Singer: A
Christian Critique (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
2002).
Webb, B. G. (ed.), The Ethics of Life and Death
(Sydney: Lancer, 1990).

Bio-ethicsgenetic engineering, IVF, surrogacy


Beauchamp, T. L. and J. F. Childress, Principles of
Biomedical Ethics (New York: Oxford University
Press, 5th ed. 2001).
Engelhardt, H. T., The Foundations of Christian
Bioethics (Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger, 2000).
Fukuyama, F., Our Posthuman Future: Consequences
of the Biotechnology Revolution (New York:
Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2002).
Gill, R., Health Care and Christian Ethics. (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press; 2006).
Hauerwas, S., Naming the Silences: God, Medicine, and
the Problem of Suffering. (New York: Continuum;
2004).
Hui, E. C., At the Beginning of Life: Dilemmas in
Theological Bioethics (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
2002).
Jeesves, M. (ed.), From Cells to Souls and Beyond:
Changing Portraits of Human Nature (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Jonsen, A. R., R. M. Veatch and L. Walters (eds),
Source Book in Bioethics: A Documentary History
(Washington: Georgetown University Press, 2000).
Kilner, J. F. et al. (eds), The Reproduction Revolution:
A Christian Appraisal of Sexuality, Reproductive
Technologies and the Family. (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000)
Mappes, T. and D. Degrazia, Biomedical Ethics
(Boston: McGraw Hill, 5thed. 2001)
Meilaender, G., Bioethics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
Rev. ed. 2005).
Messer, N. (ed.), Theological Issues in Bioethics: An
Introduction with Readings (London: Darton,
Longman & Todd, 2002).
Miller, R., B. Brubaker, and J. Peterson, Viewing New
Creations with Anabaptist Eyes: Ethics of
Biotechnology (Telford: Cascadia, 2005).
Peters, T., The Stem Cell Debate (Minneapolis: Fortress
Pr, 2007).
Peterson, J. C., Genetic Turning Points: The Ethics of
Human Genetic Intervention (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2001).
Rae, S. and P. M. Cox, Bioethics: A Christian Approach
in a Pluralistic Age (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
1999).
Sherlock, R. and J. Morrey (eds), Ethical Issues in
Biotechnology (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield,
2002).
Shuman, J. and B. Bolck, Reclaiming the Body:
Christians and the Faithful Use of Modern
Medicine. (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2006).
Verhey, A. (ed.), Reading the Bible in the Strange
World of Medicine. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans;
2003)
Waters, B. and R. Cole-Turner (eds), God and the
Embryo: Religious Voices on Stem Cells and
Coning (Washington, DC: Georgetown University,
2003).
Work and Leisure
Cosden, D., A Theology of Work (Exeter: Paternoster,
2005).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Countryman, L. W., Dirt, Greed, and Sex: Sexual Ethics


in the New Testament and Their Implications for
Today (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2nd ed. 2007).
Heintzman, P. et al, Christianity and Leisure: Issues in
a Pluralistic Society (Sioux Centre, IN: Dordt
College, 1994).
Hilgert, R. L., P. H. Lochhaas and J. L. Truesdell,
Christian Ethics in the Workplace (St. Louis, MO:
Concordia, 2001).
Jensen, J., Ethical Dimensions of the Prophets
(Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2006).
Miller, D. W., God at Work: The History and Promise
of the Faith at Work Movement (Oxford: Oxford
University Press; 2007).
Stevens, R. P., Doing God's Business: Meaning and
Motivation for the Marketplace. (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans: 2006).
Via, D. O., and R. A. J. Gagnon, Homosexuality and the
Bible: Two Views (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003).
Classics:
Birch B. C. and L. L. Rasmussen, Bible and Ethics in
the Christian Life (Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1976).
Bonhoeffer, D., Ethics (New York: Macmillan, 1965).
Finnis, J., Natural Law and Natural Rights. (Oxford:
Clarendon Press, 1980).
Hauervas, S., On Keeping Theological Ethics
Theological (1983) pp51-74 in S. Hauerwas, J.
Berkman, M. G. Cartwright The Hauerwas reader
(Durham: Duke University Press: 2001).
Meilaender, G. C., Faith and Faithfulness: Basic
Themes in Christian Ethics. (Notre Dame:
University of Notre Dame Press, 1991).
Meilaender, G. C., The Theory and Practice of Virtue
(Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press,
1984).
Mitchell, B., Law, Morality, and Religion in a Secular
Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970).
Niebuhr, R., The Nature and Destiny of Man: I.
Human Nature (New York: Charles Scribners
Sons, 1941).
ODonovan, O., Resurrection and Moral Order
(Leicester: IVP, 2nd edition. 1986).
Ramsey, P., Basic Christian Ethics (Louisville:
Westminster/John Knox, 1950).
Yoder, J. H., The Politics of Jesus (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1972).

135

be able to appropriately utilise them in specific


situations;
(b) To enable candidates to understand, and be able to
compare, contrast and assess historical approaches
to social ethics and their implications today;
(c) To make students aware of historical and
contemporary approaches to methods of social
change in Christian history and be able to
appropriately observe and evaluate those found in
contemporary culture;
(d) To enable candidates to theologically and critically
assess some contemporary ethical issues.
Content
Section A: Developing a Christian Social Ethic
1 Social ethics: its nature, biblical basis and
principles; personal and social ethics.
2 Social structures and institutions: their nature;
persons and roles; responsibility and social
structures.
3 Concepts of justice; sin and society.
Section B: Historical Approaches to Social Ethics
A study and comparison of four of the following:
1 Catholic
2 Lutheran
3 Reformed
4 Anabaptist
5 Anglican
6 Evangelical
Section C: Ethical Evaluation of Alternative
Methods of Social Change.
Ethical evaluation of the following aspects of Christian
involvement in social change:
(a) Evangelism
(b) Social action
(c) Counter-culture and alternative communities
(d) Non-co-operation and civil disobedience
(e) Revolution
(f) Reform
Section D: Ethical Issues
Candidates choose two of the following topics for study:
Government and the State
War and Nuclear Arms
Business and economic ethics
Punishment (including capital punishment)
Law and Liberty
Population and Ecology.

PE603 Christian Social Ethics


Status
Elective

Note
Sections A, B, C and D are weighted approximately
25% each.

Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH

Bibliography
In addition to the set texts, and appropriate works listed
in Bibliography for PE 403 and PE 501 and PE 602:

Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to evaluate the foundations of
various approaches to Christian social ethics and to

Section A: Developing a Social Ethic


Preston, N., Understanding Ethics (3rd edition;
Annandale, NSW: Federation Press, 2007).

136

MDiv Unit Outlines

Storrar, W. F. and A. R. Morton (eds), Public


Theology for the 21st Century: Essays in Honour
of Duncan B. Forrester (London: T. & T. Clark,
2004).
Sweetman, B., Why Politics Needs Religion: The Place
of Religious Arguments in the Public Square
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2006).
Section B: Historical Approaches to Social Ethics
Niebuhr, H. R., Christ and Culture (New York:
Harper, 1951).
Niebuhr, R., The Essential Reinhold Niebuhr: Selected
Essays and Addresses (ed. R. McA. Brown; New
Haven, NY: Yale University Press, 1986).
Troeltsch, E., The Social Teaching of the Christian
Churches (2 vols; Louisville, KY: Westminster
John Knox Press, 1992 [1912]).
Wogaman, J. P. and D. M. Strong (eds), Readings in
Christian Ethics: A Historical Sourcebook
(Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press,
1996).
Section C: Ethical Evaluation of Alternative Methods
of Social Change
Niebuhr, R., Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study
in Ethics and Politics (Rev. ed.; Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 2001).
Scott, P. and W. T. Cavanaugh (eds), The Blackwell
Companion to Political Theology (Oxford, UK:
Blackwell Publishing, 2007).
Section D: Ethical Issues
Government and state
Clark, S. (ed.), Tales of Two Cities: Christianity and
Politics (Leicester, UK: IVP, 2005).
Frame, T., Church and State: Australias Imaginary
Wall (Sydney: University of NSW Press, 2006).
Mott, S. C., A Christian Perspective on Political
Thought (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press,
1993).
ODonovan, O., The Ways of Judgment (Grand
Rapids, MI: Wm B. Eerdmans, 2005).
Wogaman, J. P., Christian Perspectives on Politics
(2nd ed.; Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
2000).
War and nuclear war
ODonovan, O., The Just War Revisited (Cambridge,
UK: Cambridge University Press, 2003).
Reichberg, G. M. et al (eds), The Ethics of War:
Classic and Contemporary Readings (Oxford,
UK: Blackwell Publishing, 2006).
Business and economic ethics
Byron, W. J., The Power of Principles: Ethics for the
New Corporate Culture (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis
Books, 2006).
Grace, D. and S. Cohen, Business Ethics: Australian
Problems and Cases (2nd edn; South Melbourne,
Vic: Oxford University Press, 1998).

Punishment
Magivern, J. J., The Death Penalty: An Historical and
Theological Survey (New York: Paulist, 1997).
Sanders, A. and R. Young, Criminal Justice (3rd ed.;
Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2007).
Law and liberty
Audi, R., Religious Commitment and Secular Reason
(Cambridge, UK: Cabridge University Press,
2000).
Taylor, P. M., Freedom of Religion: UN and European
Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge
University Press, 2005).
Population and ecology
Jenkins, W., Ecologies of Grace: Environmental
Ethics and Christian Theology (Oxford, UK:
Oxford University Press, 2008).
Northcott, M. S., A Moral Climate: The Ethics of
Global Warming (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books,
2007).
Rasmussen, L. L., Earth Community, Earth Ethics
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1996).
Scott, P., A Political Theology of Nature (Cambridge,
UK: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

PE617 Church in Australian Society


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to understand the interaction
of church and Australian society and be able to
utilise conceptual tools for social analysis;
(b) To equip candidates to interpret and respond to the
dynamics of changing social patterns in
contemporary Australia and to be able to assess their
impact on the life of the church;
(c) To provide a conceptual and methodological
foundation for candidates evaluation of particular
aspects of church-society relationships in Australia.
Content
Section A: Australian History and Society
An introduction to Australian history and society,
including:
1 A brief outline of pre-European history and from
European arrival to the present day, with special
reference to the Christian churches.
2 Australian identity; images of self and national
consciousness; literature and the arts.
3 An introduction to conceptual tools for social
analysis, including basic sociological theory and
method and the sociology of religion.

MDiv Unit Outlines

Section B: Interaction of Church and Society


The impact of the following factors in society upon the
churches and the churches responses:
4 Growth, change and decline in patterns of religious
belief and behaviour; the churches and sectarianism;
pluralism.
5 Migration and its effects; multi-culturalism;
government and community organisations.
6 Power structures; politics, economics, education,
mass media, social class, minorities.
7 Family life and sex roles; typical life-cycles;
household patterns; womens movements.
8 Welfare; ethical decision-making; wowserism;
social policy concerns.
9 Work and leisure; voluntary associations; sport.
10 A research-based project on some aspect of the
empirical interaction of church and Australian
society.
Notes
(a) Sections A and B are weighted approximately 30%
and 70%;
(b) Candidates who have not undertaken a study of
Australian history (e.g. CH609) will need to
undertake some general reading apart from the
overview provided for in the unit.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Bouma, G. D., Australian Soul: Religion and
Spirituality in the Twenty-first Century
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).
Davie, G., The Sociology of Religion (Los Angeles:
SAGE, 2007).
Milbank, J., Theology and Social Theory: Beyond
Secular Reason. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1990).
Section A: Australian History and Society
Black, A. W. (ed.), Religion in Australia: Sociological
Perspectives (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1991).
Breward, I., A History of Australian Churches
(Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1993).
Carey, H. M., Believing in Australia: A Cultural
History of Religions (Sydney: Allen & Unwin,
1996).
Furze, B., Society and Change: A Sociological
Introduction
to
Contemporary
Australia
(Melbourne: Macmillan, 1994).
Gare, D., Making Australian History: Perspectives on
the Past Since 1788 (South Melbourne: Thomson
Learning Australia, 2008).
Graetz, B. and I. McAllister, Dimensions of Australian
Society (Melbourne: Macmillan, 1994).
Macintyre S., A Concise History of Australia,
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2004).
Section B: Interaction of Church and Society
Ballas, P. H. and G. D. Bouma (ed.), Religion in an
Age of Change (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1999).

137

Bentley, P. and P. J. Hughes, Australian Life and the


Christian Faith (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1998).
Bouma, G. D. (ed.), Many Religions, All Australian:
Religious Settlement, Identity and Cultural
Diversity (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1996).
Cowdell, S., Who Speaks for the Church? Anglican
Voices and Australian Public Life St Mark's
Review, no 203 N 2007, p 71-79.
Cowdell, S., God's Next Big Thing: Discovering the
Future church (Melbourne: John Garratt Pub,
2004).
Emilsen, W. W. and S. E. Emilsen (eds), The Uniting
Church in Australia: The First 25 years
(Armadale, Vic: Circa, 2003).
Fox, C., Working Australia (Sydney: Allen & Unwin,
1991).
Frame, T., Church and State: Australia's Imaginary
Wall (Sydney: UNSW Pr, 2006).
Frame, T., Anglicans in Australia (Sydney: UNSW Pr,
2007).
Frost, M. and A. Hirsch, The Shaping of Things to
Come: Innovation and Mission for the 21stCentury
Church
(Peabody/
Erina:
Hendrickson/Strand, 2003).
Harris, J., One Blood: 200 Years of Aboriginal
Encounter with Christianity: a Story of Hope
(Sydney: Albatross, 1990).
Howe, B., Weighing up Australian Values (Sydney:
UNSW Press, 2007).
Hughes, P. J., et al, Believe It or Not: Australian
Spirituality and the Churches in the 90s
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
1995).
Hughes, P. J., Religion in Australia: Facts and Figures
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
1997).
Kaldor, P. et al, Shaping a Future: Characteristics of
Vital Congregations (Adelaide: OpenBook, 1997).
Kaldor, P. et al, Taking Stock: A Profile of Australian
Church Attenders (Adelaide: OpenBook, 1999).
Maddox, M., For God and Country: Religious
Dynamics in Australian Federal Politics
(Canberra: Department of the Parliamentary
Library, 2001).
Maddox, M., God under Howard: The Rise of the
Religious Right in Australian Politics (Allen and
Unwin, 2005).
Manley, K., From Woolloomooloo to "Eternity": A
History of Australian Baptists (Milton Keynes:
Paternoster, 2006).
O'Brien A., God's Willing Workers: Women and
Religion in Australia (Sydney: UNSW Press,
2005).
Thompson, R., Religion in Australia (Melbourne:
OUP, 2nd ed. 2002).
Wilson, B., Reasons of the Heart: A Vision for the
New Millennium (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1998).

MDiv Unit Outlines

138

Section B: Interaction of Church and Society


Ballas, P. H. and G. D. Bouma (ed.), Religion in an
Age of Change (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1999).
Bouma, G. D. (ed.), Many Religions, All Australian:
Religious Settlement, Identity and Cultural
Diversity (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1996).
Bentley, P. and P. J. Hughes, Australian Life and the
Christian Faith (Melbourne: Christian Research
Association, 1998).
Fox, C., Working Australia (Sydney: Allen & Unwin,
1991).
Harris, J., One Blood: 200 Years of Aboriginal
Encounter with Christianity: a Story of Hope
(Sydney: Albatross, 1990).
Hughes, P. J., Religion in Australia: Facts and Figures
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
1997).
Hughes, P. J. et al, Believe It or Not: Australian
Spirituality and the Churches in the 90s
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
1995).
Hughes, P. J. and T Blomberry, Patterns of Faith in
Australian Churches, (CRA, 1990).
Kaldor, P., et al, Taking Stock: A Profile of Australian
Church Attenders (Adelaide: OpenBook, 1999).
Kaldor, P., et al, Shaping a Future: Characteristics of
Vital Congregations (Adelaide: OpenBook, 1997).
Kaldor, P., et al, Mission Under the Microscope: Keys
to Effective and Sutainable Mission, (Adelaide:
OpenBook, 1995).
Kelly, A., A New Imagining, (Collins Dove, 1990).
McKay, H., Reinventing Australia: The Mind and
Mood of Australia in the 90s (Sydney: Angus &
Robertson, 1993).
Summers, A., Damned Whores and Gods Police (3rd
ed.; Melbourne: Penguin, 2002).
Thompson, R., Religion in Australia (2nd ed.;
Melbourne: OUP, 2002).
Wilson, B., Reasons of the Heart: A Vision for the
New Millennium (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1998).

(d) To help candidates form a coherent Christian world


view in response to currents in Western thought;
(e) To enable candidates to develop the knowledge and
skills necessary to communicate to others essential
aspects of Christian apologetics.

Prescribed:
Campbell-Jack, C.; G. J. McGrath, C. S. Evans and S.
Carter (eds), New Dictionary of Christian
Apologetics (Leicester, Downers Grove: IVP,
2006).
Craig, W. L., Reasonable Faith: Christian Truth and
Apologetics. (Wheaton: Crossway Books 3rd ed,
2008).
Hiebert, P. G., Transforming Worldviews: An
Anthropological Understanding of How People
Change (Baker Academic, 2008).

PE620 Christian Apologetics


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to be able to understand and
evaluate apologetic systems within a Christian
framework;
(b) To assist candidates to explain and critique issues
raised by critics of Christian belief;
(c) To impart to candidates the knowledge and skills to
develop intelligent defences of the truth claims of
Christian faith;

Content
Section A: Apologetics and the Nature of Truth
1 The definition of apologetics; its relation to
theology, study of religion and mission.
2 A brief review of intellectual attacks upon Christian
faith and Christian responses, including the
Apologists, Augustine, Aquinas, the Enlightenment,
Darwinianism, secular humanism.
3 A review of Christian faith and its bearing upon
truth as discerned in history, nature and society; the
uniqueness of Christian revelation; the questions of
truth,
presuppositions
and
verification;
epistemology.
Section B: Critiques of Christian Faith
4 Historical: the reliability of the Scriptures; the
historicity of Christ and his Resurrection; the
emergence of the church.
5 Philosophical: atheism, pantheism, monism, deism,
divine providence and miracles; scientific method;
evil and suffering.
6 Behavioural: anthropological, sociological and
psychological; behaviourism; Freudianism.
Section C: Alternatives to Christian Belief
7 Non-supernatural alternatives: agnostic humanism;
atheistic existentialism; Marxism; moralism;
scientism and technocracy.
8 Supernatural alternatives: occultism; religious
relativism; syncretism; New Age movements.
Note
Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 20%,
40% and 40%.
Bibliography

Section A: Apologetics and the Nature of Truth


Alexander, D. (ed.), Can We be Sure About Anything?:
Science, Faith and Postmodernism (Leicester:
Apollos, 2005).
Chang, C., Engaging Unbelief: a Captivating Strategy
From Augustine and Aquinas (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2000).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Cowan, S. B., (ed.), Five Views on Apologetics (Grand


Rapids: Zondervan, 2000).
Dulles, A. R., A History of Apologetics (San Francisco:
Ignatius Press, 2nd ed 2005).
Edgar, W., Reasons of the Heart; Recovering
Christian Persuasion (Phillipsburg, New Jersey:
P&R Publishing Company, 2nd ed 2003).
McGrath, A., Scientific Theology Vol. II; Reality
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
Oliphint K. S. and L. G. Tipton (eds), Revelation and
Reason: New Essays in Reformed Apologetics
(Phillipsburg: Presbyterian and Reformed, 2007).
Oliphint, K. S., The Battle Belongs to the Lord: The
Power of Scripture for Defending Our Faith
(Phillipsburgh: P&R, 2003).
Sire, J. W., Why Good Arguments Often Fail: Making
a More Persuasive Case for Christ (Downers
Grove : IVP, 2006)
Stackhouse, J. G., Humble Apologetics: Defending the
Faith Today (Oxford : Oxford University Press,
2002).
Taylor, J., Introducing Apologetics: Cultivating
Christian Commitment (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic, 2006).
Section B: Critiques of the Christian Faith
Astley, J., et al, Problems in Theology: Science and
Religion (London; New York: T & T Clark,
2004).
Barnett, P., Finding the Historical Christ (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2009).
Copan, P. and Craig, W. L.,. Contending with
Christianitys Critics: Answering New Atheists &
Other Objectors (Nashville, TN: Broadman and
Holman Academic, 2009)
Demski, W. A. & J. M. Kushiner (eds), Signs of
Intelligence: Understanding Intelligent Design
(Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2001).
Falk, D. R., Coming to Peace with Science : Bridging
the Worlds Between Faith and Biology (Downers
Grove: IVP, 2004).
Hunter, C. M., Darwins God: Evolution and the
Problem of Evil (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2001).
Johnson, P., The Wedge of Truth: Splitting the
Foundations of Naturalism (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 2000).
Kaiser, W. C. Jr., The Old Testament Documents: Are
They Reliable and Relevant? (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 2001).
Keller T., The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of
Skepticism (Penguin, 2008)
McGrath A. and J. C. McGrath, The Dawkins
Delusion? Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial
of the Divine (Downers Grove: IVP, 2004).
Samples K. R., World of Difference, A: Putting
Christian Truth-Claims to the Worldview Test
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2007).
Stackhouse, J. G., Jr., Can God Be Trusted? Faith and
the Challenge of Evil (Downers Grove: IVP, 2008,
2nd ed).
van Inwagen, P., (ed.), Christian Faith and the
Problem of Evil (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).

139

Section C: Alternatives to Christian Belief


Baggini, J., Atheism: A Very Short Introduction
(Oxford: OUP, 2003).
Clifford, R. and P. Johnson, Jesus and the Gods of the
New Age : Communicating Christ in Today's
Spiritual Supermarket (Oxford: Lion Publishing,
2001).
Dickson, J., A Spectator's Guide to World Religions :
An Introduction to the Big Five (Sydney ; Blue
Bottle Books, 2004).
Glaser I., The Bible and Other Faiths, Christian
Doctrine in Global Perspective (Downers Grove:
IVP, 2004).
Green, M., But Dont All Religions Lead to God?:
Navigating the Multi-faith Maze (Leicester: IVP,
2002).
Hart, K., Postmodernism: A Beginner's Guide
(Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 2004).
Johnson, E. L. and S.L. Stanton (eds), Psychology and
Christianity (Downers Grove: IVP, 2000).
Netland H., Encountering Religious Pluralism The
Challenge to Christian Faith & Mission (Downers
Grove: IVP, 2001).
Partridge, C., The Re-enchantment of the West:
Alternative Spiritualities, Sacralization, Popular
Culture, and occulture 2 Volumes (London: T&T
Clark International, 2004, 2005).
Smart, S., A Spectator's Guide to Worldviews : Ten
Ways of Understanding Life Five (Sydney: Blue
Bottle, 2007).
Zacharias, R., Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute
Claims of the Christian Message (Nashville:
Word, 2000).
Classics:
Bush, L. R. (ed), Classical Readings in Christian
Apologetics, A.D. 100-1800. (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1983).
Lewis, C. S., Miracles : A Preliminary Study (London:
Geoffrey Bles, 1948).
Lewis, C. S., The Abolition of Man (New York:
Macmillan; 1975, 1st published 1947).
McGrath, A. E., Bridge-building: Effective Christian
Apologetics (Leicester: IVP, 1992).
Montgomery, J. W., Faith Founded On Fact: Essays
in Evidential Apologetics (Nashville and New
York: Thomas Nelson; 1978).
Newbigin, L., Truth to Tell: The Gospel as Public
Truth (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991).
Richardson, A., Christian apologetics (London:
S.C.M., 1955)
Schaeffer, F., The God Who is There: Speaking
Historic Christianity into the Twentieth Century
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Van Til, C. The Defense of the Faith (Phillipsburg:
Presbyterian and Reformed, 3rd edition 1967).

MDiv Unit Outlines

140

PE625PE628 Philosophy of Religion


Learning Outcomes
(a) To help candidates to examine the form of Christian
belief in its character, inner logic and validity in
comparison with other forms of knowledge.
(b) To encourage candidates to grapple with the
philosophical problems inherent in the Christian
faith by developing their powers of descriptive and
critical analysis;
(c) To provide candidates with tools for the exercise of
a profound ministry with clarity, confidence and
simplicity.

PE625 Philosophy of Religion


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to be able to compare,
contrast, interpret and critique a range of
philosophical approaches to religion adopted
throughout history;
(b) To equip candidates to effectively critique
different approaches to philosophical problems of
knowledge, reality and morality from a Christian
perspective;
(c) To help candidates appreciate and critique various
ways of responding to different philosophical
approaches to religion;
(d) To help candidates develop a coherent and
integrated approach to Christian faith by
developing their powers of descriptive and critical
analysis.
Content
1 A brief historical survey: Plato, Aristotle, Origen,
Augustine, Aquinas, Occam, Reformation and
Renaissance, Empiricism and Rationalism,
Idealism, Existentialism, Positivism, Marxism,
postmodernism and contemporary developments.
2 An introduction to the philosophical problems of
the nature of knowledge, reality and morality.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Brown, C., Christianity and Western Thought
(Downers Grove: IVP, 1990).
Ganssle, G. E., Thinking About God First Steps in
Philosophy (IVP, 2004).
Davies, B., An Introduction to the Philosophy of
Religion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 3rd ed.
2003).

Wilkins, S. and A. G. Padgett, Christianity and


Western Thought (Vol. II; Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 2000).
Recommended:
Audi, R., Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction
to the Theory of Knowledge (London: Routledge,
1998).
Audi, R., (ed.), The Cambridge Dictionary of
Philosophy (Cambridge University Press, 2nd ed.
1999).
Clark, S., God, Religion and Reality (London: SPCK,
1999).
Davies, B., (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and
Anthology (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2000).
Grenz, S. J., A Primer on Postmodernism (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Hill, D. J., and R. D. Rauser (eds) Christian
Philosophy A-Z (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University
Press, 2006).
Hoffecker, W. A. (ed.), Revolutions in Worldview
(P&R Publishing, 2007).
Kenny, A., A New History of Western Philosophy 4
volumes (Oxford: Oxford University, 2004-2007).
Le Poidevin, R., Arguing for Atheism: An Introduction
to the Philosophy of Religion.(London: Routledge,
1996).
Loux, M., Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction.
(London and New York: Routledge, 2006)
Mann, W. E., The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy
of Religion (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2005).
Peterson, M. L. and R. J. VanArragon (eds),
Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Religion
(Oxford: Blackwell, 2004).
Plantinga, A., Warranted Christian Belief (Oxford
University Press, 2000).
Rachels J. and S. Rachels, The Elements of Moral
Philosophy (Columbus: McGraw-Hill Companies,
6th ed. 2009).
Stiver, D., Philosophy of Religious Language
(Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1996).
Taliaferro, C., Contemporary Philosophy of Religion:
An Introduction (Malden: Blackwell, 1997).
Tarnas, R., The Passion of the Western Mind (Pimlico,
1996).
Thiselton, A. C., A Concise Encyclopedia of the
Philosophy of Religion (Oneworld, 2003).
Vardy, P. and P. Grosch, The Puzzle of Ethics
(London: HarperCollins, 1999).
Vardy, P. and J. Arliss, The Thinker's Guide to God
(Ropley, O-Books, 2003).
Wainwright, W., (ed) The Oxford Handbook of
Philosophy of Religion(Oxford: Oxford University
Press 2001).
Wood, W. J., Epistemology: Becoming Intellectually
Virtuous (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Classics:
Allen, D., Philosophy for Understanding Religion
(SCM, 1985).
Hick, J., Philosophy of Religion, Englewood (Cliffs:
Prentice-Hall, 3rd ed. 1983).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Mackie, J. L., The Miracle of Theism (Oxford: Oxford


University Press, 1982).

PE626 Issues in Philosophy of Religion


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
8cp of 500-level OT and/or NT and/or CH and/or PE
and/or TH
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to a number of issues in
philosophy of religion;
(b) To enable candidates to be able to evaluate the
significance of these for faith and to appropriately
critique them logically and theologically;
(c) To explore in some depth the ongoing
implications of these issues for Christian faith;
(d) To apply and develop pastoral, apologetic,
evangelistic and educational implications of
philosophical insights gained.
Content
1 The knowledge of God, including the idea of deity
and proofs of the existence of God.
2 The nature of religious experience; faith,
revelation and reason.
3 Religious language, analogy, metaphor, parable,
language-games, cognitive/emotive etc.
4 The nature of Gods relation to the world:
creation; providence; miracles.
5 The problem of evil and suffering; theodicy.
6 Human nature: body and soul; mind; death and
immorality.
Candidates are to study four of the six topics outlined
above. Candidates should pay particular attention to
the pastoral, apologetic, evangelistic and educational
implications of the insights gained in the specific
issues studied.
Bibliography
General works (and see Bibliography for PE425)
Davies, B., (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: a Guide and
Anthology (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2000).
Hick, J., Philosophy of Religion, (3rd ed Englewood
Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1983).
Le Poidevin, R., Arguing for Atheism: An Introduction
to the Philosophy of Religion. (London:
Routledge, 1996).
Mackie, J. L., The Miracle of Theism (Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 1982).
Mann W. E., The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of
Religion (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2005).
Peterson M. L. and VanArragon R. J. (eds),
Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Religion
(Oxford: Blackwell, 2004).

141

Sharma, A., The Philosophy of Religion: A Buddhist


Perspective (Delhi: Oxford University Press,
1997).
Stump, E., Aquinas (New York: Routledge Press,
2003).
Taliaferro, C., Contemporary Philosophy of Religion:
An Introduction (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1997).
Wainwright, W. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of
Philosophy of Religion (Oxford: Oxford
University Press 2001).
The knowledge of God, including the idea of deity
and proofs of the existence of God.
Clark, S., God, Religion and Reality (London: SPCK,
1999).
Clayton, P., The Problem of God in Modern Thought
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Collins, R., "A Scientific Argument for the Existence
of God: The Fine-Tuning Design Argument" pp.
47-75 in Michael J. Murray (ed), Reason for the
Hope Within (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1999).
Dawkins, R., The God Delusion (London : Bantam
Press, 2006).
Glynn, P., God: The Evidence; The Reconciliation of
Faith & Reason in a Postsecular World (Rocklin:
Forum, 1997).
Hunter, C. G., Darwins Proof: the Triumph of
Religion over Science (Grand Rapids: Brazos,
2002).
Kenny, A., "Knowledge, Belief, and Faith" Philosophy
82/3 (July 2007), 381397
Markham, I., Truth & the Reality of God: An Essay in
Natural Theology (Edinburgh: T & T Clark,
1998).
Markham, I., Truth & the Reality of God: an Essay in
Natural Theology (Edinburgh: T & T Clark,
1998).
McGrath, A., Scientific Theology Vol. II; Reality
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002).
McGrath, A. and J. McGrath, The Dawkins Delusion
(London: SPCK, 2007).
Pennock, R. T. (ed.), Intelligent Design Creationism
and Its Critics: Philosophical, Theological, and
Scientific Perspectives (Cambridge: MIT Press,
2001).
Plantinga, A., "The Dawkins Confusion - Naturalism
ad absurdum" Books & Culture March 2007
available at
http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2007/marapr
/1.21.html
Swinburne, R., The Existence of God (2nd ed.,
Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2004).
Swinburne, R., The Resurrection of God Incarnate
(Oxford: Clarendon Press,2003).
Swinburne, R., Was Jesus God? (Oxford University
Press, 2008).
Vardy, P., The Puzzle of God (London: Fount, 1999).
The nature of religious experience; faith, revelation
and reason.
Audi, R. and W. J. Wainwright, (ed.) Rationality,
Religious Belief, and Moral Commitment, (Ithaca:
Cornell University Press, 1987).

