Give My Kids Age­ appropriate Chores

Family Responsibilities Build Self­Confidence and a Sense of Belonging

Compiled by:

Table of Contents
Ten Kids' Chores for Elementary Schoolers Ten Kids' Chores for Middle Schoolers Ten Kids' Chores for High Schoolers Put Fun and Laughter into Your Kids' Chore List Help My Teenager Take On More Responsibility Worksheet: Sample Chore Contract Worsheet: Sample Chore Chart Help Your Teen Balance Responsibilities Preschooler Activities: Chores Can Be Rewarding Real Life Story: Walking the Dog How Well Does My Child Help Out at Home?  

Give My Kids Age­appropriate Chores
Family Responsibilities Build Self­Confidence and a Sense of Belonging
2 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

Do I need this EduGuide?

How Well Does My Child Help Out at Home?  

Give My Kids Age­appropriate Chores
Family Responsibilities Build Self­Confidence and a Sense of Belonging

Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you want to help your child take on more family responsibility at home. This EduGuide can help you assign age­appropriate  chores and make a household chores list that suits your family.

How does it work?
Quizzes help you know where you stand. Articles give you the background information you need to make a decision. 
l

 “On the Virtues of Making Kids Do the Dishes”  

Real Life Stories tell the experiences of real parents and real kids. ShortCuts help you take immediate action. Choose one or go through them all. 

What will I learn?
l l l

Why family responsibilities are good for kids  Which chores are appropriate for kids of all ages: elementary school, middle school, and high school  How to make chores more pleasant—for everyone  

Quick Solutions
l l

What can I do in fifteen minutes? Take the quiz “How Well Does My Child Help Out at Home?”   What can I do in a half hour? Read one of the Real Life Stories along with your spouse or child and then discuss it. What useful  ideas did you learn from this family’s experiences?  

 

Ten Kids' Chores for Elementary Schoolers
By the time children are in elementary school, they can handle a variety of house chores. They’re also eager to do things for  themselves and often enjoy helping the family. The following are age­appropriate chores for kids in elementary school. 

3

Daily Kids' Chore List
ONLINE EDUGUIDE
l

www.EduGuide.org

Make the bed. The goal isn’t military style perfection but rather a neat appearance that can foster pride in their space. You may 

 

Ten Kids' Chores for Elementary Schoolers
By the time children are in elementary school, they can handle a variety of house chores. They’re also eager to do things for  themselves and often enjoy helping the family. The following are age­appropriate chores for kids in elementary school. 

Daily Kids' Chore List
l

l l l

l

Make the bed. The goal isn’t military style perfection but rather a neat appearance that can foster pride in their space. You may  wish to set a time for this task, such as before breakfast, leaving for school, or going out to play. Younger children can strip the  bed on laundry day and add the sheets to the laundry basket.  Set the table. Kids can get dishes out of cupboards, set each place, and pour drinks. You can rotate this task among siblings  to prevent boredom and give everyone a turn.  Clear the table. Besides clearing the dishes, children can put away condiments and clean the table and placemats.  Feed a pet; walk a dog. Taking care of an animal can teach empathy as well as responsibility. Children this age can learn what  and when to feed the pet, as well as when, where, and how long to walk a dog. To make sure the pet is cared for properly,  monitor these chores until they become habits.  Make lunch. If your child takes a lunch to school, then he or she can help prepare and pack it. Making his or her lunch can also  reduce complaints about the contents. (Give kids options that ensure their lunch includes healthy foods.) 

Weekly Chores for Kids
l l l l

l

Fold laundry. Your kids can help sort laundry and fold and put away their clothes. Younger children can pair socks or fold  towels. Sorting laundry together has another benefit: extra time to talk to one another.  Vacuum. Children can vacuum their rooms (after picking up clutter from the floor) and can also be assigned other areas in the  house to vacuum.  Dust. Give children a duster or have them use old socks on their hands to dust walls and furniture. Avoid having young children  use chemical sprays when dusting.  Sort recyclables. Teaching children about recycling can begin early. Children can crush plastic milk bottles, stack  newspapers, and sort cans (make sure there are no sharp lids sticking out). They can also make sire that recyclables go into  the storage area and not the garbage.  Do light yard work. Working outdoors can improve kids’ health, as well as help them concentrate better, be less stressed, and  do better in school. If you have a garden—or even a flowerbox—assign a child responsibility for weeding and watering.  Children can also help rake leaves and shovel snow. 

