Help My Child Be a More Responsible Person

Compiled by:

Table of Contents
Help My Child Be a More Responsible Friend Help My Child Be a More Responsible Girlfriend or Boyfriend Help My Child Be a More Responsible Family Member Help My Child Be a More Responsible Citizen of Our Community Help My Child Be a More Responsible U.S. Citizen Help My Child Be a More Responsible World Citizen Help My Teenager Take On More Responsibility Help Your Teen Balance Responsibilities Am I Raising a Responsible Citizen? Does My Child Behave Responsibly in Personal Relationships?  

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Person
Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you would like to help your child become a more responsible citizen at home, in the community, and in the larger world. 
2 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

How does it work?

Does My Child Behave Responsibly in Personal Relationships?  

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Person
Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you would like to help your child become a more responsible citizen at home, in the community, and in the larger world. 

How does it work?
Quizzes help you know where you stand. Articles give you the background information you need to make a decision. 
l

“On the Virtue of Making Kids Do the Dishes”  

ShortCuts help you take immediate action. Choose one or go through them all. 

What will I learn from this EduGuide?
l l l l

What being a responsible citizen entails—at home, in the community, and in the nation and world   How to help my child be a good friend and a responsible girlfriend or boyfriend  What responsibilities are appropriate for kids of different ages  How to help my child balance responsibilities 

Quick Solutions
l l

What can I do in fifteen minutes? Take the quiz "Am I Raising a Responsible Citizen?" and evaluate the results. Figure out  which parts of this Guide can help you best and read one.  What can I do in an hour or two? Formulate a plan to balance your teen’s responsibilities with his or her privileges.  

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Friend
Peers become more important as children enter their teens, so make sure your teen has friendship skills: that he or she knows how  to nurture healthy friendships and end unhealthy ones. Talk to your child about friendship and what being a good friend means. You  might offer some of these thoughts: Friends make each other feel good about themselves. A “friend” who makes you feel bad about yourself isn’t a real friend.   You can always be honest and reveal your true self around a friend.  l Keep your promises to your friends, except when they will hurt you or the friend.  l You should be able to argue with your friends and even hurt each other without ruining the friendship. Friends apologize,  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE forgive, and repair the relationship.  l You build a good friendship by spending time with a friend. 
l l

3

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Friend
Peers become more important as children enter their teens, so make sure your teen has friendship skills: that he or she knows how  to nurture healthy friendships and end unhealthy ones. Talk to your child about friendship and what being a good friend means. You  might offer some of these thoughts:
l l l l l l l l l

Friends make each other feel good about themselves. A “friend” who makes you feel bad about yourself isn’t a real friend.   You can always be honest and reveal your true self around a friend.  Keep your promises to your friends, except when they will hurt you or the friend.  You should be able to argue with your friends and even hurt each other without ruining the friendship. Friends apologize,  forgive, and repair the relationship.  You build a good friendship by spending time with a friend.  Friends are loyal. They don’t gossip about each other, and they don’t date people they know their friends are crushing on.   Friends help each other. Make sure you always return favors.  Friends protect each other. Don’t let a friend do something dangerous like drive drunk.   Feed a friendship by paying attention to a friend, celebrating good times together, and being available when times are tough.  

Here are some things you can do to help your teen be responsible about friendships: 
l l l l l l l l l

Know the friends and their parents. You don’t need to be friends with your child’s friends, but you should know them well  enough that you can talk to your child about them.  Invite your kid’s friends to family activities. Spending time together helps you get to know them and makes everyone more  comfortable around each other.  Let teens hang out at your house. Try to make your home a welcoming and safe place for teens. Be friendly, but also be firm  about your values. Don’t provide alcohol to anyone underage and do not tolerate illegal or dangerous behavior.   Be consistent about enforcing family rules. Welcoming your child’s friends into your home does not mean that you have to  suspend family rules. Be clear about what is acceptable in your house and what is not.  Observe your child’s friendships. You don’t have to like your child’s friends, but if you think a friend is abusive emotionally or  physically, step in and help your child handle the situation.  Model good friendships. Let your children see you engaging in healthy friendships with people who have fun together, treat  each other respectfully, and help each other out.  Give your child time to make friends. People need to spend time together for friendships to develop. Make sure your child isn’t  so overscheduled with activities after school, sports, and household chores that there is no time left for friends.  Encourage participation in group activities. These activities are good a good way for your kid to meet others with similar  interests and make friends.  Support your child with your words. Words can hurt. Don’t say your kid is shy, has no friends, or is mean. Don’t tease or ridicule him or her in front of friends. Instead, encourage the behavior you’d like to see, and be kind to your child and your child’s  friends. 