142

MDiv Unit Outlines

Dulles, A., Models of Revelation (Maryknoll, NY:


Orbis, 1992).
Evans, C. S., Faith beyond Reason. (Edinburgh:
Edinburgh University Press, 1998).
Gula, R. M., Reason Informed by Faith (New York:
Paulist, 1989).
Helm, P. (ed.), Faith and Reason (Oxford; New York:
OUP, 1999).
Oliphint K. S., Reasons for Faith: Philosophy in the
Service of Theology (P&R, 2006).
Sire, J. W., Why Good Arguments Often Fail
(Leicester: IVP, 2006).
Stump, E. (ed.), Reasoned Faith (Ithaca: Cornell
University Press, 1993).
Swinburne, R., Faith and Reason (2nd ed. Clarendon
Press: Oxford, 2005).
Swinburne, R., Revelation (2nd ed. Clarendon Press:
Oxford, 2007).
Wood, W. J., Epistemology: Becoming Intellectually
Virtuous (Downers Grove: IVP, 1998).
Religious language, analogy, metaphor, parable,
language-games, cognitive/emotive etc.
Alston, W. P., Divine Nature and Human Language:
Essays in Philosophical Theology (Ithaca: Cornell
University Press, 1989).
Hicks, P., Evangelicals and Truth: A Creative
Proposal for a Postmodern Age. (Apollos, 1998).
Kenneson, P. D., Theres no such thing as objective
truth, and its a good thing, too pp 155-70 in
Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World
edited by T. R. Phillips and D. L. Okholm (eds)
IVP, 1995.
Porter, S. E., Nature of Religious Language (Sheffield:
SAP, 1996).
Stiver, D., Philosophy of Religious Language
(Cambridge: Blackwell, 1996)
The nature of Gods relation to the world: creation;
providence; miracles.
Collins, C. J., The God of Miracles (Leicester:
Apollos, 2001).
Earman J., Humes Abject Failure: The Argument
Against Miracles (Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2000).
Larmer, R. A., Water into Wine? An Investigation of
the Concept of Miracle (Montreal: McGillQueens UP, 1995).
Peters, T. and N. Hallanger, (eds) Gods Action in
Natures World (Burlington: Ashgate, 2006).
Swinburne, R., The Concept of Miracle. (2nd ed,
London: MacMillan and Co, 1981).
Swinburne, R., Providence and the Problem of God.
(Oxford: Clarendon Press 1998).
The problem of evil and suffering; theodicy.
Adams, M. M., Horrendous Evils and the Goodness of
God (Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 1999).
Blocher, H., Evil and the Cross (Leicester: Apollos,
1994).
Brand, P. and P. Yancy, Pain: The Gift Nobody Wants
(New York: HarperCollins, 1993).

Howard-Snyder, D. (ed.), The Evidential Argument


from Evil (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana
University Press, 1996).
Lucien, R., What Are They Saying About the Theology
of Suffering? (New York: Paulist, 1992).
van Inwagen, P. (ed.), Christian Faith and the
Problem of Evil (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Human nature: body and soul; mind; death and
immorality.
Baker, L. R., Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).
Edwards, P. (ed.), Immortality (New York: Macmillan,
1992).
Green, J. B. and S. Palmer (eds), In Search of the Soul:
Four Views of the Mind-Body Problem. (Downers
Grove: IVP, 2005).
Habermas, G. R. and J. P. Moreland, Beyond Death:
Exploring the Evidence of Immortality (Wheaton,
IL: Crossway, 1998).
Habermas, G. R., 1996. Near Death Experiences and
the Evidence A Review Essay. Christian
Scholar's Review 26:1, pp. 78-85
Hasker, W., The Emergent Self (Ithaca: Cornell
University Press, 1999).
Ward, K., Religion and Human Nature (Oxford; New
York: Clarendon; OUP, 1998).
Classics:
Anselm, St., St. Anselm's Proslogion with a Reply on
Behalf of the Fool by Gaunilo and the Author's
Reply to Gaunilo, M. J. Charlesworth (trans)
(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1965).
Aquinas, St. T., Summa Theologiae. Trans. by Fathers
of the English Dominican Province (New York:
Benziger Bros., 1948).
Aquinas, St. T., On the Truth of the Catholic Faith:
Summa Contra Gentiles, Anton C. Pegis (trans.),
(Garden City, NY: Doubleday Image Books,
1955).
Aristotle. Categories and On Interpretation Hugh
Tredinnick (trans) (Loeb Classical Library.
(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1938).
Augustine, St., Concerning the City of God Against the
Pagans Henry Bettenson trans. (Harmondsworth,
Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1972).
Ayer, A. J. Language, Truth and Logic. (2nd ed., New
York: Dover Publications: 1946).
Butler, J.,. The Analogy of Religion. (1st pub. London,
1736. New York: Frederick Ungar, 1961).
Hartshorne, C., The Divine Relativity (New Haven:
Yale University Press, 1948).
Hick, J. Evil and the God of Love, (rev, ed. New York:
Harper and Row, 1978).
Hick, J., Philosophy of Religion (3rd ed. Englewood
Cliffs: Prentice-Hall. 1983).
Hume, D., A Treatise of Human Nature L.A. SelbyBigge (ed) (2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press,
1975).
Hume, D., David Hume: Writings on Religion. A.
Flew (ed) (Peru: Open Court, 1992).

MDiv Unit Outlines

143

Hume, D., Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion N.


Kemp-Smith (ed) New York: Bobbs-Merrill,
1947).
Hume,
D.,
Enquiries
Concerning
Human
Understanding. Ed. L.A. Selby-Bigge. 3rd ed.
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975).
James, W., The Varieties of Religious Experience (1st
pub.1902, Mineola: Courier Dover Publications,
2002).
Kant, I., Religion within the boundaries of mere
reason and other writings A. W. Wood, G. Di
Giovanni, R. M. Adams (contributors); A.W.
Wood, G. Di Giovanni (trans); (Cambridge,
Cambridge University Press, 1998).
Lewis, C. S., The Problem of Pain, (London: Fontana
Books. 1957).
Lewis, C. S., Miracles. (New York: Macmillan, 1947).
Locke, J., A Discourse on Miracles. I.T. Ramsey(ed)
(1st Pub 1706, London: A. and C. Black, 1958).
Maimonides, M., The Guide of the Perplexed. 2 vols.
S. Pines. (trans) (Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 1963).
Owen, H. P., Concepts of Deity (New York: Herder
and Herder. 1971).
Paley, W., A View of The Evidences of Christianity (1st
pub. 1794 New York: James Miller, 1849).
Plantinga, A., God, Freedom, and Evil (New York:
Harper and Row; 1974).
Plato, Euthyphro, in Euthyphro, Apology of
Socrates, Crito John Burnet (ed) (Oxford:
Clarendon Press, 1986).

community and social ethics. The particular topics are to


be chosen by the approved teaching institution
concerned, in consultation with candidates. The course
coordinator is responsible for submitting for approval a
proposed unit outline along with assessment plans to the
moderator for Philosophy and Ethics.

Learning Outcomes
(a) To prepare candidates for active engagement in
philosophy through the
intensive study of
contemporary issues and classical readings in
philosophy of religion;
(b) To enable candidates to develop an advanced level
of philosophical understanding in two specific
areas of study;
(c) To develop the candidates understanding of the
skills involved in philosophy and enable them to
effectively utilise those skills in the research
process;
(d) To enhance collegial skills in analysis and research;
(e) To enable candidates to be able to comprehend and
effectively respond to the personal and pastoral
implications of the areas studied.

PE688 Ethics Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps PE
Learning Outcomes
(a) To prepare candidates for active engagement in
ethical analysis through the intensive study of
contemporary issues and classical readings in
Christian ethics;
(b) To enable candidates to develop an advanced level
of ethical understanding in two specific areas of
study;
(c) To develop the candidates understanding of the
skills involved in ethical analysis and enable them
to effectively utilise those skills in the research
process;
(d) To enhance collegial skills in analysis and research;
(e) To enable candidates to be able to comprehend and
effectively respond to the personal and pastoral
implications of the areas studied.
Content
Section A: Issues study
A detailed study of two ethical issuesone from the
area of personal and medical ethics and one from

Section B: Readings in Ethics


The study of texts in Christian ethics.
Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology) may
be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted appropriately
to reflect advanced level undergraduate study for
candidates enrolled in the undergraduate degrees.
Bibliography
The course coordinator is responsible for submitting for
approval a proposed unit outline with set texts and
recommended reading in Christian ethics and
assessment plans to the moderator for Philosophy and
Ethics.

PE689 Philosophy Seminar


Status
Elective
Pre/co-requisites
4cps PE

Content
Section A: Issues study
A detailed study of two philosophical issuesone from
the area of science and religion and one from the area of
epistemology. The particular topics are to be chosen by
the approved teaching institution concerned, in
consultation with candidates. The course coordinator is
responsible for submitting for approval a proposed unit
outline along with assessment plans to the moderator for
Philosophy and Ethics.
Section B: Readings in Ethics
The study of texts in philosophy of religion.

MDiv Unit Outlines

144

Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology) may


be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted appropriately
to reflect advanced level undergraduate study for
candidates enrolled in the undergraduate degrees.

Note: This topic should complement, not repeat,


students studies in CH301 and CH302, or CH305.
3

An introduction to the cultural factors which affect


mission today, including:
(a) Culture and worldview; beliefs, values and
behaviour; ethnocentrism; cultural change;
(b) Culture and communication; dynamically
equivalent communication; culture shock;
(c) Indigeneity, contextualisation, inculturation.

A survey of strategies and issues in contemporary


Christian world mission, including:
(a) World needs and strategies to meet them;
(b) Strategies for evangelism and church planting
among different people groups;
(c) Urban mission and development priorities;
evangelism and justice;
(d) Pluralism; dialogue with those of other faiths.

Mobilising local churches in support of world


mission:
(a) Types of mission agencies; resource policies,
operational structures, denominational links;
(b) Mission education and training in local
churches;
(c) The care of missionaries: pre-departure, home
assignment, permanent return;
(d) Developing active prayer, finance and other
support activities.

Bibliography
The course coordinator is responsible for submitting for
approval a proposed unit outline with set texts and
recommended reading in philosophy of religion and
assessment plans to the moderator for Philosophy and
Ethics.

DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY AND P RACTICE


EVANGELISM AND MISSIOLOGY (EM)
EM501 Mission Perspectives
Status
Elective
Exclusions
EM505 and EM506.
Learning Outcomes
This unit is primarily designed for students who do not
plan further mission studies. However, it can function
as a general introduction for other units in this Field.

Bibliography
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Summarise the biblical, historical, cultural and
strategic perspectives on mission in the
contemporary world;
(b) Critically appraise the past, present and future
development of world Christian movements;
(c) Devise potential responses to the cultural challenges
confronted in communicating the Christian gospel
cross-culturally;
(d) Generate a mission awareness and education
program appropriate for their own local church.
Content
1 A basic study of the biblical witness to the mission
of God to humanity, including:
(a) Gods desire to be known; global perspective;
(b) Abraham, Israel and the divine intention for all
nations;
(c) Teaching of Jesus: salvation to Jews and
Gentiles;
(d) the post-Easter church: obligations to all
nations;
(e) The nature of mission in the New Testament.
2 An introduction to the expansion of the Christian
movement, including:
(a) Key developments in mission history;
(b) Pioneers in Christian mission;
(c) The current status of the world Christian
movement:
statistics;
problem
areas;
challenges.

Prescribed:
Conn, H., The Urban Face of Mission (Phillipsburg,
NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed, 2002).
Elmer, D., Cross-cultural Connections: Stepping Out
and Fitting In Around the World (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2002).
Guthrie, S., Missions in the Third Millennium: 21 Key
Trends for the 21st Century (Carlisle: Paternoster,
2002).
Hiebert, P. and E. H. Meneses, Incarnational Ministry:
Planting Churches in Band, Tribal, Peasant, and
Urban Societies (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1995).
Kstenberger, A. J. and P. OBrien, Salvation to the
Ends of the Earth: A Biblical Theology of Mission
(Leicester: Apollos, 2001).
Moreau, A. S., et al (eds.), Deliver Us from Evil: an
Uneasy Frontier in Christian Mission (Monrovia:
MARC, 2002).
Moreau, A. S., G. R. Corwin and G. B. McGee,
Introducing World Missions: A Biblical,
Historical, and Practical Survey (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2004).
Pocock, M., G. Van Rheenen and D. McConnell, The
Changing Face of World Missions: Engaging
Contemporary Issues and Trends (Grand Rapids:
Baker Academic, 2005).
Smith, D. W., Against the Stream: Christianity and
Mission on an Age of Globalization (Leicester:
IVP, 2003).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Taylor, W. D. (ed.), Global Missiology for the 21st


Century (Grand Rapids, Baker Academic, 2000).
Tucker, R. A., From Jerusalem to Irian Jaya: A
Biographical History of Christian Missions (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2004).
Walls, A., The Missionary Movement in Christian
History: Studies in Transmission of Faith
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1996).
Webb, A., Your Church Can Make a World of
Difference (Sydney: OMF, 2005).
Winter, R., et al (eds), Perspectives on the World
Christian Movement: A Reader (3rd ed.; Pasadena,
CA: William Carey, 1999).
Wright, C. J., The Mission of God: Unlocking the
Bibles Grand Narrative (Nottingham: IVP, 2006).
Recommended:
Haugen, G. A., Good News About Injustice: A Witness
of Courage in a Hurting World (Leister: IVP,
1999).
Hiebert, P., Anthropological Reflections on
Missiological Issues (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1994).
Tiplady, R. One World or Many? The Impact of
Globalization on Mission (Pasadena: William
Carey, 2003).
Classics:
Kirk, J. A., What is Mission? (London: Darton,
Longman and Todd , 1994.)
Samuel, V and C. Sugden, Mission as Transformation
(Oxford: Regnum, 1999).
Yates, T., Christian Mission in the Twentieth Century
(Cambridge University Press, 1994).

EM502 History of Christian Mission


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Relate the expansion of the church from the
apostolic age to the present day, including key
individuals and movements;
(b) Evaluate the motives and methodologies involved in
the mission outreach of the church;
(c) Analyse the continuing influences of previous
mission policies on the subsequent development of
the mission ministry of the church;
(d) Reconstruct the history of mission in a particular
area or amongst a particular people group.
Content
Section A: The Apostolic Age to the 19th Century
1 The spread of Christianity to AD 500 (especially in
the Roman Empire); the conversion of Europe (to
AD 1500); the effects of the rise of Islam.
2 Reformation and Counter Reformation (1500
1750), including missions in the colonial empires of
Portugal, Spain and France especially the Jesuits in
Asia and the Americas; initial Protestant efforts.

145

Reawakening and development of missionary


concern in churches in Europe, Britain and the USA
in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Section B:
The Church Planted in Different Continents
Students are expected to study one topic in this Section
in detail.
4 Missions in the Indian sub-continent in the 19th
century, including Serampore and the early Baptists;
Duff and education; mass movements in South
India.
5 Missions in China from 1807, including the
relationship of missions to the political situation in
the 19th century; Hudson Taylor and the CIM; the
church under communism after 1949.
6 Missions in Africa, south of the Sahara, including
Creole Christianity; Moffatt, Livingstone; the
church in Uganda and the Niger Delta to 1914;
African Independent churches.
7 Missions in the Muslim world.
8 Missions in Latin America since 1800, including
Roman Catholic and Protestant work.
9 Missions in the Pacific.
10 Missionary endeavour in Australia and New
Zealand.
Section C: Developments in the 20th Century
11 Colonialism, nationalism and mission to 1945.
12 The effects of World Wars I and II on missions.
13 The Edinburgh Missionary Conference 1910; the
International Missionary Council to 1961; the work
of Mott and Oldham.
14 Trends in missionary work since 1945, including the
Roman Catholic Church since Vatican II, the
Church Growth movement, ecumenical mission, the
Lausanne Movement and international conferences.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Anderson, G. H., et al, Mission Legacies: Biographical
Studies of Leaders of the Modern Missionary
Movement (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1994).
Ellis, I. M., A Century of Mission and Unity: A
Centernary Perspective on the 1910 Edinburgh
World Missionary Conference (Dublin: Columba
Press, 2010).
Harris, J., One Blood: 200 Years of Aboriginal Contact
With Christianity (rev. ed.; Sydney: Albatross, 1994).
Irvin, D. T. and S. W. Sunquist, History of the World
Christian Movement: Earliest Christianity to 1453
(Vol. I; Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2001).
Lewis, D. M. (ed.), Christianity Reborn: The Global
Expansion of Evangelicalism in the Twentieth
Century (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Sanneh, L., Whose Religion is Christianity? The
Gospel Beyond the West (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2003).
Sanneh, L., The Changing Face of Christianity (New
York: OUP, 2005).
Schnabel, E. J., Early Christian Mission (2 vols.;
Leicester: Appollos, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

146

Shenk, W. (ed.), Enlarging the Story: Perspectives on


Writing World Christian History (Maryknoll, NY:
Orbis, 2002).
Stanley, B., The World Missionary Conference,
Edinburg 1910 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2009).
Stanley, B. (ed.), Christian Missions and the
Enlightenment (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995).
Tucker, R. A., From Jerusalem to Irian Jaya: A
Biographical History of Christian Missions (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2004).
Walls, A., The Missionary Movement in Christian
History: Studies in Transmission of Faith
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1996).
Walls, A., The Cross-cultural Process in Christian
History (Maryknoll: Orbis, 2002).
Recommended:
Jenkins, P., The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global
Christianity (Oxford; New York: OUP, 2002).
Thomas, N., Classic Texts in Mission and World
Christianity (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1995).
Classics:
Neill, S. C. and O. Chadwick, A History of Christian
Missions (rev.; 2nd ed.; New York: Penguin, 1991).

Content
Section A: Biblical Theology of Mission
1 Israels election and missional role in the Old
Testament
2 God and the nations in the Old Testament
3 The prophets, the nations and Gods missional
purpose.
4 Jesus, the gospel and the nations.
5 Mission in the Early Church.
6 The Pauline perspective on mission.
7 The church, the individual and sentness.
Section B: Contemporary Theology of Mission
8 The Missionary Conferences of the twentieth
century.
9 Development of ecumenical, evangelical and
Roman Catholic theologies of mission.
10 Religious pluralism and relationships with other
faiths.
11 Salvation, dialogue and the communication role of
the church.
12 Evangelism and social justice.
13 Contextualisation, presence and proclamation.
14 Development of indigenous theologies.
Bibliography

EM505 and EM506 Missiology


These two units provide an introduction to the study of
missiology, including mission theology, history and
practice.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable candidates to gain an awareness of the
major issues in biblical and contemporary
theologies of mission;
(b) To inform candidates of the scope and development
of Christian missionary activity to the present day,
in the light of the cultural and sociological factors
which affect mission today;
(c) To provide opportunity for candidates to study a
particular area of Christian mission in greater depth.

EM505 Theology of Mission


Status
Elective
Exclusions
EM501
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Relate a biblical theology of mission from both
the Old and the New Testaments.
(b) Compare and contrast the key issues in the
diversity of contemporary theologies of mission.
(c) Appraise contemporary theologies of mission in
the light of a biblical theology.

Prescribed:
Bolt, P. and M. Thompson (eds), The Gospel to the
Nations: Perspectives on Paul's Mission
(Leicester; Downers Grove, IL: Apollos; IVP,
2000).
Corrie, J., Dictionary of Mission Theology
(Nottingham: IVP, 2007).
Engel, J. F. and W. A. Dyrness. Changing the Mind of
Missions: Where Have We Gone Wrong?
(Downers Grove: IVP, 2000).
Glasser, A., Announcing the Kingdom: the Story of
God's Mission in the Bible (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Guthrie, S., Missions in the Third Millenium: 21 Key
trends for the 21st Century (Carlisle: Paternoster
Press, 2000).
Kaiser, W. C., Mission in the Old Testament: Israel as
a Light to the Nations (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2000).
Kirk, J. A., What is Mission? Theological Explorations
(London: Darton, Longman & Todd, 1999).
Kstenberger, A. J. and P. OBrien, Salvation to the
Ends of the Earth: A Biblical Theology of Mission
(Leicester: Apollos, 2001).
Packer, J. I. and T. C. Oden, One Faith: The
Evangelical Consensus (Downers Grove:IVP,
2004).
Peskett, H. and V. Ramachandra, The Message of
Missions: The Glory of Christ in All Time and
Space (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Piper, J., Let the Nations Be Glad! The Supremacy of
God in Missions (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Senior, D. and C. Stuhlmueller, The Biblical
Foundations for Mission (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1983).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Tennent, T., Theology in the Context of World


Christianity: How the Global Church is
Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss
Theology, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2007).
Van Engen, C. E. et al, The Good News of the
Kingdom: Mission Theology for the Third
Millennium (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 1998).
Recommended:
Petrella, I., Latin American Liberation Theology: The
Next Generation (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2005).
Taylor, W. (ed.), Global Missiology for the 21st
Century: the Iguassu Dialogue (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2000).
Classics:
Bosch, D., Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in
Theology of Mission (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1991).

EM506 Issues in Missiology


Status
Elective
Exclusions
EM501
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Relate the development of Christian missionary
activity to the present day; so as to identify the key
movements and individuals;
(b) Compare and contrast the key cultural and
sociological factors which affect mission theory and
practice today;
(c) Undertake an analytical study of the development
and current status of Christian mission in a
particular geographical region.
Content
Section A: Selected Topics in the History of Christian
Mission
1 The expansion of Christianity to AD 312 and the
rise of monasticism;
2 Celtic monasticism (Patrick) and the work of Irish
peregrini in the British Isles and on the Continent
(Columba, Aidan, Columbanus, Gallus);
3 The Roman mission to England (Augustine) and the
work of Anglo-Saxon missionaries on the Continent
(Boniface);
4 The rise of Islam and early Franciscan attempts to
win Muslim people (Francis himself, Ramon Lull);
5 The founding of the Society of Jesus and the work
of notable Jesuits (Xavier, de Nobili, Ricci);
6 The rise of Pietism and early Protestant endeavours
from the Continent (the Danish-Halle mission and
the Moravian movement);
7 William Carey and the foundation of the voluntary
societies

8
9

147

James Hudson Taylor and the beginnings of the


faith mission movement.
Key developments in the late 19th century and 20th
centuries (eg. Student Volunteer Movement, tentmaking, unreached peoples, Third World mission,
etc.)

Section B: Gospel and Culture


10 What is Culture?
11 A Theology of Gospel and Culture.
12 Processes by which Cultures change
13 Conversion and Culture
14 The Indigenous Church
15 Ancestor Worship
16 Mission in Australian Culture
17 Aboriginal Culture and the Gospel.
Section C: Area Study
A study of the history of mission, patterns of thought of
the peoples, and the results of missionary activity in one
of the following areas:
1 Africa (south of the Sahara)
2 Middle East
3 Indian subcontinent
4 East Asia
5 South America
6 Australia, or New Zealand and the Pacific.
Alternatively, an in depth study of a country or smaller
areas may be submitted.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Anderson, G. H., et al, Mission Legacies:
Biographical Studies of Leaders of the Modern
Missionary Movement (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1994).
Athyal, S., Church in Asia Today: Challenges and
Opportunities (Singapore: Asia Lausanne
Committee for World Evangelization, 1996).
Burnett, D., Clash of Worlds (London: Monarch,
2002).
Bjarati, D., Living Water and Indian Bowl: An
Analysis of Christian Failings in Communicating,
Christ to Hindus, with Suggestions Toward
Improvements (Pasadena: William Carey, 2004).
Christian, J., God of the Empty Handed: Poverty,
Power and the Kingdom of God (Monrovia:
MARC,1999).
Escobar, S., The New Global Mission: The Gospel
from Everywhere to Everywhere (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2003).
Harris, J., We Wish Wed Done More (Adelaide: Open
Book, 1998).
Hiebert, P., Anthropological Reflections on
Missiological Issues (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1994).
Iraola, A E., True Confucians, Bold Christians:
Korean Missionary Experience; A Model for the
Third Millenium, (New York: Rodopi, 2007).
Irvin, D. T. and S. W. Sunquist, History of the World
Christian Movement: Earliest Christianity to 1453
(Vol. I; Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2001).

MDiv Unit Outlines

148

Lewis, D. M. (ed.), Christianity Reborn: The Global


Expansion of Evangelicalism in the Twentieth
Century (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Lingenfelter, S., Transforming Culture: A Challenge
for Christian Missions (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Baker, 1990).
McDonald, H., Blood, Bones and Spirit: Aboriginal
Christianity in an East Kimberley Town
(Melbourne: Melbourne University, 2002).
Ramachandra, V. Gods That Fail, (Downers Grove:
IVP,1996).
Sanneh, L., Disciples of all Nations: Pillars of World
Christianity (Oxford: OUP, 2008).
Tucker, R. A., From Jerusalem to Irian Jaya: A
Biographical History of Christian Missions (2nd
ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2004).
Walls, A., The Missionary Movement in Christian
History: Studies in Transmission of Faith
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1996).
Recommended:
Jenkins, P., The Next Christendom: The Coming of
Global Christianity (Oxford; New York: OUP,
2002).
Sweet, L. (ed.), The Church in Emerging Culture: Five
Perspectives (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Wells, D., God in the Wasteland (Grand Rapids:
Wm.B. Eerdmans, 1994).
Classics:
Neill, S. C. and O. Chadwick, A History of Christian
Missions, (Rev. 2nd ed.; London; New York:
Penguin, 1990).
Nicholls, B., Contextualization: A Theology of Gospel
and Culture (Vancouver: Regent College, 1979).
Stott, J., Making Christ Known, Carlisle: (Paternoster
Press, 1996).

2
3
4
5

attention to what constitutes the gospel message and


varied approaches according to audience;
Divine sovereignty and human response, faith,
conversion and baptism.
Motivations for evangelism; the relation of
proclamation to meeting human need.
Proclamation, witness and presence; the place of
evangelism in Christian education and worship.
Hindrances to evangelism, including brief
consideration of common objections to the gospel.

Section B: Principles of Evangelism


6 The role of the evangelist: the vocation to be an
evangelist; lifestyle and message; the role(s) of the
congregation in the evangelists ministry.
7 Communicating faith: person to person; through
relationships; small groups; life networks; earning
the right to speak; mass evangelism.
8 Evangelism of various groups: for example youth,
nominal church members, ethnic groups, secular
humanists, factory workers.
9 Appropriate evangelistic methods for different
situations and contexts (including dialogue
meetings, evangelistic church services, distinctive
approaches for women and men); examination of
two methods of personal evangelism.
Section C: Field Work
10 Personal involvement (with supervision) in not
less than 20 hours in specifically evangelistic
programmes, including at least 5 hours of direct
evangelism by the student. These hours exclude
preparation and writing-up time. This work
should include both inter-personal and small
group contexts, using the methods studied in topic
9. This work should include people known to the
student as evangelist, and those unknown. Large
group and media settings may also be used.

Bibliography
EM524 Principles of Evangelism
Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Summarise a biblical basis and definition of
evangelism that takes into account related key
theological issues;
(b) Relate the task of evangelism to various
generational and social groupings, and identify
appropriate forms of communication that allow for
cultural and worldview factors;
(c) Appraise various programs of evangelism through
personal involvement and critique, and identify their
own areas of competency and any areas needing
development.
Content
Section A: Biblical and Theological Perspectives
1 An examination of evangelistic proclamation in
Acts and the other New Testament texts, with

Prescribed
Allison, L. and M. Anderson, Going Public With the
Gospel: Reviving Evangelistic Proclamation
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Chapman, J., Know and Tell the Gospel (Sydney:
Matthias Media, 1998).
Claydon, D., Connecting Across Cultures (Melbourne:
Acorn Press, 2000.)
Claydon, D. (ed.), A New Vision, A New Heart, A
Renewed Call (Pasadena: William Carey, 2005).
Cowan, S. B. and W. L. Craig, Five Views on
Apologetics (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000).
Drummond, L., Reaching GenerationNext: Effective
Evangelism in Todays Culture (Grand Rapids:
Baker 2002).
Finney, J., Emerging Evangelism (London: Darton,
Longman & Todd, 2004).
Hughes, B. and J. Bellamy, A Passion for Evangelism:
Turning Vision into Action (Adelaide: OpenBook,
2004).
Kallenberg, B. J., Live to Tell: Evangelism for a
Postmodern Age (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Long, J., Emerging Hope: A Strategy for Reaching


Postmodern Generations (2nd ed.; Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
McQuoid, S., Sharing the Good News in C21:
Evangelism in a Local Church Context (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2002).
Mittelberg, M., Building a Contagious Church:
Revolutionizing the Way We View and Do
Evangelism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000).
Pippert, R. M., Saltshaker Resources: An Evangelism
Toolkit (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Richardson, R., Evangelism Outside the Box: New
Ways to Help People Experience the Good News
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2000).
Sire, J. W., The Universe Next Door (4th ed.; Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Recommended:
Little, P. & M. Little, Know Why You Believe (5th ed.;
Wheaton, IL: Victor, 2003).

EM603 Biblical Theology of Mission


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Relate the nature of God as a missionary God,
concerned for the salvation of the whole creation;
(b) Demonstrate the constant intention of God,
throughout the period of biblical revelation, to
redeem humanity and restore creation;
(c) Summarise the divine intention and enablement for
human co-operation in the universal purposes of
God;
(d) Integrate their study of the Scriptures, theology and
personal understanding of vocation in mission.
Content
Section A: Old Testament Perspectives
1 God, Creation and the world; human sin and the
effects of the fall.
2 The missiological significance of Babel and the
Flood.
3 The Abrahamic covenant; God and Israel: election,
covenant and responsibility.
4 Yahweh versus Baal; Israel and the nations;
universal hope in the Psalms.
5 The missionary emphasis of the prophets; the
Servant of the Lord.
6 The kingdom of God in the Old Testament; intertestamental hopes, nationalistic and universal.
Section B: New Testament Perspectives
7 The synoptic Gospels and the ministry of Jesus; the
Kingdom of God and the ministry to Israel; the
place of the gentiles; the missionary mandate.
8 The Gospel of John: the world and its need; the
children of God; Abrahamic sonship; Jesus and his
own as sent.