To help you and your kids keep track of their chore commitment, create a Chore Contract and Chore Chart. For a sample of each, click  on the following links: [sample chore chart] [sample chore contract]  

Ten Kids' Chores for Middle Schoolers
For kids this age, chores on their chore list can include several steps and require greater strength and more concentration than  www.EduGuide.org 4 chores for younger children.  ONLINE EDUGUIDE

[sample chore chart] [sample chore contract]  

Ten Kids' Chores for Middle Schoolers
For kids this age, chores on their chore list can include several steps and require greater strength and more concentration than  chores for younger children.  Here are ten kids’ chores that middle school­age children can handle successfully.  1. 2. Wash and dry their clothes. If you’ve got a big family, you may need to designate laundry times for family members. Consider  rotating family responsibility for sheets, towels, and non­personal laundry.  Clean the bathroom. Daily maintenance tasks such as wiping out the shower or weekly tasks such as cleaning the sink and  toilet are good chores for younger teens. Have them wear gloves, make sure the bathroom is well ventilated, and teach kids  about safe chemical use (for example, ammonia and bleach give off a toxic gas if mixed together).  Care for pets. Tasks may include bathing and taking the dog for walks, brushing the cat and clipping its claws, and cleaning  up animal waste. If you have fish, teach kids how to wash out the tank or perform simple maintenance on aquarium filters.   Wash dishes. Middle schoolers can safely wash and dry silverware, dishes, pots, and pans or load and unload the  dishwasher.  Watch younger siblings. Depending on how responsible your middle schooler is, he or she may be ready to baby­sit younger  siblings while you run errands or take short trips away from home. Kids this age can also help younger ones by helping them  get clothes to wear in the morning or walking with them to a bus stop.  Bring in groceries. If your child helps you carry groceries into the house and put them away, you can use this time to talk about  why you chose certain foods, what dishes you plan to make, and how the food you bought will contribute to healthy eating.   Take out the trash. Have your child take the garbage to the curb or the garbage can or dumpster. For a while, you may have to  remind him or her what day garbage is picked up.  Rake leaves; shovel snow. Both tasks also lend themselves to fun outdoor activities. So as long as the job eventually gets  done, let your child play in the snow or jump in leaf piles.  Mow the lawn. This is a task that requires safety training (power mower safety includes ear and eye protection) as well as  supervision at first. Start by assigning just one part of the lawn. Add more responsibility gradually.  Wash the car. This is a good task for siblings to do together. The frequency of this chore may depend on the weather and how  dirty your car gets. 

3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

To help you and your kids keep track their chore commitment, create a Chore Contract and Chore Chart. For a sample of each, click on  the following links: [sample chore chart] [sample chore contract]  

Ten Kids' Chores for High Schoolers
Giving Your Teen Chores Helps Them Develop Responsibility
While high school academics are the top priority, teenagers can still do their part to help the family accomplish household chores.  Since teens are almost independent, they should be able to perform nearly any chore adults can—if the adults take the time to show  teens how the tasks should be done.
5 The following are some ideas that might help you develop a chore list for teens.  ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

[sample chore chart] [sample chore contract]  

Ten Kids' Chores for High Schoolers
Giving Your Teen Chores Helps Them Develop Responsibility
While high school academics are the top priority, teenagers can still do their part to help the family accomplish household chores.  Since teens are almost independent, they should be able to perform nearly any chore adults can—if the adults take the time to show  teens how the tasks should be done. The following are some ideas that might help you develop a chore list for teens. 

Teens' Chores in the Home
l

l l

Mop floors. Have your teenagers mop the floor once a week—or twice a month if they have particularly busy schedules. If you  want to make the task more interesting, rotate which floors (bathrooms, kitchen, etc.) they are responsible for each week.  Remind them that the job requires making sure the floor is clean enough to mop, which may mean sweeping before mopping.  Also, the task includes cleaning up afterward: putting away the mop and dumping water or cleaning solutions.  Clean out the fireplace. If you have a fireplace in your home, teach your teenagers how to clean it out and safely dispose of the  ashes.  Cook meals. Have your teenagers prepare one meal a week for the family. Discuss how to plan a healthy, well­balanced meal.  Suggest cookbooks or online sites with good recipes. Be sure to praise successes and maintain a good sense of humor  about failures. 