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Girlfriend or Boyfriend
Though your teenager is more likely to turn to peers for tips on dating and relationship advice, you still play a critical role in teaching  www.EduGuide.org 4 him or her about friendship, love, and dating.  ONLINE EDUGUIDE

friends.   

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Girlfriend or Boyfriend
Though your teenager is more likely to turn to peers for tips on dating and relationship advice, you still play a critical role in teaching  him or her about friendship, love, and dating. 

Relationship Advice for Preteens (Teens, and Post Teens)
Though it is never too late to learn how to be a responsible girl­ or boyfriend, ideally the following lessons should start before kids  start dating: 
l

l

l l

l l

Model healthy relationships. To the best of your ability be polite, respectful, attentive, and caring to your spouse or significant  other. Point out examples of people who treat each other well and explain how that behavior builds healthy relationships. Make  sure that your kid understands that people involved in good relationships do disagree and argue—sometimes frequently. To  demonstrate constructive conflict resolution, let your child observe how you and a partner work through a significant  disagreement.  Explain that to be a good girlfriend or boyfriend, you first have to be a good friend. If you choose to forbid exclusive dating until  a certain age (you’re the parent, you have this right), suggest instead that your child spend time with groups of friends of mixed  gender with adult chaperones. It’s a good way to gain social skills without the pressure of a relationship.   Listen to your kids sometimes without giving advice. This helps to establish trust and let your kids know that they can talk to  you about important things without having to hear a lecture.  Teach your children to respect themselves by urging them to consider the impact of their choices (whether clothing or friends or behaviors). Show them that you respect them and model respect for them (see ShortCut “How to Respect (and Love) a  Disrespectful Teen”)   Provide a comfortable and relaxed place in your home where their friends can hang out (having home­cooked food on hand  doesn’t hurt, either!). Don’t embarrass your kids in front of their friends and be polite to those they bring home.   Talk about sex. Make sure your child has a solid sex education and understands how babies are made. Share your values  about sex and the complications (physical and emotional) that come from having sex. 

Teen Dating Advice
Parents can help kids avoid relationship pitfalls, stay safe while dating, and enjoy healthy, responsible relationships by following  some simple guidelines: 
l

l l l l l l

Try group dates. It’s not only a lot of fun, it can strengthen a relationship by creating memories, building a support group, and  reducing the pressure for two people to keep up all the conversation. It also can help protect you from physical situations that  you might not be ready for.  Instead of asking someone, “Do you like me?” be the first to say what your feelings are without expecting a response. Be  respectful of whatever response you do get. This shows moral courage without pressuring the other person.  Avoid dating a friend’s ex or someone your friend is interested in: it will do nothing but cause trouble. Definitely don’t ask  someone out that your friend is currently dating.  Guard your date’s trust. Don’t share everything the two of you say to each other or do together with friends at school. In other  words, don’t kiss and tell or boast about how the other person feels about you.   Ask yourself, if you and your date are gentle and kind to each other, have fun and laugh a lot together, and listen to each  other. If you can’t say “most of the time,” this is a clear sign it isn’t a healthy relationship.   Try to show dignity at all times—from when you first ask a person out, through whatever ups and downs a relationship has, to  when it ends.  Find things that you enjoy doing together, from playing a sport to supporting a cause. Look for things which you either share in common or are interested in doing. If you have no common interests (besides each other) this can be a warning sign that you  aren’t truly compatible.  

Relationship Advice for Teens Going Steady
5 ONLINE EDUGUIDE When things start getting exclusive, talk with your teen about the following relationship issues: www.EduGuide.org

common or are interested in doing. If you have no common interests (besides each other) this can be a warning sign that you  aren’t truly compatible.  