149

The Holy Spirit in the mission of the church;


missionary principles in Acts; ethnic barriers and
cross cultural mission.
10 The Pauline theology of mission:
(a) Jew and Gentile in Christ; the new humanity
and the renewal of creation.
(b) The mission of the church and the powers;
conflict, suffering and mission;
(c) Mission and future hope; the consummation of
all things in Christ.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Blauw, J., The Missionary Nature of the Church; A
Survey of the Biblical Theology of Mission
(London: Lutterworth, 2003).
Bolt, P. and M. Thompson (eds), The Gospel to the
Nations: Perspectives on Paul's Mission: in
honour of Peter T. O'Brien (Leicester: Apollos,
2000).
Glasser, A., Announcing the Kingdom: the Story of
God's Mission in the Bible (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Kaiser, W. C., Mission in the Old Testament: Israel as
a Light to the Nations (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2000).
Kstenberger, A. J. and P. OBrien, Salvation to the
Ends of the Earth: A Biblical Theology of Mission
(Leicester: Apollos, 2001).
Larkin, W. J., et al, Mission in the New Testament: An
Evangelical Approach (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1998).
OBrien, P. T., Gospel and Mission in the Writings of
Paul: An Exegetical and Theological Analysis
(Grand Rapids; Carlisle: Baker; Paternoster,
1995).
Okoye, J. C., Israel and the Nations: A Mission
Theology of the Old Testament (Maryknoll: Orbis
Books, 2006).
Peskett, H. and V. Ramachandra, The Message of
Mission: The Glory of Christ in All Time and
Space (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Sanders, J., No Other Name: An Investigation Into the
Destiny of the Unevangelized (Eugene, OR: Wipf
& Stock, 2001).
Sanneh, L., Disciples of all Nations: Pillars of World
Christianity (Oxford: OUP, 2008).
Senior, D. and C. Stuhlmueller, The Biblical
Foundations for Mission (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1983).
Van Engen, C. E., et al, The Good News of the
Kingdom: Mission Theology for the Third
Millennium (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 1998).
Recommended:
Park, Joon-Sik, Missional Ecclesiologies in Creative
Tension: H Richard Niebuhr and John Howard
Yoder (New York: Peter Lang, 2007).

MDiv Unit Outlines

150

Classic:
Bosch, D., Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in
Theology of Mission (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1991).

EM604 Contemporary Theology of Mission


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Outline the changing world situation since 1945,
especially the emergence of post-colonialism;
(b) Delineate the relationship between post 1945
missiological perspectives and the emergence of
various socio-political situations and movements;
(c) Compare and contrast the key issues present in the
development of the diversity of theologies of
mission.
(d) Evaluate these contemporary developments in the
light of a biblical understanding of mission.
Content
A study of the theological issues arising in the
Missionary and Ecumenical Conferences of the 20th
century, with special reference to post-1961 conferences,
including:
1 The nature of mission; Missio Dei; holistic mission;
evangelism and social justice; development;
humanisation.
2 Holistic salvation; liberation theology; the poor in
Gods mission; evangelism; education, social
responsibility, medicine and development.
3 Conversion in a pluralistic world; syncretism;
universalism.
4 The church in relation to other faiths: dialogue;
Christian presence; anonymous Christians.
5 Developments
in
ecumenical,
evangelical,
charismatic, and Roman Catholic theologies of
mission.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Ajulu, D., Holism in Development (Monrovia: MARC,
2001).
Bevans, S. B. and R. P. Schroeder, Constants in Context:
A Theology of Mission for Today (Maryknoll, NY:
Orbis, 2004).
Eitel, K. E. (ed.), Missions in Contexts of Violence,
(Pasadena: William Carey, 2007).
Guthrie, S., Missions in the Third Millennium,
(Carlisle: Paternoster Press, 2000).
Hiebert, P. G., Missiological Implications of
Epistemological Shifts (Harrisburg, PA: TPI,
1999).

Kirk, J. A., What is Mission?: Theological


Explorations (London: Darton, Longman & Todd,
1999).
Lewis, D. M. (ed.), Christianity Reborn: The Global
Expansion of Evangelicalism in the Twentieth
Century (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004).
Myers, B. L., Walking with the Poor: Principles and
Practices of Transformational Development,
(Maryknoll: Orbis, 1999).
Packer, J. I. and T. C. Oden, One Faith:The
Evangelical Consensus (Downers Grove: IVP,
2004).
Petrella, I., Latin American Liberation Theology: The
Next Generation (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2005).
Ram, E. (ed.), Transforming Health, (Monrovia:
MARC, 1995).
Samuel, V. and C. Sugden (eds), The Church in
Response to Human Need (Eugene, OR: Wipf &
Stock, 2003).
Samuel, V. and A. Hauser, Proclaiming Christ in
Christs Way: Studies in Integral Evangelism,
(Oxford: Regnum Books, 1989).
Sanneh, L., Whose Religion Is Christianity? The
Gospel Beyond the West (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2003).
Stone, B., Evangelism After Christendom: The
Theology and Practice of Christian Witness,
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2007).
Thomas, N., Classic Texts in Mission and World
Christianity (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1995).
Recommended:
Schreiter, R., Constructing Local Theologies
(Maryknoll: Orbis 1996).
Taylor, W. (ed.), Global Missiology for the 21st
Century: the Iguassu Dialogue (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2000).
Classics:
Bosch, D., Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in
Theology of Mission (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis,
1991).
Nicholls, B. J., In Word and Deed: Evangelism and
Social Responsibility, (Carlisle: Paternoster Press,
1985).
Samuel, V. & C. Sugden, Mission as Transformation,
(Oxford:Regnum, 1999).

EM608 Cross-cultural Communication


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Outline the dynamics of the communication process
and their place in communication theory;

MDiv Unit Outlines

(b) Identify the divine usage of communication


patterns, and understand the Bible from a
communicational perspective;
(c) Compare and contrast the principles and patterns
involved in cross-cultural missionary witness with a
view to being able to employ them in a ministry
context.
(d) Analyse
their
own
past
and
present
communicational activity with a view to improving
their communication skills in diverse contexts;
(e) Predict the process and meaning of the
contextualisation of the gospel in particular cultural
situations.
Content
1 Theories
and
models
of
cross-cultural
communication: Culture (Nida); Incarnational
(Kraft); Bonding (Brewster & Brewster); Christ and
Culture (Niebuhr).
2 World views and their significance for cross-cultural
communication, with reference to: naturalist;
animist; folk religion; Hindu-Buddhist; Chinese;
monotheist; syncretistic and multi-religious worldviews.
3 Cognitive processes: conceptual, intuitional,
concrete relational; language and communication;
cultural distance and audience response.
4 Behavioural patterns: cultural norms and values;
body language, space, time, para-language, artefacts
and the environment.
5 The influence of social structures on
communication;
indigenous
modes
of
communication: music; drama; sports; puppetry etc.
6 Media influences: media and message; audience
response.
7 Contextualisation:
(a) Its necessity; biblical mandate and examples ;
(b) The process of contextualisation: criteria, stage
and limitations;
(c) Cultural examples of contextualisation
critically evaluated.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Claydon, D., Connecting Across Cultures (Melbourne:
Acorn Press, 2000).
Claydon, D (ed.), A New Vision, A New Heart, A
Renewed Call ( Pasadena: William Carey, 2005).
Bevans, S. B., Models of Contextual Theology Rev. ed.
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2004).
Burnett, D., Clash of Worlds (London: Monarch,
2002).
Carson, D. A. (ed.), Biblical Interpretation and the
Church: The Problem of Contextualization
(Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2002).
Elmer, D., Cross-Cultural Connections: Stepping Out
and Fitting in Around the World (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2002).
Fleming, D. E., Contextualisation in the New
Testament: Patterns for Theology and Mission
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2005).

151

Hesselgrave, D. J., Communicating Christ CrossCulturally (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1991).
Hesselgrave, D. J. and E. Rommen, Contextualization:
Meanings, Methods, Models (Pasadena, CA:
William Carey, 2000).
Kraft, C. H., Culture, Communication, and
Christianity: A Selection of Writings (Pasadena,
CA: William Carey, 2001).
Lingenfelter, J. E. and S. G. Lingenfelter, Teaching
Cross-Culturally: An Incarnation Model for
Learning and Teaching (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Lingenfelter, S. G. and M. K. Mayers, Ministering
Cross-culturally: An Incarnational Model for
Personal Relationships (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2003).
Sweet, L. (ed.), The Church in Emerging Culture: Five
Perspectives (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Weaver, G., Culture, Communication and Conflict:
Readings in Intercultural Relations (Boston:
Pearson, 2000).
Recommended:
Gilliland, D. S. (ed.), The Word Among Us:
Contextualizing Theology for Mission Today
(Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2002).
Hofstede, G. H. and G. J. Hofstede, Cultures and
Organizations: Software of the mind (2nd ed.; New
York: McGraw-Hill, 2005).
Sire, J. W., Naming the Elephant: Worldview As a
Concept (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).

EM609 Cultural Anthropology


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Illustrate the value and potential ways of utilising
the insights and knowledge of cultural anthropology
as a tool in Christian mission;
(b) Present a Christian perspective upon anthropology
and an anthropological perspective upon
Christianity;
(c) Compare and contrast the patterns and processes of
culture and cultural change, thus enabling them to
understand their own cultural context and to accept
the validity of different cultures;
(d) Explain culture as the context within which God
interacts with people and the significance of this to
the mission of the church in the world today.
Content
Section A: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
1 The nature of anthropology, its presuppositions and
the concept of culture.

MDiv Unit Outlines

152

3
4

People, culture and society: world views; verbal and


non-verbal communication; life cycles and
education; kinship, marriage and family; technology
and the economy; art and music; political and
community leadership; magic, science and religion.
Cultural stability, innovation and change; form,
function and meaning.
Anthropological research and field methods.

Section B: Anthropology for Cross-cultural Ministry


5 Anthropology and the Bible: examples of the
structures studied in Section A.
6 Cultural and anthropological factors that influence
church planting and development.
7 Missionary/national relationships and leadership
development in anthropological perspective.
8 Students undertake an anthropological case study in
cross-cultural ministry.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Angeloni, E. (ed.), Annual Editions: Anthropology
05/06 (Guilford, CT: McGraw Hill/Dushkin,
2004).
Burnett, D., Clash of Worlds (London: Monarch,
2002).
Grunlan, S. A. and M. K. Mayers, Cultural
Anthropology (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Academie,
1988).
Hiebert, P. G., Cultural Anthropology (2nd ed.; Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1983).
Hiebert, P. G., Anthropological Reflections on
Missiological Issues (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1994).
Kraft, C. H., Anthropology for Christian Witness
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1997).
Lingenfelter, S., Agents of Transformation: a Guide
for Effective Cross-cultural Ministry (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1996).
Park, M. A., Introducing Anthropology: An Integrated
Approach (2nd ed.; Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill,
2002).
Price, D., Karl Barths Anthropology in Light of
Modern Thought (Grand Rapids: Wm B.
Eerdmans, 2002).
Sweet, L. (ed.), The Church in Emerging Culture: Five
Perspectives. (El Cajon, CA: EmergentYS, 2003).
Womack, M., Being Human: An Introduction to
Cultural Anthropology (2nd ed.; Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001).
Recommended
Hofstede, G. H. and G. J. Hofstede, Cultures and
Organizations: Software of the Mind (2nd ed.;
Guilford, CT: McGraw-Hill, 2005).

EM610 Aid and Development


Status
Elective

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Identify and explain within its context the biblical
material that relates to aid and development,
including its relationship to gospel presentation;
(b) Apply biblical perspectives to the role of aid and
development within the context of cross-cultural
ministry; while giving recognition to other views
based on different hermeneutical perspectives;
(c) Explain the general theories related to the issues
impacting aid and development in the contemporary
world in both urban and rural situations, and show
how they affect implementation;
(d) Evaluate the diversity of approaches to the concept
of holistic ministries and show how they impact
the delivery of aid and development in crosscultural contexts around the world;
(e) Appraise the issues involved in planning,
implementing
and
evaluating
community
development projects.
Content
Section
A:
Philosophical
and
Theological
Perspectives
1 Biblical perspectives on aid and development:
creation, the people of God, divine provision for the
poor and needy; the example and teaching of Jesus;
those in need in New Testament churches.
2 Aid and development perspectives: descriptive
analysis of international aid and agencies, Christian
and secular; multilateral and bilateral programs;
north-south debates; rural and urban situations.
3 Economic issues: causes of poverty (local and in a
country as a whole); international monetary policy
and developing countries; third world debt; cycles
of poverty; justice and social structures.
4 Theological analysis: philosophies of development
and aid; participatory community perspectives;
development programmes in Christian missionary
strategy; holism in current discussion.
Section B: Field Application
5 Understanding an area before beginning a project;
baseline surveys.
6 Developing and evaluating community projects;
equipping local people for leadership in aid and
development projects; analysing and responding to
their problems and needs.
7 The role of outside organisations: philosophy;
financial and human resources.
8 Project evaluation; the people evaluating their own
project; the outside organisation and its evaluation;
9 Detailed examination of one case study of an aid or
development project.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Ajulu, D., Holism in Development, (Monrovia:
MARC, 2001).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Blomberg, C. L., Neither Poverty Nor Riches: A


Biblical Theology of Possessions (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2001).
Bradshaw, B., Change Across Cultures: A Narrative
Approach to Social Transformation (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Bussau, D. and R. Mask, Christian Microenterprise
Development: An Introduction (Oxford: Regnum,
2003).
Chambers, R., Whose Reality Counts? (London:
ITDG, 2003).
Chester, T. (ed.), Justice, Mercy and Humility:
Integral mission and the poor (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2002).
Degnbol-Martinussen, J. and P. Engberg-Pedersen,
Aid: Understanding International Development
Cooperation (London: Zed, 2003).
Eade, D. (ed.), Development Methods and
Approaches: Critical Reflections (London:
Oxfam, 2003).
Grigg, V., Cry of the Urban Poor: Reaching the Slums
of Today's Megacities (Milton Keynes: Authentic
Media, 2005).
Grigg, V., Companion to the Poor: Christ in the
Urban Slums (Milton Keynes: Authentic Media,
2004).
Kilbourn, P., Street Children: A Guide to Effective
Ministry, (Monrovia: MARC, 1997).
Myers, B. L., Walking With the Poor: Principles and
Practices of Transformational Development
(Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1999).
Samuel, V. and C. Sugden, The Church in Response to
Human Need (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2003).
Sider, R. J., Good News and Good Works: A Theology
for the Whole Gospel (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1999).
Thomas, J., From Lausanne to Manila: Evangelical
Social Thought (Delhi: ISPCK, 2003).
Yamamori, T., B. Meyers and K. Luscombe (eds.),
Serving with the Urban Poor (Monrovia: MARC,
1998).
Recommended:
Grigg, V., Companion to the Poor: Christ in the
Urban Slums (Milton Keynes: Authentic Media,
2004).
Classics:
Nicholls, B. J., In Word and Deed, Evangelism and
Social Responsibility (Exeter: Paternoster
Press,1985)
Van Engen C. and J. Tiersma, God So Loves the City:
Seeking A Theology for Urban Mission
(Monrovia: MARC, 1994).

EM611 Mission in the Urban Context


Status
Elective

153

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Define urbanisation in the modern world and outline
the historical development of urbanism and urban
culture around the world;
(b) Identify and explain within its context the biblical
material that relates to the various aspects of
urbanisation;
(c) Appraise on the basis of theological principles, past
and present forms of mission in urban contexts
around the world, particularly in relation to their
capacity to communicate the gospel;
(d) Formulate a contextually appropriate proposal for
planning, implementing and evaluating an effective
approach to mission in a contemporary urban
context, including the ongoing structure and
leadership needs of the Christian community that is
established.
Content
Section A: Biblical Foundations
1 Biblical views of creation, the city; aspects of the
prophetic message; corporate sin and structural evil;
2 The life, ministry and teaching of Jesus, with special
reference to the issues of poverty, wealth, justice
and power; the theology of the cross; responses of
the early church to gospel ministry and discipleship
in urban contexts.
3 Theological perspectives on concepts such as
incarnational, sign and agent, and Kingdom of
God within the context of urban mission.
Section B: Understanding the Urban Context
4 An overview of the history of urbanisation around
the world;
5 Urbanisation as a cultural phenomenon; the impact
of pluralism, mobility and anonymity on church
structures in the urban context;
6 Approaches to mission which have been and are
being applied in the urban context;
Section C: Evaluation of Mission Structures in Urban
Contexts
7 Traditional approaches to urban mission and their
relevance to different urban contexts today;
8 Evaluating the necessity of, and approaches to the
reformation of church structures; urban church
models, including adaptations of parish models;
base communities; house churches; cell churches.
9 Proclaiming the gospel in urban language, symbols
and life-style that are appropriate to the specific
cultural context.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Ajulu, D., Holism in Development, (Monrovia:
MARC, 2001).

MDiv Unit Outlines

154

Barker, A. and J. Hayes, Submerge: Living Deep in a


Shallow
World
(Mellbourne:
GoAlliance
Springvale, 2002).
Bakke, R., A Theology as Big as the City (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 1997).
Conn, H., et al, The Urban Face of Mission
(Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed,
2002).
Conn, H. and M. Ortiz, Urban Ministry: The Kingdom,
the City, and the People of God (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2001).
Conn, H. (ed.), Planting and Growing Urban
Churches (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997).
Claerbaut, D., Urban Ministry in a New Millenium
(Milton Keynes: Authentic, 2005).
Green, L., Urban Ministry and the Kingdom of God
(London: SPCK, 2003).
Gornick, M., To Live in Peace: Biblical Faith and the
Changing Inner City (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2003).
Kilbourn, P., Street Children: A Guide to effective
Ministry, (Monrovia: MARC, 1997).
Lebacqz, K., Six Theories of Justice (Minneapolis:
Augsburg, 1986).
Linthicum, R., Transforming Power: Biblical
Strategies for Making a Difference in Your
Community (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Lupton, R. D., Renewing the City: Reflections on
Community Development and Urban Renewal
(Downers Grove IL: IVP, 2005).
Recommended:
Davey, A., Urban Christianity and the Global Order
(Peabody, MA: Hendrikson, 2002).
Fuder, J. (ed.), A Heart for the City (Chicago, IL:
Moody, 1999).
Murray, S., Church Planting: Laying Foundations
(Scottdale, PA: Herald, 2001).
Classic:
Van Engen C. and J. Tiersma, God So Loves the City:
Seeking A theology for Urban Mission,
(Monrovia: MARC, 1994).

EM615 Christian Ministry in Islamic Contexts


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Explain Islamic faith and practice, including
biblical and theological perspectives on Islam
(b) Compare and contrast the diversity of Muslim
world views and practice in the modern world and
the implications for Christian witness;
(c) Identify and respond to contemporary points of
encounter and challenge arising out of the
interface between Christian and Muslim faiths,
including the place and practice of dialogue;

(d) Appraise various forms of Christian witness among


the broad spectrum of Muslim peoples and suggest
possible modifications that might make those forms
more contextually appropriate;
(e) Summarise the various spiritual and socio-cultural
factors involved in the growth of Christianity in
Islamic contexts and how they might guide the
planning of future ministry.
Content
1. Biblical and theological perspectives of Islam;
Muslim beliefs and practices; Christian-Muslim
worldview comparison;
2. Contemporary
trends
in
Islam:
reform
movements; political Islam; popular Islam;
modernisation; secularisation;
3. Diversification of 20th Century Islam; Muslim
world views; significance to Christian witness;
4. Christianity in Muslim majority countries; Christward movements; Messianic Muslims; secret
believers; persecution;
5. Issues in contextualisation among Muslims:
doctrine; practice; church forms;
6. Christian conversion among Muslims: theological
and sociological factors in religious change:
belief; power; Christian lifestyle; mission
approaches; socio-political factors;
7. Mission strategy among Muslims: evangelism;
church-planting; holistic ministry; issues in
Christian-Muslim dialogue;
8. Muslims in Australia; local church relations.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Ahmed, A., Discovering Islam (London: Routledge,
2002).
Caner, E. M. and E. F. Caner, Unveiling Islam: An
Insiders Look at Muslim Life and Beliefs (Grand
Rapids: Kregel, 2002).
Catherwood, C., Christians, Muslims and Islamic Rage
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Chapman, C. G., Cross and Crescent: Responding to
the Challenge of Islam (IVP, 2003).
Claydon, D. (ed.). Islam, Human Rights and Public
Policy (Melbourne: Acorn Press, 2009).
Durie, M., Revelation: Do We worship the Same God?
(Upper Mt Gravatt: City Harvest, 2006).
Greenlee, D., From the Straight Path to the Narrow
Way: Journeys of Faith (STL, 2005).
Husain, E., The Islamist, (Camberwell, Vic: Penguin
Books, 2007).
Livingstone, G., Planting Churches in Muslim Cities:
A Team Approach (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2001)
Love, R., Muslims, Magic and the Kingdom of God:
Church Planting Among Folk Muslims (Pasadena:
William Carey, 2000).
Mallouhi, C., Mini-Skirts, Mothers & Muslims: a
Christian Woman in a Muslim Land (Oxford:
Monarch Books, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Musk, B., Touching the Soul of Islam: Sharing the


Gospel in Muslim Cultures (Great Britain: Monarch
Books, 2003).
Robinson, S., Mosques & Miracles: Revealing Islam
and Gods Grace (2nd ed.; Upper Mt. Gravatt: City
Harvest, 2003).
Sookhdeo, P., Faith, Power and Territory, (McLean,
VA: Isaac Publishing, 2008).
Spencer, R., The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam
and the Crusades, (Washington: Regnery Pub.,
2005).
Woodberry, J. D., Muslims and Christians on the
Emmaus Road: Crucial Issues in Witness Among
Muslims (MARC, 1989).
Yeor, B., Islam and Dhimmitude (Lancaster: Gazelle
Books, 2002).
Recommended:
Ibn Ishaq, Life of Muhammad, (OUP ,15th Impression
2001).
Karsh, E., Islamic Imperialism, (New Haven: Yale Uni
Press, 2007).
Manji, I., The Trouble with Islam, (Milsons Point:
RandomHouse, 2003).
Parshall, P., Muslim Evangelism: Contemporary
Approaches to Contextualization (Waynesboro:
Gabriel, 2003).
Saeed, A., Islam in Australia, (Crows Nest: Allen &
Unwin, 2003).
Warraq, I., Why I Am Not A Muslim, (Amherst:
Prometheus Books, 2003).
Classic:
Cragg, K., The Call of the Minaret (Oxford: One
World, 2000).

EM617 Spiritual Formation for Cross-Cultural


Ministries
Status
Elective
Exclusions
PC608.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Relate the key issues and pressures that will be
confronted by a person or a family making the
transition into cross-cultural ministry and the
strategies that can be employed in dealing with
them.
(b) Distinguish how their relationship with Christ and
the ministry of the Word of God relate to their
ability to cope within those pressures and to develop
meaningful relationships within the new context.
(c) Devise a program that will help them prepare for
effective exit from their own culture and entry in to
a new culture, including strategies appropriate for a
family and its individual members.

155

(d) Describe and appreciate how they can learn from


the experience of others past and present, both from
within their own culture and from within the host
culture.
Content
Section A: Personal Spiritual Development
1 Research that identifies the issues; concept of a
call, sentness, giftedness; role of the home church;
role of selection procedures used by agencies.
2 Maintaining spiritual vitality in cross-cultural
ministry settings, including patterns of personal
prayer and Bible study; and fellowship with
Christians across cultures;
3 Dealing with stress and its spiritual consequences;
culture shock; conflict resolution; avoiding burnout;
material possessions and money; physical health
and recreation;
4 Doubt, temptation and testing, confronting spiritual
warfare; maintaining spiritual wholeness.
Section B: Relationships in Cross-Cultural Ministry
5 Personal security and significance; relational skills
in cross-cultural ministry, including listening, selfdisclosure, empathy.
6 Relations with others in cross-cultural ministry,
including national Christians, co-workers from
similar and different Christian traditions and those
in authority.
7 Relations in the missionary household; the single
missionary; the missionary family; spiritual factors
affecting the spouse and children.
8 Roles and role conflict; authority and team-work;
issues arising from different ministry models.
Section C: Distinctive Factors in Cross-Cultural
Ministries
9 Adjusting to cross-cultural living and lifestyle;
relating to those with different living standards;
confronting the wealth/poverty issues.
10 Relations with sponsoring churches and mission
society, including prayer and financial support,
supervision, encouragement; home assignment and
ministry; the re-entry process, preparing for
permanent resettlement and retirement.
11 Missionary perceptions of obedience, faith,
service, sacrifice, hardship missionary
power and related themes.
12 The influence of missionary biography on
missionary commitment, including an evaluation of
the theology and practical spirituality of selected
missionary writings.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Daniels, G., Searching for the Indigenous Church
(Pasadena, CA: William Carey, 2005).
ODonnell, K. (ed.), Doing Member Care Well
(Pasadena, CA: William Carey, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

156

Elmer, D., Cross Cultural Connections: Stepping Out


and Fitting in Around the World (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2002).
Fawcett, J., Stress and Trauma Handbook (Monrovia,
CA: World Vision, 2003).
Foyle, M. F., Honourably Wounded (Grand Rapids:
Kregel, 2001).
Griffiths, M., Lambs Dancing with Wolves: A Manual
For Christian Workers Overseas (London:
Monarch, 2001).
Kraft,
M.,
Frontline
Women:
Negotiating
Crosscultural Issues in Ministry (Pasadena, CA:
William Carey Library, 2003).
Lingenfelter, S. and M. Mayers, Ministering CrossCulturally: An Incarnational Model for Personal
Relationships (2nd ed.; Baker, 2003).
McGrath, A. E., Christian Spirituality: An
Introduction (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999).
Pollock, D. C., Third Culture Kids (Yarmouth, ME:
Nicholas Brealey, 2001).
Roembke, L., Building Credible Multicultural Teams
(Pasadena, CA: William Carey, 2000).
Storti, C., The Art of Crossing Cultures (Yarmouth,
ME: Nicholas Brealey, 2001).
Taylor, W. D. (ed.), Too Valuable To Lose: The
Causes and Cures of Missionary Attrition
(Pasadena, CA: William Carey, 1997).
Recommended:
Hale, T., On Being a Missionary (Pasadena, CA:
William Carey Library, 2000).
Pascoe, R., A Moveable Marriage: Relocate Your
Relationship Without Breaking It (Vancouver:
Expatriate, 2003).

EM618 Ministry in a Culturally Diverse Context


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Engage with appropriate biblical, historical, cultural
and strategic perspectives on ministry in a context of
cultural diversity
(b) Build the understanding and cultural sensitivity
needed for ministry engagement with a community
in a context of cultural diversity
(c) Identify and interact with the challenges and
opportunities in communicating the Christian gospel
and establishing the church in an environment of
cultural diversity;
(d) Devise appropriate ministry approaches for a
context of cultural diversity, including planning,
implementation and evaluation, assisted by
exposure to, and evaluation of existing multicultural
ministry models.

Content
Section A: Principles
1 Culture and ethnicity, unity and division, and
individuality and community in the Bible; in
particular within the context of New Testament
teaching on evangelism and the body of Christ..
2 Theological perspectives: Trinitarian implications
for ministry in a culturally diverse context, theology
of such ministry in the context of diversity, church
and culture in the New Testament.
3 Assimilation, integration and multiculturalism in
Australia: immigration and refugees; ethnic
communities; history and directions of government
policies with awareness of the limitations of these
and their impacts on church life.
4 Models of ministry in a context of cultural diversity;
relevant biblical and modern examples, including
multi-congregational, mono-ethnic and culturally
diverse churches; homogeneous unit and other
church growth principles; relational, leadership,
learning style, worship preference, language, areas
of tension and conflict, and other cultural variables.
5 Review of the issues relating to cultural distance and
its implications for the structure and ministry of a
local church; case studies of different models being
used by churches seeking to overcome cultural
distance.
6 Strategies and resources for making the transition to
a local church model that reflects the demographic
realities of the locality; research, design,
implementation and evaluation.
Section B: Practice
Candidates are for a minimum of 20 hours to:
1 Participate in either a culturally diverse
congregation or mono-cultural congregation of a
culture other than the students own; and
2 With the help of members of that church, observe
non church attending people of that culture in their
social and family contexts.
Discern the challenges with regard to cultural variables,
such as leadership patterns and processes, learning style
and worship preferences. Consider possible strategies for
the future ministry of the congregation.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Anderson, D., Multicultural Ministry: Finding Your
Churchs Unique Rhythm (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2004).
Brynjolfson, R. and J. Lewis (eds), Becoming an
Intentionally Intercultural Church (Waynesboro,
GA: World Evangelical Alliance Missions
Commission, 2004).
DeYmaz, M., Building a Healthy Multi-Ethnic
Church: Mandate, Commitments, and Practices of
a Diverse Congregation (Jossey-Bass, 2007).
DeYoung, C. P., G. Yancey, et al, United by Faith:
The Multiracial Congregation as an Answer to the
Problem of Race (OUP, 2004).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Docker, J. and G. Fischer, Race, Colour and Identity in


Australia and New Zealand (Sydney: UNSW,
2000).
Foster, C., Embracing Diversity: Leadership in
Multicultural Congregations (Bethesda, MD:
Alban, 1997).
Keneally, T. and R. Scott (eds), Another Country
(Halstead, 2005).
Kramer, L. J., The Multicultural Experiment:
Immigrants, Refugees and National Identity
(Sydney: Macleay, 2003).
Rhodes, S., Where the Nations Meet: The Church in a
Multicultural World (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
1998).
Richmond, H (ed.), Snapshots of Multicultural
Ministry (UCA Assembly Multicultural and
Cross-Cultural Ministry, 2006).
Richmond, H. and M. D. Yang (eds), Crossing
Borders: Shaping Faith, Ministry and Identity in
Multicultural Australia (UCA Assembly and
NSW Board of Mission, 2006).
Wilson, M., Churches Crossing Cultures: A Practical
Guide and Workbook for Cross Cultural Ministry
in Your Church (Anglicare, 2002).
Yancey, G., One Body, One Spirit: Principles of
Successful Multiracial Churches (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2003).
Recommended:
Jupp, J., The Challenge of Diversity, (Canberra:
AGPS-Office of Multicultural Affairs, 1989).
Jupp, J., From White Australia to Woomera: the Story
of Australian Immigration (Cambridge: CUP,
2003).
Multicultural Australia: United in Diversity (Canberra:
Australian
Government
Department
of
Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous
Affairs, 2003).
New Agenda for Multicultural Australia (Canberra:
Australian
Government
Department
of
Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous
Affairs, 1999).
Robinson, S. P., C. Smith and M. K. Wilson, Mission
Action Planning (Anglicare, 2004).

EM621 Living Faiths


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Relate with a significant level of detail the historical
development of at least two living faiths;
(b) Explain with sensitivity the beliefs of at least two
living faiths, highlighting where necessary the key
variations between different traditions within that
faith, and drawing upon writings of those within that
faith;

157

(c) Appreciate and summarise the practices of at least


two living faiths as consequences of the belief
system and cultural worldview of the participant.
(d) Identify and analyse within at least two living
faiths the contemporary reforms and responses to
change in global culture, including an awareness
of the challenges those reforms offer to the
Christian faith.
Content
The historical roots, beliefs, practices, cultural influences
and contemporary reforms in TWO, THREE or FOUR
of the following living faiths: Hinduism, Buddhism,
Judaism, Islam, Australian Aboriginal religions, primal
religions.
Bibliography
Bhaskarananda, S., The Essentials of Hinduism
(Seattle: Viveka, 2002).
Burnett, D., The Spirit of Buddhism (Sussex: Monarch
2003).
Catherwood, C., Christians, Muslims and Islamic Rage
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).
Gross, R. M. and T. C. Muck (eds), Buddhists Talk
about Jesus, Christians Talk about the Buddha
(New York: Continuum, 2000).
Partridge, C. H. and D. R. Groothius Dictionary of
Contemporary Religion in the Western World:
Exploring Living Faiths in Postmodern Contexts
(Leicester; Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2002).
Ludwig, T. M., The Sacred Paths (3rd ed.; Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001).
Lehmann, A. C. et al, Magic, Witchcraft, and
Religion: An Anthropological Study of the
Supernatural (6th ed.; New York: McGraw-Hill,
2004).
Noss, D. S., A History of the Worlds Religions (11th
ed.; Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2002).
Robinson, G., Essential Judaism (New York: Simon &
Shuster, 2000).
Telushkin, J., Jewish Literacy (Tbingen: Mohr
Siebeck, 2001).