Teens' Chores behind the Wheel
l

l l

Maintain the car. Teach your teens how to check the oil, air pressure, and antifreeze levels. Teach them how to change a tire,  windshield wipers, and oil. If you can, teach them basic car repairs such as changing brake pads, spark plugs, etc. Learning  these tasks now with adult supervision will save them money and hassle later when they are responsible for a car.  Run errands. Teenagers with driver’s licenses can share errand running as well as chauffeur duty on occasion by taking  siblings to school, games, practices, rehearsals, and other after­school activities.  Shop for groceries. For a teen whose license is newly in hand, shopping may quickly become a favorite chore. Involve your  teens in making grocery lists and teach them how to shop wisely for healthy food. If you are reluctant to hand over the grocery  shopping to your teens, consider having them pick up necessities such as milk, bread, light bulbs, batteries, or last­minute  meals if they run out between grocery runs. 

Teen’s Chores Outdoors 
l

l

l l

Wash windows. While washing windows isn’t a frequent task, it is necessary and time consuming. Teach your teenagers how  to wash windows inside and out. You can also show them how to remove storm windows and screens for washing and  storing.  Clean gutters. Many young people actually relish the chance to climb around on the roof. Most teenagers can learn how to be  safe on the roof and then be assigned the task of cleaning leaves and dirt out of the gutters once or twice a year. You might  also be able to get your teens to trim tree branches and remove debris from the roof while they are up on the ladder.  Maintain the house. Teenagers can help strip and stain decks, wash siding, and paint porches. Besides building skills, these  occasional jobs will give teens a good idea of what home ownership requires.  Care for the garden. Teens can easily make sure the lawn and garden are watered, weeded, and fertilized. Establish a  schedule for garden chores so your kids know how often to do each task. 

 

6

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

schedule for garden chores so your kids know how often to do each task.   

Put Fun and Laughter into Your Kids' Chore List
The tasks on the household chores list don’t have to be a drag, they just have to get done. There are lots of ways you can transform  chores for kids (and parents) into fun family activities. Try some of the following ideas and see what works for your family: 
l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Model a good attitude. If you want your kids to do their chores without complaining or whining, you need to do the same.  Whenever you can, model an attitude of gratitude—gratefulness that you have a home to clean, that you have the opportunity to  do things together, that your home will be cozy and comfortable after you're through. When you show a positive attitude toward  and enthusiasm about chores, your children are more likely to do so as well.  Rotate tasks. To guard against boredom, rotate the chores children are responsible for. Some families use a job jar that has  each household task written on a piece of paper inside. Everyone draws a paper from the jar to learn what task they are  responsible for.  Sing a song. Make up new lyrics to familiar songs—lyrics that go with the task at hand. “Row Your Boat” can turn into “Make,  make, make your bed, cheerfully every morn…” If your kids are too old for this, crank up some tunes and choreograph the tasks  on your chore list to music.  Act out a story (for younger kids). Create a story around chores and assign “roles” (tasks). For example, play the pit crew at a  racetrack. Your kids are expecting a star racecar driver, and their job is to prepare for the arrival. Make simple costumes  together such as aprons, name tags, or hats. Give each child a checklist of tasks to be done. Assign yourself a role (pit boss?)  Tell your kids that if they aren’t working, they can be fired. When the work is done, celebrate the arrival of the star with an  appropriate event (a parade, dance, or a tea). The possibilities are endless; you can adapt stories from television shows,  books, video games, or movies.  Work together. Adjust your schedule so that everyone can do chores at the same time. It’s often easier to do tasks as a group,  as each family member can help the others stay motivated. Working together also appeals to the sense of fairness that is very  strong in elementary school­age children.  Race against the clock. Let time be your friend. Get a timer and challenge your children to beat the clock. Hold races to see  whether family members can beat their record times while still meeting the quality standards of the tasks. Reward time saved  by letting your child do something special—extra video time, reading a book, or playing a card game.   Create a chore board game. Make your own board game patterned after such classics as Candy Land or Chutes and  Ladders. Besides putting get­home­free­type spaces on the board, write chores on some of the spaces. Play the game; then  do the chores.  Auction off chores. If you have more than one child, give your kids a chance to bid on weekly rotating chores. Let your children  earn credits during the week—perhaps by doing daily chores. Then once a week auction off rotating chores for those credits,  giving your children the opportunity to earn more coveted tasks. If no one bids on a chore, then you get to assign it when all the  other bidding is complete. You might even offer a chore­free purchase option for a minimum number of credits.  Use chore kits and games. Several companies have created chore kits that can be downloaded from the Web. These kits  typically include chore charts, rewards, and graphics that can make household tasks more entertaining. There are also sites  like ChoreWars.com that turn chores into competitive role playing games in which characters earn experience points and  treasures by completing chores.  Celebrate chores. If your family enjoys being silly, consider holding mock awards nights once a month. You can bestow such  titles as Prince of the Vacuum, Dust Destroyer, or Queen of Quite Perfect Dishes. You can make ribbons or certificates or  bestow a trophy on the family member who contributed the most to the household or showed the greatest improvement. 