Relationship Advice for Teens Going Steady
When things start getting exclusive, talk with your teen about the following relationship issues:
l

l l l l l l l l

Give your significant other space and time to be with other friends. Wanting to hang out with someone else isn’t an insult or  a sign that there is something wrong with the relationship. Rather it is healthy to have friends outside of a romantic  relationship.  Be careful about age differences. An age difference can mean an imbalance of power and a greater potential for abuse.  If you are in an exclusive relationship with someone, don’t flirt with other people. It is disrespectful to yourself, your significant  other, and the person you are flirting with.  Honor your commitments to each other and when you can’t, let the other person know before the commitment is broken.   Don’t pressure your girlfriend or boyfriend to do something that he or she doesn’t want to do. This is true whether it is  becoming more involved physically, emotionally, or socially.  Be careful about what you post on Facebook, MySpace, or other social networking sites. Keep in mind that these are public,  searchable, and can come back to haunt you.  Do not let anyone take nude pictures of you with their camera, cell phone, or any other device. No matter what you are  promised, you never know where they might end up.  Remember that it is easy to misinterpret written communication, especially when it is in the shortened form of emails or text  messages. Take a deep breath before writing anything and take the time to carefully read what you’ve written.   Be responsible when breaking up. When possible and safe, do it face­to­face and not via email, a phone call, texting, or a  note. Be courteous and firm. 

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Family Member
Becoming a responsible family member not only makes home life more pleasant, it also prepares your child for participation in the  larger community. Here are some expectations that build children’s social strengths and encourage responsibility toward the family. 
l

Get along with siblings. Remind your children that even when they are angry with their siblings, they still love each other and  can rely on each other for help.  One trust­building fun family activity is the compliments game. Gather the family in a circle and have each family member  mention something they like and appreciate about the person to their right and then to the left. Continue until everyone has had  a chance to compliment all the members of the family. If your children are having difficulties getting along, have them make a list of suggestions to improve the situation. Suggestions on teaching citizenship might include respecting each other’s belongings, being kind to each other, agreeing on which  television shows to watch, or avoiding interrupting when siblings are playing with friends. (See "How to Respectfully Disagree in a Disrespectful World" for advice on guiding siblings through conflict.)

6

Treat family members respectfully. Model this behavior by treating your children with respect and courtesy. Demand that they  treat each other and you the same way. For more information, see the Get Respect from My Teen Guide.  l Perform chores without complaining. Assigning age­appropriate chores to children helps them learn responsibility. Sharing  chores also makes lighter work for everyone in the home. For more on this, check out our Give My Kids Age­appropriate Chores Guide.  l Read stories that promote your family’s values. Make sure the books in your home express values you approve of. Read  aloud to your children when they are younger, but continue the family tradition with preteens and teens by taking turns reading  aloud to each other.  l Remember birthdays. Encourage your children to recognize each other’s special day by going out of their way to it enjoyable.  This might mean making a card, singing a song, serving breakfast in bed, or making the birthday person “monarch for a day.”   l Apologize for mistakes. Everyone does things they shouldn’t, and there’s one simple action to take when that happens: say  you’re sorry. That includes everyone in the family, child and adult.   l Respect the rules of the house. Family rules help the group operate smoothly and keep everyone safe. Following these rules  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE shows respect and demonstrates responsible behavior. Make sure your children understand that when they respect family  rules, they will be trusted with more privileges. 
l

note. Be courteous and firm.   

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Family Member
Becoming a responsible family member not only makes home life more pleasant, it also prepares your child for participation in the  larger community. Here are some expectations that build children’s social strengths and encourage responsibility toward the family. 
l

Get along with siblings. Remind your children that even when they are angry with their siblings, they still love each other and  can rely on each other for help.  One trust­building fun family activity is the compliments game. Gather the family in a circle and have each family member  mention something they like and appreciate about the person to their right and then to the left. Continue until everyone has had  a chance to compliment all the members of the family. If your children are having difficulties getting along, have them make a list of suggestions to improve the situation. Suggestions on teaching citizenship might include respecting each other’s belongings, being kind to each other, agreeing on which  television shows to watch, or avoiding interrupting when siblings are playing with friends. (See "How to Respectfully Disagree in a Disrespectful World" for advice on guiding siblings through conflict.)