EM622 Alternative Religious Movements


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Explain the characteristics of modern alternative
religious movements;
(b) Analyse the factors involved in the growth and
contemporary significance of such movements in
the Western World;

158

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) Summarise the history, beliefs, structures and


growth strategies of four movements;
(d) Devise for implementation a strategic Christian
response to such movements, their teachings and
their followers, that is both sensitive and biblically
appropriate.
Content
Section A: Definitions, Terms, Characteristics
1 The contemporary growth and significance of
alternative religious movements.
2 Definition of terms: cult; sect; church;
denomination; religion; movement.
3 Categories and classifications of movements:
eastern
mysticism;
Christian
aberration;
psychospiritual self-improvement; eclectic religion;
the psychic; the occult; astrology.
4 Factors involved in the contemporary growth of
alternative movements.
5 Common characteristics of alternative religious
movements.
6 Christian responses to alternative religious
movements and their followers.
Section B: Particular Movements
The history, beliefs, structures/organisation and means of
propagation of four alternative religious movements,
such as: Transcendental Meditation; Children of God;
Church of Scientology; the Unification Church; New
Age movements; Church of Jesus of Latter Day Saints
(Mormons); Jehovahs Witnesses.

Herrick, J. A., The Making of the New Spirituality: The


Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Hexham, I., S. Rost and J. W. Morehead II (eds),
Encountering New Religious Movements: A
Holistic Evangelical Approach (Grand Rapids:
Kregel Academic & Professional, 2004).
Rhodes, R., The Challenge of the Cults and New
Religions: The Essential Guide to Their History,
Their Doctrine, and Our Response (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2001).
Sire, J. W., The Universe Next Door (4th ed.; Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Wilson, B. R. and J. Cresswell, New Religious
Movements: Challenge and Response (London;
New York: Routledge, 1999).
Zaretsky, Y., Jewish Evangelism, Lausanne
Occasional Paper 60 (and in A New Vision, A
New Heart, A Renewed Call)
Zacharias, R., Jesus Among Other Gods, (Nashville:
Word, 2000).
Recommended:
Karkkainen, V., An Introduction to the Theology of
Religions (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Lehmann, A. C., et al, Magic, Witchcraft, and
Religion: An Anthropological Study of the
Supernatural (6th ed.; New York: McGraw-Hill,
2004).
Ludwig, T. M., The Sacred Paths (3rd ed.; Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001).

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Ankerberg, J. and J. Weldon, The Facts on Jehovah's
Witnesses (Eugene, OR: Harvest House, 2003).
Ankerberg, J. and J. Weldon, What Do Mormons
Really Believe? (Eugene, OR: Harvest House,
2002).
Clifford, R. and P. Johnson, Jesus and the Gods of the
New Age: Communicating Christ in Todays
Spiritual Supermarket (Wheaton, IL: Victor
2003).
Clifford R., Religious and Non-Religious Spirituality
in the Post Modern World, Lausanne Occasional
Paper 45 (Lausanne as a separate paper & in
Claydon, David (ed.), A New Vision, A New
Heart, A Renewed Call, (Pasadena: William
Carey, 2005).
Drane, J. W., P. Johnson and R. Clifford, Beyond
Prediction: the Tarot and your Spirituality
(Oxford: Lion, 2001).
Drury, N., Magic and Witchcraft: From Shamanism to
the Technopagans (London: Thames & Hudson,
2003).
Enroth, R., A Guide to New Religious Movements
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2005).
Geisler, N. L. and R. Rhodes, Correcting the Cults:
Expert Responses to their Scripture Twisting
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2005).

EM625 Applied Evangelism


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
(a) Demonstrate the interaction of evangelism and
society in different periods of the history of the
church.
(b) Analyse and propose biblical responses to the key
issues that impact on evangelism in contemporary
society.
(c) Compare and contrast evangelistic strategies as
appropriate for various contemporary contexts,
including those suitable for use in both the local
church and through evangelistic agencies;
(d) Engage in an evangelistic program in a position of
leadership, responding effectively to the social and
cultural context within which the activity is
undertaken.
Content
Section A: Evangelism in Context
1 A study of issues affecting evangelism at significant
periods in church history:

MDiv Unit Outlines

(a) From the apostolic period to Nicea;


(b) The fourth century: the coming of
Christendom;
(c) The sixteenth century: the Reformations;
(d) Evangelical revivals: Edwards, Wesley and
Whitefield;
(e) Modern mass evangelism: Finney, Moody and
Graham.
N.B: This topic should complement, not repeat,
students studies in CH301 and CH302, or CH305.
Evangelism in the Christian church since 1960:
(a) Ecumenical approaches, including the IMC
Conferences (New Delhi, Bangkok, Melbourne
and San Antonio);
(b) The Lausanne Movement, including the Berlin,
Lausanne I and II Conferences;
(c) Roman Catholic work, including Vatican II and
lay apostolate movements.
A critical examination of issues touching
evangelism in contemporary societies;
(a) Religious pluralism and relativism; evangelism
and dialogue;
(b) Affluence, health and wealth; holism;
(c) Social concern, justice and the integrity of
creation;
(d) The influence and use of the mass media.
Evangelism and various life-contexts:
(a) The stages of adult life;
(b) Evangelism in urban, suburban, town and rural
contexts

Section B: Strategies for Evangelism


Choose the following field work projects set out in one
of the clauses 5,6, 7 or 8 below. Each field report should
include the candidates biblical reflection as well as a
reflection on the projects in the light of the literature read
and in the case of projects in paragraphs 5,6 or 7 in the
light of the students reflection the other project being
pursued in the clause. There should be a separate field
report of not less than 1,500 words of each of the two
projects in clauses 5,6 or 7. Alternatively, in clause 8 a
log book of the 30 hour project is to be maintained and
given to the lecturer for approval along with the field
work report.
5 An examination of two comprehensive programmes
of evangelism, at least one based in a local
congregation and at least one conducted by an
evangelistic agency (for example Scripture Union,
the Church Army, the Navigators, the Bible
League). Particular attention is to be paid to preevangelism, gospel presentation, means of followup and the relationships between discipleship and
church membership. The programmes considered
must be different to those already considered in the
course;
6 The development of evangelistic strategies
appropriate to two sub-culture groups (for example
unchurched industrial workers; office workers; the
disabled; those involved in sports or the arts; career
women; the military);
7 Contemporary emphases in churches and
denominations with regard to evangelistic programs.
Choose any two of these areas:

159

(a) Signs and wonders and power evangelism,


(b) Renewal of diaconal ministries
(c) The Decade of Evangelism
Participation in the development and conducting of
an evangelistic programme, in either a local
congregation or a particular sub-culture, of not less
than 30 hours. Of this time, not less than 10 hours is
to be spent in developing strategy and planning and
not less than 5 hours in direct evangelism by the
student. These hours exclude preparation and
writing up time. Students are expected to take an
active leadership role in the programme. A time log
book indicating the way the 30 hours was used is to
be maintained and shown to the unit lecturer who
will indicate in a cover report with the field report
that the time log has been examined and that the
time requirement has been fulfilled.

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Allison, L. and M. Anderson, Going Public With the
Gospel: Reviving Evangelistic Proclamation
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Booker, M. and M. Ireland, Evangelism Which Way
Now?: An Evaluation of Alpha, Emmaus, Cell
Church and Other Contemporary Strategies for
Evangelism (London: Church House, 2003).
Claydon,
D.,
Connecting
Across
Cultures,
(Melbourne: Acorn, 2000.)
Claydon, D., (ed.), A New Vision, A New Heart, A
Renewed Call (Pasadena: William Carey, 2005).
Drummond, L., Reaching GenerationNext: Effective
Evangelism in Todays Culture (Grand Rapids:
Baker 2002).
Finney, J., Emerging Evangelism (London: Darton,
Longman & Todd, 2004).
Hughes, B. and J. Bellamy, A Passion for Evangelism:
Turning Vision into Action (Adelaide: Open Book,
2004).
Kallenberg, B. J., Live to Tell: Evangelism for a
Postmodern Age (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2002).
Long, J., Emerging Hope: A Strategy for Reaching
Postmodern Generations (2nd ed.; Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
McQuoid, S., Sharing the Good News in C21:
Evangelism in a local church context (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2002).
Mittelberg, M., Building a Contagious Church:
Revolutionizing the Way We View and Do
Evangelism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000).
Pippert, R., Saltshaker Resources: An Evangelism
Toolkit (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Pitman, D. A., R. L. F. Habito and T. C. Muck (eds.)
Ministry & Theology in Global Perspective:
Contemporary Challenges for the Church, (Grand
Rapids: Wm B Eerdmans, 1996).
Richardson, R., Evangelism Outside the Box: New
Ways to Help People Experience the Good News
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2000).

MDiv Unit Outlines

160

Recommended:
Hedlund, R. E., Roots of the Great Debate in Mission
(3rd ed.; Bangalore, India: Theological Book
Trust, 1997).
Webber, R., Ancient-Future Evangelism (Grand
Rapids: Baker 2003).

EM626 Church Planting


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Prepare and present a biblical basis for church
planting and the spiritual demands placed upon
those involved in church planting ministry;
(b) Compare and contrast different methodologies by
which church planting can be undertaken in a given
cultural context, such that church reproduction is the
result;
(c) Design a church planting program that is
culturally appropriate for a particular context,
including the necessary guidelines and rationale
for planning, implementation and evaluation.
Content
Section A: Principles
1 Biblical perspectives on Church Planting:
(a) Church planting and the teaching and example
of Christ;
(b) Theology of church;
(c) New Testament approaches to church planting.
2 Personnel issues in church planting:
(a) Personal factors: spiritual life, personality, call,
aptitude, leadership styles, relational skills and
philosophies of ministry;
(b) Selection and preparation of teams for church
planting.
3 Alternative models of church planting (eg solidarity,
modality, migration): strengths and dangers;
suitability for particular situations (urban, rural,
tribal peoples etc).
4 Strategies for church planting at regional level:
multiplying local churches or developing a central
church; church planting movements.

(c) Maturity: becoming autonomous; church


reproduction; second-generation believers.
Case studies in various church planting models used
in different cultural settings.

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Conn, H. M., Planting and Growing Urban Churches:
From Dream to Reality (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1997).
Garrison, D., Church Planting Movement (Midlothian,
VA: WIGTake Resources, 2004).
Gibbs, E. and I. Coffey, Church Next: Quantum
Changes in Christian Ministry (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2001).
Hesselgrave, D. J., Planting Churches Cross-culturally
(2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2000).
Hiebert, P. and E. H. Meneses, Incarnational Ministry:
Planting Churches in Band, Tribal, Peasant, and
Urban Societies (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1995).
Malphurs, A., Planting Growing Churches for the 21st
Century: A Comprehensive Guide for New
Churches and Those Desiring Renewal (Grand
Rapids: Baker 2004).
Moore, R., Starting a New Church: The Church
Planter's Guide to Success (Ventura, CA: Regal,
2002).
Stetzer, E., Planting Churches in a Postmodern Age
(Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2003).
Stuart, M., Church Planting: Laying Foundations
(Carlisle: Paternoster,1998).
Timmis, S. (ed.), Multiplying Churches: Reaching
Today's Communities Through Church Planting
(Fearn, Ross-shire: Christian Focus, 2000).
Recommended:
Nevius, J. L., Planting and Developing Missionary
Churches (Manchester, NH: Monadnock, 2003).
Suarez, G., Connections: Linking People and
Principles for Dynamic Church Multiplication
(Friendswood, TX: Baxter, 2003).
Towns, E. L. and D. Porter, Churches That Multiply: A
Bible study on Church Planting (Kansas City,
MO: Beacon Hill, 2003).

EM627 Church Dynamics and Growth

Section B: Practice
5 Feasibility studies: gathering and interpreting
relevant data; defining a people group, measuring
receptivity; issues in location for ministry, transport,
psycho-socio-cultural factors.
6 Stages in Church Planting:
(a) Initial contacts; initial evangelism; name; home
meetings; first services;
(b) Embryonic stage: charter statement; building
issues; structures, government, leadership;

Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Summarise the theology, principles and procedures
of church growth and their significance for
contemporary ministry theory and practice;
(b) Compare and contrast contemporary approaches to,
and philosophies of church growth and highlight
their strengths and weaknesses in different cultural
environments;

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) Create a process of evaluation, select appropriate


methodologies, and develop effective strategies for
church growth in a congregational situation, such
that emphasis is put as much on church health as on
other aspects of church growth.
Content
Section A: Principles
1 The development of church growth thinking and its
contemporary significance in mission thinking and
practice; theological foundations and biblical
examples;
2 Church growth concepts: homogeneous group
principle; receptivity; people movements and
networks; redemption-lift; house churches; cell
churches; theological foundations; quantity and
quality:
3 Problems in church growth: nominalism and
attrition; follow-up and incorporation of new
members; static, passive and declining churches;
missional churches.
Section B: Practice
4 Examination of contemporary models of church
ministry and structure, evaluating philosophy,
theological implications, and dynamics of operation;
familiarisation with literature on congregational
ministry methodologies and strategy development;
structuring and staffing for different sized churches;
5 Making a local area survey; measurement of growth
and decline: types; reporting and evaluating; survey
techniques relating to: membership and attendance;
attrition; nominalism; lay mobilisation; financial
resources;
6 Growth factors: stimulants and retardants in the
congregation, the wider church, the community, and
the nation;
7 Growth goals: establishing objectives, setting goals,
making plans, assessing results.
Section C: Field Work
8 Conduct a case study of one particular congregation
to ascertain patterns of growth and decline over a
minimum period of five years, analyse the factors
involved and make recommendations.
OR
Analyse some specific model of doing church, its
philosophy, theological implications, methodologies
and strategies.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Carson, D. A., Becoming Conversant with the
Emerging Church: Understanding a Movement
and Its Implications (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2005).
Engle, P., et al (eds), Evaluating the Church Growth
Movement: Five views (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2004).

161

Frazee, R., The Connecting Church (Grand Rapids:


Zondervan, 2001).
Gibbs, E. and I. Coffey, Church Next: Quantum
Changes in Christian Ministry (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2001).
Gibbs, E. and R. Bolger, Emerging Churches:
Creating Christian Community in Postmodern
Cultures (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2005).
McGavran, D. A., Understanding Church Growth (3rd
Rev. ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990).
McIntosh, G. L., Biblical Church Growth: How you
Can Work With God to Build a Faithful Church
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Moynagh, M., Changing World, Changing Church
(London: Monarch, 2001).
Pritchard, G. A., Willow Creek Seeker Services:
Evaluating a New Way of Doing Church (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1996).
Roxburgh, A., The Missionary Congregation,
Leadership and Liminality (Harrisburg, PA: TPI,
1997).
Schwarz, C., Natural Church Development (4th ed.;
Carol Stream, IL: Churchsmart Resources, 2000).
Warren, R., The Purpose Driven Church: Growth
Without Compromising Your Message or Mission
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1995).
Recommended:
Guder, D. and L. Barrett (eds), Missional Church: A
Vision for the Sending of the Church in North
America (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).
Malphurs, A., Advanced Strategic Planning (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1999).

EM635 Linguistics and Language Learning


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Understand the value of language as a means of
communicating culture and identity and the
importance of a cross-cultural worker learning the
language of those whom he/she is serving;
(b) Outline a range of strategies and techniques for
learning language from a native speaker;
(c) Identify, transcribe phonetically and reproduce a
range of sounds common in English and some other
languages;
(d) Recognise, explain and employ basic grammatical
concepts and terminology.
Content
Section A: Principles
1 Introduction to general and applied linguistics
2 Phonetics: exploring place and manner of
articulation of sounds, vowel and consonant charts,
transcription using the International Phonetic
Alphabet, prosodic features, tone, and the

162

MDiv Unit Outlines

interpretation of phonological descriptions of


unfamiliar languages.
Morphology: investigating the structure and forms
of words, identifying the structure and forms of
words, identifying and listing morphemes in various
languages.
Syntax: analysing and describing several common
types of sentences, clauses and phrases, and
understanding the terminology used.
Semantics & Pragmatics: discussing the contextual
and social aspects of meaning, and barriers to
communication.
Sociolinguistics: considering the relationship
between language and society, understanding some
of the non-linguistic issues which affect
communication.

Section B: Practice
Students participate in an integrated practicum working
with native speakers of a language, where they work on
planning, implementing and reflecting on various
strategies and techniques for language learning. The
practicum will also involve data management,
transcription practice and basic linguistic analysis.
Various issues relating to language learning in a wide
range of situations are identified and explored, with an
emphasis on learning practical skills that will assist the
student in learning a language on the field.
Assessment Methods
Section A
1. Presentation of a written paper and a short oral
presentation outlining some aspects of a chosen
language. The following information must be
included:
a) Linguistic background of the language
b) Cultural outline of the language area
c) Brief phonological description of the language
d) Summary of key grammatical features of the
language
Plus information on one of the followingtopics:
e) Needs analysis for translation or literacy in that
language
f) A plan for learning this language
g) A plan for teaching ESL to speakers of this
language
Section B
Presentation of material and reflections from language
learning practicum sessions. The following information
must be included:
a) A comprehensive plan outlining a single session
in a small group with a native speaker of an
unfamiliar language, incorporating revision,
elicitation of the new information, cultural
information
b) Reflections on the process and outcomes of
sessions, identifuing positive and degative spects
of strategies used
c) Transcribed language data using IPA
d) An analysis of one aspect of the grammar of this
language.

The major paper should be 4,000 words and the report


3,000 words and requires a deeper level of analysis of
primary data and reflection and evaluation of source
materials than studies at degree level.
Section A constitutes approximately 60% of the unit
and Section B 40%.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Akmajiah, A., et al, Linguistics: An Introduction to
Language and Communication (3rd ed.;
Cambridge:
Massachusetts
Institute
of
Technology, 1990).
Bickford, A. J., Tools for Analysing the Worlds
Languages: Morphology and Syntax (Dallas, TX:
Summer Institute of Linguistics, 1998).
Bickford, A. C. and R. Floyd, Articulatory Phonetics:
Tools for Analysing the Worlds Languages
(Dallas, TX: Summer Institute of Linguistics,
2003).
Brewster, T. E. and E. S. Brewster, Language
Acquisition Made Practical (Colorado Springs:
Lingua House, 1976).
Brown, H. D., Principles of Language Learning and
Teaching (3rd ed.; Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice
Hall, 1994).
Emmitt, M., J. Pollock and L. Komesaroff, Language
and Learning: An Introduction (3rd ed.;
Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2003).
Fromkin, V., et al, An Introduction to Language (5th
Australian ed.; Sydney: Holt, Rinehart and
Winston, 2005).
Ladefoged, P., A Course in Phonetics (6th ed.; New
York: Harcourt Brace, 2005).
Richards, J. C. and T. S. Rodgers, Approaches and
Methods in Language Teaching (2nd ed.; New
York: CUP, 2001).
Yule, G., The Study of Language (2nd ed.; Cambridge:
CUP, 1999).
Recommended:
Crystal, D., A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics
(5th ed.; Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers, 2003).
Thomson, G., Kick-starting your language learning:
Becoming a Basic Speaker through Fun and
Games inside a Secure Nest in Language
Learning Bookshelf: LinguaLinks Library (SIL,
1993), and other articles by G. Thomson.

Field Education Units


Student may take two only of units PC642 PC647,
DM642 and EM640

MDiv Unit Outlines

Notes
(a) Units PC642644, DM642, and EM640 will be
assessed on a non-graded Pass/Fail basis, and will
not be included in the calculation of grade point
averages.
(b) Units PC642647, DM642, and EM640 will be
moderated by the appropriate Field moderator.
(c) An introduction to the ministry issues pertaining to
the context in which the Field Work will be
undertaken. The precise details of the content
should be outlined in advance by the individual
colleges for all their students.
(d) Colleges should seek approval from the relevant
field moderator for their methods of reflection and
evaluation for field education units.

163

In each case, the following conditions apply:


(a) The field work is to be approved by the students
approved institution;
(b) The student is to work under supervision of a person
experienced in living in both the students culture
and the culture in which the field work is taken;
(c) At least 30 hours are to be spent in direct contact
with the people of the culture concerned, in active
participation and communication as well as
observation;
(d) The student is to observe the ways of life of the
people of the culture visited and Christian ministries
among them (by both nationals and others);
(e) The field work is to be certified by a senior
missionary or equivalent person with whom the
student has served.

EM640 Cross-cultural Field Education


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce students to the practical issues related
to particular ministry settings.
(b) To stimulate candidates reflection, integration and
thinking with respect to philosophical issues,
including cross-cultural education, pluralism and
ethnicity and the exercise of informed critical
judgement on programmes of education within
church or nation;
(c) To facilitate in candidates an understanding of the
skills involved in practical ministry, and give
opportunity for the acquisition and development of
these skills in chosen areas;
(d) To enable candidates to examine principles of
education and educational insights from the social
sciences in the light of biblical perspectives and
contemporary theological understanding.
Content
Section A: Preparation
Students must undertake supervised preparation for
cross-cultural ministry exposure, so that they may benefit
from their field experience. The unit should include
input from people who have lived in the culture
concerned, preferably from members of the culture,
unless this is wholly impracticable.
Section B: Field Work
An experience of ONE of the following situations;
(a) A missionary trip of not less than 4 weeks
residence in a culture other than the students own;
(b) Involvement of not less than 50 hours in some form
of Christian work with people from a culture
different than the students own (e.g., an overseas
student group, ethnic church or fellowship);
(c) Satisfactory completion of a period of not less than
3 months in some form of Christian work with
people from a culture different from the students
own.

Section C: Evaluation and Reflection


Students are to spend some time in reflection upon their
field work, including group discussion and a written
individual reflection concerning problems encountered,
issues raised and encouragements received, having
regard to the literature on the subject and to the
Scriptures.
Bibliography
Nil

EM689 Evangelism and Missiology Seminar


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:
(a) Develop a program of study that explores in depth a
specific ministry topic or theme;
(b) Cooperate with others in the utilisation of research
skills to achieve specific study outcomes;
(c) Apply to the chosen ministry topic appropriate
evangelistic and/or missiological insights that draw
upon a broad range of perspectives.
Content
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but must have staff and library
support sufficient to sustain the unit. The lecturer
concerned is to submit a proposed unit outline along with
assessment plans for approval by the moderator for
Evangelism and Missiology.
The unit is conducted as a seminar involving class
discussion as well as lectures and individual reading.
The unit is not an individual research topic. It is strongly
recommended that the unit include set reading from
classical as well as contemporary authors of at least 750
pages.

MDiv Unit Outlines

164

1
2
3

The total amount of work expected is that equivalent


to an essay of approximately 6,000 words;
Students must demonstrate a thorough grasp of the
theological issues involved;
Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of theological perspectives discerned in students
learning;
Units approved for the Master of Arts (Ministry)
may be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted
appropriately
to
reflect
advanced
level
undergraduate study for those students enrolled in
undergraduate degrees.

Bibliography
Nil

PASTORAL AND CHURCH-FOCUSSED MINISTRIES (PC)


PC501 Ministry Formation
Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To help students develop a critical understanding of
themselves as persons and of pastoral roles;
(b) To provide opportunity for students to study and
discuss biblical and other literature in order to gain
insights concerning individual personhood and to
determine appropriate pastoral roles;
(c) To influence students towards an open, affirming
style: an attitude toward persons, including children
and the vulnerable, and ministry which is nondefensive, pro-active and positive, arising both from
the students view of him/herself as a secure person
and as one who understands these issues in the
context of their pastoral tasks;
(d) To help students develop their own ministerial code
of conduct in the light of recent literature on this
issue;
(e) To give students a foundation for further studies in
pastoral ministry.
Content
1 Introduction to ministry formation; review of
students past and present ministry experience as a
resource for ministry formation.
2 Reflection upon biblical passages relevant to
ministry call, style and pastoral perspectives such as
Exodus 3:14:17; Isaiah 6; Ezekiel 13; Mark
10:3545; Acts 20:1735; 2 Corinthians 45;
Ephesians 4:116; 1 Timothy 3:17; 1 Peter 5:111.
3 A brief historical overview of pastoral roles in
Christian ministry.
4 Vocation and guidance in the Christian life. The
relation between individual and corporate Christian
ministries.
5 Personal security and identity; integrity; identifying
strengths, limitations and uniqueness; developing a
personable style; ministerial codes of ethics.

The search for a pastoral identity: who/what is a


pastor; identifying and negotiating expectations,
including disparate expectations.
Ministry formation issues in theological education:
critical study of the Scriptures; theological
education and spiritual growth.

Bibliography
Cohen, M., The Divided Self (London: Marshall
Pickering, 1996).
Cullinan, A., Sorting it Out: Discerning Gods Call to
Ministry (Valley Forge, PA: Judson, 1999).
Drescher, J., If I were Starting My Ministry Again
(Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Duce, P. and D. Strange, Keeping Your Balance
(Leicester: Apollos, 2001).
Fraser, E., Confessions of a Beginning Theologian
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1998).
Hunt, R. A., et al, Clergy Assessment and Career
Development (Nashville: Abingdon, 1990).
Kinast, R. L., Let Ministry Teach (Collegeville, MN:
Liturgical, 1996).
Lewis, G. D., Meeting the Moment: Leadership and
Well-being in Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon,
2002).
McGrath, A. E., Understanding Doctrine: Its
Relevance and Purpose for Today (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1990).
Messer, D., Contemporary Images of Christian
Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 1989).
Peterson, E., Working the Angles (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1991).
Schnase, R., Ambition in Ministry: Our Spiritual
Struggle with Success, Achievement and
Competition (Nashville: Abingdon, 1993).
Tidball, D., Builders and Fools (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1999).
Tovey, P., Growing in Ministry (UK: Grove, 2000).
Willicom, W., Calling & Character: Virtues of the
Ordained Life (Nashville: Abingdon, 2003).

PC515 Christian Worship


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To explore and analyse the theology and practice of
worship through a study of the Old and New
Testaments.
(b) To discriminate between the major current forms of
worship in Australia through analysis of present
practice and significant elements in the historical
processes which have led to the present situation.
(c) To enable students to reflect upon and work towards
a personal resolution of contemporary issues in the
theology, practice and leadership of worship.
(d) To equip students with substantial skills in the
leadership of worship.

MDiv Unit Outlines

Content
Section A: Biblical Perspectives
The theology and practice of worship through a study of
the Old and New Testaments.
This requires an examination of the theology and
practice of worship in the Old and New Testaments
(with reference to Jewish and early church patterns of
worship, e.g., as in the Didache, Justin Martyrs First
Apology and the Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus). It
will involve reflection on themes such as sacrifice,
service, the nature of praise, corporate prayer, adoration,
confession and forgiveness, the confession of faith, the
relationship of worship, discipleship and ethics, the
Lords Supper, baptism, preaching and teaching, prayer
and offerings and other elements of worship.
Section B: Historical Developments
The major, current forms of worship in Australia through
reflection upon present practice and significant elements
in the historical processes which have led to the present
situation. The focus will be upon the principles and
practice of worship in Protestant denominations and
traditions but including reference to the Catholic and
Orthodox traditions.
These traditions should be
interpreted in the light of their historical development,
including the liturgical principles and practice of the
Reformation and denominations. Cultural and other
developments and influences which have led to the
present forms of worship. Where possible opportunity
should be given for particular study of one of these
traditions.
Section C: Contemporary Themes
Reflection upon contemporary issues in the theology,
practice and leadership of worship. This requires an
examination of contemporary issues in worship in the
light of scriptural principles, historical developments and
cultural perspectives. To be included are: the forms of
leadership; the style of liturgy; structure and freedom;
doctrine and experience; the relationship of traditions of
worship to contemporary culture and sub-cultures;
receiving and offering; personal and communal
dimensions; symbolism; architecture; music and the use
of the creative arts and the influence of feminism,
multiculturalism and the media.
Section D: The Practice of Worship
The aim is to equip students with basic skills in the
leadership of worship. This involves a study of the basic
principles of the planning, preparation and conduct of
worship.
Wherever possible students should be
observers of the planning, conduct and evaluation of
corporate worship and take an active part in the planning
and leadership of at least three services of worship.
Bibliography
General Works
Webber, R. E. (ed.), The Complete Library of
Christian Worship (Vols IVII; Nashville: Star
Song, 1993-1994).

165

Particular Topics
Basden, P., The Worship Maze (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1999).
Carson, D. A. (ed.), Worship by the Book (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2002).
Davies, H., Bread of Life & Cup of Joy (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1993).
Dawn M. J., Reaching Out without Dumbing Down
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995).
Dawn, M. J., A Royal Waste of Time (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1999).
Horton, M., Rediscovering the Drama of God Centred
Worship (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002).
Hurtado, L. W., At the Origins of Christian Worship
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 1999).
Krieder, E., Given for You (Downers Grove, IL: IVP,
1998).
Peterson, D., Engaging with God (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1992).
Plantinga, C. and S. A. Rozeboom, Discerning the
Spirits (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003).
Ray, D., Wonderful Worship in Smaller Churches
(Cleveland, OH: Pilgrim, 2000).
Wakefield G. S., An Outline of Christian Worship
(Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1998).
Webber, R., Planning Blended Worship (Nashville:
Abingdon, 1998).

PC527 Patterns of Spiritual Formation


Status
Elective
Exclusions
PC530.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To help students appreciate and appraise various
approaches to Christian spirituality;
(b) To enable students interpret the forms of Christian
spirituality and thus set them in their biblical and
theological contexts;
(c) To equip students to discern and practise spiritual
disciplines leading to maturity in Christ.
Content
Section A: Spirituality in Christian Life and Ministry
1 What is spirituality? Christian and non-Christian
approaches.
2 Biblical patterns of spirituality; Old Testament and
New Testament models, including godliness,
people of God, spirit, in Christ, indwelling
of the Spirit, the communion of saints.
3 Expressions of life in Christ as seen in
contemporary
Christian
churches:
e.g.
contemplative, charismatic-pentecostal, evangelical,
social justice oriented.
4 Spirituality as applied theology: the imitation of
Christ, the beatific vision, godliness and the
Christian doctrine of God.

MDiv Unit Outlines

166

Section B: Spiritual Disciplines for Maturity in


Christ
5 Disciplines of the inner life, including prayer, Bible
study, meditation, solitude, contemplation, fasting,
keeping a spiritual journal.
6 Lifestyle disciplines: simplicity, loyalty, obedience,
commitment service.
7 Corporate disciplines: public worship, confession,
guidance and discernment, accountability and
encouragement, community life, leadership.
Bibliography
Anderson, K. R. and R. D. Reese, Spiritual Mentoring
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1999).
Benner, D., Surrender to Love (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 2003).
Chester, T., The Message of the Prayer (Leicester:
IVP, 2003).
Guenther, M., The Practice of Prayer (Boston:
Cowley, 1998).
Green, M. and R. P. Stevens, Living the Story, Biblical
Spirituality for Everyday Christians (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003).
McGrath, A. E., Christian Spirituality (Oxford:
Blackwell, 1998).
Mayes, A. D., Spirituality and Struggle (London:
SPCK, 2002).
Nouwen, H. J., Ministry and Spirituality (New York:
Continuum, 1996).
Foster, R. J., Streams of Living Water (San Francisco:
HarperSanFrancisco, 1998).
Foster, R. J., Prayer: Finding the Heart's True Home
(London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1992).
Stevens, R. P., Down to Earth Spirituality (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2003).
Tan, S. and D. H. Gregg, Disciplines of the Holy Spirit
(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1997).
Willard, D., The Renovation of the Heart: Putting on
the Character of Christ (Colorado Springs:
NavPress, 2002).
Journals:
Mogabah, J. S. (ed.), Weavings: A Journal of the
Spiritual Life (Nashville: Upper Room).
Benner, D. G. and G. W. Moon (eds), Conversations: A
Forum for Authentic Transformation (Atlanta: Life
Springs, 2003).