Finally, check in with your kids. Everyone’s idea of fun is a bit different—so ask your children what would make chores more fun for  them. Don’t let them off the hook with an easy answer like “nothing” or “not doing them.” Challenge them to find at least one way that  their household tasks could give them something to smile about.  

7

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

them. Don’t let them off the hook with an easy answer like “nothing” or “not doing them.” Challenge them to find at least one way that  their household tasks could give them something to smile about.  

Help My Teenager Take On More Responsibility
EduGuide Staff
As kids grow older, they can—and should—take on increased responsibility. Responsibility is critical to a young person’s  development, building their coping skills, self­esteem, and sense of ownership. The following are tips for increasing responsibility in four key areas: academics, chores, community service, and finances.  Academics. Teens should be expected to keep track of homework, test dates, etc. without daily reminders from their parents. It is  good to start in middle school before they face the even­more­demanding responsibilities of high school. Teen’s Chores. Getting help from your teen can make your family run more smoothly, help him or her feel like a valued member of the  family team, and teach life skills. Here are some suggestions:
l l l

Trash: Ask teens to keep track of the garbage level in all family wastebaskets and empty them when they get full.  Laundry: Teens can wash all their own laundry plus one additional load per week to represent their share of towels, sheets,  etc. Show them how to wash whites, colors, etc. "Doing the laundry" means wash, dry, fold, and put away.  Errands: Once teens are able to drive, they can take younger siblings to school, lessons, or practices. Make it their  responsibility to remember times and locations. 

Community Service Opportunities. Work with your teen to find community service ideas that match their interests. These are some  options:
l l l

Local humane societies often have volunteer programs for adolescents. Contact your local ASPCA or veterinarian for  suggestions.  Kids who are artistically inclined might be able to volunteer at a local art museum, preparing materials for arts projects,  performing data entry, and acting as teacher aides for art classes.  Teens who like to work with their hands can volunteer with organizations like Habitat for Humanity (information on their youth programs is available) 

Financial Responsibilities. There are many ways to foster financial responsibility in young people. The following are ideas to get you  started:
l l

Allowance. A predictable income can help your teens learn money management skills. Help them create a chart that shows  how much they need and how long it will take to reach that goal.  Bank accounts. Middle school is also a good time to introduce checking accounts. Call your bank or credit unions to see what  special programs they have that teach teens how to save, how interest works, etc. 

Eight Tips for Assigning Responsibilities
1. Involve your teen. Talk to her or him about family needs. Some families involve their teenagers in creating a family budget. Set up a  spreadsheet and show your teenager what expenses the family has each month. When discussing chores for kids, it can be useful to  make a list of all of the tasks that must be done in the household each week and/or month. Teenagers and parents can then work  together to divide responsibilities fairly. 2. Define responsibilities clearly. Do chores with your teens until they understand what is needed. And don’t rely just on a verbal  commitment—put it in writing. Create a checklist, put up a chalkboard or a dry­erase board, make a job chart. When possible, add  pictures for teens who learn visually, read them aloud for those who are auditory learners, and have spaces to cross things off for  those who are tactile learners. Some parents even create contracts with their children.  3. Set a good example. Be careful about the language you use: if you complain about doing work or try to get out of it, you might be  teaching your children to whine or procrastinate. Show your children that you are grateful for the responsibilities that you have by  sharing things you like about your job or your satisfaction with household tasks like “It sure feels comfortable to climb into a bed with  www.EduGuide.org 8 ONLINE EDUGUIDE freshly washed sheets—it makes doing laundry feel worthwhile.”   4. Be a good coach. Supervise their responsibilities and provide feedback and coaching to make sure they are meeting standards 