l l

l

l l l

l

Treat family members respectfully. Model this behavior by treating your children with respect and courtesy. Demand that they  treat each other and you the same way. For more information, see the Get Respect from My Teen Guide.  Perform chores without complaining. Assigning age­appropriate chores to children helps them learn responsibility. Sharing  chores also makes lighter work for everyone in the home. For more on this, check out our Give My Kids Age­appropriate Chores Guide.  Read stories that promote your family’s values. Make sure the books in your home express values you approve of. Read  aloud to your children when they are younger, but continue the family tradition with preteens and teens by taking turns reading  aloud to each other.  Remember birthdays. Encourage your children to recognize each other’s special day by going out of their way to it enjoyable.  This might mean making a card, singing a song, serving breakfast in bed, or making the birthday person “monarch for a day.”   Apologize for mistakes. Everyone does things they shouldn’t, and there’s one simple action to take when that happens: say  you’re sorry. That includes everyone in the family, child and adult.   Respect the rules of the house. Family rules help the group operate smoothly and keep everyone safe. Following these rules  shows respect and demonstrates responsible behavior. Make sure your children understand that when they respect family  rules, they will be trusted with more privileges.  Eat the food that is served or decline politely. Being a responsible family member means not creating extra work for the cook  such as creating different meals for each eater. Family members should do their best to eat at least some of every meal and  then thank the cook. 

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Citizen of Our Community
A natural place to teach citizenship is within your own community where youth community service and volunteering opportunities are  plentiful. Among the many possibilities, consider some of the following:
l Be a good neighbor. Demonstrate neighborliness to your child. Shovel a neighbor’s walk, pick up trash, run errands for ailing  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE or elderly folks, participate in a block party, or simply chat over the fence. Encourage your child to help neighbors with chores  such as getting mail or taking care of a pet when a neighbor is away. 

7

then thank the cook.   

Help My Child Be a More Responsible Citizen of Our Community
A natural place to teach citizenship is within your own community where youth community service and volunteering opportunities are  plentiful. Among the many possibilities, consider some of the following:
l

l l l

l

l

l

Be a good neighbor. Demonstrate neighborliness to your child. Shovel a neighbor’s walk, pick up trash, run errands for ailing  or elderly folks, participate in a block party, or simply chat over the fence. Encourage your child to help neighbors with chores  such as getting mail or taking care of a pet when a neighbor is away.  Draw your child’s attention to the good work other people in your neighborhood do. Talk about what they do and how it  improves people lives. Then thank them.  Stay informed about your community. Read the local paper and ask your child to read it too. Discus the issues you read  about, and if your kid feels strongly, encourage him or her to write a letter to the editor expressing an opinion or taking a stand.   Teach your child about government. Review the responsibilities of the federal, state, and local government. (You don’t have to  know everything. That’s what libraries are for!) Consider taking a tour of local government buildings such as a courthouse or  city hall. Maybe you can witness a trial or a citizenship ceremony. When an issue you are interested in comes up, attend a  school board or city council meeting with your child. Speak at the meeting, if appropriate, and let your child do so. Discuss the  results of the meeting. What will happen at a result of the meeting? What next steps might the two of you take?  Model participatory democracy by making a habit of phoning and writing letters and e­mails to government officials about the  issues that you care passionately about. Discuss these communications with your child, and post the addresses and phone  numbers of government representatives in case your actions inspire your child to do the same.  Volunteer in your community. Many local nonprofit organizations are looking for volunteer help from people of all ages. There  are never enough volunteers! Depending on your family’s interests, you and your child may be able to volunteer together for an  organization like the Humane Society. Or perhaps there is a scouting or other service organization in your area that your child is interested in joining. Explain what the volunteers organizations do in your community do: for example, a YWCA, food bank,  homeless shelter, Red Cross, hospital auxiliary, recreation association, and so on.  Pick a project. Let your child choose a project that would improve the neighborhood. It might be cleaning up a park, pulling  weeds in a playground, painting a mural on a building, or planting flowers in a traffic circle. Plan together how that project could be accomplished. What do you need to do to get started? How much will it cost? Will you need to get permission, and if so,  from who? Who can help you complete the project? Make a plan together, and then carry it out. 

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible U.S. Citizen
Teaching citizenship skills is a task parents have from the time their child learns to talk until that child graduates from college and  beyond. Here are several family ideas to help you along the way. Vote. Take your child with you to the polling place when you vote—and vote in all the elections not just presidential ones. At  home discuss voting and choose some issues that can be put to a family vote.  l Obey the rules. Be a great model for your kid by following the law, for example by obeying traffic laws and paying taxes. Instead  of complaining about having to obey laws, talk to your child about ways to change laws that seem unjust or illogical.  l Treat public figures respectfully. Model respectful behavior toward politicians, police officers, and members of the military.  Discuss productive and respectful ways to disagree. When you see poor examples, in person or in the media, point them out  and ask your kids to suggest more respectful approaches. Keep in mind that adults’ pessimism and sarcasm about public  service can have a powerful negative effect on children.  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE l Learn about the country. Include American history and current events in your conversations and family activities. Put maps on  your wall or globes on desks and use them frequently. Visit history museums, historical landmarks, and national parks. Let 
l

8

from who? Who can help you complete the project? Make a plan together, and then carry it out.   