PC530 Christian Spirituality


Status
Elective
Exclusions
PC527 and PC628.
Learning Outcomes
1 To lead students to appreciate and appraise the
nature, function and dimensions of spirituality and
Christian Spiritual Formation and their relationship
to biblical and theological study.

To help students appreciate and critique the


diversity of Christian spiritualities and understand
what gives rise to such variety.
To equip students to adapt ministry patterns in their
churches in order to facilitate spiritual maturing in a
changing society.
To equip students to practice the spiritual disciplines
as part of soul-care and spiritual development.

Content
Section A: Spirituality for Christian Life and
Ministry
1 Defining spirituality and spiritual formation: their
nature, function and goals, and the factors that give
rise to the variety of patterns of spirituality.
2 Biblical patterns of spirituality: Old Testament and
New Testament models, elements such as encounter
with God, renewal of the mind, vocation,
accountability and community, recreation, work,
spiritual warfare, justice and mercy.
3 Biblical patterns and their implications for
contemporary spirituality with reference to
expressions in contemporary Christian traditions:
Contemplative,
Evangelical,
CharismaticPentecostal, Holiness, Puritan/Reformed, socialecological justice.
4 Theological study of biblical patterns: imitation of
Christ, beatific vision, in Christ, the communion
of saints, godliness, indwelling of the spirit,
pilgrimage, etc.
5 Growing in a context of spiritual opposition and
divine help. A study (biblical, theological and
contemporary) of the influence of spirit beings (the
Holy Spirit, angelic, and demonic) on personal
spiritual growth.
Section B: Historical Spirituality
6 A brief exposure to at least two historical
expressions of Christian Spirituality with special
focus on the contextual factors involved in their
formation and the implications for today.
Section C: Spiritual Disciplines for Spiritual
Formation
7 The functions and misuse of the spiritual disciplines
in spiritual formation.
8 Disciplines of the inner life, including prayer,
silence, solitude, self-examination, confession, Bible
study, meditation, contemplation, fasting, and
journalling. Special attention should be given to the
devotional use of Scripture in the context of biblical
scholarship (Lectio Divina).
9 Lifestyle disciplines, including simplicity, giving,
hospitality, chastity, Sabbath observance, and
service.
10 Corporate disciplines, including worship, guidance
and discernment, submission and authority,
fellowship and community, confession and spiritual
direction.

MDiv Unit Outlines

167

(c) To equip students for ministry to families and to


people in various life stages and transitions.

Bibliography
Journals:
Weavings: A Journal of the Christian Spiritual Life
(Nashville: Upper Room, 1986-).
The Way: A Review of Contemporary Christian
Spirituality (London: The Way, 1990).
Grove Spirituality Series (Cambridge: Grove, 19821991).
Monographs:
Arnold, C., Three Crucial Questions About Spiritual
Warfare (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997).
Barton, S., The Spirituality of the Gospels (London:
SPCK, 1992).
Gire, K., Windows of the Soul: Experiencing God in New
Ways (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996).
Guenther, M., Holy Listening (London: Darton,
Longman & Todd, 1994).
Holt, B., A Brief History of Christian Spirituality
(Oxford: Lion, 1993).
Leonard, B. J. (ed.), Becoming Christian: Dimensions of
Spiritual Formation (Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 1990).
Maas, R. and G. ODonnell, Spiritual Traditions for the
Contemporary Church (Nashville: Abingdon,
1990).
McGrath, A., Spirituality in an Age of Change (Grand
Rapids, Zondervan, 1994).
Mulholland, M. R., Invitation to a Journey (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 1993).
Murphy, E., The Handbook for Spiritual Warfare
(Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2003).
Nouwen, H., Life of the Beloved (New York: Crossroad,
1992).
Packer, J. and L. Wilkinson, Alive to God (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 1992).
Peterson, E., The Contemplative Pastor (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1993).
Rice, H., Reformed Spirituality (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1991).
Smith, M., The Word is Very Near You: A Guide to
Praying with Scripture (London: Darton, Longman
& Todd, 1990).
Sheriffs, D., The Friendship of the Lord (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 1996).
Steere, D., Dimensions of Prayer (Nashville: Upper
Room, 1997).
Thompson, M., Soul Feast: An Invitation to the
Christian Spiritual Life (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 1995).

PC602 Foundations of Pastoral Care


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To explore critical issues in pastoral theology;
(b) To enable students to develop an integrated biblical
and theological understanding of pastoral ministry;

Content
Section A: Biblical and Theological Perspectives
1 Biblical and theological perspectives on the nature
of persons and groups; the human predicament;
salvation and wholeness.
2 Biblical patterns and models of pastoral care,
including the roles of the people of God as a caring
community.
3 The maturity theme, individual and corporate,
within the New Testament; the relationships
between pastor-teacher functions and pastoral care
functions; proactive and reactive styles.
4 An overview of the history of pastoral care; the
integration of insights from the social sciences.
Section B: Pastoral Care in the Stages of Life
5 The distinction between pastoral care and pastoral
counselling; the relationship between pastoral care
and the regular life of the church, including
Christian education and liturgy.
6 Caring for the carers; supervision; support groups;
the role of the church and church leadership.
7 Pastoral care in major life-stages and transition;
common crises of life in childhood, youth, early
adulthood, middle age, old age, with attention to
Christian initiation and nurture.
8 Pastoral care of families and single people;
preparation for marriage; vocational guidance.
9 An introduction to cross-cultural factors in pastoral
care; family patterns in various cultures and subcultures.
Bibliography
Bridges, W., Managing Transitions, Making the Most
of Change (London: Nicholas Brealey, 2001).
Capps, D., Agents of Hope: a Pastoral Psychology
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995).
Gerkin, C., An Introduction to Pastoral Care
(Nashville: Abingdon, 1997).
Moessner, J. S., Through the Eyes of Women: Insights
for Pastoral Care (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Oates, W., Grief, Transition and Loss (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1997).
Peterson, E., Five Smooth Stones for Pastoral Work
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1992).
Price, W., In Transition (Harrisburg: Morehouse,
2002).
Proctor, S. and G. Taylor, We Have this Ministry
(Nashville: Judson, 1996).
Sell, C., Transitions (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1991).
Smith, D., Empowering Ministry (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Storms, C., To Love Mercy: Becoming a Person of
Compassion, Acceptance and Forgiveness
(Colorado: NavPress, 1991).
Tidball, D., Builders and Fools (Leicester: IVP, 1999).
White, P., The Effective Pastor (Carlisle: Paternoster,
2000).
Willimon, W. H., Pastor: the Theology and Practice of
Ordained Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).

MDiv Unit Outlines

168

Willimon, W. H., Pastor: A Reader for Ordained


Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Woodward, J. and S. Pattison, The Blackwell Reader
in Pastoral and Practical Theology (Oxford:
Blackwell, 2000).
Journals, and periodicals of value
Ames, S. (ed.), Ministry, Society and Theology
(Victoria: Bullen).
Beasley Murray, P., Ministry Today (Richard Baxter
Institute for Ministry).
Curkpatrick, S. (ed.), Ministry, Society and Theology
(Mulgrave, Victoria: Australian Association of
Supervised Pastoral Education).
Honeycutt, R. (ed.), Review and Expositor (Louisville:
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary).
Marshall, H. I. (ed.), Evangelical Quarterly (Carlisle:
Paternoster).
Nuncarrow, T. (ed.), Ministry Digest (Unley, SA:
South Australia Mediacom).
Strunk and Orlo (eds), Journal of Pastoral Care
(Kutztown: Journal of Pastoral Care).

(c) handicapped and disabled persons.


Pastoral care of people in the following situations:
(a) marital disharmony and divorce;
(b) dying, death and bereavement; the grief
process;
(c) depression.
Pastoral care of those in crises, or with chronic
conditions. Students study two of:
(a) alcoholism & drug dependence
(b) attempted suicide
(c) long-term illness
(d) child abuse and domestic violence
(e) AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases
(f) unemployment and work related stress
(g) those in trouble with the law
(h) financial or debt-related stress
Community resources for pastoral care, including
other helping professions; then to refer.

Note:
(a) Sections A and B are weighted approximately 40%
and 60% respectively.
(b) If PC602 has not been taken, approved colleges are
required to ensure that students have studied the unit
matter of PC602 Section A.

PC603 Pastoral Skills and Methods


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To explore and critique various aims and methods
of pastoral care;
(b) To help students identify, analyse, and develop
people helping skills, so as to deliver pastoral care
with the students own empathetic involvement;
(c) To provide students with opportunities to appraise
skills which they see modelled, and to role play,
with supervision, such skills themselves, so as to
enable them to help persons pastorally.
Content
Section A: Pastoral Skills and Methods
1 An introduction to aims and methods in pastoral
care and pastoral counselling and their implications
for Christian community.
2 Relational skills; empathy, respect, concreteness,
genuineness; listening skills.
3 Equipping others; teaching, encouragement,
recognition of abilities, training.
4 Mechanics of care; administration, publicity, the
various settings of care, record-keeping.
Section B: Pastoral Care in Particular Situations
In the topics studied below, attention should be paid not
only to the needs of those in care but the carers own
lives.
5

Pastoral care of persons with special needs,


including:
(a) the recognition of normal and abnormal
conditions;
(b) the mentally ill;

Bibliography
Augsburger, D. W., Helping People Forgive
(Nashville: Westminster John Knox, 1996).
Benner, D., Strategic Pastoral Counselling (2nd ed.;
Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Buxton, G., Dancing in the Dark: the Privilege of
Participating in the Ministry of Christ (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2001).
Capps, D., Giving Counsel: A Ministers Guidebook
(St Louis: Chalice, 2001).
Calhoun, G. J., Pastoral Companionship (New York:
Paulist, 1986).
Carr, W., Handbook of Pastoral Studies (London:
SPCK, 1997).
Claypool, J. R., The Hopeful Heart (Harrisburg:
Morehouse, 2003).
Cloud, H. and J. Townsend, Boundaries in Marriage
(Sydney: Strand, 1999).
Couture, P. D. and R. D. Hunter, Pastoral Care and
Social Conflict (Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).
Culbertson, P, Caring for Gods People (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 2000).
Dann, B., Addiction, Pastoral Responses (Nashville:
Abingdon, 2002).
Dawn, M. J., The Unnecessary Pastor (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
de Paulo, J. R., What we Know and What You Can do
about Depression (New York: John Wiley &
Sons, 2002).
Everett, C. (ed.), Divorce and the Next Generation,
Perspectives for Young Adults in the New
Millennium (New York: Hawthorn, 2001).
Fawcett, J. (ed.), Stress, Trauma Handbook
(Monrovia: World Vision, 2003).
Friberg, N. C. and M. R. Lasser, Before the Fall
(Collegeville: Liturgical, 1998).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Goodliff, P., With Unveiled Face (London: Darton,


Longman and Todd, 2005).
Harvey, R. W. and Benner, D. G., Understanding and
Facilitating Forgiveness (Grand Rapids: Baker,
1996).
Howe, L., Comforting the Fearful (New York: Paulist,
2003).
Jacobs M., Swift to Hear (London: Darton, Longman
and Todd, 1993).
Jacobs, M., Still Small Voice (London: SPCK, 2001).
Kirkwood, N. A., Pastoral Care in Hospitals (Sydney:
EJ Dwyer, 1995).
Koenig, H. G. and A. J. Weaver, Pastoral Care of
Older Adults (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998).
McMinn, M. R. and T. R. Phillips, Care For The Soul:
Exploring the Intersection of Psychology &
Theology (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2001).
Moots, P., Becoming Barnabas (New York: Alban,
2004).
Moran, F. M., Listening, A Pastoral Style (Sydney: EJ
Dwyer, 1997).
Shelp, E. E. and R. H. Sunderland, Sustaining Presence,
A Model of Caring by People of Faith (Nashville:
Abingdon, 2002).
Stairs, J., Listening for the Soul Minneapolis: Fortress,
2000).
TenBrook, G. W., Broken Bodies, Healing Hearts:
Reflections of a Hospital Chaplain (New York:
Haworth, 2000).
Williams, D. R. and J. A. Sturzl (eds), Grief Ministry:
Helping Others Mourn (San Jose, CA: Resource,
2001).
Journals
Ames, S. (ed.), Ministry Society and Theology (Victoria:
Bulleen).
Curkpatrick, S. (ed.), Ministry, Society and Theology
(Mulgrave, Victoria: Australian Association of
Supervised Pastoral Education).
Honeycutt, R. H. (ed.), Review and Expositor
(Louisville: Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary).
Marshall, I. H. (ed.), Evangelical Quarterly, (Carlisle:
Paternoster).
Nuncarrow, T. (ed.), Ministry Digest (Unley, SA: South
Australia Mediacom).
Strunk and Orlo (eds), Journal of Pastoral Care
(Kutztown: Journal of Pastoral Care).
Wallace, R. M. (ed.), Journal of Ministry in Addiction
& Recovery (Bingamton: Haworth).

PC605 Principles of Christian Counselling


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
1 To assist students to come to an understanding of
and
develop
perspectives
on
lifespan
development, through analysing the theory and
practice of counselling.

169

To help students become familiar with major life


stages and transitions, as well as common crises of
life, with specific emphasis on issues of
attachment, bonding, and relationships through the
lifecycle and to integrate them into a Christian
framework.
To provide opportunity for students to reflect
critically on their own Christian understanding in
light of the social sciences and counselling theory.
To provide students with extended opportunity to
practice and develop microskills.

Content
Section A
1 Developmental
paradigms
and
lifespan
development overviews.
2 Newer approaches to lifespan development
contextual, postmodern, constructivist, feminist
and narrative perspectives.
3 Cultural factors in lifespan development.
4 Attachment theory, lifespan development, and
implications for counselling.
5 The social sciences and Christian ministry.
6 Ethical, professional and legal issues in
counselling.
Section B
1 Development working towards a biblical
anthropology
2 Wholeness and health working towards
developing a biblical anthropology
3 Maturity and Community developing biblical
frameworks
Section C: Practical
1 Counselling microskills practice at least 14
hours of basic counselling skills, including
attending, active listening, empathy and probing.
2 The taping of a counselling session, with 15
minute transcript showing joining, empathy and
advanced empathy.
Note: Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately
25%, 25% and 50%.
Bibliography
Bee, H., The Journey of Adulthood (4th ed.; Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000).
Bee, H. and D. Boyd, Lifespan Development (Boston:
Allyn & Bacon, 2002).
Birren, J. E. and K. W. Schaie (eds), Handbook of the
Psychology of Aging (5th ed.; San Diego:
Academic, 2001).
Bloom, S., Creating Sanctuary: Toward an Evolution
of Sane Societies (New York: Routledge, 1997).
Bowlby, J., Attachment and Loss (Vols I-III; London;
New York: Penguin; Basic, 1969-1980).
Cassidy, J. and P. R. Shaver (eds), Handbook of
Attachment (New York: Guilford, 1999).
Cavanaugh, J. C. and F. Blanchard-Fields, Adult
Development and Aging (5th ed.; Belmont, CA:
Wadsworth, 2006).

MDiv Unit Outlines

170

Clinton, T. and G. Sibcy, Attachments: Why You Love,


Feel and Act the Way You Do (Brentwood, TN:
Integrity, 2002).
Corey, G., Student Manual for Theory and Practice of
Counseling and Psychotherapy (6th ed.; Pacific
Grove, CA: Brooks Cole, 2001).
Culley, S. and T. Bond, Integrative Counselling Skills
in Action (Pacific Grove, CA: Sage, 2004).
Dryden, W. (ed.), Standards and Ethics for
Counselling in Action (London: Sage, 1999).
Egan, G. and R. McGourty, The Skilled Helper (7th ed.;
Monterey, CA: Brooks Cole, 2002).
Feeney, J. A. and P. Noller, Adult Attachment
(Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1996).
Holmes, J., John Bowlby and Attachment Theory
(London: Routledge, 1993).
Lemme, B. H., Development in adulthood (3rd ed.;
Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2002).
Parkes, C. M., J. Stevenson-Hinde & P. Marris,
Attachment Across the Lifecycle (New York:
Routledge, 1996).
Simpson, J. and W. S. Rhodes (eds), Attachment
Theory and Close Relationships (New York:
Guilford, 1998).
Whitbourne, S. K., Adult Development and Aging:
Biopsychological Perspectives (2nd Ed.; New
York: Wiley, 2005).
Additional Reading:
Collins. G. R., The Biblical Basis of Counselling for
People Helpers (Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House,
1993).
Hurding, R. F., Roots and Shoots: (London: Hodder &
Stoughton, 1993).
Jacobs, M., Psychodynamic Counselling in Action
(London: Sage, 2004).
Jenkins, P., Counselling, Psychotherapy and the Law
(London: Safe, 1997).
Jones, S. L. and R. E. Butmann, Modern
Psychotherapies (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1991).
Kirwan, W. T., Biblical Concepts for Christian
Counselling (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1984).
McMinn, M. R., Psychology, Theology and
Spirituality (Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House, 1996).
Narramore, C. M., The Compact Encyclopaedia of
Psychological
Problems
(Grand
Rapids:
Zondervan, 1984).
Sanders, R. K. (ed.), Christian Counselling Ethics
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1997).

PC606 Applied Christian Counselling


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
1 To assist students to come to a critical
understanding of current models of the theory and
practice of counselling.

To help students develop an integrated Christian


approach to the dynamics of counselling and its
place in Christian ministry.
To assist students to build on their practical
counselling microskills.

Content
Section A
1 Four key therapeutic approaches to counselling
and their applications:
a analytic/psychodynamic
b cognitive-behavioural
c experiential-expressive
d strategic-systemic
2 Perspectives on at least 3 current models of
counselling: e.g., Person-centred counselling,
Gestalt therapy, Transactional analysis, Cognitive
Behavioural Therapies, Narrative Therapies.
3 Christian theology and counselling theory.
4 Ethical, professional and legal issues in
counselling.
Section B
5 At least 14 hours of intensive microskilling,
building on the skills and frameworks of PC605.
6 A video of a 45 minute to 1 hour counselling
session, with 15 minute transcript showing
students growing ability in advanced empathy,
probing, confronting and diagnostic skills.
Note: Sections A and B are weighted approximately
40% and 60%.
Bibliography
Corey, G., Theory and Practice of Counselling and
Psychotherapy (6th ed.; Pacific Grove, CA:
Brooks Cole, 2000).
Corey, G., Approach to Counselling and
Psychotherapy (5th ed.; Pacific Grove, CA:
Brooks Cole, 2001).
Corey, G., Student Manual for Theory and Practice of
Counselling Psychotherapy (5th ed.; Pacific
Grove, CA: Brooks Cole, 2001).
Egan, G. and R. McGourty, The Skilled Helper (7th ed.;
Monterey, CA: Brooks Cole, 2002).
Egan, G., Exercises in Helping Skills (7th ed.; Pacific
Grove, CA: Brooks Cole, 2001).
Jones, S. L. and R. E. Butman, Modern
Psychotherapies (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1991).
Legg, Psychology and the Reflective Counselor
(London: Blackwell, 1998).
Lynch, G. (ed.), Clinical Counselling in Pastoral
Settings (London; New York: Routledge, 1999).
Lynch, G., Pastoral Care and Counselling (London:
Sage, 2002).
ODonohue, W., J. E. Fisher and S. C. Hayes,
Cognitive
Behavior
Therapy:
Applying
Empirically Supported Techniques in Your
Practice (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2003).
de Board, R., Counselling for Toads: A Psychological
Adventure (London: Routledge, 1998).

MDiv Unit Outlines

PC608
Spiritual Formation for Professional
Ministries
Status
Elective
Exclusions
EM617
Learning Outcomes
(a) To give students opportunity to discuss and work
towards a personal resolution of issues facing a
person in professional ministry;
(b) To equip students to critically apply spirituality to
major areas of Christian ministry;
(c) To encourage increased self-awareness in students
for professional ministries as to their own growth in
maturity in Christ and as those ministering to others.
Content
Section A: Personal Spiritual Development
1 Vocation, call, giftedness, career choice; selection
for professional ministries.
2 Maintaining spiritual vitality in professional
ministry settings, including patterns of personal
prayer and Bible study; the daily offices; fellowship
with other Christians.
3 Dealing with stress and its spiritual consequences;
conflict resolution; avoiding burnout; material
possessions and money; recreation.
4 Doubt, temptation and testing, spiritual warfare;
spiritual wholeness.
Section B: Relationships in Ministry
5 Personal significance and security; relational skills,
including listening, self-disclosure, empathy.
6 Relations with others in ministry, including
congregational members and leaders, co-workers,
other ministers, Christians from other traditions,
those in authority.
7 Relationships in the professional ministers
household; the single professional minister; the
Christian home; spiritual, relational and financial
factors affecting the spouse and children.
8 Roles and role conflict; authority and team-work;
servant ministries; taking responsibility.
Note:
Sections A and B are weighted approximately equally.
Bibliography
In addition to works listed in the Bibliography for
PC525 & PC628:
Journals: Leadership, Grid and Australian Ministry.
Carson, D. A. and J. D. Woodbridge, Letters Along the
Way (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 1993).
Chan, S., Spiritual Theology (Downers Grove, IL:
IVP, 1998).
Demarest, B., Satisfy Your Soul (Colorado Springs:
NavPress, 1999).
Foster, R., Streams of Living Water (San Francisco:
HarperSanFrancisco, 1998).

171

Foster, R. and J. B. Smith (eds), Devotional Classics


(San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1993).
Kingham, R., Surprises of the Spirit (Canberra:
Barnabas, 1991).
McGrath, A. E., Christian Spirituality: An
Introduction (Oxford; Malden, MA: Blackwell,
1999).
McGrath, A. E., The Journey: A Pilgrim in the Lands
of the Spirit (London: Hodder & Stoughton,
1999).
Nouwen, H., In the Name of Jesus (New York:
Crossroad, 1989).
Peterson, E. H., Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places
(London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2005).
Peterson, E. H., The Contemplative Pastor (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993).
Piper, J., Desiring God (Sisters, OR: Multnomah,
2003).
Shawchuck, N. and R. Heuser, Managing the
Congregation (Nashville: Abingdon, 1996).
Stevens, R. P., The Abolition of the Laity: Vocation,
Work & Ministry in a Biblical Perspective (Grand
Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).

PC616 Denominational Distinctives


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To guide students towards a critical understanding
of the historical, theological and spiritual roots of a
significant Christian tradition;
(b) To equip students to assess critically contemporary
trends in the tradition studied;
(c) To enable students to reflect upon their own
attitudes towards formation and ministry in the
tradition studied.
Content
1 The historical origins of the tradition selected,
taking account of both historical, sociological,
cultural, ecclesial, theological and spiritual factors.
2 Major events significant for the formation of the
pastoral ethos and distinctive theological and
ministerial rationale of the tradition selected for
study.
3 Significant figures in the tradition concerned, both
men and women, at least one lay and one
ordained.
4 The distinctive theological motifs or beliefs of the
tradition and their pastoral and structural
consequences (local, national and global).
5 Relationships with other Christian traditions, the
wider community and Australian society.
6 Contemporary tensions, growth points and
opportunities in the tradition selected, illustrated by
a case study of a particular congregation.

MDiv Unit Outlines

172

Note:
The unit assumes that students will study the tradition of
which they are a part but this is not a requirement. In
either case, students should utilise the opportunity to
explore their own vocation in relation to both
opportunities and challenges presented to them by the
tradition concerned.

(b) To enable students to focus in greater depth on


selected periods through inductive study of primary
sources from the Christian tradition and thus make
an assessment of the tradition.
(c) To equip students to make discriminating
application of resources from the Christian tradition
to present day spiritual life.

Bibliography

Content
Section A: History of the Christian Spiritual
Tradition
A survey outlining broad spiritual traditions as a basis for
further study of selected periods: biblical roots and
perspectives, the Church Fathers, monasticism, the
English mystics, Reformation and Counter-Reformation,
Pietism, the Evangelical Revivals, the (Tractarian)
Oxford Movement.

Baptist
Primary sources:
Brackney, W. H. (ed.), Baptist Life and Thought: A
Source Book (Rev. ed.; Valley Forge, PA: Judson
Press, 1998).
Freeman, C. W., et al, Baptist Roots: A Reader in the
Theology of a Christian People (Valley Forge, PA:
Judson Press, 1999).
Secondary sources:
Brackney, W. H., A Genetic History of Baptist
Thought: With Special Reference to Baptists in
Britain and North America (Macon, GA: Mercer
University Press, 2004).
Goodwin, E. C., The New Hiscox Guide for Baptist
Churches (Valley Forge,PA: Judson Press, 1995).
Leonard, B. J., Baptist Ways: A History (Valley Forge,
PA: Judson Press, 2003).
Manley, K. R., From Woolloomooloo to Eternity: A
History of Australian Baptists 2 vols. (Milton
Keynes, U.K.: Paternoster, 2006).
Pierard, R. V. (ed.), Baptists Together in Christ 19052005: A Hundred-Year History of the Baptist
World Alliance (Birmingham, AL: Samford
University Press, 2005).
Weaver, C. D., In Search of the New Testament
Church: The Baptist Story (Macon, GA: Mercer
University Press, 2008).
Wright, N., Free Church, Free State: The Positive
Baptist Vision (Milton Keynes, U.K.: Paternoster,
2005).
Classics:
Lumpkin, W. L., Baptist Confessions of Faith (Rev.
ed.; Valley Forge, PA: Judson Press, 1969).
McBeth, H. L., The Baptist Heritage (Nashville, TN:
Broadman, 1987).

Section B: Readings in the Christian Spiritual


Tradition
The study of three primary texts selected from different
periods. The particular themes for each text should be
identified, discussed in their historical setting and related
to their application to present day spirituality. The texts
should be chosen from those listed in the Recommended
Readings, or others approved by the Field moderator.
Note
Sections A and B are weighted approximately equally.
Bibliography
In addition to works listed in the recommended readings
for PC327:
Adam, P., Hearing Gods Words: Exploring Biblical
Spirituality (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Downey, M., Understanding Christian Spirituality
(New York: Paulist, 1997).
Mursell, G. (ed.), The Story of Christian Spirituality:
Two Thousand Years, from East to West (Oxford:
Lion, 2001).
Nouwen, H. J. M., Life of the Beloved: Spiritual Living
in a Secular World (New York: Crossroad, 2002).
Rienstra, D., An Invitation to Christian Spirituality (San
Francisco: Jossey Bass Wiley, 2005).
Sheldrake, P. (ed.), The New SCM Dictionary of
Spirituality (London: SCM, 2005).
Williams, R., Christian Spirituality from the New
Testament to St. John of the Cross (London:
Darton, Longman and Todd, 1990).

PC628 The Christian Spiritual Tradition

Status
Elective

PC629 Contemporary Trends in Spirituality

Exclusions
This unit may not be taken if PC530 has been taken.

Status
Core

Learning Outcomes
(a) To guide students towards a critical understanding
of Christian spirituality from the New Testament to
the present;

Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist students to analyse major influences in
spirituality;
(b) To enable students to critique the world-views
behind contemporary spiritualities;

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) To equip students to respond appropriately to


contemporary trends in spirituality.
Content
Section A
Includes a study of major Christian doctrines in the light
of contemporary spiritualities. These include a doctrine
of God, creation and human wholeness. Concerns to do
with our understanding of the Kingdom of God;
authentic spirituality; ecology; the place of scripture;
meditation; contemplative prayer; and the place of
religious experience.
Section B
From the perspective of biblical and theological insights
and Christian practice students are encouraged to come
to an appreciative and critical study of the Islamic,
Buddhist, Aboriginal, Feminist and Creation
spiritualities.
Bibliography
Recommended Readings:
Abu-Rabi, I. M., The Blackwell Companion of
Contemporary Islamic Thought (London:
Blackwell, 2006).
Augsburger, D., Dissident Discipleship (Grand Rapids:
Brazos Press, 2005).
Barket, L. L., Stone Crossings: Finding Grace in Hard
and Hidden Places (Downers Grove: InterVarsity
2008).
Clapp, R., Tortured Wonders (Grand Rapids: Brazos
Press, 2004).
Drane, J., Do Christians Know How to be Spiritual?
The Rise of New Spirituality, and the Mission of
the Church (London: Darton, Longman and Todd,
2005).
Foster, R., Streams of Living Water: Celebrating the
Great Traditions of Christian Faith (San
Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco. 1998).
Fox, M., Creation Spirituality (San Francisco:
HarperSanFrancisco 1995).
Hunt, S., Spiritual Mothering: Titus 2 Model for
Women Mentoring Women (Wheaton: Crossway.
2008).
King, U., The Search for Spirituality (Norwich:
Canterbury Press, 2009).
Liebelt P (ed), Gentle Rain on Parched Earth
(Melbourne: JBCE 1996)
McGrath, A. E, Christian Spirituality (London:
Blackwells, 1999).
Raiter, M., Stirrings of the Soul (Kingsford: Matthias
Media, 2003).
Rankin, M., An Introduction to Religious and Spiritual
Experience (New York: Continuum, 2009).
Sheldrake, P., A Brief History of Spirituality (London:
Blackwell, 2006).
Stevens, R. P., Down to Earth Spiritualty (Downers
Grove: InterVarsity 2003).
Storkey, E., Created or Constructed?(Sydney: UNSW
Press, 2001).
Tacey, D., ReEnchantment, (Pymble: Harper and
Collins, 2000).

173

Tacey, D., The Spirituality Revolutionary (Pymble:


Harper/Collins 2003).
Thompson, M., Soul Feast (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2005).
Whelan, R., J. Kirwan, and P. Haffner, The Cross and
the Rain Forest (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996)
Whetham, P. and Libby, Hard to be Holy (Adelaide:
Openbook Press, 2001).
Reference Books
Holder, A., The Blackwell Companion of Christian
Spirituality (London: Blackwell, 2005)
Howard, E. B., The Brazos Introduction to Christian
Spirituality (Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2008)
Partridge, C. (ed.), The World Religions 3rd Edition
(Oxford: Lion Hudson, 2005)
Brown, D. W., (2nd ed), The New Introduction to Islam
(London: Blackwell, 2007).
Dowson, M; M. Miner, S. Devenish (eds) Spirituality
in Australia: Resurgence and Divergence
(Roselands, NSW: Centre for Human Interaction,
Learning and Development (CHILD) &
Australasian Centre for Studies in Spirituality
(ACSS), 2008).
Journals
Fiorenza, E. S. and E. M. Townes (eds), Journal of
Feminist Studies in Religion (Edinburgh: T & T
Clark).
John, C. (ed.). Journal of Formation & Soul Care (La
Mirada: Talbot School of Theology)
Jordan, T. (ed.), Spirituality (Dublin: Dominican)
Mogabah, J. S. (ed.), Weavings: A Journal of the
Spiritual Life (Nashville: Upper Room).
Singh, D. E., Transformation: an International Journal
of Holistic Mission Studies (Exeter: Paternoster
Press)
Wagner, N., Presence: An International Journal on
Spritual Direction (Bellevue: Spiritual)

PC634 Leadership in Christian Ministry


Status
Elective
Exclusions
PC635.
Learning Outcomes
To develop in students a critical appreciation of and
practical competence in:
(a) the principles of leadership
(b) how to manage organizational culture
(c) how to find, select, and nurture a leadership team
(d) how to manage conflict
(e) how to gain an understanding of their community
using census data
(f) how to think strategically about Christian ministry
(g) the ethics of leadership
(h) themselves and how to work with others.