commitment—put it in writing. Create a checklist, put up a chalkboard or a dry­erase board, make a job chart. When possible, add  pictures for teens who learn visually, read them aloud for those who are auditory learners, and have spaces to cross things off for  those who are tactile learners. Some parents even create contracts with their children.  3. Set a good example. Be careful about the language you use: if you complain about doing work or try to get out of it, you might be  teaching your children to whine or procrastinate. Show your children that you are grateful for the responsibilities that you have by  sharing things you like about your job or your satisfaction with household tasks like “It sure feels comfortable to climb into a bed with  freshly washed sheets—it makes doing laundry feel worthwhile.”   4. Be a good coach. Supervise their responsibilities and provide feedback and coaching to make sure they are meeting standards  and that they continue to do the task. Remember that the goal here isn’t perfection—praise your children frequently and acknowledge  what they do accomplish.  5. Provide rewards and consequences. Be generous with praise and provide appropriate rewards for tasks completed. Tasks well  done can be rewarded with family games or increased freedom or rights. It’s never too early to learn that increased responsibilities  equal increased trust. 6. Be consistent. Once a job is assigned, expect the teen to fulfill that responsibility. If the task is taking out the garbage twice a week,  then make sure the child does that task twice a week. 7. Don’t sabotage! 
l l l l l

Don’t stereotype chores as being female or male.   Don’t overwhelm your teens—children still need time for play, homework, and friendships.   Don’t expect perfection.   Don’t redo the task behind your teens' back.   Don’t let kids whine their way out of a task or procrastinate.  

8. Make the job fun.  Many chores can be made more pleasant with a song or a game. Graphic designer Marie Marfia created a board  game for her kids called The Endless Chore Game. The board has squares like Candy Land but no beginning or end. Each square  has pictures of kids doing chores (mowing the lawn and washing dishes and sweeping floors). Mafia puts the board on the fridge and  uses magnets for game pieces. Her kids roll dice find out what chores they have. How is this fun? “The board has a few free spaces  with fun stuff, like cloud watching or pudding construction or singing "Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” If you’re lucky, you might get out of  chores for a day."  

Worksheet: Sample Chore Contract
June 15, 2009 This contract is between the parties Lydia and Herman Smith (hereinafter called the Parents) and Melissa Smith (hereinafter called  Melissa).  Purpose  This contract cites the household responsibilities for which Melissa will be responsible and the frequency they are to be performed.  Responsibilities It shall be Melissa’s responsibility to complete the following tasks according to the frequency indicated:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Vacuum and dust her room once a week.  Make her bed every day before leaving for school.  Wash the dinner dishes every Wednesday and Saturday night.  Clear the dinner dishes every Monday and Thursday night.  Make her breakfast and clear away the dishes on school days.  Make herself a lunch to take to school every school day.  Shovel the sidewalk whenever there is more than an inch of snow on the ground.  Bring in the mail and place it on the table after school every day.  Take the recycling out to the curb every Tuesday morning.  Fold the towels and put them away every Saturday afternoon. 

The Parents may ask Melissa to perform other reasonable tasks to help with the running of the family in a way that is helpful, healthy, 
9 and pleasant for all family members. ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

Compensation

chores for a day."  

Worksheet: Sample Chore Contract
June 15, 2009 This contract is between the parties Lydia and Herman Smith (hereinafter called the Parents) and Melissa Smith (hereinafter called  Melissa).  Purpose  This contract cites the household responsibilities for which Melissa will be responsible and the frequency they are to be performed.  Responsibilities It shall be Melissa’s responsibility to complete the following tasks according to the frequency indicated:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Vacuum and dust her room once a week.  Make her bed every day before leaving for school.  Wash the dinner dishes every Wednesday and Saturday night.  Clear the dinner dishes every Monday and Thursday night.  Make her breakfast and clear away the dishes on school days.  Make herself a lunch to take to school every school day.  Shovel the sidewalk whenever there is more than an inch of snow on the ground.  Bring in the mail and place it on the table after school every day.  Take the recycling out to the curb every Tuesday morning.  Fold the towels and put them away every Saturday afternoon. 