Help My Child Be a More Responsible U.S. Citizen
Teaching citizenship skills is a task parents have from the time their child learns to talk until that child graduates from college and  beyond. Here are several family ideas to help you along the way.
l l l

l

l l

l l

l l

Vote. Take your child with you to the polling place when you vote—and vote in all the elections not just presidential ones. At  home discuss voting and choose some issues that can be put to a family vote.  Obey the rules. Be a great model for your kid by following the law, for example by obeying traffic laws and paying taxes. Instead  of complaining about having to obey laws, talk to your child about ways to change laws that seem unjust or illogical.  Treat public figures respectfully. Model respectful behavior toward politicians, police officers, and members of the military.  Discuss productive and respectful ways to disagree. When you see poor examples, in person or in the media, point them out  and ask your kids to suggest more respectful approaches. Keep in mind that adults’ pessimism and sarcasm about public  service can have a powerful negative effect on children.  Learn about the country. Include American history and current events in your conversations and family activities. Put maps on  your wall or globes on desks and use them frequently. Visit history museums, historical landmarks, and national parks. Let  your child pick a destination that has historical significance. Have him or her research the location and then be the tour guide  when you arrive.  Volunteer for a political candidate. Explain why you support this candidate, take your kid along to the campaign office, and give him or her a job to do.  Read a newspaper. Discuss interesting articles with your child. Find editorials that take opposing views of the same issue and have your child read them. Then ask him or her to explain which editorial was more convincing and why. Explore politics on the  Internet with your child.  Honor the flag. Attend a flag ceremony on a special occasion. Display the flag at your home and talk to your child about its care. Give your child the responsibility of raising and lowering the flag each day.  Hold a mock trial. Invent a scenario and issue jury notices to your child and some friends. Select a jury and appoint lawyers  and a judge. Then hold the trial. As a family, watch a classic movie about a trial such as “Twelve Angry Men” or “To Kill a  Mockingbird.” Then discuss the issues the movie raises.   Create a Family Bill of Rights. Study the Bill of Rights in the Constitution. Brainstorm with your kid the responsibilities that go  with each of these rights. Using this work as a model, create a bill of rights for the family.  Make national holidays meaningful. Pick a holiday and spend the day focusing on its meaning to citizens. For example, on  Martin Luther King Jr. Day, you could visit a civil rights museum or attend a local event honoring him. On President’s Day, each  family member could pick a president, do research on his life and accomplishments, and give a speech about him. On  Memorial Day, your family could put flowers at an untended gravesite at a veteran’s cemetery. On Independence Day, you could attend a parade or a community picnic. On Labor Day, you might look at photos of child labor and talk about the protections  child and adult workers have today. On Veteran’s Day, you could visit a war memorial or write to service members overseas.  

 

Help My Child Be a More Responsible World Citizen
Help your children become more responsible world citizens and develop social strengths by providing practical citizenship education  including volunteering opportunities. Here are some ideas to get you started.  Learn about your world. Read the newspaper, watch the news on TV, and go online to find out which countries are in the news these days and why. Locate the countries on a world map or globe or in an atlas. Discuss international events with your teen.  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE How might an event that happens in a country halfway around the world affect your family? If your child is studying another  country or region of the world in school, learn from him or her. Then use library or museum resources to find out more. 
l

9

child and adult workers have today. On Veteran’s Day, you could visit a war memorial or write to service members overseas.    