174

MDiv Unit Outlines

Content
Section A: Leadership Principles and Skills
1 Biblical principles of leadership
2 Leadership qualities and style
3 Understanding the health of your church or
organisation
4 Visionary thinking and strategic planning;
communicating vision
5 Being a change agent and influencing
organisational culture
6 Ethics in leadership
7 Finding, selecting and investing in a team; writing
job contracts
8 Running effective meetings and a small group
9 Conflict management and working with different
personality types
Section B: Understanding Australian Society and
Personal Development
10 Societal make up. Use of census data.
11 Cultural and spiritual trends and how culture
shapes outreach ministry
12 Personal disciplines and intentional character
development
13 Understanding your personality and overcoming
disappointments
Section C: Field Work
14 At least 8 hours under the guidance of a Christian
in a significant leadership position, observing and
reflecting upon the principles and processes of
leadership in operation.
15 Students undertake a personal evaluation, under
supervision, of their own strengths and
weaknesses in leadership. The evaluation may be
in written or oral form.
Note:
Sections A, B and C are weighted 60%, 20% and 20%
respectively in the assessment.
Bibliography
Baab, L., Personality Type in Congregations
(Bethesda, MD: Alban, 1998).
Banks, R. and B. Ledbetter, Reviewing Leadership
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004).
Blanchard, K., J. Carlos and A. Randolph,
Empowerment Takes More than a Minute (San
Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 1996).
Jones, G. and R. Jones, Teamwork: How to Build
Relationships (London: Scripture Union, 2003).
Malphurs, A., Advanced Strategic Planning (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 1999).
Malphurs, A., Being Leaders (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Maxwell, J., Developing the Leaders Around You
(Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1995).
Rendle, G., Leading Change in the Congregation
(Bethesda, MD: Alban, 1998).
Richardson, R., Creating a Healthier Church
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Schaller, L., Tattered Trust: Is there Hope for Your
Denomination? (Nashville: Abingdon, 1996).

Shawchuck and Heuser, Managing the Congregation


(Nashville: Abingdon, 1996).
Steinke, P., Healthy Congregations: a Systems
Approach (Bethesda, MD: Alban, 1996).
Tidball, D., Builders and Fools (Leicester, IVP, 1999).
Wright, W., Relational Leadership (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2000).

PC635 Principles of Leadership and Management


Status
Elective
Exclusions
PC634.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To develop students capacity for the appraisal of
the theology and dynamics of leadership,
challenging them to a commitment to excellence;
(b) To promote the process of personal development,
assisting students to become facilitators in the
leadership development of others;
(c) To equip students with the ability through critical
reflection to structure, reform and manage
congregations and other Christian organisations.
Content
Section A: Principles of Christian Leadership
1 Biblical principles and patterns of leadership.
2 Leadership qualities; gifts and abilities; the process
of leadership development.
3 Operating as a leader: appropriate styles for
different situations and people; mentoring,
delegating, motivating, communicating.
4 Power, authority, responsibility and influence.
Section B: Managing Christian Institutions
5 Establishing purpose, objectives, philosophy of
ministry, goals, plans, administration, feedback and
problem-solving.
6 Principles of organisation: alternative structures,
job-descriptions, decision-making, committees,
accountability, time-management.
7 Managing conflict and implementing change.
8 Financial management; Christian principles in using
money, understanding accounts, budgeting,
accountability.
9 Institutional life-cycles and aging; bureaucracy and
devitalisation.
Section C: Field Work
10 At least 8 hours under the guidance of a Christian in
a significant management position, observing and
reflecting upon the principles and processes of
management in operation.
11 Students undertake a personal evaluation, under
supervision, of their own strengths and weaknesses
in leadership; it may be in written or oral form.

MDiv Unit Outlines

Note
Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 40%,
40% and 20% respectively.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Anthony, M. J., Management Essentials for Christian
Ministries (Nashville, Tenn; Broadman &
Holman, 2005).
Tidball, D. J., Builders and Fools: Leadership the
Bible Way (Leicester: Inter-Varsity Press, 1999).
Wright, W., Relational Leadership (Carlisle:
Paternoster, 2000).
Recommended:
Bacher, R., Church Administration: Programs,
Process and Purpose (Minneapolis: Fortress
Press, 2007).
Bass, R. W., Leadership in Congregations (Herndon,
VA: Alban, 2006).
Bolman, L. G., Reframing Organizations: Artistry,
Choice and Leadership (San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Bass, 2003).
Brand, C. O. and R. S. Norman, Perspectives on
Church Government: Five Views of Church Polity
(Nashville: B&H Academic, 2004).
Clarke, A. D., Secular and Christian Leadership in
Corinth: A Socio-Historical and Exegetical Study
of 1 Corinthians 1-6 (Bletchley, Milton Keynes:
Paternoster, 2006).
Cole, N., Organic Leadership: Leading Naturally
Right Where You Are (Grand Rapids, Mich:
Baker, 2009).
Collins, J., Built to Last: Successful Habits of
Visionary Companies (London: Random House,
2005).
Cowan, S. B. (ed.), Who Runs the Church: 4 Views on
Church Government (Grand Rapids, Mich:
Zondervan, 2004).
Gerzon, M., Leading through Conflict: How
Successful Leaders Transform Difference into
Opportunity (Boston, Mass: Harvard, 2006).
Hotchkiss, D., Governance and Ministry: Rethinking
Board Leadership (Herndon, VA: Alban Institute,
2008).
Johnson, B. C and A. Dreitcer, Beyond the Ordinary:
Spirituality for Church Leaders (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2001).
Kaiser, J. E., Winning on Purpose: How to Organize
Congregations to Succeed in their Mission
(Nashville, Tenn: Abingdon Press, 2006).
Keel, T., Intuitive Leadership: Embracing a Paradigm
of Narrative, Metaphor and Chaos (Grand Rapids,
MI: Baker, 2007).
Laniak, T. S., Shepherds after my Heart: Pastoral
Traditions and Leadership in the Bible (Downers
Grove, Ill: Intervarsity Press, 2006).
Malphurs, A., Being Leaders (Grand Rapids: Baker,
2003).
Malphurs, A., Leading Leaders: Empowering Church
Boards for Ministry Excellence (Grand Rapids,
MI: Baker, 2005).

175

McNeal, R., Practicing Greatness: Seven Disciplines


of Extraordinary Spiritual Leaders (San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2006).
Nelson, J., How to Become a Creative Church Leader
(London: Canterbury Press, 2008).
Prosser, S., To be a Servant Leader (Mahwah, NJ:
Paulist, 2007).
Roxburgh, A. J., The Missional Leader: Equipping
Your Church to Reach the World (San Francisco,
CA: Jossey-Bass, 2006).
Smith, D. P., Pathway for Renewal: Practical Steps for
Congregations (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2008).
Tidball, D. J., Ministry by the Book: New Testament
Patterns for Pastoral Leadership (Nottingham:
Apollos, 2008).
Welch, R. H., Church Administration: Creating
Efficiency for Effective Ministry (Nashville, Tenn:
Broadman & Holman, 2005).
Wright, W., Mentoring: The Promise of Relational
Leadership (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2004).

PC636 Clinical Pastoral Education


A basic unit in Clinical Pastoral Education
Content
The successful completion of a basic unit in Clinical
Pastoral Education.

PC640 Communication Principles


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce students to communication theory and
group dynamics and equip them to appraise the
various theories;
(b) To help students acquire communication skills,
especially in relation to Bible study methods;
(c) To provide opportunity for students to undertake
more detailed study of particular areas of
communication as applied to Christian ministries
and assess their value.
Content
Section A: Communication Theory
1 Elements in communication: the source, message,
medium and receptor in the communication process;
the appropriateness of the medium to the message;
the message intended and heard.
2 Group communication: group dynamics; verbal and
non-verbal communication; factors which hinder
communication in formal and informal gatherings
(including corporate worship).
3 Verbal skills: types of spoken communication;
presentations appropriate to different age groups,
cultures and situations.

MDiv Unit Outlines

176

5
6

Group Bible study: deductive and inductive


learning; group leadership roles; various methods
and programmes of study.
Group learning: in corporate worship, service, work,
fellowship, body-life.
Church communication with the modern world; use
of the media; publicity and public relations.

Section B: Communication Practice


7 Practice of skills in public speaking and study group
leadership.
8 A detailed consideration of the principles involved,
the advantages and disadvantages for various
situations and the practice of skills, in two of the
following topics:
(a) Printed materials: church newspapers, bulletins,
tracts; notice-boards;
(b) Audio-visual techniques: incorporating current
technologies;
(c) Radio: preparation and presentation of scripts;
interviewing techniques; talk-back radio;
(d) Music: appropriateness for various situations
and people; available resources (including
hymn books for choir and congregational use);
music and ministry; copyright issues;
(e) Drama and dance: opportunities and techniques
for various situations and people; corporate and
liturgical dance and movement.
Section C: Field Work
9 Personal creative involvement (with supervision) in
one of the areas studied in topic 8, including
production of a sample project involving at least 20
hours work.
Assessment Methods
Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 40%,
40% and 20% respectively.
Bibliography
General Works:
Baker, J. D., Christian Cyberspace Companion: A Guide
to the Internet and Christian Online Resources
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997).
Barker, L., Communication (Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Prentice Hall, 2000).
Bluck, J., Christian Communications Reconsidered
(Geneva: WCC, 1994).
Crabb, L., Connecting (Nashville: Word, 1997).
DeVito, J. A., The Interpersonal Communication Book
(10th ed.; New York: Addison Wesley, 2004).
Elder, B., Communication Skills (Melbourne:
Macmillan, 1994).
Kraft, C. H., Communication Theory For Christian
Witness (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1991).
Littlejohn, S. W., Theories Of Human Communication
(Belmont: Wadsworth, 1996).
Nash, T., The Christian Communicators Handbook
(Victor, 1995).

Verbal Communication
Bewes, R., Speaking In Public Effectively (Great
Britain: Christian Focus Publications, 1998).
Chan, S., et al, How To Prepare A Bible Talk (Sydney:
Sydney Missionary & Bible College, 2003).
Cotter, H., Reading the Bible Aloud (Sydney: Aquila,
1998).
DeVito, J. A., Messages Building Interpersonal
Communication (4th ed.; New York: Longman,
1999).
Warne, C. & P. White, How to Hold an Audience
Without a Rope (Sydney: AIO, 1986).
Small Groups
Gudykunst, W. B., Bridging Differences: Effective
Intergroup Communication (Thousand Oaks: Sage,
1994).
Hestenes, R., Building Christian Community Trhough
Small Groups (Pasadena, CA: Fuller, 1995).
Hestenes, R., Using The Bible In Groups (Swindon,
UK: British and Foreign Bible Society, 1990).
Mallison, J., The Samll Group Leader (Adelaide: Open
Book, 1996).
Morris, K. and R. Morris, Leading Better Bible
Studies: Essential Skills For Effective Small
Groups (Sydney: Aquila, 1997).
Mass Media
Baker, J. D., Christian Cyberspace Companion: A
Guide To The Internet And Christian Online
Resources (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997).
Bausch, M. G., Silver Screen, Sacred Story: Using
Multimedia in Worship (Washington: Alban,
2002).
Eason, T., Media Ministry Made Easy: A Practical
Guide To Visual Communication (Nashville:
Abingdon, 2003).
Schultze, Q. J., Communicating For Life: Christian
Stewardship In Community And Media (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2000).
Slaughter, M., Out On The Edge: A Wake-Up Call For
Church Leaders On The Edge Of The Media
Reformation (Nashville: Abingdon, 1998).
Walsh, R., Reading the Gospels in the Dark:
Portrayals of Jesus in Film (Harrisburg, PA:
Trinity, 2003).

PC642PC644 Field Education Units


Candidate may not take more than 3 of units PC636,
PC642-644, DM642, EM640 and not more than 2
designated Field Education units---PC642-644, DM642
and EM640.
Notes
(a) Units PC642644, DM642, and EM640 will be
assessed on a non-graded Pass/Fail basis, and will
not be included in the calculation of grade point
averages.
(b) Units PC642644, DM642, and EM640 will be
moderated by the appropriate Field moderator.

MDiv Unit Outlines

(c) An introduction to the ministry issues pertaining to


the context in which the Field Work will be
undertaken. The precise details of the content
should be outlined in advance by the individual
colleges for all their students.
(d) Colleges should seek approval from the relevant
field moderator for their methods of reflection and
evaluation for field education units.

PC642 Congregational Field Education


Status
Elective
Exclusions
Candidates may take two only of units PC642-644 and
DM642.
Co-requisites
Colleges may require PC501 or PC537 as a co-requisite.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce students to the practical issues related
to particular ministry settings.
(b) To stimulate candidates reflection, integration and
thinking with respect to philosophical issues,
including cross-cultural education, pluralism and
ethnicity and the exercise of informed critical
judgement on programmes of education within
church or nation;
(c) To facilitate in candidates an understanding of the
skills involved in practical ministry, and give
opportunity for the acquisition and development of
these skills in chosen areas;
(d) To enable candidates to examine principles of
education and educational insights from the social
sciences in the light of biblical perspectives and
contemporary theological understanding
Content
Section A: Theoretical Study
1 An introduction to the planning and conduct of
church services and other programmes connected
with the life and work of a local congregation, and
the pastoral opportunities they represent.
2 A basic study of church administration, including
the role of ordained ministers, church secretary,
treasurer and other leaders; church organisations;
the conduct of business meetings.
3 Ministers as pro-active leaders and managers;
strategy and goal-setting; appropriate leadership
styles for different situations; anticipating and
managing conflict.
4 Ministers as agents of social change; the local
church in the local community.
Section B: Field Work
5 The supervisory relationship; the supervisory
session; learning covenants; evaluation; Field
Committees.

177

EITHER
not less than 200 hours experience (with
supervision) in a local congregation.
OR
a period of continuous residence (with supervision)
of not less than six weeks duration in a local
congregation.
In either case,
(a) Approximately 120 hours are to be spent in
actual ministry, including participation in the
conduct of regular church services, and
involvement in some aspect of the
congregations service to its community;
(b) Approximately 60 hours are to be spent in
preparation, and writing up verbatims for
supervisors;
(c) Approximately 20 hours are to consist of
reflection upon practical experience, at least 10
hours on an individual basis, with an approved
supervisor. Such reflection must include
comments from local congregation leaders.

Bibliography
Prescribed:
Bass, D. C. (ed.), For Life Abundant: Practical
Theology, Theological Education, and Christian
Ministry (Grand Rapids, Mich: Eerdmans, 2008).
Johnson, A., Shaping Spiritual Leaders: Supervision
and Formation in Congregations (Herndon, VA:
Alan, 2007).
Malphurs, A., A New Kind of Church: Understanding
Models of Ministry for the 21st Century (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2007).
Recommended:
Allen, R. J., Preaching and Practical Ministry (St.
Louis: Chalice, 2001).
Brian, P. R., Going the Distance: How to Stay Fit for a
Lifetime of Ministry (Kingsford: Matthias Media,
2006).
Carl, W. J. (ed.), Best Advice: Wisdom on Ministry
from 30 Leading Pastors and Preachers
(Louisville, KY: Westminster John Know Press,
2009).
Carroll, J. W., Gods Potters: Pastoral Leadership and
the Shaping of Congregations (Grand Rapids,
Mich: Eerdmans, 2006).
Drane, J. W., After McDonaldization: Mission,
Ministry and Christian Discipleship in an Age of
Uncertainty (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2008).
Elias, J. W., Remembering the Future: The Pastoral
Theology of Paul the Apostle (Scottsdale, PA:
Herald, 2006).
Herrington, J., R. R. Creech and T. Taylor, The
Leaders Journey: Accepting the Call to Personal
and Congregational Transformation (San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2003).
Hillman, G. M,. Preparing for Ministry: A Practical
Guide for Theological Field Education (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Kregel, 2008).

MDiv Unit Outlines

178

Hotchkiss, D., Governance and Ministry: Rethinking


Board Leadership (Herndon, VA: Alban Institute,
2008).
Laniak, T. S., Shepherds after my Heart: Pastoral
Traditions and Leadership in the Bible (Downers
Grove, Ill: Intervarsity Press, 2006).
Piper, J., Brothers, We are Not Professionals: A Plea
to Pastors for Radical Ministry (Nashville:
Broadman and Holman, 2002).
Steinke, P. L., Congregational Leadership in Anxious
Times: Being Calm and Courageous No Matter
What (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Steinke, P. L., Healthy Congregations: A Systems
Approach (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Stott, J. R. W., The Living Church: Convictions of a
Lifelong Pastor (Nottingham: IVP, 2007).
Tidball, D. J., Ministry by the Book: New Testament
Patterns for Pastoral Leadership (Nottingham:
Apollos, 2008).
Thompson, J., Pastoral Ministry According to Paul: A
Biblical Vision (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker,
2006).
Willimon, W. H., Calling and Character: Virtues of
the Ordained Life (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Willimon, W. H., Pastor: A Reader for Ordained
Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Wood, C. M., Attentive to God: Thinking
Theologically about Ministry (Nashville, TN:
Abingdon, 2008).

PC643 Pastoral Care Field Education


Status
Elective
Exclusions
Candidates may take two only of units PC643-644 and
DM642.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to the practical issues
related to pastoral care in a congregation or other
ministry setting;
(b) To provide candidates an opportunity to work with
supervision in a church or other ministry setting for
an extended period;
(c) To allow candidates to reflect on the ministry they
observe with an experienced practitioner(s);
(d) To allow candidates to reflect on their own
ministry with an experienced practitioner(s);
Content
Section A: Theoretical Study
1 Pastoral visitation: congregational members,
families, the sick, the home-bound, and those with
fringe contacts.
2 The pastoral care of new believers; assimilation into
the life, work and witness of the church.
3 Pastoral opportunities provided by enquiries for the
baptism or blessing of children; preparation of
students for communicant membership.

An introduction to ministry to the dying and


bereaved, including the preparation and conduct of
funerals; follow-up or the bereaved.

Section B: Field Work


5 The supervisory relationship; the supervisory
session, learning covenants; evaluation; Field
Committees.
6

EITHER
not less than 200 hours experience (with
supervision) in a local congregation;
OR
a period of continuous residence (with supervisor)
of not less than six weeks duration in a local
congregation.
In either case,

(a) Approximately 120 hours are to be spent in actual


ministry, including participation in the conduct of
church services for Christian initiation, and funerals,
and involvement in pastoral visitation of different
types of regular and fringe congregational members;
(b) Approximately 60 hours are to be spent in
preparation, and writing up verbatims for
supervisors;
(c) Approximately 20 hours are to consist of reflection
upon practical experience, at least 10 hours on an
individual basis, with an approved supervisor. Such
reflection must include comments from local
congregational leaders.
Bibliography
Prescribed:
Bass, D. C. (ed.), For Life Abundant: Practical
Theology, Theological Education, and Christian
Ministry (Grand Rapids, Mich: Eerdmans, 2008).
Johnson, A., Shaping Spiritual Leaders: Supervision
and Formation in Congregations (Herndon, VA:
Alan, 2007).
Malphurs, A., A New Kind of Church: Understanding
Models of Ministry for the 21st Century (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2007).
Recommended:
Allen, R. J., Preaching and Practical Ministry (St.
Louis: Chalice, 2001).
Brian, P. R., Going the Distance: How to Stay Fit for a
Lifetime of Ministry (Kingsford: Matthias Media,
2006).
Carl, W. J. (ed.), Best Advice: Wisdom on Ministry
from 30 Leading Pastors and Preachers
(Louisville, KY: Westminster John Know Press,
2009).
Carroll, J. W., Gods Potters: Pastoral Leadership and
the Shaping of Congregations (Grand Rapids,
Mich: Eerdmans, 2006).
Drane, J. W., After McDonaldization: Mission,
Ministry and Christian Discipleship in an Age of
Uncertainty (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2008).

MDiv Unit Outlines

Elias, J. W., Remembering the Future: The Pastoral


Theology of Paul the Apostle (Scottsdale, PA:
Herald, 2006).
Herrington, J., R. R. Creech and T. Taylor, The
Leaders Journey: Accepting the Call to Personal
and Congregational Transformation (San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2003).
Hillman, G. M., Preparing for Ministry: A Practical
Guide for Theological Field Education (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Kregel, 2008).
Hotchkiss, D., Governance and Ministry: Rethinking
Board Leadership (Herndon, VA: Alban Institute,
2008).
Laniak, T. S., Shepherds After My Heart: Pastoral
Traditions and Leadership in the Bible (Downers
Grove, Ill: Intervarsity Press, 2006).
Piper, J., Brothers, We Are Not Professionals: A Plea
to Pastors for Radical Ministry (Nashville:
Broadman and Holman, 2002).
Steinke, P. L., Congregational Leadership in Anxious
Times: Being Calm and Courageous No Matter
What (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Steinke, P. L., Healthy Congregations: A Systems
Approach (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Stott, J. R. W., The Living Church: Convictions of a
Lifelong Pastor (Nottingham: IVP, 2007).
Tidball, D. J., Ministry by the Book: New Testament
Patterns for Pastoral Leadership (Nottingham:
Apollos, 2008).
Thompson, J., Pastoral Ministry According to Paul: A
Biblical Vision (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker,
2006).
Willimon, W. H., Calling and Character: Virtues of
the Ordained Life (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Willimon, W. H., Pastor: A Reader for Ordained
Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Wood, C. M., Attentive to God: Thinking
Theologically about Ministry (Nashville, TN:
Abingdon, 2008).

179

Content
Section A: Theoretical Study
1 An introduction to the ministry issues pertaining to
the context in which the Field Work will be
undertaken. The precise details of the content
should be outlined in advance by the individual
colleges for their students.
Section B: Field Work
2 The supervisory relationship; the supervisory
session; learning covenant; evaluation; field
committees.
3 A placement in a practical ministry situation, to
include a minimum of 200 hours experience under
supervision. Students may be placed in one of the
following categories:
EITHER
(i) At least 120 hours cumulative experience in
one non-congregation situation, such as an
institutional or para-church ministry;
OR
(ii) A period of continuous residence and ministry
of not less than six weeks duration in an
institutional or para-church situation;
OR
(iii) A series of placements, in one or more settings,
either congregational or non-congregational.
In all cases,
(a) Approximately 120 hours are to be spent in actual
ministry, including active involvement in a variety
of the organisations operations;
(b) Approximately 60 hours are to be spent in
preparation, and writing up verbatims and/or reports
for supervisors;
(c) Approximately 20 hours are to be spent in reflection
upon practical experience, at least 10 hours on an
individual basis, with an approved supervisor. Such
reflections should include comments from members
of the organisation or congregation where the field
work was undertaken.

PC644 Practical Ministry Field Education

Bibliography

Status
Elective

Prescribed:
Bass, D. C. (ed.), For Life Abundant: Practical
Theology, Theological Education, and Christian
Ministry (Grand Rapids, Mich: Eerdmans, 2008).
Johnson, A., Shaping Spiritual Leaders: Supervision
and Formation in Congregations (Herndon, VA:
Alan, 2007).
Malphurs, A., A New Kind of Church: Understanding
Models of Ministry for the 21st Century (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2007).

Exclusions
Candidates may take two only of units PC642-644 and
DM642.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to the practical issues
related to particular ministry settings.
(b) To provide candidates an opportunity to work with
supervision in a church or other ministry setting for
an extended period;
(c) To allow candidates to reflect on the ministry they
observe with an experienced practitioner(s);
(d) To allow candidates to reflect on their own
ministry with an experienced practitioner(s);

Recommended:
Allen, R. J., Preaching and Practical Ministry (St.
Louis: Chalice, 2001).
Brian, P. R., Going the Distance: How to Stay Fit for a
Lifetime of Ministry (Kingsford: Matthias Media,
2006).
Carl, W. J. (ed.), Best Advice: Wisdom on Ministry
from 30 Leading Pastors and Preachers

MDiv Unit Outlines

180

(Louisville, KY: Westminster John Know Press,


2009).
Carroll, J. W., Gods Potters: Pastoral Leadership and
the Shaping of Congregations (Grand Rapids,
Mich: Eerdmans, 2006).
Drane, J. W., After McDonaldization: Mission,
Ministry and Christian Discipleship in an Age of
Uncertainty (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker, 2008).
Elias, J. W., Remembering the Future: The Pastoral
Theology of Paul the Apostle (Scottsdale, PA:
Herald, 2006).
Herrington, J., R. R. Creech and T. Taylor, The
Leaders Journey: Accepting the Call to Personal
and Congregational Transformation (San
Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2003).
Hillman, G. M., Preparing for Ministry: A Practical
Guide for Theological Field Education (Grand
Rapids, Mich: Kregel, 2008).
Hotchkiss, D., Governance and Ministry: Rethinking
Board Leadership (Herndon, VA: Alban Institute,
2008).
Laniak, T. S., Shepherds after my Heart: Pastoral
Traditions and Leadership in the Bible (Downers
Grove, Ill: Intervarsity Press, 2006).
Piper, J., Brothers, We Are Not Professionals: A Plea
to Pastors for Radical Ministry (Nashville:
Broadman and Holman, 2002).
Steinke, P. L., Congregational Leadership in Anxious
Times: Being Calm and Courageous No Matter
What (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Steinke, P. L., Healthy Congregations: A Systems
Approach (Herndon, VA: Alban, 2006).
Stott, J. R. W., The Living Church: Convictions of a
Lifelong Pastor (Nottingham: IVP, 2007).
Tidball, D. J., Ministry by the Book: New Testament
Patterns for Pastoral Leadership (Nottingham:
Apollos, 2008).
Thompson, J., Pastoral Ministry According to Paul: A
Biblical Vision (Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker,
2006).
Willimon, W. H., Calling and Character: Virtues of
the Ordained Life (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Willimon, W. H., Pastor: A Reader for Ordained
Ministry (Nashville: Abingdon, 2002).
Wood, C. M., Attentive to God: Thinking
Theologically about Ministry (Nashville, TN:
Abingdon, 2008).

PC647 Introductory Preaching


Status
Elective
Aims
(a) To assist candidates to explore theological and
pastoral issues in preaching;
(b) To enable candidates to understand and acquire
substantial techniques for preaching;
(c) To give candidates opportunities to practice
preaching and further develop skills in its critique

and training, sufficient to begin a preaching


ministry.
Content
Section A: An Introduction to Preaching
1 Preaching as the ministry of the Word; preaching
and teaching; preaching and liturgy.
2 The aims, forms and context of preaching;
consideration of classical models.
3 Preaching and the preacher; the person of the
preacher; the relationship between preaching and
personal spirituality.
4 Biblical Theology and its impact on the practice of
preaching.
Section B: Preaching in Practice
5 An introduction to basic principles in exposition.
6 The components of a sermon, including introductions
and conclusions, outlining, illustrations, applications,
transitions, climaxes.
7 Methods and techniques of public speaking;
contemporary methods in preaching.
Section C: Field Work
8 The preparation and delivery of a talk or portions of a
sermon in class for critique e.g. introduction,
illustrations. Where possible video recording is to be
used to assist in the critique. This should be done
early in the conduct of the unit.
9 (a) The preparation and delivery of at least two
sermons preferably in a church or chapel
context.
(b) At least one should be expository. The other
may be from a different text type or on a topic
or given in an occasional or evangelistic
context.
(c) Full texts or notes are to be submitted to the
supervisor, preferably before each sermon is
preached. In each case comments are to be
obtained from at least one regular preacher
present and at least two congregational
members.
(d) The candidate is to write a 500 word critique of
each sermon and/or reflect upon the sermon
with a supervisor and others, where appropriate.
Notes:
(a) Where a candidate has regular preaching
engagements outside the conduct of this unit the
college may consider it appropriate for the
candidate to prepare three or four sermons for
critique.
(b) Students must be capable of preaching a
reasonable sermon before being granted a pass in
this unit. If the supervisor believes it is necessary,
a student may be required to undertake a program
of voice production, public speaking, or additional
preaching assignments before satisfactory
completion of this unit is approved.
(c) It is the responsibility of approved institutions to
ensure that appropriately qualified and
experienced supervisors are employed for the
moderation and assessment of sermons, where

MDiv Unit Outlines

these people are not the staff member responsible


for teaching the unit.
(d) Sections A, B and C will be weighted 20%, 20%
and 60% respectively.
(e) Where the unit is conducted over more than one
semester care should be taken not to overload the
unit with assessments.

181

Stott, J., I Believe in Preaching (London: Hodder and


Stoughton, 1998).
Taylor, B. B., The Preaching Life (Cambridge, MA:
Cowley, 1993).
Wilson, P. S., A Concise History of Preaching
(Nashville: Abingdon, 1992).

Bibliography
Adam, P., Speaking Gods Words: A Practical
Theology of Preaching (Vancouver: Regent
College, 2004).
Brueggemann, W., Cadences of Home: Preaching
Among Exiles (Louisville: Westminster John Knox,
1997).
Brueggemann, W., Texts for Preaching (Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1999).
Chapell, B., Christ-Centred Preaching: Redeeming the
Expository Sermon (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2005).
Chapman, J., Setting Hearts on Fire (Sydney:
Matthias, 1999).
Childers, J., Purposes of Preaching (Cambridge, MA:
Chalice, 2004).
Craddock, F., Preaching (Nashville: Abingdon, 1990).
Day, D., A Preaching Workbook (London: SPCK,
2004).
Gibson, S., Preaching for Special Services (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Goldsworthy, G., Preaching the Whole Bible as
Christian Scripture: The Application of Biblical
Theology to Expository Preaching (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2000).
Johnston, G., Preaching to a Postmodern World: A
Guide to Reaching Twenty-First Century Listeners
(Leicester: IVP, 2001).
Larson, C. B. and H. W. Robinson (eds.), The Art and
Craft of Biblical Preaching: A Comprehensive
Resource for Todays Communicators (Grand
Rapids: Zondervan, 2005).
Loscalzo, C. A., Evangelistic Preaching that Connects
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1995).
Lowry, E. L., The Homiletical Plot: Sermon as Narrative
Art Form (Rev. ed.; Louisville: Westminster John
Knox, 2001).
Mitchell, J. P., Visually Speaking: Radio and the
Renaissance of Preaching (Edinburgh: T. & T.
Clark, 1999).
Osborne, G. R., The Hermeneutical Spiral: A
Comprehensive
Introduction
to
Biblical
Interpretation (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1991).
Pagitt, D., Preaching Re-Examined: The Role of the
Sermon in Communities of Faith (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2005).
Robinson, H., Biblical Preaching: The Development
and Delivery of Expository Messages (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Robinson, H. and B. Larson (eds), The Art and Craft of
Biblical Preaching (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2005).
Schlafer, D., Your Way with Gods Word: Discovering
your Distinctive Preaching Voice (Cambridge, MA:
Cowley, 1995).

PC648 Advanced Preaching


Status
Elective
Pre-requisites
PC647 Introductory Preaching
Aims
(a) To assist candidates to explore the theology of
preaching in depth;
(b) To equip candidates for significant preaching
ministries;
(c) To give candidates opportunity to study various
styles of preaching and contemporary issues in
preaching.
(d) To give students the opportunity to practice
various styles of preaching
Content
Section A: Topics
1 A consideration of several of the following topics,
or in specialised cases the elaboration of one of the
following topics:
(a) Concepts relevant to preaching in the Old
Testament;
(b) The preaching of Jesus;
(c) Preaching in the Book of Acts and the New
Testament;
(d) Preaching in the classical period: a study of
John Chrysostom;
(e) Reformation perspectives;
(f) Significant post-reformation preachers e.g. Jay,
Edwards, Wesley, Whitefield, Spurgeon;
(g) Evangelistic preaching;
(h) Apologetic preaching;
(i) Occasional preaching such as weddings,
baptisms, funerals;
(j) Preaching to a particular demographic e.g
nursing home residents, Generation Y, people
with disabilities
(k) Preaching in a church plant. Transitioning to an
established church.
Section B: Preaching in Practice
2 Preaching from various types of biblical literature,
including Old Testament prophecy, narrative and
poetry, New Testament gospels, epistles.
3 Preaching in particular circumstances, including
evangelistic services, major seasons in the church
year, occasional offices.
4 Various types of sermons: expository, biographical,
doctrinal; the significance of hermeneutics;

182

MDiv Unit Outlines

contemporary approaches, including narrative


approaches, preaching as art.
5 The construction of sermon series in the life of the
church possibly including the use of lectionaries.

PC649A
PC649B
PC649C
PC649D

Section C: Field Work


9 (a) The preparation and delivery of at least two
sermons preferably in a church or chapel
context.
(b) Full texts or notes are to be submitted to the
supervisor, preferably before each sermon is
preached. In each case comments are to be
obtained from at least one regular preacher
present and at least two congregational
members
(c) The candidate is to write a 1000 word critique
of each sermon and/or reflect upon the sermon
with a supervisor, and others where appropriate.

Workload
The total hours spent in these activities should not be less
than 150 It is strongly recommended that work in this
area be spread through a students MDiv course.

Notes:
(a) Under the direction of the college, candidates may
choose to focus on different topics in Section A
and present material/ critiques etc in seminar
style.
(b) Where a candidate has regular preaching
engagements outside the conduct of this unit the
college may consider it appropriate for the
candidate to prepare three or four sermons for
critique.
(c) It is the responsibility of approved institutions to
ensure that appropriately qualified and
experienced supervisors are employed for the
moderation and assessment of sermons, where
these people are not the staff member responsible
for teaching the unit.
(d) Appropriate Bibliography will need to be
developed for each topic where the general
bibliography is inadequate
(e) Sections A, B and C will be weighted 20%, 20%
and 60% respectively.
Bibliography
In addition to the works listed in the Recommended
Readings for PC647:
Allen, R. J. (ed.), Patterns of Preaching: A Sermon
Sampler (St. Louis, MO: Chalice, 1998).
Gaskell, K., Open-Air Evangelism Today (Cambridge:
Grove, 1997).
Goldsworthy, G., Preaching the Whole Bible as
Christian Scripture (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2000).
Greidanus, S., Preaching Christ from the Old Testament
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000).
Hughes, R. G. and R. Kysar, Preaching Doctrine for the
Twenty-First Century (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1997).
Johnston, G., Preaching to a Postmodern World (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Standing, R., Preaching for the Unchurched in an
Entertainment Culture (Cambridge: Grove, 2002).
Watson, N., Sorrow and Hope: Preaching at Funerals
(Cambridge: Grove, 2001).
Willimon, W. H., The Intrusive Word: Preaching to the
Unbaptised (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994).

Guided Spiritual Formation A


Guided Spiritual Formation B
Guided Spiritual Formation C
Guided Spiritual Formation D

Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) The candidate has been deepened in their own
intimacy with God, and are committed to their
future ministry effectiveness being fed by repeated
times of personal spiritual renewal.
(b) The candidate has developed their philosophy of
ministry so that its broad outline has begun to take
shape.
(c) The candidate has engaged, in the course of their
theological education, in regular reflection on their
own personhood and vocation in the light of the
truths, skills and commitments gained through that
formal education.
(d) The candidate has experienced a model of growth
through personal accountability, mentoring, reading
and reflection, and through this the candidate has
been supported and equipped to minister to others.
Content
GSF is designed to integrate the various disciplines of
the students course that contribute to their spiritual
formation. By supervised learning is meant assisting
students to reflect upon their experience in the light of
their studies. It does not mean merely supervising
work done. Thus, placing a student in a local church is
not sufficient of itself: it must be accompanied by
reflection and feed-back in such a way that the student
learns from his/her experience. The focus of GSF is to
be reflection, self-evaluation and growth planning in
relation to personal spiritual growth through college
activities or ministry experience.
While individual colleges will structure this unit in
their own way, the program should include such
elements as:
1. intentional participation in local Christian
community
2. written reflection on a students unfolding spiritual
journey
3. regular contact with an individual mentor
4. participation in a group reflective process
Assessment
GSF will be graded on pass/fail basis. There is no
external moderation. Colleges should consider the
following examples:
1. book reviews, primarily in the areas of spiritual
formation
2. ministry formation portfolio that records and
traces a students spiritual, academic and

MDiv Unit Outlines

3.

vocational development during their time at


college
personal journal with supervisor assessment

Bibliography
Allen, R. J., Preaching and Practical Ministry (St.
Louis: Chalice, 2001).
Anderson, R. S., The Soul of Ministry: Forming
Leaders
for
Gods
People
(Louisville:
Westminster John Knox, 1997).
Borreson, G. L., A Case for Excellence: Case Studies
in Congregational Ministry (Lima, Ohio: CSS,
1998).
Copenhaver, M. B., et al, Good News In Exile: Three
Pastors Offer a Hopeful Vision for the Church
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
Fisher, D., The 21st Century Pastor: A Vision Based
on the Ministry of Paul (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1996).
Heitink, G., Practical Theology (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1999).
Jackson, G. E., Creating Something of Beauty: A
Theology for Ministry (St. Louis: Chalice, 1998).
Patton, J., From Ministry to Theology: Pastoral &
Action Reflection (Nashville: Abingdon, 1995).
Pohly, K. H., Transforming the Rough Places: The
Ministry
of
Supervision
(Dayton,
OH:
WhalePrints, 1993).
Pyle, W. T. and M. A. Seals, Experiencing Ministry
Supervision: A Field Base Approach (Nashville:
Broadman & Holman, 1995).
Sherlock, C., A Pastoral Handbook for Anglicans
(Canberra: Acorn, 2001).
Stone, H. W. and J. O. Duke, How to Think
Theologically (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996).
Swetland, K. L., The Hidden World of the Pastor:
Case Studies on Personal Issues of Real Pastors
(Grand Rapids: Baker, 1995).
Whitehead, J. D. and E. E. Whitehead, Method in
Ministry: Theological Reflection and Christian
Ministry (Kansas City: Sheed & Ward, 1995).
Williamson, C. M. and R. J. Allen, The Vital Church:
Teaching, Worship, Community, Service (St.
Louis: Chalice, 1998).
Willimon, W. H., Calling and Character: Virtues of
the Ordained Life (Nashville: Abingdon, 2000).

PC651 Seniors Ministry


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) Compare various theories regarding the spiritual,
social, emotional and developmental needs and
challenges of seniors
(b) Evaluate the theological, pastoral and ethical
issues relating to ministry to seniors
(c) Apply the basic principles of adult learning theory
to pastoral and educational situations

183

(d) Construct a theology and practice of pastoral care


that will be most beneficial to seniors
(e) Devise ways that seniors can be encouraged to
contribute to the life of the church
Content
1. Theological and ethical issues in ministry to the
ageing
2. Psychosocial and spiritual development and needs
in older people
3. The aging person: challenges for body, mind and
spirit
4. Theory and practice of adult learning amongst
seniors
5. Ministry to and by seniors
6. The place of seniors in the life of the church
7. The pastoral care of older people including
residential care, mental health and dementia
8. Pastoral ministry to the grieving and dying
9. Supporting carers of seniors
Bibliography
Recommended:
Beck, J. R. and B. Demarest, The Human Person in
Theology and Psychology: A Bbiblical
Anthropology for the Twenty-first Century
(Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 2005).
Benner, D., Strategic Pastoral Counselling, 2ed. (Grand
Rapids: Baker, 2003).
Burrell, D., Deconstructing Theodicy: Why Job Has
Nothing to Say to the Puzzle of Suffering (Grand
Rapids, MI: Brazos Press, 2008).
Corr, C. A., C. M. Nabe and D. M. Corr, Death and
Dying: Life and Living (Stamford, CN: Wadsworth
Publishing [Thomson Reuters], 2008).
Driskell, J L., Adventures in Senior Living: Learning
How to make Retirement Meaningful and Enjoyable
(Brighampton, NY: Haworth Pastoral Press, 1997).
Gerkin, C. An Introduction to Pastoral Care
(Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 1997).
Hall, E. T. and H. G. Koenig, Caring for a Loved One
with Alzheimers Disease: A Christian Perspective
(Brighampton, NY: Haworth Pastoral Press,
2000).
Hasker, W., The Triumph of God over Evil: Theodicy
for a World of Suffering (Downers Grove, IL: IVP
Academic, 2008).
Hoare, C. (ed.), Handbook of Adult Development and
Learning (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2006).
Jewell, A. (ed.), Spirituality and Ageing (London:
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 1998).
Jeffery, P., Going Against the Stream: Ethical Aspects
of Ageing and Care (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical
Press, 2000).
Knowles, M. S., E. F. Holton and R. A. Swanson, The
Adult Learner: The Definitive Classic in Adult
Education and Human Resource Development, 6th
ed. (Burlington, MA: Elsevier, 2005).
Koenig, H. G., A Gospel for the Mature Years:
Finding Fulfillment in Knowing and Using Your

184

MDiv Unit Outlines

Gifts (Brighampton, NY: Haworth Pastoral Press,


1997).
Koenig, H. G. and G. W. Bowman, Dying, Grieving,
Faith and Family: A Pastoral Care Approach
(London: Routledge, 1997).
Koenig, H. G. and B. W. Gilbert, The Pastoral Care of
Depression: A Guidebook (Brighampton, NY:
Haworth Pastoral Press, 1998).
Koenig, H. G. and J. B. McCall, Bereavement
Counseling: Pastoral Care for Complicated
Grieving (Brighampton, NY: Haworth Pastoral
Press, 2004).
Koenig, H. G. and J. B. McCall, Grief Education for
Caregivers of the Elderly (Brighampton, NY:
Haworth Pastoral Press, 2000).
Koenig, H. G. and J. B. McCall, A Practical Guide to
Hospital Ministry: Healing Ways (Brighampton,
NY: Haworth Pastoral Press, 2002).
Koenig, H. G. and A. J Weaver, Pastoral Care of
Older Adults (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 1998).
Koenig, H. G. and A. J Weaver, Counselling Troubled
Older Adults: A Handbook for Pastors and
Religious Caregivers (Nashville, TN: Abingdon
Press, 1997)
MacKinlay, E. (2007) Ageing A Public Theology
and Anglican Perspective. St Marks Review. 203
(2) 23-26.
MacKinlay, E. B. (ed.), Ageing, Disability &
Spirituality: Addressing the Challenge of
Disability in Later Life (London: Jessica Kingsley
Publishers, 2008).
MacKinlay, E. B. (ed.), Aging, Spirituality and
Palliative Care (New York: Haworth Press,
2006).
MacKinlay E. B., Spiritual growth and care in the
fourth age of life (London: Jessica Kingsley
Publishers, 2006).
MacKinlay E. B. (ed.), On Spirituality in Later Life:
Humour and Despair (New York: Haworth Press,
2004).
MacKinlay E. B. (ed.), Mental Health and the
Spiritual Dimension in Later Life (New York:
Haworth Press, 2002).
MacKinlay E. B., The Spiritual Dimension of Ageing
(London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2001).
MacKinlay E. B., J. Ellor, S. Pickard (eds), Aging,
Spirituality and Pastoral Care: A Multinational
Perspective (New York: Haworth Press, 2001).
MacKinlay, E. and C. Trevitt, Facilitating Spiritual
Reminiscence for Older People With Dementia: A
Learning Package. (CAPS Publishing, Canberra,
2006).
MacKinlay, E. B. and C. Trevitt (2007) Spiritual Care
and Ageing in a Secular Society. The Medical
Journal of Australia. 186, 10, S74-S76.
Merriam, S. B., R. S. Caffarella and L. M.
Baumgartner, Learning in Adulthood: A
Comprehensive Guide (San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Banks, 2007).
Paget, N. K and J. R. McCormack, The Work of the
Chaplain (Valley Forge, PA: Judson Press, 2006).
Toole, M. M., Handbook for Chaplains: Comfort My
People (Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1996).

Swinton, J. and D. Willows (eds), Spiritual


Dimensions of Pastoral Care: Practical Theology
in a Multidisciplinary Context (London: Jessica
Kingsley Publishers, 2009).
Van De Creek, L., Spiritual Care for Persons with
Dementia: Fundamentals for Pastoral Practice
(London: Routledge, 2001).
Classics:
Becker, E., The Denial of Death(New York: Free
Press, 1973).
Becker, E., The Birth and Death of Meaning: An
interdisciplinary perspective on the problem of
man (New York: Free Press, 1971).
Kubler-Ross, E., On Death and Dying (New York:
Scribner, 1997).
Lewis, C. S., A Grief Observed (New York:
HarperOne, 2001).
Journals:
Australian Journal of Adult Learning (Mawson Lakes,
South Australia).
Australasian Journal on Ageing (John Wiley).
Canadian Journal on Aging (Cambridge University
Press).
Educational Gerontology (Routledge).
International Journal of Lifelong Education (Routledge).
Journal of Adult Theological Education (Antigonish,
Nova Scotia).
Journal of Pastoral Care (Decatur, GA)
Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging (London:
Taylor and Francis).
Journal of Religious Gerontology (Binghampton, NY).
Ministry, Society and Theology (Mulgrave: Australian
Association of Supervised Pastoral Education).
Ministry Today (Richard Baxter Institute for Ministry).
Religion & Education (Routledge).

PC689
Pastoral & Church Focussed Ministry
Seminar
Learning Outcomes
(a) To provide candidates with the opportunity to study
in depth a topic or theme of interest;
(b) To give candidates the opportunity to develop cooperative research skills;
(c) To assist candidates in the application of pastoral
insights to personal and pastoral needs.
Unit Outline:
The choice of the topic or theme to be studied is left to
approved institutions but must have staff and library
support sufficient to sustain the unit. The lecturer
concerned is to submit a proposed unit outline along with
assessment plans for approval by the moderator for
Pastoral & Church Focussed Ministry.
The unit is conducted as a seminar involving class
discussion as well as lectures and individual reading.
The unit is not an individual research topic. It is strongly

MDiv Unit Outlines

recommended that the unit include set reading from


classical as well as contemporary authors of at least 750
pages.
(a) The total amount of work expected is that equivalent
to an essay of approximately 7,000 words;
(b) Candidates must demonstrate a thorough grasp of
the theological issues involved;
(c) Assessment should be designed to encourage
exploration of the personal and pastoral implications
of theological perspectives discerned in candidates
learning;
(d) Units approved for the Master of Arts (Theology)
may be used as the basis for this unit, adjusted
appropriately to reflect major level graduate study
for students enrolled in the graduate degrees.

DEVELOPMENTAL MINISTRY (DM)


Aims:
(a) To offer candidates an integrated series of units
which will provide an educational and theological
undergirding for professional or lay specialisation in
Christian education, youth ministry and ministry to
children and families within both church and parachurch structures as well as government and nongovernment schools;
(b) To enable candidates to examine principles of
education and educational insights from the social
sciences in the light of biblical perspectives and
contemporary theological understanding;
(c) To stimulate candidates reflection, integration and
thinking with respect to philosophical issues,
including cross-cultural education, pluralism and
ethnicity and the exercise of informed critical
judgement on programmes of education within
church or nation;
(d) To facilitate in candidates an understanding of the
skills involved in Christian education and ministries
to children, youth and families, and give opportunity
for the acquisition and development of these skills
in chosen areas;
These Field aims are reflected in different ways in each
unit but individual units emphasise distinctive features of
each of these aims.
Education/Ministry in Practice:
In the education and ministry units of this Field practical
skill acquisition is required. The following regulations
apply:
1
2
3
4
5

Religious Education in Infant classes in a school


Religious Education in a Primary school
Religious Education or Religious Studies in a
Secondary school
General teaching in a Christian school
Christian Education in a parish, for children or
infants of primary level

185

Christian Education provided for infants or children


in a non-church setting
7 A Christian Education programme for adolescents
8 A programme of Christian Education for adults
(Note: if preaching is included, it must be evaluated
as an educational enterprise)
9 Theological Education at pre-tertiary level
10 Theological Education at tertiary level
11 Clinical Pastoral Education
12 Family and inter-generational programmes.
Where specified for a unit, Education in Practice is to
include a minimum of 20 hours work in each area(s)
chosen. Of this, at least 3 hours are to be spent in
observation, at least 8 hours in teaching or leading and at
least 5 hours in supervised reflection upon observation
and teaching. These hours exclude preparation and
writing up time.
Candidates may not study a particular area for more than
one unit.

DM501 Foundations of Christian Education


Workload
Where specified for a unit, Education in Practice is to
include a minimum of 20 hours work in each area(s)
chosen. Of this, at least 3 hours are to be spent in
observation, at least 8 hours in teaching or leading and at
least 5 hours in supervised reflection upon observation
and teaching. These hours exclude preparation and
writing up time.
Status
Elective
This unit is a pre-requisite for all further Christian
education units, except for those with professional
qualifications as teachers or holders of degrees which
include equivalent papers in education or psychology. In
these cases candidates approved institutions must ensure
that coverage of Christian approaches to education have
been considered before further units are taken.
Notification of names of candidates for whom exemption
is claimed by an approved institution shall be forwarded
to the moderator for the Field, to whom belongs the right
to question or ratify such exemptions.
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to the psychology of human
development and learning:
(b) To assist candidates to comprehend the place of the
Scriptures in Christian education in contemporary
society and schooling;
(c) To enable candidates to articulate their own
theology of education;
(d) To enable candidates to acquire skills in effective
teaching;
(e) To equip candidates to pursue further studies in
Christian education.

186

MDiv Unit Outlines

Content
Section A: Human Development and Learning (30%)
1 An overview of the process of human development
from conception to death; an introduction to
Christian perspectives on human growth and
development.
2 A survey of socialisation and attitude formation and
their impact upon the developing person; their
implications for Christian education.
3 An overview of the psychology and characteristics
of learning and maturing through infancy,
childhood, adolescence and adulthood; biblical
principles of learning and spiritual nurture.
4 An introduction to educational psychology and
issues in pedagogy and andragogy.
Section B: Issues in Christian Education (30%)
5 The aims of Christian education; the use of Biblical
content in Christian education; Jesus as a teacher.
6 The nature and purpose of education in our
contemporary pluralistic society and a survey of the
place of religious education in state and private
schooling.
Section C: Education in Practice (40%)
7 Work in two of the following areas. A minimum of
20 hours work to be completed in each area.
(a) Religious Education in Infant classes in a
school
(b) Religious Education in a Primary school
(c) Religious Education or Religious Studies in a
Secondary school
(d) General teaching in a Christian school
(e) Christian Education in a parish, for children or
infants of primary level
(f) Christian Education provided for infants or
children in a non-church setting
(g) A Christian Education programme for
adolescents
(h) A programme of Christian Education for adults
(Note: if preaching is included, it must be
evaluated as an educational enterprise)
(i) Theological Education at pre-tertiary level
(j) Theological Education at tertiary level
(k) Clinical Pastoral Education
(l) Family and inter-generational programmes.
Bibliography
Anthony, M. J. (ed.), Christian Education Foundations
for the Twenty-first Century (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2001).
Anthony, M. J.and W. S. Benson, Exploring the
History and Philosophy of Christian Education
(Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2003).
Crawford, M. and G. Rossiter, Reasons for Living:
Education and Young Peoples Search for
Meaning, Identity and Spirituality (Camberwell,
VIC: Australian Council for Educational
Research, 2006).
Dykstra, C., Growing in the Life of Faith: Education
and Christian Practices (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2005).

Estep, J., M. Anthony and G.Allison, A Theology for


Christian Education (B&H Publishing Group,
2008).
Everist, N. C. (ed.), Christian Education as
Evangelism. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2007).
Groome, T. H. and H. D. Horell, Horizons & Hopes:
The Future of Religious Education (Paulist Press,
2003).
Krych, M A., The Ministry of Children's Education:
Foundations, Contexts, and practices (Fortress
Press, 2004).
Pazmino, R. W., Foundational Issues in Christian
Education (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2008).
Peterson, C., Looking Forward Through the Life Span
(4th ed.; Sydney: Pearson, 2003).
Van Dyk, J., The Craft of Christian Teaching: A
Classroom Journey (Dordt College Press, 2005).
Yount, W. R (ed.), The Teaching Ministry of the Church
(2ed.; Nashville, Tenn. : B&H Academic, 2008).

DM502 Ministry Formation for Chaplaincy


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
Building on previous study and graduate occupation,
this unit offers new chaplaincy practitioners the
opportunity to engage in a process of professional
formation that will provide a foundation for their
development into the profession of chaplaincy in an
educational setting.
(a) Students will have an understanding of themselves
as persons in a professional context different from
their previous field of study or graduate
occupation.
(b) They will have examined the context in which
they will be working as professionals and explore
the implications of these factors on their practice
as Christian chaplains.
(c) They will know who are the key stakeholders in
their positions and understand the importance of
an open, affirming style of engagement with them
that is proactive and positive.
(d) They will have an understanding of the Chaplains
Code of Conduct as provided by the National
School Chaplaincy Program and have examined it
in the light of recent literature on this issue.
(e) They will have a foundation for their further
Professional Development and Supervision.
Content
1. Introduction to key elements of Ministry
Formation with particular reference to the
education context that Chaplains work in.
2. Brief examination of historical models of
chaplaincy and relevant Biblical models for this
ministry.
3. Exploration of the roles and relationships of the
key stakeholders in chaplaincy work, including an
examination of the challenges of working

MDiv Unit Outlines

ecumenically in a secular and multi-faith setting


and consideration of the importance of cultivating
positive relationships with all stakeholders.
4. Exploration of Code of Conduct and relevant
policies and procedures that determine the
professional boundaries within which chaplains
must operate.
5. Examination of the resources for individual
learning and working styles that will assist
graduate chaplains in the formation of their new
pastoral identity.
6. An introduction to the purpose and function of
supervision of candidates professional practice.
Bibliography
Bass, D. C., For Life Abundant: Practical Theology,
Theological Education, and Christian Ministry
(Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2008).
Bush, J. E., Gentle Shepherding: Pastoral Ethics and
Leadership (Chalice Press, 2006).
Department of Education, Employment, and
Workplace Relations, Australian Government.
National School Chaplaincy Programme
Guidelines (including Code of Conduct).
Hill, B.V. (ed.), Chaplaincies in State Schools,
Journal of Christian Education 48, 1 (May 2005)
[whole issue.]
Hughes, P. and S. Bond, Chaplaincy in Uniting
Church Schools: Report on Research 2001
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
2003).
Lartey, E. Y., In Living Color: An Intercultural
Approach to Pastoral Care and Counseling
(Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2003).
Norman, J.(ed.), At the Heart of Education: School
Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care (Dublin: Veritas,
2004).
Orchard, H. C. (ed.), Spirituality in Health Care
Contexts (London: Jessica Kingsley, 2001).
Patton, J., Pastoral Care in Context: An Introduction
to Pastoral Care (Westminster John Knox Press,
2005).
Paver, J. E., Theological Reflection and Education for
Ministry: The Search for Integration in Theology
(Aldershot, Hants: Ashgate, 2006).
Pohlmann, D., School Chaplaincy: An Introduction
(Mansfield, Qld.: Christian Heritage College,
2004).
Williams, B., The Potter's Rib: Mentoring for Pastoral
Formation (Regent College Publishing, 2005).

DM510 Foundations for Youth Ministry


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates comprehend the Bibles
teaching on young people;

(b)

(c)

(d)

187

To assist the candidate to develop a theology of


ministry with young people and to evaluate and
analyse models of ministry with them;
To introduce the major aspects of youth cultures
in Australia and the forces which have shaped
those cultures;
To provide an opportunity for the candidate to
undertake supervised practical work.

Content
Section A: Biblical, Theological, Historical and
Strategic Foundations for Youth Ministry with an
Introduction to Youth in Society. (50%)
1 The Bibles teaching on youth and young people.
2 Developing a theology of youth ministry. Biblical
authority in a post modern world. Relational
theology. Incarnation and reconciliation.
3 Historical overview of Christian youth ministry in
Australia, especially since World War 2.
4 An examination and development of strategic
models of youth ministry; motivation; goals;
content; methodologies.
Section B: Youth Today (50%)
5 A survey of the place and understanding of youth in
western society.
6 Major aspects of youth cultures in Australia, in the
light of secularisation. The changing nature of
youth subcultures.
7 The beliefs and values of significant youth
subcultures, including varieties of household types,
ethnicity, rural or urban contexts; students, workers
and the unemployed. The contexts where young
people gather.
Bibliography
Butcher, T. (ed.), Emerging Youth Cultures Urban
Australia (Melbourne: Pluto, 2003).
Dean, K., C. Clark and D. Rahn, Starting Right:
Thinking Theologically about Youth Ministry
(Grand Rapids: Youth Specialties; Zondervan,
2001).
DeVries, M., Family-based Youth Ministry (Downers
Grove, Ill. : InterVarsity Press, 2004).
Heflin, H., Youth Pastor: The Theology and Practice of
Youth Ministry (Nashville, TN : Abingdon Press,
2009).
Higgs, M., Youth Ministries from the Inside Out
(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
Hilborn, D. and M. Bird, God & the Generations
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2002).
Jones, T., Postmodern Youth Ministry (Grand Rapids:
Youth Specialities; Zondervan, 2001).
Muggleton, D. and R. Weinzerl, The Post-Subcultures
Reader (Oxford: Berg, 2004).
Nilan, P. M., R. Julian and J. Germov, Australian Youth:
Social and Cultural Issues (Frenchs Forest, N.S.W. :
Pearson Education Australia, 2007).
Senter, B., Clark and Nel, Four Views of Youth Ministry
and the Church (Grand Rapids: Youth Specialities;
Zondervan).

MDiv Unit Outlines

188

Yaconelli, M., The Core Realities of Youth Ministry:


Nine Biblical Principles That Mark Healthy Youth
Ministries (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003).

DM520 Introduction to Church-based Childrens


Ministry
Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce candidates to the essential factors
involved in ministry to children in church;
(b) To help candidates evaluate the appropriateness of
a number of approaches to church-based
childrens ministry;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.
Content
Section A: Children and Faith Development (40%)
1 Biblical perspectives on children: introduction to
theology of childhood; implications for ministry.
2 Human and child development; ages and stages of
growth; introduction to developmental theories;
implications for programs and relationships.
3 Children and God; overview of moral and faith
development; survey of a variety of perspectives
such as Fowler, Westerhoff, Groom, Bridger,
Buckland.
4 Children and the church; history of children in the
church; recent trends.
5 Children and their culture; influences on children
school, friendships, family, media; introduction
to multi-cultural/multi-faith issues.
Section B: Church-Based Childrens Ministry: An
Introduction (40%)
6 An introduction and overview of childrens
ministry; a definition; exploration of the
experience of participants; aims, philosophy and
strategy; introduction to leadership motivation,
self care, integrity, leading teams.
7 Developing
aims,
philosophy,
strategies,
evaluation,
vision;
principles
for
good
organisation and planning; exploring a variety of
models and sizes; choosing and adapting
curriculum and materials.
8 Children as part of the worshipping community;
childrens ministry as an integral part of the life of
the church; all age worship; designing services
that are all age friendly; learning together and
separately; building an all age community;
environment and facilities.
9 Nurturing faith and discipleship; encouraging
parents, caregivers, and the church in nurture and
discipleship of children, prayer for and with
children; helping children read and understand the
Bible; children and the Holy Spirit; training
children for ministry; children and spiritual gifts.

10 Evangelism and outreach; organisation and


planning; structures and programs; liaison with
other churches; evangelism and the family;
evangelism and schools; evangelism and the
community; relational work; assisting children to
faith.
11 Safety and care for staff, parents and children;
developing a safety policy; premises; insurance;
legal issues.
Section C: Ministry in Practice (20%)
12 Supervised Field Education: At least 20 hours
work to be undertaken in one of the following
areas: holiday and after-school programs; family
ministry; camps; school religious education;
church-based religious education; other work as
approved by the course coordinator.
Bibliography
Allen, H. C., Nurturing Children's Spirituality:
Christian Perspectives and Best Practices
(Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, 2008).
Beckwith, I., Formational Children's Ministry:
Shepherding Children Using Story, Ritual, and
Relationship Emersion (Grand Rapids, MI:
Baker Books, 2010).
Beckwith, I., Postmodern Children's Ministry:
Ministry to Children in the 21st Century (El
Cajon, CA : Youth Specialties, 2004).
Bunge, M. J. (ed.), The Child in Christian Thought
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Cliff, P., The Endless Playground: Celebrating
Australian Childhood (Canberra: National Library
of Australia, 2000).
Fosarelli, P. D., ASAP : Ages, Stages, and Phases:
from Infancy to Adolescence: Integrating
Physical, Social, Moral, Emotional, Intellectual,
and Spiritual Development (Liguori, Missouri :
Liguori, 2006).
Lausanne Conference on Evangelism 2004
(www.forum2004children.com).
May, S., Children Matter: Celebrating Their Place in
the Church, Family, and Community (Grand
Rapids, Mich. : William B. Eerdmans Pub., 2005).
Mercer, J., Welcoming Children: A Practical Theology
of Childhood (St. Louis, Mo.: Chalice Press, 2005).
Roehlkepartain, E. C. and P. E. King (eds), The
Handbook of Spiritual Development in Childhood
and Adolescence (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage,
2005).
Shier-Jones, A. (ed.), Children of God: Towards a
Theology of Childhood (Peterborough : Epworth,
2007).
Yaconelli, M., Contemplative Youth Ministry:
Practicing the Presence of Jesus (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2006).

DM603 Adult Christian Education


Status
Elective

MDiv Unit Outlines

Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates comprehend how adults learn;
(b) To help candidates evaluate the appropriateness of
provisions made in the churches for the education of
adults in faith;
(c) To assist candidates determine the methods of
education that would most benefit various groups
within their society;
(d) To provide an opportunity for the candidate to
undertake supervised practical work.
Content
Section A: Adults and Learning (30%)
1 The development characteristics of adults, from
post-adolescence to old age; crisis points; common
and distinctive needs of various stages; moral and
faith development.
2 Learning characteristics of adults; the learning needs
of particular groups: for example men, women,
occupations, socio-economic, interests etc.
3 Adults in todays society; the adult education
movement; past, present and future trends.
4 An introduction to group learning, its dynamics and
its place in adult education through house task and
interest groups in the churches.
Section B: Adult Learning in the Churches (30%)
5 Methods of teaching suitable for adult learning;
particularly Bible study methods; the All-age
Sunday School; adult study groups; liturgy
(including preaching) as a vehicle of adult learning.
6 The socialising, didactic and faith formation
functions of congregation and family in relation to
ministry with adults.
7 Adult teaching and learning roles in a diversity of
contexts: for example in family settings, community
issues, disciple-making, leading liturgy, preaching,
church business meetings.
8 Christian Education curricula for adults: goals,
content and curriculum issues; a critical examination
of one curriculum for use in adult Christian
education.
Section C: Education in Practice (40%)
9 Work in two of following areas. A minimum of 20
hours work to be completed in each area.
(a) A programme of Christian Education for adults
(Note: if preaching is included, it must be
evaluated as an educational enterprise)
(b) Theological Education at pre-tertiary level
(c) Theological Education at tertiary level
(d) Clinical Pastoral Education
(e) Family and inter-generational programmes.
Bibliography
Astley, J. (ed.), Learning in the Way: Research and
Reflection on Adult Christian Education
(Leominster: Gracewing, 2000).
Brookfield, S., The Power of Critical Theory for Adult
Learning
and
Teaching
(McGraw-Hill
International, 2005).

189

Jarvis, P., Adult Education and Lifelong Learning:


Theory and Practice (3rd ed.; New York:
Routledge, 2004).
Knowles, M. S., E. F. Holton and R. A. Swanson, The
Adult Learner (6th ed.; Burlington, MA: Elsevier,
Butterworth & Heinemann, 2005).
McKenzie, L. and R. M. Harton, The Religious
Education of Adults (Smyth & Helwys Publishing,
Inc., 2002).
Parent, N. A., A Concise Guide to Adult Faith
Formation (Notre Dame, IN : Ave Maria Press,
2009).
Regan, J. E., Toward an Adult Church: A Vision of
Faith Formation (Chicago, IL: Loyola, 2002).
Robero, J., Becoming a Church of Lifelong Learners:
The Generations of Faith Sourcebook (New
London, CT : Twenty-Third Publications, 2006).
Rodgers, A., Teaching Adults (3rd ed.; Buckingham,
UK: Open University, 2002).
Segler, F. M. and R. Bradley, Christian Worship: Its
Theology and Practice (B&H Publishing Group,
2006).
Tye, K. B., Christian Education in the Small
Membership Church (Nashville : Abingdon Press,
2008).
Vella, J. K., On Teaching and Learning : Putting the
Principles and Practices of Dialogue Education
into Action (San Francisco, Calif.: Jossey-Bass
2008).

DM604 Christian Education in Practice


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates evaluate and analyse the role of
the teacher in Christian education;
(b) To assist candidates determine their own theory of
Christian education;
(c) to provide an opportunity for the candidate to
undertake supervised practical work.
Content
Section A: Issues in Learning (30%)
1 The teacher as role model/discipler; personal
educational development; identification of gifts,
personality type, relationship qualities; ongoing
learning, in-service education.
2 Environmental factors and learning: the home; peer
groups; the classroom; camp situations.
3

EITHER
The school situation: inter-staff relationships; legal
aspects of teaching Religious Education; career
potentialities;
voluntary
Christian
groups;
relationships with non-school ministers.
OR
The parish situation: education in relation to other
church activities; the parish and local schools
(government and non-government); para-church
educational agencies and the local church; relations

190

MDiv Unit Outlines

between church staff; educational ministry as a


career.
Section B: Issues in Methodology (30%)
4 Class management: the theory and practical
application in formal teaching of the following:
group dynamics; discipline; accommodating the
special student; competition and co-operation.
5 Lesson preparation; assessment of student learning;
evaluation of educational programmes.
6 Theory and practice of teaching methods, including
individual and group learning (seminars, buzz
groups, discussion groups etc); drama, music and
dance; team teaching; research projects; lectures;
visual aids; using educational technology (recorders,
OHPs, computers, video, etc.)
Section C: Education in Practice (40%)
7 Work in depth in one of the following areas.
(a) Religious Education in Infant classes in a
school
(b) Religious Education in a Primary school
(c) Religious Education or Religious Studies in a
Secondary school
(d) General teaching in a Christian school
(e) Christian Education in a parish, for children or
infants of primary level
(f) Christian Education provided for infants or
children in a non-church setting
(g) A Christian Education programme for
adolescents
(h) A programme of Christian Education for adults
(Note: if preaching is included, it must be
evaluated as an educational enterprise)
(i) Theological Education at pre-tertiary level
(j) Theological Education at tertiary level
(k) Clinical Pastoral Education
(l) Family and inter-generational programmes.
Bibliography
In addition to relevant works in appropriate unit
Bibliography:
Anthony, M. (ed.), Evangelical Dictionary of Christian
Education (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2001).
Ashton, E., Religious Education in the Early Years
(London ; New York : Routledge, 2000).
Bass, D. C., For Life Abundant: Practical Theology,
Theological Education, and Christian Ministry
(Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2008).
Bunge, M. J. (ed.), The Child in Christian Thought
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001).
Dykstra, C., Growing in the Life of Faith: Education
and Christian Practices (Louisville: Westminster
John Knox, 2005).
Felderhof, M., D. Torevell and P. Thompson (eds),
Inspiring Faith in Schools: Studies in Religious
Education (Hampshire, UK: Ashgate, 2007).
Kramer, P. A., The ABC's of Classroom Management:
An A-Z Sampler for Designing Your Learning
Community (Kappa Delta Pi, 2005).
Lambert, D., Teaching that Makes a Difference: How
to Teach for Holistic Impact (Zondervan, 2004).

Partin, R. L., The Classroom Teacher's Survival Guide:


Practical Strategies, Management Techniques and
Reproducibles for New and Experienced Teachers
(John Wiley and Sons, 2009).
Peterson, M. L, With All Your Mind : A Christian
Philosophy of Education (Notre Dame, Ind. :
University of Notre Dame Press, 2001).
White, D., K. OBrien and S. Todd, Into the Deep
(Sydney: KD, 2003).
Wilhoit, J., Christian Education and the Search for
Meaning (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1991).

DM611 Youth in the Churches


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates to form their own theology of
young people and the church;
(b) To assist candidates to evaluate and analyse the
various theories of the role of the youth worker as
leader and mentor;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.
Content
Section A: Theoretical Study (70%)
1 Young people, their place and role in the life of the
churches, their rituals and liturgy, including
nurture/conversion tensions, baptism/confirmation,
worship participation, music, witness and pastoral
care.
2 Christian education for the adolescent in various
contexts: Sunday school, home groups, catechesis,
church youth groups, secondary school religious
education and voluntary groups, Christian camps;
methods and models of Christian discipleship in
youth ministry.
3 Youth leadership: biblical imperatives for nurture
and discipleship; tasks and roles; the youth pastor;
youth leaders; team building and dynamics;
organisational structures; relationships with other
church ministries; burnout.
4 The content and planning of a balanced youth
programme: strategies, aims and objectives;
methods and evaluation of appropriate social,
educational, liturgical, counselling and empowering
strategies; syllabi, themes, literature, resources.
5 The evaluation of an existing substantial youth
programme in a Christian church.
Section B: Ministry with Youth (30%)
6 Christian ministry among adolescents in a particular
church, including a minimum of 20 hours field
work. Of this, at least 5 hours are to be spent in
observation, at least 8 hours in ministry by the
candidate, and at least 5 hours in supervised
reflection upon observation and teaching. (These
hours exclude preparation and writing up time.)

MDiv Unit Outlines

In addition to and distinctively different from


Section 6, candidates are required to participate in
one of the following:
(a) The planning, preparation and leadership of a
camp of at least 40 hours duration, for a
Christian group;
(b) The planning and conduct of a one-off youth
event;
(c) The organising and conduct of a youth
leadership training programme.

191

Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates understand the social factors
that shape the lives of young Australians;
(b) To assist candidates understand the social
development of young people and the ways in
which they learn, and to evaluate the
appropriateness of a number of models of youth
ministry;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.

OR, as an alternative to 6 and 7:


8

Christian Ministry among adolescents including a


minimum of 30 hours of fieldwork. Of this at least
7 hours are to be spent in observation, at least 12
hours in ministry by the candidate, and at least 7
hours in supervised reflection upon observation and
teaching (these hours exclude preparation and
writing up time).

Bibliography
Arzola, F., Toward a Prophetic Youth Ministry: Theory
and Praxis in Urban Context (InterVarsity Press,
2008).
Brain, P., Going the Distance: To Stay Fit For a Lifetime
in Ministry (Sydney: Matthias Ministry, 2004).
Brierly, D., Growing Community: Making Groups Work
with Young People (London: Authentic Lifestyle,
2003).
Dean, K., C. Clark and D. Rahn, Starting Right:
Thinking Theologically about Youth Ministry
(Grand Rapids: Youth Specialities; Zondervan,
2001).
Dean, K., Practicing Passion: Youth and the Quest for a
Passionate Church (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2004).
Kimmel, T., Why Christian Kids Rebel (Nashville:
World Wide, 2004).
King, M., Presence-Centered Youth Ministry: Guiding
Students into Spiritual Formation (Downers Grove,
IL: IVP, 2006).
Lawrence, R., Jesus-Centred Youth Ministry (Loveland,
CO: Group, 2007).
Moore, M. E. and Wright, A., Children, Youth, and
Spirituality in a Troubling World (Chalice Press,
2008).
Moser, K., Changing the World Through Effective Youth
Ministry (Sydney: Aquila, 2000).
Robins, D., L. Kageler and W. Black, This Way to Youth
Ministry Companion Guide: Readings, Case
Studies, Resources to Begin the Journey (Grand
Rapids, Zondervan: 2004).
Strommen, M. P., K. Jones and D. Rahn, Youth Ministry
That Transforms (Grand Rapids: Youth Specialities;
Zondervan).

DM612 Youth: Context, Development and Learning


Status
Elective

Content
Section A: Youth in Society (35%)
1 Major trends in Australian society and how they
impact young people.
2 Government policy and approaches to young
people, especially education and employment.
3 An introduction to the major social questions
relating to youth: identity and self image; family,
economic,
societal
and
political
issues;
environmental issues; values and morals; gender
and sexual issues; sport; drugs; materialism and
perspective son the future.
4 An examination of the religious context of youth.
Section B: Youth Development and Learning (50%)
5 The developmental characteristics of adolescents:
physical, emotional, psychological and intellectual
changes; sexuality and the emergence of gender
identity.
6 Learning characteristics of adolescents, attitudinal,
moral and spiritual, relational; learning in formal
and informal settings; affective and cognitive issues.
7 Methods of learning and teaching suited to
adolescents, in both formal and information
situations; an introduction to the various
philosophies of religious education, and their
implications for Christian ministry towards and by
adolescents.
8 Personal ministry with adolescents: style, ethos,
methodology ; mentor and peer relationships;
personal skills in discipling and visiting young
people.
Section C: Ministry with Youth (15%)
9 Candidates are required to complete at least 20
hours supervised field education, observing and
engaging with young people of different ages and
contexts. This should include supervised visits to
typical youth activities (e.g., sport, social or cultural
events) and visits to a Secondary College and a
TAFE College. Conduct survey of students and
staff to identify their perspectives on youth
concerns.
Bibliography
Barwick, H., Youth Work Today : A Review of the Issues
and Challenges : A Literature Review of Youth
Work in New Zealand, Australia and the United
Kingdom (Wellington, New Zealand : Ministry of
Youth Development, 2006).

MDiv Unit Outlines

192

Bellamy, M. and Castle, Social Influences Upon Faith


Development (Sydney: NCLS Research & Bible
Society, 2004).
Butcher, M. and M. Thomas, Emerging Youth Cultures
in Urban Australia (Melbourne: Pluto, 2003).
Crawford, M. L. and G. Rossiter Reasons for Living:
Education and Young People's Search for Meaning,
Identity and Spirituality: A Handbook (Camberwell,
Vic. : ACER Press,, 2006).
de Vries, P., Family Based Youth Ministry (Downers
Grove, IL: IVP, 2004).
DuBois, D. L. and M. J. Karcher (eds), Handbook of
Youth Mentoring (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage,
2005).
Pazmino, R. W., Foundational Issues in Christian
Education (3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2008).
Rice, F. P., The Adolescent: Development,
Relationships, and Culture (12th edition) (Boston :
Pearson/Allyn and Bacon, 2008).
Savage, S., S. Collins-Mayo, B. Mayo and G. Cray,
Making Sense of Generation Y: The World View of
15-to-25-year-olds (London: Church House, 2006).
Tacey, D., The Spirituality Revolution: The Emergence
of
Contemporary
Spirituality
(Sydney:
HarperCollins, 2003).
Wyn, J. (ed.), Generations and Social Change:
Negotiating Adulthood in the 21st Century : Report
on the Life-Patterns Research Program : 2005-2007
(Melbourne : Australian Youth Research Centre,
Melbourne Graduate School of Education,
University of Melbourne 2008).
Yaconelli, M., Core Realities of Youth Ministry (Grand
Rapids: Youth Specialities; Zondervan, 2003).

DM613 Ministry with Non-Church Youth


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates evaluate the appropriateness of
strategies for ministry to young people outside the
church;
(b) To assist candidates evaluate a number of
approaches for reaching non-church youth;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.
Content
Section A: Ministry with Non-Church Youth (70%)
1 The development of specific aims, objectives,
methods and strategies to meet specific needs and
opportunities with non-Church youth.
2 An examination of the gospel message and how to
communicate it with young people.
3 Strategies for making contact with young people.
School programmes. Developing links in the
community.
4 Strategies and models for evangelistic outreach with
non-church youth.

The approaches of significant youth organisations to


outreach ministry with youth: a survey of the
philosophies and work of church and congregational
youth departments, and bodies such as Theos,
Fusion, Campus groups (AFES etc), YFC etc.
The relationship between secular and Christian
bodies working with youth.

Section B: Ministry in Practice (30%)


7 (a) An evaluation and examination of at least one
para-church, and at least one church-based
programme oriented to youth outside or on the
fringes of the church, including observation,
participation and supervised reflection.
OR

(b) Visits to at least one agency working with


disadvantaged youth; and to student welfare
work in both state and church secondary
schools.
(a) Participation in the planning and conduct of an
evangelistic mission to youth, including at least
8 hours personal ministry by the candidates,
and 5 hours individual supervision.
OR
(b) Candidates are required to participate in the
planning, preparation and leadership of a camp
of at least 40 hours duration, intended for nonChristian young people.

Bibliography
Butcher, M. and M. Thomas, Emerging Youth Cultures
in Urban Australia (Melbourne: Pluto, 2003).
Dean, K., C. C. Creasy and D. Rahn., Starting Right:
Thinking Theologically about Youth Ministry
(Zondervan, 2001).
McKee, J. R., Do They Run When They See You
Coming? : Reaching Out to Unchurched Students
(El Cajon, CA : Youth Specialties ; Grand Rapids,
Mich. : Zondervan, 2004).
Moore, M. E. and A. M. Wright (eds), Children, Youth,
and spirituality in a Troubling World (St. Louis,
Mo. : Chalice Press, 2008).
Moser, K., Youth Evangerlism: Reaching Young People
in a Way that Honours God (Sydney: Aquila, 2004).
Olsen, P., Youth at Risk (Cleaveland: Pilgrim, 2003).
Peel, M., The Lowest Rung: Voices of Australian Poverty
(Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
Reid, A., Radically Unchurched: Who They Are and
How to Reach Them (Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2002).
Root, A., Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry: From a
Strategy of Influence to a Theology of Incarnation
(InterVarsity Press, 2007).
Semmel, C. J. No Meeting Required: Strategies for
Nongathered Ministry with Young People (Winona,
MN : Saint Mary's Press, 2007).
Sudowrth, T., G. Cray and C. Russell, Mission-Shaped
Youth: Rethinking Yound People and Church
(London: Church House, 2007).
Winter, R., Ancient-Future Evangelism (Grand Rapids:
Baker, 2003).

MDiv Unit Outlines

DM614 Chaplaincy in Educational Settings


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To enable current and prospective practitioners to
explore the practice and theology of chaplaincy in
a range of educational settings: primary,
secondary and tertiary, state and private systems;
(b) To assist candidates evaluate a number of models
for effective Christian education in a chaplaincy
context;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.
Content
Section A: The Role of the Chaplain and a
Theology of Chaplaincy (50%)
1 The development of a theology and ecclesiology
of chaplaincy.
2 An exploration of the various models of
chaplaincy in primary, private secondary, state
secondary and tertiary settings.
3 An examination of the role of a chaplain. The
varied roles of the chaplain as pastor, youth
worker, welfare counsellor, teacher and
psychologist. Being a professional Christian in a
secular pluralist context. The chaplains job
description.
4 Professional ethics, confidentiality and legal
issues for chaplains. Professional development,
supervision and self-care issues in chaplaincy.
Referral and crisis responses.
5 Approaches to classroom religious education
including teaching world religions in the multifaith classroom. Approaches to religious
education in the state system.
6 An examination of pastoral care and counselling
models in the educational institution.
Section B: Issues among Children, Adolescents and
Young Adults (30%)
7 Youth in Australian society and the major issues
confronting children and young people.
8 Key issues that relate to the health and spirituality
of children, adolescents and young people.
9 Identify the physical, emotional, cognitive and
moral issues among children, adolescents and
young people.
Section C: Chaplaincy in Practice (20%)
10 The exploration through observation and
interview of a chaplain working in their particular
educational setting.

193

Bibliography
Beck, M., et al, Exploring Religion (Melbourne: OUP,
2000).
Berger, K. S., The Developing Person Through the
Life Span (W H Freeman & Co, 2007).
Buckland, R., Perspectives on Children and the
Gospel: Excellence in Ministry with Children and
their Families (Gosford: Scripture Union, 2001).
Crawford, M. and G. Rossiter, Reasons for Living:
Education and Young Peoples Search for
Meaning, Identity and Spirituality (Camberwell,
VIC: Australian Council for Educational
Research, 2006).
Felderhof, M., D. Torevell and P. Thompson (eds),
Inspiring Faith in Schools: Studies in Religious
Education (Hampshire, UK: Ashgate, 2007).
Garlid, C. F., A. A. Zollfrank & G. Fitchett (eds)
Expanding the Circle: Essays in Honor of Joan E.
Hemenway (Decatur, Georgia: Journal of Pastoral
Care Publications Inc., 2009)
Hughes, P. and S. Bond, Chaplaincy in Uniting
Church Schools: Report on Research 2001
(Melbourne: Christian Research Association,
2003).
Imbroscio, A., Post Modern Religious Education in
Religious Education Journal of Australia 16:2,
2000.
McAlpin, K. and M. J. Leddy, Ministry That
Transforms: A Contemplative Process of
Theological Reflection (Liturgical Press, 2009).
Norman, J. (ed.), At the Heart of Education: School
Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care (Dublin : Veritas,
2004).
Pohlmann, D., School Chaplaincy: An Introduction
(Mansfield, Qld. : Christian Heritage College,
2004).
Rice, F. P., The Adolescent: Development,
Relationships, and Culture (12th edition) (Boston :
Pearson/Allyn and Bacon, 2008).
Robinson, S., Ministry Among Students: A Pastoral
Theology and Handbook for Practice (London:
SCM Canterbury, 2004).

DM621 Issues in Childrens Ministry


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates to analyse a number of
contemporary issues with a bearing on churchbased childrens ministry;
(b) To develop effective skills for work among
church-based children;
(c) To provide an opportunity for supervised practical
work.

194

MDiv Unit Outlines

Content
Section A: Contemporary issues in Church-based
Childrens Ministry (40%)
1 Definitions of family: historical, sociological, and
contemporary understandings; implications for
family ministry.
2 Children and education: a survey of government,
independent and Christian schools; the
implications for and relationships between church
and school based ministry.
3 An overview of significant pastoral issues for
children: loss and grief; stress; drugs; occult;
family dysfunction; abuse.
4 Working with children in a multi-cultural setting;
children and other faiths.
5 An overview of children with special needs; and
their integration.
Section B: Childrens Ministry Skills (40%)
6 Communicating with children; pastoral care;
modelling behaviour; listening and language,
verbal and non-verbal; effective discipline in a
small or large group context.
7 Children, doctrine and the sacraments; teaching
the doctrines of revelation, humanity, salvation,
church, and work of the Holy Spirit; children and
baptism, communion, and confirmation; various
denominational perspectives.
8 Using Scripture with children, effective use and
abuse.
9 Practical skills in ministry: creative arts music,
drama, puppets, storytelling; small group work.
10 Supporting and resourcing parents in nurturing
and discipleship roles.
11 Leading a team; recruiting, training, liaising with
parents and other stakeholders, including those
from different cultures.

Fosarelli, P. D., ASAP: Ages, Stages, and Phases: from


Infancy to Adolescence: Integrating Physical,
Social, Moral, Emotional, Intellectual, and
Spiritual Development (Liguori, Missouri:
Liguori, 2006).
Keeley, R. J., Helping Our Children Grow in Faith:
How the Church Can Nurture the Spiritual
Development of Kids (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker
Books, 2008).
May, S., B. Posterski and C. Stonehouse, Children
Matter: Celebrating Their Place in the Church,
Family and Community (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,
2005).
Mercer, J., Welcoming Children: A Practical Theology
of Childhood (St. Louis, Mo.: Chalice Press, 2005).
Roehlkepartain, E. C. & P. E. King (eds), The
Handbook of Spiritual Development in Childhood
and Adolescence (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage,
2005).
Shier-Jones, A. (ed.), Children of God: Towards a
Theology of Childhood (Peterborough: Epworth,
2007).
Withers, M., Mission-shaped Children: Moving
Towards a Child-centred Church (London: Church
House, 2006).
Yaconelli, M., Contemplative Youth Ministry:
Practicing the Presence of Jesus (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2006).

DM630 Australian Families and the Church


Status
Elective

Section C: Ministry in Practice (20%)


12 Supervised Field Education: At least 20 hours
work to be undertaken in one of the following
areas: holiday and after-school programs; family
ministry; camps; school religious education;
church-based religious education; other work as
approved by the course coordinator.
Note: the ministry area should be different from
that undertaken in previous study.

Learning Outcomes
(a) To assist candidates form a theology of the family
and its relationship to the local church;
(b) To assist the candidate to develop an
understanding of the diversity of expression of
family in contemporary Australia, to analyse the
factors that impact its well-being and how
Christian family can be expressed in this light;
(c) To seek evidence that the candidate is equipped
for the tasks of the evaluation and development of
the churchs ministry to families.

Bibliography
Allen, H. C., Nurturing Children's Spirituality:
Christian Perspectives and Best Practices
(Eugene, Or.: Cascade Books, 2008).
Beckwith, I., R. N. Altson and S. Burke, Postmodern
Childrens Ministry: Ministry to Children in the
21st Century Church (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
2004).
Beckwith, I., Formational Children's Ministry:
Shepherding Children Using Story, Ritual, and
Relationship Emersion (Grand Rapids, MI : Baker
Books, 2010).
Cliff, P., The Endless Playground: Celebrating
Australian Childhood (Canberra : National
Library of Australia, 2000).

Content
Section A (60%)
1 Understanding family: definitions, variety
ethnic, aboriginal; biblical, theological and
sociological views; family life-cycle and rites of
passage;
2 Beginnings, marriage and marriage preparation;
3 Family roles: relationships, enriching good and
repairing damaged; rights and responsibilities,
parent-parent including sexual relationships,
parent-child including discipline and childrens
rights, parent-teenage, governance;
4 Family maintenance and enrichment: Christian
living in the home; spiritual nurture; marriage
enrichment; holistic development;

MDiv Unit Outlines

Families and church: ministry to families; family


worship; church as family.

Section B (20%)
6 Families in crisis: modern pressures on the family;
domestic violence and abuse, pastoral care and
family counselling; the family and the law, Family
Court and other Courts;
7 Broken families: divorce, children and divorce;
single-parenting; remarriage and blended families;
the churchs ministry to broken families.

195

(b) Units PC642644, DM642 and EM640 will be


moderated by the appropriate Field moderator.
(c) An introduction to the ministry issues pertaining to
the context in which the Field Work will be
undertaken. The precise details of the content
should be outlined in advance by the individual
colleges for all their students.
(d) Colleges should seek approval from the relevant
field moderator for their methods of reflection and
evaluation for field education units.

Section C (20%)
8 Practical work: a profile of family ministry in a
local church together with a critical assessment
and the development of a relevant ministry
approach.
Bibliography
Browning, D. S., Equality and the Family: a
Fundamental, Practical Theology of Children,
Mothers and Fathers in Modern Societies (Wm.
B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2007).
Everett, C. A. (ed.), Divorce and the Next Generation
(New York: Hawthorn, 2001).
Fosarelli, P. D., Family Ministry Desk Reference
(Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2004).
Jones, T. P., R. Stinson, P. Renfro and B. Shields,
Perspectives on Family Ministry: Three Views
(B&H Publishing Group, 2009).
Nilan, P., R. Julian and J. Germov, Australian Youth:
Social and Cultural Issues (Pearson Education
Australia, 2007).
Penner, M., Youth Worker's Guide to Parent Ministry
(Zondervan, 2003).
Poole, M., Family: Changing Families, Changing
Times (Allen & Unwin, 2005).
Qu, L., Snapshots of Family Relationships
(Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family
Studies, 2008).
Strommen, M. P. and R. A. Hardel, Passing on the
Faith: A Radical New Model for Youth and Family
Ministry (Winona, MN: Saint Marys, 2000).
van Leuwen, M. S., Father and Sons (Leicester, IVP:
2002).
Zubrick, S. R., Parenting and Families in Australia
(Canberra: Dept. of Families, Housing,
Community Services and Indigenous Affairs,
2008).

DM642 Childrens Ministry Field Education


Status
Elective
Learning Outcomes
(a) To introduce students to the practical issues related
to particular ministry settings.
(b) To stimulate candidates reflection, integration and
thinking with respect to philosophical issues,
including cross-cultural education, pluralism and
ethnicity and the exercise of informed critical
judgement on programmes of education within
church or nation;
(c) To facilitate in candidates an understanding of the
skills involved in practical ministry, and give
opportunity for the acquisition and development of
these skills in chosen areas;
(d) To enable candidates to examine principles of
education and educational insights from the social
sciences in the light of biblical perspectives and
contemporary theological understanding
Content
Section A: Preparation
Candidates must undertake a preparation course for
this field education.
The unit should include
communicating with children, with particular attention
paid to the communication of Christian truth; health,
safety and legal issues; accountability, reporting and
referral. Colleges are advised to require a police check
or its equivalent from students.
Note:
Students who are taking concurrently, or have
successfully completed, DM621 Issues in Childrens
Ministry are exempt from taking Section A.

Field Education Units


Student may take two only of units PC642 PC647,
DM642 and EM640
Notes
(a) Units PC642644, DM642, and EM640 will be
assessed on a non-graded Pass/Fail basis, and will
not be included in the calculation of grade point
averages.

Section B: Field Education


1 The supervisory relationship; the supervisory
session;
learning
covenants;
evaluation;
theological reflection, including the use of
verbatims; Field Committees.
2 EITHER
not less than 200 hours experience (with
supervision) in childrens ministry;
OR
a period of continuous residence (with
supervision) of not less than six weeks duration
in a childrens ministry program.

MDiv Unit Outlines

196

Bibliography
Nil

DM689 Christian Education Seminar


Status
Elective

Pre-requisites
(i) Grad Dip Div candidates:
Students may attempt the project in their final
semester of studies.
(ii) MDiv candidates:
The project should be attempted no earlier in the
course than the last year of enrolment. Candidates
must have completed at least 8 credit points in the
field of study.
Aims:

Learning Outcomes
(a) To provide candidates with the opportunity to study
in depth a topic or theme of interest;
(b) To give candidates the opportunity to develop cooperative research skills;
(c) To assist candidates in the application of Christian
education insights to Christian education needs.
Content
A study (under supervision) of the history, philosophy,
methodology and organisation of specialised Christian
Education ministries.
The study must include detailed examination of at least
one particular agency, or a comparison of more than one.
Agencies may include a church Department of Education
(whether in a local church with professional education
staff, or a regional or national body) or a para-church
agency with substantial education ministry (such as the
Scripture Union, the Navigators, the Student Christian
Movement, student bodies affiliated with the
International Fellowship of Evangelical Students, or
Youth with a Mission). First-hand involvement with any
agency under study is highly desirable.
The agency to be studied and the assessment procedures
must be approved by the Field Moderator.
Bibliography
Nil

RESEARCH PROJECTS
++650 (4 cps)
++690 (8 cps)
Research Projects worth four credit points are offered in
each Field of Study within the Grad Dip Div.
Students may be permitted to attempt a 4 credit point
project (++650) as part of their Graduate Diploma
programme.
The eight credit point project is compulsory for MDiv
candidates who wish to articulate to the MTh, and is
offered in each Field of Study.
Candidates may not include more than one project in
their course.

(a) To allow candidates to pursue in depth a topic of


interest not studied elsewhere in their degree;
(b) To enable candidates to develop research and
reporting skills at an advanced standard;
(c) To provide opportunities for candidates to explore
aspects of research of relevance to their major area
of ministry preparation.
Regulations:
Candidates must submit a proposed programme of
research to the course coordinator at their institution.
1

The candidates approved institution is responsible


to ensure that the appropriate pre-requisites have
been met, that the candidate has the ability to
complete the project satisfactorily, that effective
supervision and resources are available, and that the
program of study has been submitted to and
approved by the appropriate Field moderator.
Essays and projects form an important aspect of
candidates learning, providing opportunity for
developing research skills, logical argument and
proper use of source documents. It is therefore
essential that candidates do their own work.
However it is also true that first year students in
particular need assistance in the techniques of
extended writing. Some directions are provided in
the Manual. The following guidelines attempt to
delineate where proper help ends and undue
assistance begins:
a. Lecturers may give broad direction concerning
topics in relation to when corresponding topics
will be dealt with in the course, or what general
resources are readily available, such as relevant
textbooks and likely journals.
b. The choice of topic and initial outline of
approach must be the candidates own work.
No interviews should be conducted until these
have been set down in writing by candidates.
Talks on how to approach this topic should
be avoided. Further help should be restricted to
indicating possible lines of development which
raise from the candidates own research. It is
also permissible for lecturer to give some
guidance to students in relation to basic
Bibliography.
c. Essay seminars should not be conducted.
Each essay must represent the candidates own
work.
d. A candidate may be requested to correct poor
spelling, expression or irregularities in

MDiv Unit Outlines

synopsis, footnotes and bibliography before an


essay is accepted
The Research Topic may take the form of academic
or field-based research on a particular aspect of one
subject area, or across several areas or Fields. It
must have clear aims and focus, and will normally
be approx. 6,000-7,000 words for Grad Dip Div
candidates and 7,000-8,000 words (including
footnotes but not Bibliography or abstracts) for
MDiv candidates.
The completed Research Project must conform to
the format specified for Projects in the Master of
Arts (Theology) (Ministry). One copy is to be kept
by the approved institution and one submitted to the
designated Field Moderator.
The Project shall be assessed by an appropriately
qualified person within the candidates approved
institution and moderated by the designated Field
Moderator.

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