The Parents may ask Melissa to perform other reasonable tasks to help with the running of the family in a way that is helpful, healthy,  and pleasant for all family members. Compensation The Parents will pay Melissa a weekly allowance of ten dollars every Saturday. A dollar will be deducted for any task that is not  satisfactorily performed.  Duration  This contract will be in effect for one year. It will be reviewed on June 16, 2010—one week after Melissa’s fourteenth birthday—to  determine whether changes need to be made. Changes Proposed changes will be agreed to by both parties and written, signed, and attached to this contract. Signed:   Lydia Smith   Herman Smith   Melissa Smith   Date  

    

10

Worsheet: Sample Chore Chart

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Lydia Smith   Herman Smith

Melissa Smith   Date  

Worsheet: Sample Chore Chart

11

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Worsheet: Sample Chore Chart

 

12

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

 

Help Your Teen Balance Responsibilities
Juggling Family Responsibility, High School Academics, and Extra­curricular Activities
A major challenge for teenagers is balancing the many demands on their time—heavy student homework loads, family responsibility,  extra­curricular activities, community service, a job, friendships. How can you help your teen balance commitments responsibly? Try  some of these suggestions.
l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Model balance. Do your best to achieve a balanced life. Demonstrate to your teen how you meet your commitments to your  interests, work, family, friends, and community by planning ahead and setting priorities (See below). You might also identify  and discuss potential role models, such as scholar athletes and teen volunteers, who balance various interests in their life  successfully.  Stay calm. When things get crazy, take a break. Even if the break lasts two minutes, being removed from the fray can make a  big difference. What else helps? Deep breathing. Take several long, deep breaths to slow the heartbeat and get oxygen flowing  through the bloodstream. Use these techniques yourself and also encourage your teenager to use them.  Start the day right. Different people prefer different methods of waking up: some like a gentle nudge and some need reveille,  but everyone benefits from a little extra time. Make sure everyone has a good breakfast. A nutritious breakfast can be as simple  as a sliced orange and peanut butter toast or a fruit smoothie. Above all, don’t forget to tell your kids you love them, no matter  how grumpy they may be in the morning.  Help your teen set priorities. Have your child list all the activities of each day in a typical week, along with the approximate  amount of time he or she spends on each activity. Check the list to make sure nothing was forgotten, for example, time spent  on social networking sites, playing video games, or reading for pleasure. Then ask him or her to rank the activities from most  to least important. Discuss the ranking. Make sure your teen understands that high school academics is priority number one  and that student homework must take as much time as necessary to accomplish it well. Help your child realize that the time  devoted to activities at the bottom of the priority list may have to decrease in order to spend more time on higher priority  activities.  Help your teen plan ahead. If your teen is not already using one, teach him or her how to use a planner or a calendar to  schedule important deadlines and activities. Demonstrate how you use your planner, and work together to find one for your  teen that is simple and enjoyable to use.  Help your teen stay organized. Whether it is using to­do lists, keeping an Outlook calendar, using a spreadsheet, electronic  alerts, or any other method, help your teenager find an organizational method that works. Consider setting up a reminder chart  for the family that lists important tasks, appointments, and events.  Make sure your teen resolves conflicting commitments. Before a teenager takes on a job or extracurricular activity, make  sure he or she finds out when it takes place and how long it lasts. If the activity conflicts with a previous commitment, help your  child figure out whether the conflict can be resolved and then communicate with everyone involved as soon as possible. 

 

Preschooler Activities: Chores Can Be Rewarding
Bryan Taylor
Considering how much of my life is spent avoiding work, I've been shocked by how eager my 3­year­old son is to get into it. He begs to  visit me at my office. He shadows me around the house, offering to help paint, hammer and sweep. Last night he led me into my  www.EduGuide.org 13 ONLINE EDUGUIDE workroom just so he could gaze at my tools.

child figure out whether the conflict can be resolved and then communicate with everyone involved as soon as possible.   

Preschooler Activities: Chores Can Be Rewarding
Bryan Taylor
Considering how much of my life is spent avoiding work, I've been shocked by how eager my 3­year­old son is to get into it. He begs to  visit me at my office. He shadows me around the house, offering to help paint, hammer and sweep. Last night he led me into my  workroom just so he could gaze at my tools. Some parents introduce chores and even allowance between 3 and 5 years of age with a chart of a few small jobs posted on the  refrigerator. Kids labor to fill in the chart with stickers and stars. At this stage, we've decided to focus on teaching our boy to clean up after himself with odd jobs that have to be done before he can  move on to other family home activities. We talk a lot about sharing responsibility. Here's what we've learned:
l

Share the work. Your preschooler won't be mowing the lawn anytime soon. In fact, he's likely to get distracted during any job  that takes more than ten minutes. Look for simple activities like setting the table or projects that can be broken down into bite­ sized chunks like making thank­you cards. Count on lending a hand, but avoid the temptation to take over if it's "his" job; try to  work at his pace or move on to other things.  Share the rewards. I don't like to nag my son into working ­­ it belittles both of us.So I try to give him jobs with rewards and let  him choose: "If you clean up the toys, we can wrestle." The trick is finding jobs where we can live with the results if the work  doesn't get done right away and then keeping my mouth shut.  Share the praise. A little praise goes a long way. Experts say the most effective praise goes beyond "Johnny, you're a good  boy." Tell kids exactly what they're doing that's so good and why: "Johnny, I like the way you held the bowl so that the cookie  dough wouldn't spill when I stirred it. We didn't lose any dough on the floor, and now there's more to eat."  Share what you know. I learned from my dad that kids learn best by watching and doing. They love to mimic us, and they learn  quicker by being shown how to hold a screw driver than by being told. But letting them make mistakes on their own can also  help them learn and even inspire confidence: "Dad trusts me to figure this out."  Share your values. I've had to think twice about how I glorify or gripe about my work in front of our kids. I want them to know that  work is sometimes hard and can be a rewarding part of their lives. I like them to visit me at work and see me in action. I want  them to dream about the kind of jobs they may have one day. And I also want them to know that there's more to life than work.  

l

l

l

l

Getting your child's "help" may take more time at first, but it will pay off as he learns new skills and gains greater confidence in his  ability to make a difference. After all, some day they may be caring for us when we retire.

Bryan Taylor is the president and founder of EduGuide.

 

14

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Bryan Taylor is the president and founder of EduGuide.

 

Real Life Story: Walking the Dog
How My Mom Viewed this Kids' Chore as a Privilege MaryKat Parks Workinger
Chore. It’s an ugly little word. A cross between chalky and boring, it even sounds unpleasant.  This may have been one reason why my mom, ever attuned to the music of language, never assigned this word to the care of her  children or her pets. Lots of child experts will tell you that caring for the family pet is an excellent way to teach children responsibility. It  may be true, but on this, as on many “expert decrees,” my Mom quietly dissented.   To her, the quickest way to demote man’s best friend to the level of yard work was to assign the word “chore” to him. Walking our dogs  and feeding out cats was, for her, an act of love—not remotely related to taking out the garbage or shoveling the driveway. Our dogs  and cats were family, with nearly equal status as the two­footed relations (valued more highly than some). Taking care of them was a  privilege, not a chore for kids. My siblings and I were allowed to do it, if we were good. We weren’t paid for it or punished with it.  In my mother’s house, the pets ate when we ate, lounged where we lounged. Mom cleaned up their “accidents” (and ours) with Pine  Sol and patience. There was no swatting and no shaming, for man or beast. My mom wasn’t the world’s most fastidious housekeeper, but fresh water in the dog bowls was sacrosanct. She wouldn’t go to bed  until the pets’ water was topped off. On hot days, she added ice. When I grew up and she visited my house, I’d catch her eyeing the pet  bowls. If they weren’t full, she’d cast a commiserative look at my pets and raise an eyebrow at me.  Since she was small, my own daughter has watched me walk our dogs (in sleet and wind), scoop cat litter, and keep the pet bowls  filled. She frequently asks if she may pour out the kibble, hold the leash, or brush a shaggy coat. And whenever she draws pictures of  her family, she always labels us: “Mommy, Daddy, Jazzy, Oyster, and me.” 

MaryKat Parks Workinger is the editorial director of EduGuide.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

How Well Does My Child Help Out at Home?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/54/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

15

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

MaryKat Parks Workinger is the editorial director of EduGuide.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

How Well Does My Child Help Out at Home?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/54/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

16

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org