Help My Child Be a More Responsible World Citizen
Help your children become more responsible world citizens and develop social strengths by providing practical citizenship education  including volunteering opportunities. Here are some ideas to get you started. 
l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Learn about your world. Read the newspaper, watch the news on TV, and go online to find out which countries are in the news these days and why. Locate the countries on a world map or globe or in an atlas. Discuss international events with your teen.  How might an event that happens in a country halfway around the world affect your family? If your child is studying another  country or region of the world in school, learn from him or her. Then use library or museum resources to find out more.  Learn about the United Nations. Founded by fifty­one countries after World War II, the UN, which now has 192 member states,  keeps the peace, resolves conflicts, and provides humanitarian assistance around the world. Help your kids become better­ informed world citizens by learning more about the triumphs and challenges this great institution faces. Tour the UN in New York (it’s free!) or take a virtual tour.   Go green. Hold a family summit on reducing your family’s consumption of the earth’s resources. Talk about saving energy,  water, and gas by dialing down the thermostat, using compact fluorescent bulbs, unplugging appliances when they’re not  being used, taking shorter showers, using low­flow showerheads, eating locally raised meat, eggs, and dairy products, having  vegetarian meals once a week (or more), skipping bottled water, bringing your own tote to the grocery store, and recycling  rechargeable batteries and printer cartridges. Brainstorm. What can your family buy second hand rather than new? What can  you borrow (or share) instead of buying? Are there places you drive to that you could walk or ride bikes to? Would your family  enjoy a game night once a week with all the computers and televisions turned off? What other ideas for conserving resources  can your family come up with?  Celebrate Earth Day. Join this annual April 22 appreciation of the earth’s environment. Local activities often include park and  beach cleanups, gardening projects, and informational events focusing on conservation and climate change. Many schools  celebrate Earth Day, so find out what your local school is planning, and check with local environmental groups as well. Then  choose an activity and join the celebration as a family.  Make friends with someone from another country. The person could be a neighbor, someone you know from work or your  child knows from school, or even a relative. If you can’t think of anyone, contact your child’s school, your place of worship, or a  social service agency. Bring your teen with you as you get to know the person. Enjoy both likenesses and differences between  your families. Holiday celebrations, food, and leisure activities are always good conversation starters.  Help your child find a pen pal from another country. What a great way to gain an international perspective and make a new  friend! Online is the easiest way to find a pen pal, but make sure the site is safe. If you can’t find a site you’re comfortable with  (your child’s teacher may know one), these two Web sites are reputable: http://www.amazing­kids.org/penpals and  www.ipf.net.au/.  Help someone in another part of the world. Search for volunteer opportunities that will give you the chance to help others. The  Red Cross is just one disaster relief agency with local affiliates. Nearly every religious denomination sponsors a relief agency  as well. If you are considering donating to an international charity that you are not familiar with, check www.charitynavigator.org  for help evaluating it.  Learn a foreign language with your child. Take a community education class or use CDs and books at home. This is a tall  order for busy families, but you should be able to learn at least the basics if you keep at it. One fun family alternative is for each  family member to memorize a few greetings and polite phrases in a different language. Then teach each other what you  learned. Encourage everyone to keep using the phrases so they don’t forget them.  

 

Help My Teenager Take On More Responsibility
10 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

EduGuide Staff

learned. Encourage everyone to keep using the phrases so they don’t forget them.    

Help My Teenager Take On More Responsibility
EduGuide Staff
As kids grow older, they can—and should—take on increased responsibility. Responsibility is critical to a young person’s  development, building their coping skills, self­esteem, and sense of ownership. The following are tips for increasing responsibility in four key areas: academics, chores, community service, and finances.  Academics. Teens should be expected to keep track of homework, test dates, etc. without daily reminders from their parents. It is  good to start in middle school before they face the even­more­demanding responsibilities of high school. Teen’s Chores. Getting help from your teen can make your family run more smoothly, help him or her feel like a valued member of the  family team, and teach life skills. Here are some suggestions:
l l l

Trash: Ask teens to keep track of the garbage level in all family wastebaskets and empty them when they get full.  Laundry: Teens can wash all their own laundry plus one additional load per week to represent their share of towels, sheets,  etc. Show them how to wash whites, colors, etc. "Doing the laundry" means wash, dry, fold, and put away.  Errands: Once teens are able to drive, they can take younger siblings to school, lessons, or practices. Make it their  responsibility to remember times and locations. 

Community Service Opportunities. Work with your teen to find community service ideas that match their interests. These are some  options:
l l l

Local humane societies often have volunteer programs for adolescents. Contact your local ASPCA or veterinarian for  suggestions.  Kids who are artistically inclined might be able to volunteer at a local art museum, preparing materials for arts projects,  performing data entry, and acting as teacher aides for art classes.  Teens who like to work with their hands can volunteer with organizations like Habitat for Humanity (information on their youth programs is available) 

Financial Responsibilities. There are many ways to foster financial responsibility in young people. The following are ideas to get you  started:
l l

Allowance. A predictable income can help your teens learn money management skills. Help them create a chart that shows  how much they need and how long it will take to reach that goal.  Bank accounts. Middle school is also a good time to introduce checking accounts. Call your bank or credit unions to see what  special programs they have that teach teens how to save, how interest works, etc. 

Eight Tips for Assigning Responsibilities
1. Involve your teen. Talk to her or him about family needs. Some families involve their teenagers in creating a family budget. Set up a  spreadsheet and show your teenager what expenses the family has each month. When discussing chores for kids, it can be useful to  make a list of all of the tasks that must be done in the household each week and/or month. Teenagers and parents can then work  together to divide responsibilities fairly. 2. Define responsibilities clearly. Do chores with your teens until they understand what is needed. And don’t rely just on a verbal  commitment—put it in writing. Create a checklist, put up a chalkboard or a dry­erase board, make a job chart. When possible, add  pictures for teens who learn visually, read them aloud for those who are auditory learners, and have spaces to cross things off for  those who are tactile learners. Some parents even create contracts with their children.  3. Set a good example. Be careful about the language you use: if you complain about doing work or try to get out of it, you might be  teaching your children to whine or procrastinate. Show your children that you are grateful for the responsibilities that you have by  sharing things you like about your job or your satisfaction with household tasks like “It sure feels comfortable to climb into a bed with  www.EduGuide.org 11 ONLINE EDUGUIDE freshly washed sheets—it makes doing laundry feel worthwhile.”   4. Be a good coach. Supervise their responsibilities and provide feedback and coaching to make sure they are meeting standards 

commitment—put it in writing. Create a checklist, put up a chalkboard or a dry­erase board, make a job chart. When possible, add  pictures for teens who learn visually, read them aloud for those who are auditory learners, and have spaces to cross things off for  those who are tactile learners. Some parents even create contracts with their children.  3. Set a good example. Be careful about the language you use: if you complain about doing work or try to get out of it, you might be  teaching your children to whine or procrastinate. Show your children that you are grateful for the responsibilities that you have by  sharing things you like about your job or your satisfaction with household tasks like “It sure feels comfortable to climb into a bed with  freshly washed sheets—it makes doing laundry feel worthwhile.”   4. Be a good coach. Supervise their responsibilities and provide feedback and coaching to make sure they are meeting standards  and that they continue to do the task. Remember that the goal here isn’t perfection—praise your children frequently and acknowledge  what they do accomplish.  5. Provide rewards and consequences. Be generous with praise and provide appropriate rewards for tasks completed. Tasks well  done can be rewarded with family games or increased freedom or rights. It’s never too early to learn that increased responsibilities  equal increased trust. 6. Be consistent. Once a job is assigned, expect the teen to fulfill that responsibility. If the task is taking out the garbage twice a week,  then make sure the child does that task twice a week. 7. Don’t sabotage! 
l l l l l

Don’t stereotype chores as being female or male.   Don’t overwhelm your teens—children still need time for play, homework, and friendships.   Don’t expect perfection.   Don’t redo the task behind your teens' back.   Don’t let kids whine their way out of a task or procrastinate.  

8. Make the job fun.  Many chores can be made more pleasant with a song or a game. Graphic designer Marie Marfia created a board  game for her kids called The Endless Chore Game. The board has squares like Candy Land but no beginning or end. Each square  has pictures of kids doing chores (mowing the lawn and washing dishes and sweeping floors). Mafia puts the board on the fridge and uses magnets for game pieces. Her kids roll dice find out what chores they have. How is this fun? “The board has a few free spaces  with fun stuff, like cloud watching or pudding construction or singing "Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” If you’re lucky, you might get out of  chores for a day."  

Help Your Teen Balance Responsibilities
Juggling Family Responsibility, High School Academics, and Extra­curricular Activities
A major challenge for teenagers is balancing the many demands on their time—heavy student homework loads, family responsibility,  extra­curricular activities, community service, a job, friendships. How can you help your teen balance commitments responsibly? Try  some of these suggestions. Model balance. Do your best to achieve a balanced life. Demonstrate to your teen how you meet your commitments to your  interests, work, family, friends, and community by planning ahead and setting priorities (See below). You might also identify  and discuss potential role models, such as scholar athletes and teen volunteers, who balance various interests in their life  successfully.  l Stay calm. When things get crazy, take a break. Even if the break lasts two minutes, being removed from the fray can make a  big difference. What else helps? Deep breathing. Take several long, deep breaths to slow the heartbeat and get oxygen flowing through the bloodstream. Use these techniques yourself and also encourage your teenager to use them.  l Start the day right. Different people prefer different methods of waking up: some like a gentle nudge and some need reveille,  but everyone benefits from a little extra time. Make sure everyone has a good breakfast. A nutritious breakfast can be as simple as a sliced orange and peanut butter toast or a fruit smoothie. Above all, don’t forget to tell your kids you love them, no matter  how grumpy they may be in the morning.  l Help your teen set priorities. Have your child list all the activities of each day in a typical week, along with the approximate  amount of time he or she spends on each activity. Check the list to make sure nothing was forgotten, for example, time spent  on social networking sites, playing video games, or reading for pleasure. Then ask him or her to rank the activities from most  to least important. Discuss the ranking. Make sure your teen understands that high school academics is priority number one  and that student homework must take as much time as necessary to accomplish it well. Help your child realize that the time  devoted to activities at the bottom of the priority list may have to decrease in order to spend more time on higher priority  activities.  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE l Help your teen plan ahead. If your teen is not already using one, teach him or her how to use a planner or a calendar to 
l

12

chores for a day."  

Help Your Teen Balance Responsibilities
Juggling Family Responsibility, High School Academics, and Extra­curricular Activities
A major challenge for teenagers is balancing the many demands on their time—heavy student homework loads, family responsibility,  extra­curricular activities, community service, a job, friendships. How can you help your teen balance commitments responsibly? Try  some of these suggestions.
l

l

l

l

l

l

l

Model balance. Do your best to achieve a balanced life. Demonstrate to your teen how you meet your commitments to your  interests, work, family, friends, and community by planning ahead and setting priorities (See below). You might also identify  and discuss potential role models, such as scholar athletes and teen volunteers, who balance various interests in their life  successfully.  Stay calm. When things get crazy, take a break. Even if the break lasts two minutes, being removed from the fray can make a  big difference. What else helps? Deep breathing. Take several long, deep breaths to slow the heartbeat and get oxygen flowing through the bloodstream. Use these techniques yourself and also encourage your teenager to use them.  Start the day right. Different people prefer different methods of waking up: some like a gentle nudge and some need reveille,  but everyone benefits from a little extra time. Make sure everyone has a good breakfast. A nutritious breakfast can be as simple as a sliced orange and peanut butter toast or a fruit smoothie. Above all, don’t forget to tell your kids you love them, no matter  how grumpy they may be in the morning.  Help your teen set priorities. Have your child list all the activities of each day in a typical week, along with the approximate  amount of time he or she spends on each activity. Check the list to make sure nothing was forgotten, for example, time spent  on social networking sites, playing video games, or reading for pleasure. Then ask him or her to rank the activities from most  to least important. Discuss the ranking. Make sure your teen understands that high school academics is priority number one  and that student homework must take as much time as necessary to accomplish it well. Help your child realize that the time  devoted to activities at the bottom of the priority list may have to decrease in order to spend more time on higher priority  activities.  Help your teen plan ahead. If your teen is not already using one, teach him or her how to use a planner or a calendar to  schedule important deadlines and activities. Demonstrate how you use your planner, and work together to find one for your  teen that is simple and enjoyable to use.  Help your teen stay organized. Whether it is using to­do lists, keeping an Outlook calendar, using a spreadsheet, electronic  alerts, or any other method, help your teenager find an organizational method that works. Consider setting up a reminder chart  for the family that lists important tasks, appointments, and events.  Make sure your teen resolves conflicting commitments. Before a teenager takes on a job or extracurricular activity, make  sure he or she finds out when it takes place and how long it lasts. If the activity conflicts with a previous commitment, help your  child figure out whether the conflict can be resolved and then communicate with everyone involved as soon as possible. 

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Am I Raising a Responsible Citizen?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/55/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx 13 ONLINE EDUGUIDE
www.EduGuide.org

child figure out whether the conflict can be resolved and then communicate with everyone involved as soon as possible.   

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Am I Raising a Responsible Citizen?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/55/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

Does My Child Behave Responsibly in Personal Relationships?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/56/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

14

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful