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HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Gulf Coast Health Promotion and Education Project


Annie Marhula, Emily Marshall, Lisa Christopher, Molly Chaffin
The University of Southern Mississippi

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

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Table of Contents

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Step 1: Community Needs Assessment


Step 2: Program Goals and Objectives...
Literature Review.
Step 3: Develop a Program Plan
a. Session 1 Lesson Plan: Hand Washing, Cross-Contamination

p. 3
p. 15
p. 17
p. 21

Prevention, and Food Allergies


b. Session 2 Lesson Plan: Cleaning & Sanitizing and Temperature Control
c. Session 3 Lesson Plan: Healthy Eating with Offer Versus Serve
d. Session 4 Lesson Plan: Application and Problem Solving of OVS
Step 4/5: Management System
Step 6: Implement the Intervention
Step 7: Evaluate the Intervention
References
Appendix

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HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Step 1: Community Needs Assessment


What is the name of the organization/group with which
you will implement the HPE project?

Pascagoula School District, Child Nutrition

What is the name & contact information for the individual Assistant Director of Child Nutrition Sarah Steinberger, MS, RD, LD
with whom you will collaborate to complete the HPE
Email: ssteinberger@psd.ms
project?
Phone: (228) 938-6209
What is your PRIORITY ISSUE that you plan to address
with this group?

Foodservice training (including food safety behaviors, safe working


practices, and culinary skills) does not adequately promote a healthy
work environment and individual behaviors of foodservice employees.

Gather the perspective of the key stake holders:

Write a summary of the views of the stakeholders


related to your intended project related to their interest in
this type of project and their areas of concern

Ms. Steinberger recognized a need for education for cafeteria


employees in the Pascagoula School District focusing on teaching
proper food safety practices, work-related injury prevention, offer
versus serve, good attitudes, and improvement of culinary skills. This is
due to a high turnover rate of employees and a lack of frequent training
of employees. Why does she feel these are areas of concern with her
population?

Examine the Literature

Examine the literature for research about projects,


communities, and issues related to your priority issue

Examine previous evaluation findings of similar


projects

Review the literature regarding similar types of


projects and recommendations for designs/appropriate
interventions

(Review 3-5 articles related to the topics listed to the left, and write a
150-200 word abstract of each below)
Reference
Brown, B.J. & Herman, J.R. (2005). Cooking classes increase fruit and
vegetable intake and food safety behaviors in youth and adults. Journal
of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 37(2), 104-105. Retrieved from:
http://web.b.ebscohost.com.lynx.lib.usm.edu/ehost/detail/detail?
vid=18&sid=1f190426-26e0-4381-aaa6-fc0050bff8fa

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%40sessionmgr110&hid=107&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ
%3d%3d#db=aph&AN=17041069
Background: According the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, less than 23% of Americans are consuming five servings of
fruits and vegetables each day. A contributing factor to this is the
foodborne illnesses that are associated with fruits and vegetables. These
illnesses are often attributed to improper handling of food, improper
hygiene, poor sanitation, and cross-contamination.
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to increase fruit and vegetable
consumption and increase food safety knowledge and behaviors in fruit
and vegetable preparation and cooking techniques in both youth and
adults.
Methods/Analysis: This research experiment consisted of an education
program intervention along with a pre-education and post-education
questionnaire. The program was conducted in 28 counties by the
Oklahoma County Extension over a two month period. The classes
were focused on fruit and vegetable preparation and cooking skills,
food safety practices, and general nutrient information. The analysis of
the questionnaire included means, frequencies, and paired t-tests.
Results: Both fruit and vegetable intake increased significantly for both
adults and females. In addition, there was also a significant increase in
safe food-handling techniques such as washing hands, washing produce,
and using a clean knife and cutting board to avoid cross contamination.
Conclusion: In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that
educational classes on fruit and vegetable cooking and food safety can
increase fruit and vegetable consumption and food safety behaviors in
youth and adults.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Reference
Medeiros, C., Cavalli, S., Salay, E., & Proena, R. C. (2011).
Assessment of the methodological strategies adopted by food safety
training programmes for food service workers: A systematic review.
Food Control, 22(8), 1136-1144. doi:10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.02.008
Background: Foodservice employees directly involved in food
handling have a responsibility to minimize foodborne disease outbreaks.
Training aimed at changing practices and building skills has been
identified as the most crucial tactic to decrease risk of contamination.
Purpose: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the various
methodological strategies used to train food service employees in food
safety.
Methods/Analysis: This was a systematic review in which researchers
searched for articles related to studies concerning food safety training
for food service employees. After eliminating all studies that did not
meet inclusion criteria (for example, all studies had to offer a training
program to employees), the 14 remaining studies were analyzed using
double data extraction. Aspects of the studies such as method, length,
and effectiveness of training were identified for each study. Training
programs were compared among the studies based on the topic, method,
and length of each studys program. Programs were evaluated for the
knowledge, practices, and attitudes of employees.
Results: The most frequently used topic in the training programs
among the studies was hygiene. Some training methods were used more
often than others, with the method used most being audiovisual media
(71 percent of studies). Every study used more than one single method

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to train employees. Hand washing was the most commonly assessed
topic.
Conclusion: The most accepted teaching method was the use of
interactive media. Post-intervention, employees exemplified an increase
in knowledge along with improved attitudes and behaviors.
Reference
Cekal, N. (2012). The effect of a nutrition education programme on
cooks knowledge of nutrition and food preparation-cooking methods.
International Journal of Academic Research, 4(3). 66-74.
Background: Collective nutrition involves places that provide food and
service to a number of individuals. The meals served in collective
nutrition settings should be well-balanced be of high quality and
adequate quantity to properly nourish those receiving the meal.
Therefore, the methods used to prepare and cook these meals are critical
in maintaining the nutritional value.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nutrition
knowledge, cooking methods, and nutrition attitudes of cooks and to
determine whether an education session on these topics improved the
cooks knowledge and attitude in these areas.
Methods/Analysis: A total of 442 cooks and students studying cookery
from various foodservice institutions participated in the research study.
The cooks completed a pre-test questionnaire to evaluate their
nutritional knowledge level. The cooks then participated in a half-day
education session that discussed food elements and functions, food
groups, and methods of correct food preparation and cooking. A
post-test questionnaire was then given to assess the cooks knowledge

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and determine if their knowledge increased after the education session.
The data was analyzed using SPSS 11.00 and utilized a t-test to analyze
the results.
Results: The results acknowledge a significant difference in pre-test
and post-test scores of the cooks nutritional knowledge. Food nutritionrelated knowledge as well as knowledge regarding food preparation and
cooking methods increased.
Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that educating cooks on
proper preparation and cooking techniques can improve their
knowledge and ability to prepare quality meals with minimal nutrient
losses.
Reference
Roberts, K. R., Barrett, B. B., Howells, A. D., Shanklin, C. W., Pilling,
V. K., and Brannon, L. A. (2008). Food safety training and foodservice
employees knowledge and behavior. Food Protection Trends, 28(4).
252-260.
Background: Safe food service practices are of great importance in
preventing foodborne illnesses. However, employee knowledge and
compliance to the learned materials does not always meet food safety
guidelines.
Purpose: This study attempted to determine if food safety training
improved employee knowledge and behavior.
Methods/Analysis: A total of 160 employees from 31 restaurants in
Kansas and Iowa completed a pre-assessment quiz to determine
knowledge of food safety practices. Trained researchers then observed
employees for 3 hours and recorded each behavior regarding food

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handling, thermometer use, and handwashinghand washing. Behaviors
were analyzed as a percentage: behaviors performed correctly compared
to total behaviors observed. Employees later completed a four-hour
Servsafe course. A follow-up test and 3-hour observation was then
completed.
Results: Knowledge scores improved overall according to the pre- and
post-assessments (M=42.8 to M=44.1). The overall percentage of
behaviors performed correctly also improved significantly (P < 0.001).
When analyzed independently, however, only hand washing behaviors
significantly improved, specifically to prevent cross contamination and
proper hand washing techniques. Although knowledge and behavior
changes were statistically significant, scores that were initially low did
not improve substantially.
Conclusion: Knowledge and behavior can be improved by proper food
safety training; however, increased knowledge does not necessarily
improve food safety behaviors.
Reference:
Manes, M.R., Liu, L.C., Dworkin, M.S. (2013). Baseline knowledge
survey of restaurant food handlers in suburban chicago: do restaurant
food handlers know what they need to know to keep consumers safe?
Journal of Environmental Health, 76 (1), 18-26. Retrieved from:
http://web.a.ebscohost.com.lynx.lib.usm.edu/ehost/detail/detail?
vid=4&sid=46e35609-6531-4238-802a-cc2804508b9a
%40sessionmgr4004&hid=4109&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ
%3d%3d#db=aph&AN=88899620
Background: Food handler behaviors are a major contributing factor to

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the thousands of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses each year. Food
handling techniques such as correct hand hygiene, maintaining proper
cooking and food handling temperatures of food and decreasing cross
contamination are often causes of such outbreaks. Some of these
improper techniques can be attributed to a lack of knowledge of food
handlers on how to correctly handle food.
Purpose: To determine areas where suburban foodservice workers have
limited knowledge of proper food handling techniques. Additionally, to
create targeted educational materials to increase food service workers
knowledge in these areas.
Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 729 food handlers by collecting
data from a 50-question survey about baseline food handler knowledge.
The surveys were graded according to the number of correct answers
given by the food service worker to provide a food safety knowledge
score.
Results: The average foodservice knowledge score was 72%. The areas
where the most nutrition knowledge was lacking included optimal
cooking, holding and refrigeration temperatures, cross-contamination
and hygiene. English-speaking food handlers scored higher than
spanishSpanish-speaking employees.
Conclusion: In order to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks,
foodservice workers should be provided with education in the areas of
food temperatures and storage, cross-contamination and hygiene.

Collect Health Related Data About your Issue

Morbidity & Mortality reports related to your


primary issue

Health behavior & practices related to your primary


issue found in research journals

(Review 5-7 articles/reports related to the topics listed to the left, and
write a 150-200 word abstract of each below)
Reference
United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014).

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Health status data related to your primary issue


(including social, economic, & environmental indicators)

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Food services and drinking places: North American Industry
Classification System 722. Retrieved from
http://www.bls.gov/iag/tgs/iag722.htm
The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) identifies the number of workrelated fatalities, injuries, and illnesses per 100 full-time food service
employees from 2010 to 2012. Only preliminary data concerning
fatalities exists for 2013. BLS defines work-related injury or illness to
mean any factor in the workplace that either caused or contributed to
the injury or illness or worsened the state of an injury or illness. Workrelated fatalities increased from 2011 to 2012 (105 to 120 employees);
however, the number of fatalities decreased from 2012 to 2013 (120 to
112 employees). The total number of work-related injuries and illnesses
out of 100 employees decreased from 2011 to 2012 (3.6 to 3.4). The
number of employees with injuries and illnesses with resulting days off
increased from 0.8 to 0.9 (out of 100 employees) from 2011 to 2012.
The number of employees with work-related injuries and illnesses with
related job restrictions or transfers remained constant from 2011 to 2012
at 0.3 employees.
Reference
Food and Drug Administration. (2009). FDA report on the occurrence
of foodborne illness risk factors in selected institutional foodservice,
restaurant, and retail food store facility types. Retrieved from
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodPr
otection/FoodborneIllnessRiskFactorReduction/UCM224682.pdf
The Food and Drug Administration conducted a 10-year study to
measure the frequency of behaviors known to cause foodborne illness in

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food service operations. These behaviors included: food procurement
from unsafe sources, personal hygiene, cross-contamination, improper
holding time or temperature, and inadequate cooking. Observations
were conducted at over 800 establishments in three different categories
of food service operations: retail, restaurants, and institutional food
service. Compliance to food safety guidelines was measured as a
percentage comparing the amount of behaviors observed out of
compliance to the total observations of each of the behaviors. In
elementary school foodservice operations, noncompliance was as
follows:
27.5% improper holding
14.9% poor personal hygiene
14.7% cross-contamination
11.8% inadequate cooking
3.7% unsafe food sources
The FDA also found improper storage of chemical to be an additional
out of compliance behavior in need of improvement. Materials were
improperly stored 14% of the time. Results from this study indicate that
the recommendations made following the first phase of the study should
be reemphasized; management should more actively control the risk
factors by proper training and frequent inspections.
Reference: Smith, L.P., Ng, S.W., Popkin, B.M. (2013). Trends in US
home food preparation and consumption: Analysis of national nutrition
surveys and time use studies from 1965-1996 to 2007-2008. Nutrition
Journal, 12(45). doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-12-45
Background: As technology advances, more Americans shift toward
quicker and faster ways of preparing foods. Assessing and identifying

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home food production trends is necessary to evaluate goals of public
health programs in different socioeconomic groups.
Purpose: To find trends among differing socioeconomic groups
regarding home food production and home food consumption, and how
these variables have changed from 1965 to 2008.
Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was completed on data from 6
surveys representing individuals across the country in 2007-2008, and 6
surveys representing individuals over time. The source of food
individuals consumed was analyzed and compared to calculate a daily
proportion of energy consumed for each individual. Some data was
excluded if the content or source of a food was unavailable. Each
survey was weighted according to Census data of the years the survey
was collected. Information about the amount of time spent preparing
food was used only if the individual spent time preparing or cleaning up
after the meal. Each person's gender, age group and income level was
considered in order to classify individuals as low, middle or upper
socioeconomic class.
Results: Individuals have decreased the amount of time spent at home
preparing foods, as well as the amount of food consumed at home.
There has been a gradual decrease in home food preparation and
consumption from 1965-2008, but the most significant decline was seen
from 1965-1992. In 2007-2008 only 54-57% of individuals reported
cooking from home and only 65-72% of food was eaten at home.
Conclusion: People spend less time cooking at home or eating at home
than they did in 1965. In order to encourage people to eat a healthy diet,
education on home cooking must be given.

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Review Existing Mandates

Mandate of the organization/group with which you


are working

Legislation, regulations, and/or health policies

Professional standards and ethical guidelines

Political agendas

Mandates of potential partners and/or competitors

(Summarize findings from 1-2 of the bullets listed to the left)

Write a 2-3 page community needs assessment using the


data collected above, using APA format & provide a
reference list

(Attached)

Write 3 PES statements that summarize the priority issue


and tie with the information collected in the community
needs assessment.

1. Inadequate food safety knowledgeknowledge RT limited employee


training practices AEB high employee turnover rate, delayed initial
training following employment, and required training program for all
employees related to Point of SaleOS system (unrelated to food safety)
2. Inadequate training of employees RT high employee turnover rate
AEB minimal training requirements.Limited adherence to food safety
practice RT lack of value of consequences of inappropriate food safety
practices AEB research indicating that increased food safety knowledge

In the Pascagoula School District, all managers and assistant managers


must be ServSafe certified and certified in Mississippi Department of
EducationDE Child Nutrition. All food service employees of the school
district must complete a TrainSmart online training program. This
program educates new employees on customer service, teamwork and
places an emphasis on improving leadership, management and
communication skills.The high employee turnover rate is the reason
employees are not automatically trained prior to starting work. All
employees, however, are first introduced in the facilities in substitute
positions for absent employees. EmployeesThey are selected for hire if
they demonstrate good work performance. Formal training begins
when employees are offered a permanent position. And then when does
the formal training begin?

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does not necessarily correlate with food safety behaviors.
3.
Lack of knowledge of culinary skills RT need for
additional culinary training AEB key informants report of lack of
culinary skills and decreased national home meal preparations
according to statistics.Inadequate enforcement of Offer Versus
Serve (OVS) RT lack of knowledge regarding the importance of
OVS AEB key informants reports of desire to increase knowledge
of OVS Policies

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Step 2: Program Goals & Objectives


Goal 1

Promote food safety knowledge and


behaviors.Promote culinary skills to increase
knowledge of how to prepare healthy foods.

Objective 1a.

Improve food safety knowledge of foodservice


employees according to a 10% improvement
between pre-test and post-test scores on food safety
knowledge assessments. Improve knowledge of
culinary skills in 80% of Pascagoula foodservice
employees who attend all sessions.

Objective 1b.

Improve foodservice safety behaviors in


foodservice employees by documentation of an
observed 10% increase in proper food safety
behaviors through food safety behavior assessment.
Improve employee intake of meals prepared at
home by 50% to decrease overall consumption of
undesirable foods and nutrients.

Goal 2

Improve compliance with OVS policies through


increasing knowledge of importance of OVS
policies.Promote food safety knowledge and
behaviors and improve self efficacyself-efficacy of
healthy meal preparations.

Objective 2a.

Ensure that 80% of employees have the ability to


recognize and enforce that a students meal tray has
all necessary components of a reimbursable meal.

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Improve food safety knowledge and food safety


behavior compliance by 25% of food service
employees to improve food quality and work
environment within the Pascagoula school
foodservice.
Objective 2b.

Following the intervention, 90% of employees will


score 80% or higher on the OVS post-test
assessment.Improve foodservice safety in
foodservice employees by documentation of less
than a25% reduction in the total number of
employees experiencing a work-related injury.

Based on the PES statements created in step 1 (specifically the signs and
symptoms) and the objectives list all of the data that you will need to collect
and how it will be collected before, during, and/or after the program.
In other words, how will you know if your program was a success?
Data/measure/monitor needed (list ALL data that you will need to collect as
part of your HPE project)

How will it be collected?


Interviews, pre-/post-test,
game, contest,
anthropometric data,
demographic data, etc.

When will the data


be collected?
Before, during,
and/or after the
intervention

Assessment of Knowledge of Food Safety Practices

Pre and Post test

Before and after

Assessment of knowledgeFood Safety behaviors of Culinary Skills

Pre and Post


testobservation

Before and after

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Literature Review
As technology advances, Americans begincontinue to develop thea need for speed and ease. In the last 50 years, new
inventions have created an opportunity for Americans to eliminate the task of buying, preparing and eating foods, andwhile replacing
this experience with the ease and convenience of dining away from the home. Since 1965, a significant decrease has occurred in the
amount of time Americans spend preparing and eating food at home. In the years 2008-2009 only 54-57% of people reported cooking
from home, and only 65-72% of foods eaten daily came from home. This is a significant decrease from the 92% of women who
cooked from home in 1965-1966 (Smith, Ng, & Popkin, 2009).
As more Americans follow the trend of dining out, meal preparation at home is declining. Although many foodservice workers
are knowledgeable about preparing and serving convenience food items, the skills and knowledge necessary to prepare home cooked
or scratch meals is scarce. An increase in the knowledge of culinary skills and food safety is vital in improving the foodservice system
of public schools and the health of foodservice workers. Need a transition sentence to get to the topic of foodborne illness. Poor food
safety practices can lead to fFoodborne illness, is a great concern in foodservice operations, especially in school cafeterias. The top
risk factors of foodborne illnesses are directly related to unsafe practices in food production, which include; these practices include
improper food holding (time and temperature), inadequate cooking, cross contamination, poor employee hygiene, and procurement

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from unsafe sources (Food and Drug Administration [FDA], 2009). According to a ten-year study conducted by the FDA, foods were
held at either an unsafe temperature or for an extended amount of time 27.5% of the time during observations in over 800 foodservice
operations. Poor personal hygiene and cross-contamination behaviors were observed almost 15% of behaviors.. Inadequate cooking of
the foods was observed 11.8%,, and unsafe food sources were used almost 4% of the time. This study revealed that food safety
training should be strongly emphasized and reviewed often in all foodservice operations (FDA, 2009).
A study done by Manes, Liu and Dworkin (2013) surveyed and assessed which areas foodservice workers were lacking the
most nutrition knowledge in order to create educational materials to provide to foodservice workers. The survey assessed the
knowledge of two different demographics of foodservice workers, certified managers and non-certified employees to compare
differences in food handling knowledge. Although the average food handler knowledge score was 72%, the majority of workers
answered poorly to questions regarding storage and cooking temperatures, cross-contamination and hygiene. English-speaking
foodservice workers scored higher on the majority of questions compared to Spanish-speaking employees (Manes, Liu, Dworkin,
2013). A difference in knowledge was also noted between certified and non-certified employees. On average, certified managers
scored between 1.42 and 3.6 points higher on the survey than non-certified employees (Manes, Liu, Dworkin, 2013). In order to
increase food safety knowledge,decrease the amount of foodborne illnesses each year, educational materials and training sessions
appropriate for that target Spanish-speaking populations should be created. Increasing the amount of employees that are foodservice
certified can also increase food safety knowledge, which should consequently lead to an improvement in food safety practices.

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Foodservice certification training is a necessity in foodservice operations; however, employee knowledge of safe food practices
does not always correlate to food safety behaviors. Roberts et al. (2006) determined that although food safety training, specifically
Servsafe training, increased employee knowledge, compliance to the Servsafe guidelines did not significantly improve. Employees
must not only understand the information, but also attribute value to these actions by realizing the consequences of poor food safety
practices. If employees realize the importance of food safety, they may be more committed to following practices.
Frequent food safety training and compliance to learned behaviors are highly needed in foodservice operations. Training
techniques should be individualized to reach the learners, and training should be reviewed often. Foodservice managers should also
employ motivational techniques to promote employee compliance for the prevention of foodborne illnesses.
The evaluation in a review study of various methodological strategies for food safety training for foodservice employees used in 14
different studies found that hygiene was the topic most frequently used in education. The training method most commonly used was
training with audiovisual media. The topic most commonly assessed in employees was hand washing. In each study evaluated, more
than one training method was used to teach employees about food safety (Medeiros, Cavalli, Salay, & Proena, 2011). These results
can be used to guide the curriculum and methods for training programs in foodservice establishments.
Food safety, however, is not the only type of safety education which should be taught to foodservice employees. Workplace
safety is evidently an important concern in foodservice, as well, as indicated by the rise from 2011 to 2012 in the number of

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foodservice employees with work-related injuries and illnesses resulting in days off increasing from 0.8 to 0.9 out of 100 employees
(United States Department of Labor, 2014). The kitchen can be a high-risk environment, and foodservice employees should be taught
proper procedures and appropriate precautions for operating equipment, handling hot pans, lifting heavy items, and using sharp
knives.
It is reported that less than 23% of Americans are consuming five servings of fruits and vegetables each day. A contributing
factor in this is the association of fruits and vegetables with foodborne illnesses. These illnesses are often attributed to improper
handling of food, improper hygiene, poor sanitation, and cross-contamination (Brown & Herman, 2005).
Research investigating the improvement of food safety behaviors and fruit and vegetable consumption indicates that an
education program on fruit and vegetable preparation and cooking skills along with food safety practices and general nutrient
information can increase the knowledge and skills of those who participate in these programs (Brown & Herman, 2005). This is
supporting evidence to research how food safety and cooking techniques can increase the nutrition knowledge and health of
foodservice employees. If such program is effective in both youth and adults, it is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of a similar
program in foodservice employees.
In addition, there is supporting evidence that nutrition education and cooking education can improve nutrition knowledge.
Cekal (2012) reportsed that following a nutrition education session, cooks post-test scores increased significantly compared to their

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pre-test scores regarding their nutrition-related knowledge. Therefore, after the education session, the cooks had a greater knowledge
of how the preparation and cooking of foods can impact the nutrients that are either still intact or destroyed for the final product. These
are positive results that support the need for continuing research of how cooking and food safety education can improve the
foodservice workers outcomes both at their job and in their everyday lives.
Step 3: Develop a Program Plan (Intervention/Nutrition Education Component)
Intervention Strategy
Conduct a Target
Contextual Analysis
How many people might
be involved?
At what times are the
potential participants able
to attend sessions?
What are the ages of the
potential participants?
What race, gender,
ethnicity, and social class
are the potential
participants?
What is the best way to
disseminate the
information to the
participants (based on type
of information and

Approximately 109 foodservice employees from the Pascagoula School District are expected to be involved in the
project.
Participants will be able to attend the sessions between three and four oclock on Friday afternoons.

Ages of the potential participants range from approximately 18 to 65 years of age.


Participants are male and female middle class workers of various ethnicities.

Based upon the information we wish to teach the participants, and based on their demographic characteristics, the best
way to relay this information to the foodservice staff is through mandatory inservices. These inservices will focus on
two educational lessons and two hands on experience lessons.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


demographic
characteristics of the
participants)?
Why do the potential
participants want to enroll
or be involved in the
program?
Are the potential
participants motivated to
learn this material, and if
so, what are the primary
motivators?
What are the costs (for
example, for fees, loss of
job time, travel, and
childcare) to the potential
participants for attending
the program?

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Potential participants have incentive to participate because they will be required for their job and will be payed for their
time. Additionally, these education lessons will increase their knowledge and understanding of the importance and
standards involved in food safety and offer versus serve guidelines. We will also be doing prize drawings to give some
incentive for employees to participate as well as attend.
The potential participants are motivated to learn this material in order to be productive at their job as well as be
compliant with health codes and government regulation standards. The primary motivators are that they must fulfill thei
job requirements in order to get paid.

There are no fees to participants. The participants will attend the lessons during non-working hours. Travel costs will be
minimal for participants because the location of the project is in Pascagoula, and therefore, will not be far from their
place of work. Childcare costs may be increased to allow participants to attend the lessons. The participants will be
getting paid to attend the session, so the participants will make up for some of the travel and childcare costs.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Outline the Instructional Plan


Course/Session Title(s)List the titles for the
overall HPE project and the titles for each
individual session
Proposed date(s) and timeframe for implementation
of the intervention
Learning Objectives for EACH sessionWhat the
participant will learn as a result of attending the
education or training session? These should tie
back to the program objectives. These should be
written as, The participants will

23

Power and Performance: Winners Work is the title for the overall HPE project.

The implementation and education series will span over a one month period. Proposed dates
include February 6, 17, and 24. The session on the 24th will include 2 lessons because of time
restraints.
(A minimum of 3 requiredthere are 5 major categories of learning outcomes: acquisition of
knowledge, enhancement of cognitive skills, development of psychomotor skills, strengthening
of problem-solving and finding capabilities, and changing attitudes, beliefs, values, and/or
feelings)
Lesson 1 Learning Objectives:
- 70% of participants will be able to correctly identify the correct order of steps to use a threecompartment sink on their post-test assessment.
- 70% of participants will correctly identify the danger zone on their post-test assessment.
- 70% of participants will correctly identify 70% of correct temperature questions on the posttest assessment.
- Improve food-safety knowledge by 10% between pre-test and post-test scores of food safety
assessment.
Lesson 2 Learning Objectives:
-Learners will score an average of 10% higher from pre- and post-test scores regarding
nutritional needs and obesity prevention in children.
-Learners will score an average of 10% high from pre- and post-surveys on the value of
promoting healthy options for school lunch and likeliness to encourage fruit and vegetable
intake in the cafeteria.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

24

-Learners will score an average of 10% higher on knowledge-based pre- and post-test
questions regarding offer versus serve guidelines.
-Learners will score an average of 10% high from pre- and post-surveys on the value of the
offer versus serve program and confidence in helping students select reimbursable meal
components

Proposed activities for EACH session

Lesson 3, Part 1 Learning Objectives:


-90 % of the learners will be able to correctly identify the 5 food groups in OVS reimbursable
meals, know the minimum and maximum number of food item selections and know the
stipulations for creating a reimbursable meal.
-95% of the learners will be able to identify the meal components in food items that contain
one or more food components (casseroles, tacos, desserts with grains, etc.)
-85% of the learners will be able to visually identify meals that are considered reimbursable.
-75% of learners will be able to state what component is missing from a reimbursable meal.
Lesson 3, Part 2 Learning Objectives:
-85% of participants will score a 90% or higher on the assessment quiz.
-85% of participants will be able to identify all five steps of proper hand washing procedure.
-85% of participants will be able to identify one way to prevent cross-contamination.
-85% of participants will be able to list two common food allergens.
Lesson 1 Proposed Activities:
An interactive activity at the opening session will require one volunteer to place the steps to
clean and sanitize in order and ask the audience if they agree or disagree with the volunteers
order. A PowerPoint presentation will be used to improve knowledge of food safety workers.
Quick Reviews throughout the presentation will incorporate audience participation and
reiterate main points by testing their knowledge. Participants will also have to take a post-test
at the end of the session.
Lesson 2 Proposed Activities:

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

25

The lesson will begin with a few interactive questions to engage the audience and help the
learners personally relate to the lesson being taught. The instructor will ask the audience to
raise their hand if they have kids or have kids in their lives that they care a lot about. Learners
will then be asked if they want said kids to be happy and healthy. Learners will then be shown
the picture of MyPlate examples and asked to raise their hand if their childs meals always look
similar to these pictures. This introduction will initiate the discussion that fruit and vegetable
intake is often difficult for school aged children.
Learners will be shown a short video detailing some national statistics on childhood obesity.
Instructor will discuss the five food groups and why a varied diet containing appropriate
servings from each food group and a variety of food items is important for children to meet
nutritional needs. Photos will then be shown of unhealthy breakfast and lunch meals and the
number of servings from each food group. These photos will illustrate that unhealthy
breakfasts and lunches make meeting the recommended serving size for fruits and vegetables
nearly impossible.
This will transition into discussing the importance of the offer versus serve program. The
instructor will discuss how offer versus serve allows students to select their meal components
instead of making all meal components necessary for reimbursement. By allowing the students
to choose what they prefer or what they think they will eat, this will cut down on food waste.
Although students may select their components, they must select items from at least three of
the five groups for reimbursement. The students meal must also contain at least one serving
(1/2 cup) of fruit, fruit juice, vegetables, or combined fruit and vegetable to qualify for
reimbursement. Multiple foods in each food group may be offered, with the condition that
students may select up to two items from this food group. However, this reinforces the need fo
foodservice workers to recognize what food groups each item falls under and whether or not
the meal qualifies for reimbursement.
The lesson will conclude with a choose this, not that game. Participants will be asked to
recall the child or children they thought of at the beginning of the lesson, and then select which
meal (between two options) they would prefer their child choose. Participants will be asked to
call out A or B. Each plate will be discussed briefly regarding nutritional content and food

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

26

groups.
Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 1:
A trivia spin-off game will be played to assess the learners ability to demonstrate principles
learned in the previous lesson pertaining to OVS and the learners ability to recognize and
create trays that are considered reimbursable. Each round will serve as a round of trivia, and
the group with the most points at the end of the game will receive a small prize. The learners
will be asked to sit at the tables in groups of 6. A dry erase board and marker will be given to
each group. Each group will work as a team to do each assignment. After each question is
asked, the group will have 30 seconds to come up with an answer. The questions will be
displayed on a projector at the front of the room. The interns and key informants will walk
around the room to check the answers of each team for correctness. After the interns and key
informants check each question, the answer will be shared and discussed with the group.

Round 1: Principles of OVS


Questions:
1.
Write out the 5 food groups used in offer versus serve.
2.
Give an example food in each food group.
3.
What are the minimum and maximum number of selections a child can put on their
plate during a meal?
4.
If a student chooses only 3 components, what component MUST be on their tray? Wha
is the serving size of that component?
5.
By allowing students to choose the items on their tray, what element is reduced? Or
what does OVS prevent?
Round 2: Combination dishes in OVS
Questions:
1.
What food groups are found in a taco (like the one on the screen)?
2.
Name a dish that contains more than 1 food group.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

27

3.
Name a dish that contains both a fruit and grain component.
4.
What food groups are found in a fruit and yogurt parfait?
5.
If a student chooses a dish that contains cup of vegetables in a mixed dish, does that
student still need to select another item with either fruit or vegetables?

Round 3: Identify the reimbursable meal


Questions: For each question here, the food items on 3 trays will be listed, but only 1 will
contain the correct components of a reimbursable meal. Learners will have to write 1, 2, or 3 to
show which tray they choose as the reimbursable tray.

Round 4: Whats missing?


Questions: Each question in this round will list the items on a tray and the learners will have to
identify what food group is missing and what item they can offer the child.
Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 2: Hand Washing Demo
Ask for a volunteer from the audience to come up to the front of the class and demonstrate
with the teacher proper hand washing procedure. If there is no sink available, use two large
bowls, two empty soap dispensers, and paper towels and act out the procedure. Thank them
for their participation.

Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 3: Cross-Contamination Identification


Show a video of a foodservice worker who does not take any precautions in the kitchen to
prevent cross-contamination. After the video ends, ask audience what that individual did
wrong. Then discuss what the person should have done instead to prevent cross-contamination

Assessment plan for EACH session (these should


tie back to your objectives for each session)

Lesson 1 Assessment:
Informal: This will be assessed through observation of participants engagement in the session,
volunteering for the activity, and answering the quick reviews.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

28

Formal: The formal assessment will be a post-test that will be taken at the end of the session.
The questions will assess participants knowledge of the material presented in the session.
Questions included in the assessment pertain to the temperature danger zone; the proper steps
in cleaning and sanitizing; and proper internal temperatures.

Lesson 2 Assessment:
Informal- Engagement and participation during lesson by show of hands, nodding, answering
questions. The closing activity will also assess whether or not learners have gained a basic
understanding of the food groups and reimbursable meals.
Formal-The formal assessment will be conducted by a post-test following the final lesson. This
post test will ask questions regarding simple child nutrition and offer versus serve guidelines.
This post-test will also contain a survey regarding the likeliness of learners to practice this
knowledge in their work environment. Questions will inquire of the learners likeliness to
encourage fruit and vegetable consumption and confidence in each individuals knowledge of
the offer versus serve guidelines. 80% of the participants will be expected to pass the post test
with an 80% score or higher.
1. True/False: According to MyPlate, half of your plate should be filled with whole grains.
2. School age children need how many servings of vegetables per day?
a. 1-2
b. 2-3
c. 3-5
d. 6-7
3. True/False: The recommended servings of fruits and vegetables can easily be met in the
dinner meal alone.
4. How likely are you to encourage fruit and vegetable intake to the students in the school

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

29

cafeteria?
Not Likely

Somewhat Likely

Very likely

Undecided

4. Which of the following is NOT true of offer versus serve?


a. Students are required to choose at least one serving (or cup) of fruit, fruit juice, and/or
vegetables.
b. Offer versus serve helps to prevent waste by allowing students to choose which items they
prefer.
c. Students must select at least one item from all five food groups for a reimbursable meal.
d. Students may select up to two items from one food group as long as the meal has items from
at least three food groups.
5. Which of the following represents your feelings regarding the following statement? The
offer versus serve guidelines are important for promoting nutritious school meals.
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree

Lesson 3, Part 1 Assessment:


Informal- The learners participation in the opening activity as well as the answers to the
questions in the activity will allow the intern to asses how much the learners have learned
throughout the intervention.
Formal- The formal assessment will be conducted by a post-test following the final lesson.
This post-test will ask situational questions and questions regarding offer versus serve
guidelines. This post-test will also contain a survey regarding the likeliness of learners to
enforce this knowledge in their work environment. Questions will inquire of the learners
likeliness to enforce students choice of reimbursable trays and confidence in each individuals

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

30

knowledge of the offer versus serve guidelines. 80% of the participants will be expected to
pass the post test with an 80% score or higher.
Lesson 3, Part 2 Assessment:
Informal - Ask questions at the end of the presentation to check audiences comprehension.
Formal - Ask audience to complete a three-question, short answer quiz. The questions are as
follows:
Please list the five steps of proper handwashing.
Please describe two ways to prevent cross-contamination.
Please identify four common allergens in food.
Estimated time for each major part of the learning
activity or activities to be completed

Lesson 1 Time Schedule:


- 10 minutes for pre-test assessment
- 5 minute introduction/opening activity
- 30 minute presentation/review questions
- 5 minute closure/questions
- 10 minutes for post-test formal assessment
Lesson 2 Time Schedule:
-10 minute introduction/opening activity
-30 minute presentation/activity
-10 minute closure/questions
-10 minute formal assessment
Lesson 3, Part 1 Time Schedule:
-5 minute introduction
-20 minute trivia game/discussion of answers
-5 minute closure/ question and answer time
Lesson 3, Part 2 Time Schedule:
-5 minute introduction

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Lesson Plan for EACH lesson

Marketing the Program (The 4 Ps)


Product (Comprehensive description of the
program)

Price (The cost charged to the participants)

Place (The location must be consistent with the


program design, audience, and budget)
Promotion (Strategies and materials aimed at
generating or increasing enrollment)
Marketing/Promotion Plan
Name of Program and Proposed Dates
Target Audience
List of promotional materials used to advertise (e.g.
Newspaper, posters, personal contacts, websites,
flyers, etc.) and sample copies
Timeline for dissemination of promotional
materials

31

-20 minute lesson/activities


-5 minute closure/question and answer time
Attach a copy of the lesson plan

Four education sessions (one hour each) will be conducted to all food service workers
providing knowledge and practice of food safety and offer versus serve. Two sessions will
provide general information and practice of safe food handling, preparation, and distribution
techniques. Two sessions will provide information on the offer versus serve program and
requirements with practice recognizing reimbursable meals.
Employees will not be charged for the session, but will instead be paid hourly wage for each
session attended. Training will be a requirement for all food service employees, and no
additional cost will be charged to the school district for the educational sessions provided.
Pascagoula School District Central Office Board Room
See Appendix

Power and Performance: Winners Work


Cafeteria workers in Pascagoula School System
Posters for managers office (See Appendix)
Flyers in school cafeteria kitchen (See Appendix)
Emails from CNP to cafeteria managers to make announcements about meetings
Breakroom Bulletin Boards
January 23- begin distributing promotional materials to all school cafeterias
send email to key informants to send to cafeteria managers informing employees of meetings

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

32

January 30- send a second email to key informants to send to cafeteria managers informing
employees of meetings
February 6th-send an email to key informants to send to cafeteria managers informing
employees of the first meeting that afternoon
February 13- send an email to key informants to send to cafeteria managers informing
employees of meeting that afternoon
February 20- send an email to key informants to send to cafeteria managers informing
employees of meeting that afternoon

Session 1 Lesson Plan: Hand Washing, Cross-Contamination Prevention, and Food Allergies

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

33

Name of Intern: Emily Marshall


Setting: Pascagoula Family Interactive Center
Time Allotment: 30 minutes
Estimated Number of Learners: 109
I. Goals and Rationale (5 points)
II.
#

Goal

Rationale for Goal

1.

The goal of this lesson is to


promote food safety knowledge
and behaviors of foodservice
employees in the Pascagoula
School District.

Food safety knowledge is necessary in the


foodservice establishments to decrease the
spread of foodborne illnesses. There is a wide
variety of food safety practices, including hand
washing and cross contamination prevention.
Education should stress not only what
constitutes food safety, but why it is important to
adopt food safety practices. If the consequences
of improper food safety are not emphasized,
then individuals may not fully understand
implications, making behavior change less
likely.

I. Objectives (5 points)
II.
#

Objective

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

34

1.

By the end of the session, 85% of participants will score a 90% or higher on the assessment quiz.

2.

By the end of the session, 85% of participants will be able to list all five steps of proper hand
washing procedure.

3.

By the end of the session, 85% of participants will be able to describe one way to prevent crosscontamination.

4.

By the end of the session, 85% of participants will be able to list two common food allergens.

I. Teaching/Learning Procedures (5 points)


Motivation/Introduction

Start by introducing self and the topics for the lesson:


proper hand washing procedures, cross contamination,
and food allergies. Ask audience if they have ever gone to
a restaurant and noticed that the servers failed to wash
their hands at a critical time. Explain that some common
instances observed in commercial foodservice are
handling both money and food without washing hands in
between and sneezing without washing hands
immediately afterwards. Ask audience if they have ever
been to a foodservice establishment that was out of soap
in the bathroom, yet there is a sign that says employees
MUST WASH HANDS. Ask audience if these
experiences have made them think twice about going
back to that restaurant. Ask audience why washing hands
is important. Explain that washing hands can help to
prevent the spread of bacteria and foodborne diseases
(World Health Organization, n.d.). This is why it is

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

35

important to always wash hands during appropriate times


using the correct procedure.
Teaching/Learning Activities

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Begin PowerPoint slides that follow along with the


lesson. Ask audience if they can identify times when it is
necessary to wash hands. Explain that we should wash
hands:
before, while, and after preparing food
prior to eating
before and after taking care of a sick person
before and after treatment of cuts
after using the bathroom
after sneezing, coughing, or blowing nose
after handling trash (Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 2011)
in between touching soiled trays and clean trays
Ask audience how many steps are in the hand washing
process and if anyone can identify them. Explain each
step in the process while demonstrating each step.
Run hands under either warm or cold clean water, turn off
the water, and put soap on hands.
Rub hands together to completely lather hands with the
soap, including the back of hands, under nails, and in
between the fingers.
Scrub hands for a minimum of 20 seconds. Can time this
by humming or singing the Happy Birthday song two
times in a row.
Run hands under clean water until all soap is rinsed away.
Air dry hands or use a clean towel to dry them (Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011).
Note: NEVER wash hands in a sanitizer bucketonly

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

36

wash hands in a sink!


Ask for a volunteer from the audience to come up to the
front of the class and demonstrate with the teacher proper
hand washing procedure. If there is no sink available, use
two large bowls, two empty soap dispensers, and paper
towels and act out the procedure. Thank them for their
participation.
Next, explain that washing hands with soap and water is
the best way to decrease the amount of microorganisms
on hands. If soap and water are unavailable, then a hand
sanitizer consisting of at least 60 percent alcohol should
be used; however, it should be noted that hand sanitizers
do not remove all types of germs from the hands (Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011).
Introduce the next topic of cross-contamination
prevention. Explain that cross contamination is the
transference of microorganisms from one object to
another. Foodborne illness can occur if:
1. Contaminated foods are added to another food and that
food is not cooked
2. Contaminated food drips on or comes in contact with
foods that are ready-to-eat.
3. A person touches a contaminated food and then touches
another food that is ready-to-eat without washing their
hands in between.
4. A food that is ready-to-eat comes in contact with a
contaminated surface.
5. A contaminated towel touches or is used to clean

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

37

surfaces that will come in contact with food (National


Restaurant Association, 2010b).
Ask if anyone can name a way to prevent crosscontamination. Cross-contamination can be prevented by
using physical and procedural barriers. Physical barriers
are:
1. Color code or assign certain equipment (cutting boards,
containers, and utensils) for specific uses in the kitchen.
For example, a yellow cutting board can be used for raw
chicken, a purple cutting board can be used for raw beef,
and a pink cutting board can be used for produce.
2. Wash, rinse, and sanitize all surfaces, equipment, and
utensils after use.
Procedural barriers are:
1. Prepare raw meats/seafood at different times than
ready-to-eat foods if using the same work surface. For
example, potatoes can be peeled in the morning on a prep
table and raw hamburgers can be assembled on the same
prep table in the afternoon as long as the prep table and
utensils are cleaned and sanitized in between uses.
2. Choose ingredients more often that need minimal
preparation. For example, precooked meatballs instead of
raw beef pose less risk of cross-contamination (National
Restaurant Association, 2010c).
Next, show a video of a foodservice worker who does not
take any precautions in the kitchen to prevent crosscontamination. After the video ends, ask audience what
that individual did wrong. Then discuss what the person

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

38

should have done instead to prevent cross-contamination.


Introduce the last topicfood allergies. Ask audience to
define food allergy. Explain that it is a negative reaction
by the body to a certain protein. Reactions can start
immediately after contact with the protein or several
hours after contact. The most common food allergens are:
Milk and dairy products
Eggs and egg products
Fish and shellfish
Wheat
Soy and soy products
Peanuts and tree nuts (National Restaurant Association,
2010a)
Ask audience why it is important to be aware of the most
common food allergens and know what menu items
contain them. Explain that symptoms of food allergies
can be very serious, even life-threatening. Symptoms may
include itching, tightening of the throat, wheezing,
shortness of breath, hives, swelling in the eyes, face,
hands, or feet, abdominal cramps, vomiting, diarrhea,
unconsciousness, and death. Foodservice employees can
help prevent allergic reactions from occurring. Service
staff should be able to communicate to customers any
items on the menu that contain potential allergens. Staff
should be able to:
Explain to customers how a menu item is made and
mention the inclusion of sauces, marinades, and garnishes
which may have allergens
Note any secret ingredients which may have potential
allergens.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

39

If a customer has an allergy and is concerned, suggest


simpler foods on the menu for them to order. The simpler
foods will have fewer ingredients and it will be easier to
pinpoint the presence of potential allergens in these foods
Kitchen staff must be careful not to transfer an allergen
from one food to a food that does not contain the allergen.
Cross-contact can occur if different foods are cooked in
the same fryer oil or food is placed on surfaces that have
come in contact with allergens. Kitchen staff should:
Wash, rinse, sanitize all cookware, equipment, and
utensils prior to food preparation
Wash hands and change gloves prior to food preparation
Use specific equipment to prepare food for customers
with food allergies (National Restaurant Association,
2010a)
Closure

Summarize main points, ask if there are any questions,


and thank audience for their participation. Pass out quiz.
Once audience has completed the quiz, pick up the quiz
and pass out the handouts which include main points
from the lesson.

Informal Assessment

Ask questions to check understanding throughout the


lesson.

Formal Assessment

Pass out the quiz (copy provided below). The quiz will
assess the participants knowledge of the steps of proper
hand washing, how to prevent cross contamination, and
common food allergens.

II. Materials/Media (5 points) (attach a sample)

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


Cross-contamination video

Pens/pencils

2 Large bowls

Computer

2 Empty soap dispensers

Projector

Paper towels

Quizzes

40
Handouts

Assessment of Participants Learning (5 points) (attach sample and summarize results)


Quiz
1. Please identify the 5 steps of proper hand washing:
a. Lather, rinse, dry
b. Wet, lather, scrub for 20 seconds, rinse, air dry
c. Sanitize and rinse
d. Wet, lather, scrub for 10 seconds, rinse, air dry
2. Jill is getting ready to prepare a chicken Cobb salad. Please identify one way Jill can prevent cross-contamination:
a. Prepare the salad and raw chicken on opposite ends of the cutting board.
b. Prepare the raw chicken first on the cutting board, and then chop the ingredients for the
salad on the cutting board.
c. Use two separate, color-coded cutting boards for the raw chicken and the salad
ingredients.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

41

d. Rinse the cutting board after prepping the raw chicken and before prepping the salad.
3. Please identify two common allergens in food:
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
Thank you for your participation!!!

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

42

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

43

Session 2 Lesson Plan: Cleaning & Sanitizing and Temperature Control


Name of Intern: Annie Marhula
Setting: Pascagoula Community Center
Time Allotment: 60 minutes
Estimated Number of Learners: 100

I.
#
1.

II.
#
1.
2.
3.
4.
III.

Goals and Rationale


Goal
Promote food safety knowledge and
behaviors regarding cleaning and
sanitizing along with temperature control.

Rationale for Goal


Key informant Ms. Steinberger recognized a need for cafeteria
employees in the Pascagoula School District to avoid
contamination and serve the children safe and nutritious food.

Objectives
Objective
70% of participants will correctly identify the danger zone on their post-test assessment.
70% of participants will correctly identify 70% of correct temperature questions on the post-test assessment.
70% of participants will be able to correctly identify when food temperatures must be taken.
Improve food-safety knowledge by 10% between pre-test and post-test scores of food safety assessment.
Teaching/Learning Procedures

Motivation/Introduction

I. Participants will be asked to take a pre-test before the start of the


session.
II. Introduce self. Our series of lessons called Power & Performance:
Winners Work. By the end of this session I hope you feel

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

44

comfortable and confident with your knowledge and ability to


apply the skills and practices we will discuss to day about cleaning
and sanitizing along with temperature control.
III. Interactive Activity:
a. Ask one volunteer to come up and place the steps to clean
and sanitize in the correct order.
b. Ask the rest of the participants if they think the person put
the steps in the correct order.
c. Thank the volunteer for coming up.
IV. Overall, this presentation will cover information and practices on
cleaning and sanitizing along with temperature control in
foodservice.
Teaching/Learning Activities

PowerPoint presentation will be used to improve knowledge of food safety


workers. Quick Reviews throughout the presentation will incorporate audience
participation and reiterate main points. Have participants take post-test.
Outline:
Interactive Quiz
Need 1 volunteer!
Come place the steps to clean and sanitize in the correct order.
Are the steps in order?
Overview:
Cleaning and Sanitizing
Temperature Control
Cleaning & Sanitizing Goals
Know how and when to clean and sanitize both food and non-food
surfaces.
Know how to clean and sanitize items in a three-compartment sink.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

45

How to Clean and Sanitize


What surfaces should be cleaned and rinsed?
Walls, storage shelves, and garbage containers.
Any surface that touches food:
Knives, stockpots, cutting boards, and prep-tables
How to Clean and Sanitize
Step 1: Scrape or remove food
Step 2: Wash the surface
Use correct cleaner
Step 3: Rinse the surface
Use clean water
Step 4: Sanitize the surface
Use correct sanitizing solution
Step 5: Allow surface to air dry
When to Clean & Sanitize
Food-Contact Surfaces:
After they are used
Before food handler starts working with a different food
Any disruption in food handlers task that could cause items to be
contaminated
After four hours if items are in constant use
Quick Review
What surfaces should be cleaned and sanitized?
What is one time when food surfaces should be cleaned and sanitized?
Temperature Control Goals
Know the temperature Danger Zone
Know when time-temperature abuse can occur
Know ways to avoid time-temperature abuse

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

46

Know what the correct temperatures certain foods must be cooked to


TCS Food?
What is this?
Time-temperature control food
Must monitor foods temperature to prevent growth of
microorganisms
Danger Zone
Avoid TCS food entering the danger zone
41F to 135F (5C to 57C)
Pathogens grow in this range
40F to 125F (21C to 52C)
Pathogens grow rapidly in this range
When time-temp abuse can occur
Food is not cooked to proper minimum internal temperature
Food is not held at proper temperature
Should not be in danger zone for more than 4 hours
Food is cooled or reheated inappropriately
How to avoid time-temp abuse
Monitor
Who, what foods, how often
Proper Tools
Record
Temperature, when the temp was taken, and who took the temp
Time-temp control
Limit danger zone time
Corrective Actions
What do you do?

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

47

Quick Review
What is the danger zone temperature?
List one time that time-temperature abuse can occur.
What are two ways to avoid time-temperature abuse?

Correct
temperatures
Thawing
Cooling
Reheating
Minimal Internal Cooking Temps
Correct Temperatures
THAWING:
Cooler (41F)
Running Water (70F or lower)
Food temp cannot get above 41 for 4+ hours
Microwave (food must be cooked immediately)
Cooking (Frozen food can go from freezer to being cooked)
COOLING:
Cool TCS food must be cooled from 135F to 41F or lower
within 6 hours
First 2 hours:
Cool from 135F to 70F
If it does not reach 70F cool or Reheat and cooled again
Next 4 hours:
Cool from 70F to 41F
REHEATING:
Served Immediately
Hot-holding

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

48

TCS food to internal temp of 165F for 15 seconds


Must reach 165F within 2 hours of reheating process
Commercial processed and ready-to-eat foods:
Cooked to internal temp of 135F or greater
Ex: cheese sticks and deep-fried vegetables
Minimal Internal Cooking Temps
165F for 15 seconds:
Poultry (whole or ground chicken, turkey, or duck), stuffing,
stuffed meat, and dishes that include TCS foods that have been previously
cooked
155F for 15 seconds:
Ground meat, injected meat, mechanically tenderized meat,
ratites (ostrich and emu), ground seafood, and shell eggs (hot held)
145F:
15 seconds: steaks/chops of pork, beef, veal,
and lamb; seafood; commercially raised game, and shell eggs (served
immediately)
4 minutes: Roasts of pork, beef, veal, and lamb
135F:
Fruit, vegetables, grains, and legumes (all hotheld for service)
175F:
Tea
Quick Review
When thawing food under running water what temperature must the
water be at?
What temperature must cold food be cooled to within the first two
hours?
When reheating food to be held hot what internal temperature must it
reach and for how long must it stay at this temperature?
What internal temperature do ground meats need to be cooked to?

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

49

What did you learn?


Closure
Informal Assessment

Formal Assessment

IV.

Ask participants what they learned and thank them for their time.
Throughout the PowerPoint the Quick Review questions will informally assess
participants knowledge. If participants answer questions correctly, the
presentation will continue; however, if participants continue to struggle the
presenter will review the concepts that the participants are having difficulty
with.
The same test about food safety practices and behaviors given prior to the
intervention presentation will be given as a post-test to assess if the participants
knowledge improved from the course or not.

Materials/Media (attach a sample)

Paper cards: Scrape and remove


food bits from the surface, wash the
surface, rinse the surface, sanitize
the surface, allow surface to air dry.

PowerPoint with computer and


projector

Pens and pencils for quiz

V.
Assessment of Participants Learning (attach sample)
Power & Performance: Winners Work
Pre-test
True or False
1. _____ A whole turkey should be cooked to a minimum internal cooking temperature of 165 F for 15 seconds.
2. _____ Hamburger patties should be cooked to a minimum internal cooking temperature of 135F for 15 seconds.
3. _____ A steak should be cooked to a minimal internal temperature of 155F for at least 15 seconds.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

50

4. _____ Time-temperature abuse can occur when food is cooked to the proper minimum internal temperature.

Place the steps in order:


_____ Scrape or remove food
_____ Allow surface to air dry
_____ Rinse the surface
_____ Wash the surface
_____ Sanitize the surface
Multiple Choice:
1. _____ Water in the sink used for washing should be replaced when
a. it feels too hot
b. it becomes dirty
c. the water level is at the top of the sink
d. it is diluted with bleach
2. _____ Chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of
a. 135 F for 15 seconds
b. 155 F for 15 seconds
c. 165 F for 15 seconds
d. 145 F for 15 seconds
3. What is the temperature danger zone?
a. 41 F to 135 F
b. 41 F to 0 F

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

51

c. 30 F to 40 F
d. 140 F to 165 F
4. Time temperature abuse can occur with all of the following EXCEPT:
a. Food is not cooked to proper minimum internal temperature
b. Food is not held at proper temperature
c. Food is cooled or reheated inappropriately
d. Food temperature is held outside of the danger zone
Fill in the blank
1. What is one way to avoid time-temperature abuse? _______________________
2. What temperature should the water be when thawing foods? __________________
3. How many hours do you have total to cool TCS food from 135 F to 41 F? ____________________

Power & Performance: Winners Work


Post-test
True or False
5. _____ A whole turkey should be cooked to a minimum internal cooking temperature of 165 F for 15 seconds.
6. _____ Hamburger patties should be cooked to a minimum internal cooking temperature of 135F for 15 seconds.
7. _____ A steak should be cooked to a minimal internal temperature of 155F for at least 15 seconds.
8. _____ Time-temperature abuse can occur when food is cooked to the proper minimum internal temperature.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Place the steps in order:


_____ Scrape or remove food
_____ Allow surface to air dry
_____ Rinse the surface
_____ Wash the surface
_____ Sanitize the surface
Multiple Choice:

5. _____ Chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of


a. 135 F for 15 seconds
b. 155 F for 15 seconds
c. 165 F for 15 seconds
d. 145 F for 15 seconds
6. What is the temperature danger zone?
a. 41 F to 135 F
b. 41 F to 0 F
c. 30 F to 40 F
d. 140 F to 165 F
7. Time temperature abuse can occur with all of the following EXCEPT:
a. Food is not cooked to proper minimum internal temperature
b. Food is not held at proper temperature

52

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

53

c. Food is cooled or reheated inappropriately


d. Food temperature is held outside of the danger zone
Fill in the blank
4. What is one way to avoid time-temperature abuse? _______________________
5. What temperature should the water be when thawing foods? __________________
6. How many hours do you have total to cool TCS food from 135 F to 41 F? ____________________
a. Pre-test
i. Key:
ii. T, F, F, T, F,
iii. Step 1: Scrape or remove food
iv. Step 2: Wash the surface
v. Step 3: Rinse the surface
vi. Step 4: Sanitize the surface
vii. Step 5: Allow surface to air dry
viii. B, C, D,
ix. Monitor, Proper tools, Record, Time-temp control, or corrective actions
x. 70 degrees or less
xi. 6 hours
b. Post-test
i. Key:
ii. T, F, F, T, F
iii. Step 1: Scrape or remove food
iv. Step 2: Wash the surface
v. Step 3: Rinse the surface
vi. Step 4: Sanitize the surface
vii. Step 5: Allow surface to air dry
viii. B, C, D,

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

54

ix. Monitor, Proper tools, Record, Time-temp control, or corrective actions


x. 70 degrees or less
xi. 6 hours

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

55

Scrape and remove food


bits from the surface

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

56

Wash
the surface

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

57

Rinse
the surface

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

58

Sanitiz
e the surface

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

59

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

60

Allow surface to air dry

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

61

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

62
Session 3 Lesson Plan: Healthy Eating with

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

63

Offer Versus Serve


Name of Intern: Molly Chaffin
Setting: Pascagoula Community Center
Time Allotment: 1 hour
Estimated Number of Learners: 100
VI.

Goals and Rationale (5 points)

#
1.

Goal
Learners will gain understanding on
the importance of nutritious meals and
healthy food choices in school
foodservice programs.

2.

Learners will better understand the


basic concepts of offer versus serve
and gain value and understanding of
the necessity of its proper
implementation.

Rationale for Goal


Proper nutrition for children is extremely important in
promoting adequate growth, maintaining health, and
preventing childhood obesity. Many children, especially in
low-income areas, consume 2/3 of their daily meals at
school; therefore, cafeteria meals play the largest role in a
childs dietary intake. Healthy meals should be provided in
schools to promote proper nutrition and health in schoolaged children.
Basic guidelines of offer versus serve (OVS) must be
understood to be able to effectively enact the program and
help students select reimbursable meals. The rationale for
implementation of the offer versus serve program must be
well understood to gain value for the program. If
foodservice workers do not value the program and
understand the need for this program, implementation will
be less effective.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


VII.
#
1.
2.

3.
4.

64

Objectives (5 points)
Objective
Learners will score an average of 10% higher from pre- and post-test scores regarding
nutritional needs and obesity prevention in children.
Learners will score an average of 10% high from pre- and post-surveys on the value of
promoting healthy options for school lunch and likeliness to encourage fruit and vegetable
intake (according to the OVS regulations) in the cafeteria.
Learners will score an average of 10% higher on knowledge-based pre- and post-test questions
regarding offer versus serve guidelines.
Learners will score an average of 10% high from pre- and post-surveys on the value of the offer
versus serve program and confidence in helping students select reimbursable meal components

VIII. Teaching/Learning Procedures (5 points)


Motivation/Introduction

Teaching/Learning Activities

The lesson will begin with a few interactive questions to engage the
audience and help the learners personally relate to the lesson being taught.
The instructor will ask the audience to raise their hand if they have kids or
have kids in their lives that they care a lot about. Learners will then be
asked if they want said kids to be happy and healthy. Learners will then
be shown the picture of MyPlate examples and asked to raise their hand if
their childs meals always look similar to these pictures. This introduction
will initiate the discussion that fruit and vegetable intake is often difficult
for school aged children.
Learners will be shown a short video detailing some national statistics on
childhood obesity. Instructor will discuss the five food groups and why a
varied diet containing appropriate servings from each food group and a
variety of food items is important for children to meet nutritional needs.
Photos will then be shown of unhealthy breakfast and lunch meals and the
number of servings from each food group. These photos will illustrate that

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Closure

Informal Assessment

Formal Assessment

65

unhealthy breakfasts and lunches make meeting the recommended serving


size for fruits and vegetables nearly impossible.
This will transition into discussing the importance of the offer versus
serve program. The instructor will discuss how offer versus serve allows
students to select their meal components instead of making all meal
components necessary for reimbursement. By allowing the students to
choose what they prefer or what they think they will eat, this will cut
down on food waste. Although students may select their components, they
must select items from at least three of the five groups for reimbursement.
The students meal must also contain at least one serving (1/2 cup) of
fruit, fruit juice, vegetables, or combined fruit and vegetable to qualify for
reimbursement. Multiple foods in each food group may be offered, with
the condition that students may select up to two items from this food
group. However, this reinforces the need for foodservice workers to
recognize what food groups each item falls under and whether or not the
meal qualifies for reimbursement.
The lesson will conclude with a choose this, not that game. Participants
will be asked to recall the child or children they thought of at the
beginning of the lesson, and then select which meal (between two
options) they would prefer their child choose. Participants will be asked
to call out A or B. Each plate will be discussed briefly regarding
nutritional content and food groups.
Engagement and participation during lesson by show of hands, nodding,
answering questions. Closing activity will also assess whether or not
learners have gained a basic understanding of the food groups and
reimbursable meals.
The formal assessment will be conducted by a post-test following the
final lesson. This post test will ask questions regarding simple child
nutrition and offer versus serve guidelines. This post-test will also contain

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

66

a survey regarding the likeliness of learners to practice this knowledge in


their work environment. Questions will inquire of the learners likeliness
to encourage fruit and vegetable consumption and confidence in each
individuals knowledge of the offer versus serve guidelines. 80% of the
participants will be expected to pass the post test with an 80% score or
higher.
IX.

Materials/Media (5 points) (Sample attached)

Computer
Internet Access
Projector
Quizzes (pre/post) 200 (sample attached)
Pens (100)

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

67

Offer Versus Serve (OVS) Pre/Post Quiz


1. True/False: According to MyPlate, half of your plate should be filled with whole grains.

2. School age children need how many servings of vegetables per day?
a. 1-2
b. 2-3
c. 3-5
d. 6-7

3. True/False: The recommended servings of fruits and vegetables can easily be met in the dinner meal alone.

4. How likely are you to encourage fruit and vegetable intake to the students in the school cafeteria?
Not Likely

Somewhat Likely

Very likely

Undecided

5. Circle the meal that meets the OVS guidelines?

6. Which of the following represents your feelings regarding the following statement? The offer versus serve
guidelines are important for promoting nutritious school meals.
Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly Agree

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

68

Session 4 Lesson Plan: Application and Problem Solving of OVS


Name of Intern: Lisa Christopher
Setting: Family Interactive Center, Pascagoula, MS
Time Allotment: 30 minutes (combined session with another intern).
Estimated Number of Learners: 100
I.

Goals and Rationale (5 points)

Goal

Rationale for Goal

1.

Learners will demonstrate


understanding of basic principles
of OVS policies

In addition to knowing and understanding the


policies of OVS, foodservice workers need to
be able to enforce these policies in order for the
school to be reimbursed for the meals that are
served in the cafeteria.

2.

Learners will demonstrate ability


to differentiate between the 5
meal components of OVS

The 5 meal components that make up OVS


reimbursable meals can sometimes be confusing
because one food may contain 2 components.
Employees need to be able to know which foods
count as a reimbursable component for each
meal.

3.

Learners will be able to identify


reimbursable meals

Putting together all the components of a meal


that is reimbursable for OVS can be confusing,
especially when there are several options.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

69

Employees need to be able to quickly identify a


meal as students pay for their meals.
4.

Learners will be able to identify


the missing components of a
reimbursable meal

II.

Objectives (5 points)

Employees should be trained to be able to tell


students which components of a meal are
missing. If a student tries to take a meal that is
missing a reimbursable component, the
foodservice worker needs to be able to quickly
identify what components are missing so the
student can fix his meal and check out.

Objective

1.

90 % of the learners will be able to correctly identify the 5 food groups in OVS reimbursable
meals, know the minimum and maximum number of food item selections and know the
stipulations for creating a reimbursable meal.

2.

95% of the learners will be able to identify the meal components in food items that contain
one or more food components (casseroles, tacos, desserts with grains, etc.)

3.

85% of the learners will be able to visually identify meals that are considered reimbursable.

4.

75% of learners will be able to state what component is missing from a reimbursable meal.

III.

Teaching/Learning Procedures (5 points)

Motivation/Introduction

Each learner will be given pencil and a piece of paper that


has a picture of a compartmentalized tray on it. The

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

70

learners will be asked to fill in the compartments of the


tray will food items that they think fit the criteria for a
reimbursable meal. After 1 minute, 3 learners will be
chosen to share what they wrote on their tray. If an
employee shares the items on their tray, and a component
of the reimbursable meal is missing, the intern will ask the
group what component is missing. This will give an
opportunity for the crowd to interact and share with the
group an item that would fulfill the requirements for a
reimbursable tray.
Teaching/Learning
Activities

A trivia spin-off game will be played to assess the


learners ability to demonstrate principles learned in the
previous lesson pertaining to OVS and the learners ability
to recognize and create trays that are considered
reimbursable. Each round will serve as a round of trivia,
and the group with the most points at the end of the game
will receive a small prize. The learners will be asked to sit
at the tables in groups of 6. A dry erase board and marker
will be given to each group. Each group will work as a
team to do each assignment. After each question is asked,
the group will have 30 seconds to come up with an answer.
The questions will be displayed on a projector at the front
of the room. The interns and key informants will walk
around the room to check the answers of each team for
correctness. After the interns and key informants check
each question, the answer will be shared and discussed
with the group.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

71

Round 1: Principles of OVS


Questions:
1.
Write out the 5 food groups used in offer versus
serve.
2.
Give an example food in each food group.
3.
What are the minimum and maximum number of
selections a child can put on their plate during a meal?
4.
If a student chooses only 3 components, what
component MUST be on their tray? What is the serving
size of that component?
5.
By allowing students to choose the items on their
tray, what element is reduced? Or what does OVS prevent?
Round 2: Combination dishes in OVS
Questions:
1. What food groups are found in a taco (like the one on
the screen)?
2. Name a dish that contains more than 1 food group.
3. Name a dish that contains both a fruit and grain
component.
4. What food groups are found in a fruit and yogurt
parfait?
5. If a student chooses a dish that contains cup of
vegetables in a mixed dish, does that student still need to
select another item with either fruit or vegetables?
Round 3: Identify the reimbursable meal
Questions: For each question here, the food items on 3
trays will be listed, but only 1 will contain the correct

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

72

components of a reimbursable meal. Learners will have to


write 1, 2, or 3 to show which tray they choose as the
reimbursable tray.
Round 4: Whats missing?
Questions: Each question in this round will list the items
on a tray and the learners will have to identify what food
group is missing and what item they can offer the child.
Closure

The group with the most correct answers will be given a


small prize. A time for any final questions will be allowed.
The post-test for the intervention will be distributed to
participants.

Informal Assessment

The learners participation in the opening activity as well


as the answers to the questions in the activity will allow the
intern to assess how much the learners have learned
throughout the intervention.

Formal Assessment

The formal assessment will be conducted by a post-test


following the final lesson. This post-test will ask
situational questions and questions regarding offer versus
serve guidelines. This post-test will also contain a survey
regarding the likeliness of learners to enforce this
knowledge in their work environment. Questions will
inquire of the learners likeliness to enforce students
choice of reimbursable trays and confidence in each
individuals knowledge of the offer versus serve
guidelines. 80% of the participants will be expected to pass
the post test with an 80% score or higher.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

IV.

73

Materials/Media (5 points) (attach a sample)

Projector

Dry Erase Board

Small Prizes

Screen

Markers

Tables

Tray component Sheet

Chairs

Pencils

Steps 4/5: Management System


Budget
Budget justificationfor each item in the budget,
complete a narrative explaining the rationale for

Budget (see below)


The two large plastic bowls will act as hand sinks for the teacher and the class volunteer to use during the hand
washing demonstration. The ducky soap dispenser will be used by the teacher and volunteer during the hand

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


the item(s)

Potential funding sourceswrite a summary of


the type of funding that is required to achieve the
goals and objectives of your project

Grant application/description

74

washing demonstration to pump the imaginary soap. The paper towels will be used by the teacher and
volunteer to dry their hands at the end of the demonstration. The thermometer will be used to show the class
how to properly use the thermometer. The white boards and markers will be used for the OVS Trivia game.
Participants will be divided into groups and each group will get one white board and one marker to write the
answers to the questions for the trivia game. The plate activity sheets will be used for audience members to
label a tray that meets OVS guidelines. The hand washing handout and food safety handout will be used as
reference materials for the audience. The pre- and post-tests will be used to assess the knowledge of the
audience before and after the presentation to determine if the presentation is effective. The pens will be used
for the audience to fill out the pre- and post-assessments. The salaries for the Child Nutrition Director,
Assistant Child Nutrition Director, and foodservice employees will be for their time spent during the
presentation. The mileage encompasses travel costs for the teachers (interns) to the Pascagoula School District
Central Office. The refreshments and cookies will be snacks for the audience. The candy will be given out as
prizes to audience members who volunteer during the presentation and to the winning team of the OVS Trivia
Game. The office space rental will secure the appropriate location for the presentation at the Pascagoula
School District Central Office. The utilities will include the electricity and air conditioning during the
presentation to allow for a comfortable, well lit environment.
Because the goals and objectives of this project concern food safety and offer versus serve at a school district
participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the National School Breakfast Program
(NSBP), possible funding sources would be food companies and the United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA) who are interested in promoting healthy, balanced school lunch meals that resemble the MyPlate
model. The Champions for Healthy Kids Grant from the General Mills Foundation awards grants to
organizations that promote healthy nutrition and physical activity for children and their parents. The goal of
the foundation is to bridge communication between registered dietitians and students to encourage healthy
eating and physical activity behaviors in children ages two to eighteen.
Attach

Sample Budget
Expenses
Salaries and wages (list specific positions below)
(Average wage for 4 hours
Child Nutrition Director
based on salary)

$255.00

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Assistant Child Nutrition Director


Employees (87)

75
(Average wage for 4 hours
based on salary)
$29/each (4 hours @
$7.25/hr)

$215.00
$2,523.00

Travel
Air fare
Mileage (total miles X
$.55)
Hotels
Meals
Other ground transportation
Equipment and supplies (list items below)
White Boards
10
Markers
5 packs
Pens
4 packs
Bowls
2
Ducky Soap Dispenser
1
Thermometer (lent item)
1
Paper Towels
1
Education Materials (list items below)
Pre and Post Tests
600 copies
Plate Activity Sheets
200 copies
Hand washing Handout
100 copies
Food Safety Handout
100 copies
Miscellaneous Costs
Refreshments and Cookies
Candy
Office Space Rental
Utilities
Other indirect costs

$141.02

$10.00
$5.00
$4.00
$2.00
$1.00
$0.00
$1.00
$8.00
$2.66
$1.33
$1.33

$30.00
$5.00
$249
$4.71
$0.00

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Total Expenses

76

$3,459.05

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

Champions for Healthy Kids Grant Application


Note:
Only online applications will be accepted. Visit www.eatright.org/foundation/championgrants
to access the grant application and learn more about previously funded programs. Online
applications are due Friday, January 23, 2015 at 5pmCST.

Eligibility Quiz
Does your organization refrain from discrimination in its provision of service, in particular along
lines of race, color, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability,
physical appearance, national origin, language, educational background, and veteran status?
(Select Yes, we affirm the policy or No, we do not affirm the policy)
Select One:
Yes
No
<next page>

Before You Begin


Championsfor Healthy KidsProgramOverview
For more than a decade, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation and the
General Mills Foundation have partnered to improve youth nutrition and physical activity
behaviors across the country. The goal of the Champions grants program is to encourage
communities in the United States to partner with Registered Dietitian Nutritionists to
improve the eating and physical activity patterns of youth, ages 2-18. Using a competitive
process, fifty grants of $20,000 each will be awarded to non-profit organizations working
with/in communities that demonstrate the greatest need and likelihood of sustainable
impact on youth nutrition and physical activity behaviors through effective programming
resulting in positive outcomes.
Important Tips:
Applications must be submitted by Friday, January 23, 2015 at 5pm Central Standard
Time.
Internet Explorer is the preferred browser for this online application.
Limit your use of bullets and other formatting.
It is highly recommended to utilize the Guide for Effective Nutrition Interventions and
Education (GENIE) as a tool to help strengthen your application. You can access GENIE
here sm.eatright.org/GENIE.
Log into your account here to access saved and submitted applications. Please save this
link to your web browser for easy access.
Add mail@grantapplication.com to your safe senders list to ensure you receive all
system communications.

77

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

78

Step 6: Implement the Intervention


Content Area
Course/Session
Title(s)List the
titles for the
overall HPE
project and the
titles for each
individual session

Proposed Intervention (Copy from Step 3)


Power and Performance: Winners
Work is the title for the overall HPE
project.
Individual Presentation Topics:

Sanitizing & Temperatures


Healthy Eating with Offer
Versus Serve
OVS Trivia
Hand washing, Cross
Contamination Prevention, and
Food Allergies

Actual Intervention
Power and Performance:
Winners Work is the title for the
overall HPE project.
Individual Presentation Topics:

Proposed date(s)
and timeframe for
implementation of
the intervention

January 23- begin distributing


promotional materials to all school
cafeterias
send email to key informants to send to
cafeteria managers informing employees
of meetings
January 30- send a second email to key
informants to send to cafeteria managers
informing employees of meetings
February 6th-send an email to key
informants to send to cafeteria managers
informing employees of the first
meeting that afternoon
February 13- send an email to key
informants to send to cafeteria managers
informing employees of meeting that
afternoon
February 20- send an email to key

Hand washing, Cross


Contamination
Prevention, and Food
Allergies
Sanitizing & Temperatures
Healthy Eating with
Offer Versus Serve
OVS Trivia

December 17- Two interns visited


1 elementary school and 1 high
school cafeteria to observe
cafeteria staff and managers.

- Pre-intervention
survey distributed to all
school cafeteria managers
in the district via mail
currier
December 17 January 6 Preintervention survey collected
between these dates
January 6- 7:30am- 11:30am Power and Performance: Winners
Work Inservice 1

- 12:00pm- 4:00pm
Power and Performance:

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


informants to send to cafeteria
managers informing employees of
meeting that afternoon

79
Winners Work Inservice 2
- All PreIntervention Surveys were
due/collected on this date
February 20- Post-Intervention
survey distributed to managers at
each school via mail curriers
March 20- Two interns visit 1
elementary school and 1 high
school cafeteria to observe
cafeteria staff and managers.

- Post-intervention
survey due/collected on
this date
Proposed activities
for EACH session

Lesson 1 Proposed Activities:


An interactive activity at the opening
session will require one volunteer to
place the steps to clean and sanitize in
order and ask the audience if they agree
or disagree with the volunteers order. A
PowerPoint presentation will be used to
improve knowledge of food safety
workers. Quick Reviews throughout the
presentation will incorporate audience
participation and reiterate main points
by testing their knowledge. Participants
will also have to take a post-test at the
end of the session.
Lesson 2 Proposed Activities:
The lesson will begin with a few
interactive questions to engage the

Lesson 1 Actual Activity 1:


Hand Washing Demo
A volunteer from the audience
was asked to come up to the front
of the room and demonstrate with
the teacher proper hand washing
procedure. There was no sink
available in the conference room,
so the teacher used two large
bowls, one empty soap dispenser,
and paper towels to act out the
procedure with the volunteer,
while asking the audience the
appropriate steps throughout the
activity. For the third step, the
audience was asked to sing the
Happy Birthday Song two
times to demonstrate how long to

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


audience and help the learners
personally relate to the lesson being
taught. The instructor will ask the
audience to raise their hand if they have
kids or have kids in their lives that they
care a lot about. Learners will then be
asked if they want said kids to be happy
and healthy. Learners will then be
shown the picture of MyPlate examples
and asked to raise their hand if their
childs meals always look similar to
these pictures. This introduction will
initiate the discussion that fruit and
vegetable intake is often difficult for
school aged children.
Learners will be shown a short video
detailing some national statistics on
childhood obesity. Instructor will
discuss the five food groups and why a
varied diet containing appropriate
servings from each food group and a
variety of food items is important for
children to meet nutritional needs.
Photos will then be shown of unhealthy
breakfast and lunch meals and the
number of servings from each food
group. These photos will illustrate that
unhealthy breakfasts and lunches make
meeting the recommended serving size
for fruits and vegetables nearly
impossible.
This will transition into discussing the
importance of the offer versus serve

80
scrub hands. The teacher then
thanked the volunteer for their
participation.
Lesson 1 Actual Activity 2:
Cross-Contamination
Identification
A video was shown of an
individual who did not take any
precautions in the kitchen to
prevent cross-contamination. The
teacher paused the video about
three times and asked the
audience what the individual did
wrong. Then, the teacher
discussed with the audience what
the person should have done
instead to prevent crosscontamination.
Lesson 2 Actual Activity:
An interactive activity at the
opening session required one
volunteer to place the steps to
clean and sanitize in order and the
audience was asked if they agreed
or disagreed with the volunteers
order. A PowerPoint presentation
will be used to improve
knowledge of food safety
workers. The PowerPoint
discussed how and when to clean
and sanitize food and non-food

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


program. The instructor will discuss
how offer versus serve allows students
to select their meal components instead
of making all meal components
necessary for reimbursement. By
allowing the students to choose what
they prefer or what they think they will
eat, this will cut down on food waste.
Although students may select their
components, they must select items
from at least three of the five groups for
reimbursement. The students meal must
also contain at least one serving (1/2
cup) of fruit, fruit juice, vegetables, or
combined fruit and vegetable to qualify
for reimbursement. Multiple foods in
each food group may be offered, with
the condition that students may select up
to two items from this food group.
However, this reinforces the need for
foodservice workers to recognize what
food groups each item falls under and
whether or not the meal qualifies for
reimbursement.
The lesson will conclude with a choose
this, not that game. Participants will be
asked to recall the child or children they
thought of at the beginning of the
lesson, and then select which meal
(between two options) they would prefer
their child choose. Participants will be
asked to call out A or B. Each plate will
be discussed briefly regarding

81
surfaces along with temperatures
including the danger zone, proper
cooling, reheating, and cooking
temperatures, and when
temperatures should be taken.
Quick Reviews throughout the
presentation incorporated
audience participation and
reiterated main points by testing
participants knowledge.
Participants completed a post-test
at the end of the session.

Lesson 3 Actual Activities: The


instructor asked the audience to
raise their hand if they have kids
or have kids in their lives that
they care a lot about and if they
want these kids to be happy and
healthy. Learners were then
shown pictures of MyPlate
examples and asked to raise their
hand if their childs meals always

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


nutritional content and food groups.
Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 1:
A trivia spin-off game will be played
to assess the learners ability to
demonstrate principles learned in the
previous lesson pertaining to OVS and
the learners ability to recognize and
create trays that are considered
reimbursable. Each round will serve as a
round of trivia, and the group with the
most points at the end of the game will
receive a small prize. The learners will
be asked to sit at the tables in groups of
6. A dry erase board and marker will be
given to each group. Each group will
work as a team to do each assignment.
After each question is asked, the group
will have 30 seconds to come up with an
answer. The questions will be displayed
on a projector at the front of the room.
The interns and key informants will
walk around the room to check the
answers of each team for correctness.
After the interns and key informants
check each question, the answer will be
shared and discussed with the group.
Round 1: Principles of OVS
Questions:
1.
Write out the 5 food groups used
in offer versus serve.
2.
Give an example food in each

82
look similar to these pictures.
This facilitated a discussion of
common diets of school-aged
children.
Learners were then shown a
short video detailing some
national statistics on childhood
obesity. The instructor discussed
the five food groups and why a
varied diet containing appropriate
servings from each food group
and a variety of food items is
important for children to meet
nutritional needs. Photos were
shown of unhealthy breakfast and
lunch meals and the number of
servings the meal contributes
from each food group. These
photos illustrated that unhealthy
breakfasts and lunches make
meeting the recommended
serving size for fruits and
vegetables nearly impossible.
The speaker then transitioned
into discussing the importance of
the offer versus serve program.
The instructor discussed how
offer versus serve allows
students to select their meal
components instead of making all
meal components necessary for
reimbursement.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


food group.
3.
What are the minimum and
maximum number of selections a child
can put on their plate during a meal?
4.
If a student chooses only 3
components, what component MUST be
on their tray? What is the serving size of
that component?
5.
By allowing students to choose
the items on their tray, what element is
reduced? Or what does OVS prevent?

83
The lesson concluded with a few
examples of school breakfast and
lunch meals. The participants
were asked to determine if these
meals contained the necessary
components for reimbursement.
The justification for
reimbursement was discussed for
each picture, providing an
opportunity for questions prior to
the following activity.

Round 2: Combination dishes in OVS


Questions:
1.
What food groups are found in a
taco (like the one on the screen)?
2.
Name a dish that contains more
than 1 food group.
3.
Name a dish that contains both a
fruit and grain component.
4.
What food groups are found in a
fruit and yogurt parfait?
5.
If a student chooses a dish that
contains cup of vegetables in a mixed
dish, does that student still need to select
another item with either fruit or
Lesson 4 OVS Trivia Actual
vegetables?
Activity 1:
Each participant received a piece
Round 3: Identify the reimbursable meal
of paper with a 5-component tray
Questions: For each question here, the
picture on it. In order to assess
food items on 3 trays will be listed, but
each participants understanding of
only 1 will contain the correct
what a reimbursable OVS tray
components of a reimbursable meal.
looks like, each participant was

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


Learners will have to write 1, 2, or 3 to
show which tray they choose as the
reimbursable tray.
Round 4: Whats missing?
Questions: Each question in this round
will list the items on a tray and the
learners will have to identify what food
group is missing and what item they can
offer the child.
Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 2: Hand
Washing Demo
Ask for a volunteer from the audience to
come up to the front of the class and
demonstrate with the teacher proper
hand washing procedure. If there is no
sink available, use two large bowls, two
empty soap dispensers, and paper towels
and act out the procedure. Thank them
for their participation.

84
asked to write/draw a meal that
meets the OVS guidelines for a
reimbursable meal. Participants
were given 5 minutes to
write/draw on their papers. After
the allotted time, 3 participants
were asked to share what foods
they wrote/drew on their tray. All
participants that shared chose
meals that fit OVS guidelines.
Participants were asked to write
the name of their school on their
paper for data collection
purposes. Each piece of paper
was then collected as data.

Lesson 4 OVS Trivia Actual


Activity 2:
A trivia spin-off game was
played to assess the learners
ability to demonstrate principles
learned in the previous lesson
Lesson 3 Proposed Activity 3: Crosspertaining to OVS and the
Contamination Identification
learners ability to recognize and
Show a video of a foodservice worker
create trays that are considered
who does not take any precautions in the reimbursable. Each round served
kitchen to prevent cross-contamination. as a round of trivia, and the
After the video ends, ask audience what group with the most points at the
that individual did wrong. Then discuss end of the game received a small
what the person should have done
prize. The learners were asked to
instead to prevent cross-contamination.
sit at the tables in groups of 6. A
dry erase board and marker was
given to each group. Each group

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

85
worked as a team to do each
assignment. After each question
was asked, the group had 30
seconds to come up with an
answer. The questions were
displayed on a projector at the
front of the room. The interns and
key informants walked around the
room to check the answers of
each team for correctness. After
the interns and key informants
checked each question, the
answer was shared and discussed
with the group. The following are
the questions for each round.
Round 1: Principles of OVS
(Write our the answer to each
question on the dry erase board)
Questions:
1.
Write out the 5 food
groups used in offer versus serve.
2.
Give an example food in
each food group.
3.
What are the minimum
and maximum number of
COMPONENTS a child can put
on their plate during a meal?
4.
If a student chooses only 3
components, what component
MUST be on their tray?
5.
By allowing students to
choose the items on their tray,

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86
what element is reduced? Or what
does OVS prevent?
Round 2: Choose which tray is
correct
1. Tray 1- Water, roll, macaroni
and cheese
Tray 2- Entre salad, milk
Tray 3 Roll, macaroni and
cheese, milk
2. Tray 1- Peaches, Mixed
vegetables, milk, taco
Tray 2- Taco, Milk, pudding
Tray 3- Taco, Spanish rice,
milk, pudding
3. Tray 1- Roll, ranch baked
chicken, milk
Tray 2- Green beans, ranch
baked chicken, milk
Tray 3- Ranch baked chicken,
pudding, roll, milk
4. Tray 1- French fries, milk
Tray 2- BBQ sandwich, milk
Tray 3- BBQ chicken
sandwich, French fries, milk
5. Tray 1- Chicken spaghetti,
Texas toast, glazed carrots,
pudding
Tray 2- chicken spaghetti,
Texas toast, pudding
Tray 3- Texas toast, glazed
carrots, pudding

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87
Round 3: Whats missing?
(If a tray is missing a component,
write a food you would suggest to
the child to complete the tray.)
1. turkey wrap, ranch
dressing, chips, milk
2. chicken nuggets, mashed
potatoes and gravy
3. soft taco, Spanish rice
4. fish nuggets, roll, milk,
apple

Assessment plan
for EACH session

Lesson 1 Assessment:
Informal: This will be assessed through
observation of participants engagement
in the session, volunteering for the
activity, and answering the quick
reviews.
Formal: The formal assessment will be a
post-test that will be taken at the end of
the session. The questions will assess
participants knowledge of the material
presented in the session. Questions
included in the assessment pertain to the
temperature danger zone; the proper
steps in cleaning and sanitizing; and
proper internal temperatures.
Lesson 2 Assessment:
Informal- Engagement and participation
during lesson by show of hands,
nodding, answering questions. The

Lesson 1 Assessment:
Informal: During the presentation,
the audience was asked when
should people wash their hands
and what are the five steps to
proper hand washing.
Formal: Before the presentation
and at the end of the presentation,
the audience was asked to
complete a pre-assessment and a
post-assessment:
1. Please identify the 5 steps of
proper hand washing:
a. Lather, rinse, dry
b. Wet, lather, scrub for 20
seconds, rinse, air dry
c. Sanitize and rinse
d. Wet, lather, scrub for 10
seconds, rinse, air dry

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


closing activity will also assess whether
or not learners have gained a basic
understanding of the food groups and
reimbursable meals.
Formal-The formal assessment will be
conducted by a post-test following the
final lesson. This post test will ask
questions regarding simple child
nutrition and offer versus serve
guidelines. This post-test will also
contain a survey regarding the likeliness
of learners to practice this knowledge in
their work environment. Questions will
inquire of the learners likeliness to
encourage fruit and vegetable
consumption and confidence in each
individuals knowledge of the offer
versus serve guidelines. 80% of the
participants will be expected to pass the
post test with an 80% score or higher.
1. True/False: According to MyPlate,
half of your plate should be filled with
whole grains.
2. School age children need how many
servings of vegetables per day?
a. 1-2
b. 2-3
c. 3-5
d. 6-7
3. True/False: The recommended

88

2. Jill is getting ready to prepare a


chicken Cobb salad. Please
identify one way Jill can prevent
cross-contamination:
a. Prepare the salad and
raw chicken on opposite
ends of the cutting
board.
b. Prepare the raw
chicken first on the cutting board,
and then chop the
ingredients for the salad on the
cutting board.
c. Use two separate,
color-coded cutting boards for
the raw chicken and
the salad ingredients.
d. Rinse the cutting board
after prepping the raw
chicken and before
prepping the salad.
3. Please identify two common
allergens in food:

Lesson 2 Assessment:
Informal: This was assessed
through observation of
participants engagement in the
session, when participants
volunteer for the activity, and

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


servings of fruits and vegetables can
easily be met in the dinner meal alone.
4. How likely are you to encourage fruit
and vegetable intake to the students in
the school cafeteria?
Not Likely
Somewhat Likely
Very likely
Undecided
5. Which of the following is NOT true
of offer versus serve?
a. Students are required to choose at
least one serving (or cup) of fruit,
fruit juice, and/or
vegetables.
b. Offer versus serve helps to prevent
waste by allowing students to choose
which items they prefer.
c. Students must select at least one item
from all five food groups for a
reimbursable meal.
d. Students may select up to two items
from one food group as long as the meal
has items from at least three food
groups.
6. Which of the following represents
your feelings regarding the following
statement? The offer versus serve
guidelines are important for promoting

89
when participants answered
the quick reviews.
Formal: The formal assessment
was a post-test that was taken at
the end of the session. The
questions assessed participants
knowledge of the material
presented in the session.
Questions included in the
assessment pertain to the
temperature danger zone; the
proper steps in cleaning and
sanitizing; and proper internal
temperatures. The following are
the questions that were included
in the assessment:
True or False

9. _____ A whole turkey


should be cooked to a
minimum internal cooking
temperature of 165 F for
15 seconds.
10. _____ Hamburger patties
should be cooked to a
minimum internal cooking
temperature of 135F for
15 seconds.
11. _____ A steak should be
cooked to a minimal

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


nutritious school meals.
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
Lesson 3, Part 1 Assessment:
Informal- The learners participation in
the opening activity as well as the
answers to the questions in the activity
will allow the intern to asses how much
the learners have learned throughout the
intervention.
Formal- The formal assessment will be
conducted by a post-test following the
final lesson. This post-test will ask
situational questions and questions
regarding offer versus serve guidelines.
This post-test will also contain a survey
regarding the likeliness of learners to
enforce this knowledge in their work
environment. Questions will inquire of
the learners likeliness to enforce
students choice of reimbursable trays
and confidence in each individuals
knowledge of the offer versus serve
guidelines. 80% of the participants will
be expected to pass the post test with an
80% score or higher.
Lesson 3, Part 2 Assessment:
Informal - Ask questions at the end of
the presentation to check audiences

90
internal temperature of
155F for at least 15
seconds.
12. _____ Time-temperature
abuse can occur when
food is cooked to the
proper minimum internal
temperature.
Place the steps in order:

_____ Scrape or remove food


_____ Allow surface to air dry
_____ Rinse the surface
_____ Wash the surface
_____ Sanitize the surface
Multiple Choice:

8. _____ Water in the sink


used for washing should
be replaced when
a. it feels too hot
b. it becomes dirty
c. the water level is
at the top of the
sink
d. it is diluted with
bleach

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


comprehension.
Formal - Ask audience to complete a
three-question, short answer quiz. The
questions are as follows:
Please list the five steps of proper
handwashing.
Please describe two ways to prevent
cross-contamination.
Please identify four common allergens
in food.

91

9. _____ Chicken should be


cooked to an internal
temperature of
a. 135 F for 15
seconds
b. 155 F for 15
seconds
c. 165 F for 15
seconds
d. 145 F for 15
seconds
10. What is the temperature
danger zone?
a. 41 F to 135 F
b. 41 F to 0 F
c. 30 F to 40 F
d. 140 F to 165 F
11. Time temperature abuse
can occur with all of the
following EXCEPT:
a. Food is not
cooked to proper
minimum internal
temperature
b. Food is not held at
proper temperature
c. Food is cooled or
reheated

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

92
inappropriately
d. Food temperature
is held outside of
the danger zone
Fill in the blank

7. What is one way to avoid


time-temperature abuse?
_____________________
__
8. What temperature should
the water be when
thawing foods?
__________________
9. How many hours do you
have total to cool TCS
food from 135 F to 41
F?
____________________
Lesson 3 OVS Actual
Assessment:
1. True/False: According to
MyPlate, half of your plate should
be filled with whole grains.

2. School age children need how


many servings of vegetables per
day?

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

93
a. 1-2
b. 2-3
c. 3-5
d. 6-7

3. True/False: The
recommended servings of fruits
and vegetables can easily be met
in the dinner meal alone.

4. How likely are you to


encourage fruit and vegetable
intake to the students in the
school cafeteria?
Not Likely
Somewhat Likely
Very likely
Undecided

5. Circle the meal that meets the


OVS guidelines?

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94

6. Which of the following


represents your feelings
regarding the following
statement? The offer versus
serve guidelines are important for
promoting nutritious school
meals.
Strongly Disagree Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree

Lesson 4 OVS Trivia Actual


Assessment:
Informal- The learners
participation in the trivia game

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

95
activity as well as the answers to
the questions in the activity
allowed the intern to assess how
much the participants learned
throughout the intervention.
Formal- The formal assessment
was conducted through the paper
trays and through accuracy of
group answers in the trivia game.
90% of the participants were
expected to write/dray the correct
components of an OVS meal on
the paper tray. It was expected
that each group of participants
would be able to answer 80% of
the questions in the trivia game
correctly. Results from the
assessment are still pending.

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96

Step 7: Evaluate the Intervention


Step 7: Evaluate the Intervention
What were your original goals and objectives for your education session? (list below)
Goal 1
Objective 1a.

Promote food safety knowledge and behaviors.


Improve food safety knowledge of foodservice employees according to a 10% improvement between pretest and post-test scores on food safety knowledge assessments.
Improve foodservice safety behaviors in foodservice employees by documentation of an observed 10%
increase in proper food safety behaviors through food safety behavior assessment.
Improve compliance with OVS policies through increasing knowledge of importance of OVS policies.
Ensure that 80% of employees have the ability to recognize and enforce that a students meal tray has all
necessary components of a reimbursable meal.
Following the intervention, 90% of employees will score 80% or higher on the OVS post-test assessment.

Objective 1b.
Goal 2
Objective 2a.
Objective 2b.

Briefly describe how you used these to develop your intervention evaluation.
In the evaluation of our intervention, we used the goals and measurable objectives to assess if our intervention had the intended outcomes. The
success of our first goal to promote food safety knowledge and behaviors was determined by comparing our results to objectives 1a and 1b listed
above. A 10% improvement in scores and an observed 10% increase in food safety behaviors would imply a successful intervention. The success
of our second goal to improve compliance with OVS policies through increasing knowledge of importance of OVS policies was determined by
comparing our results to objectives 2a and 2b. If 80% of employees had the ability to recognize and enforce that a students meal tray has all
necessary components of a reimbursable meal and if 90% of employees score 80% or higher on the OVS post-test assessment, then the intervention would
be considered successful in accomplishing the goal.

Actual data collection:


What data did you actually monitor as
part of the intervention?
Learner knowledge regarding hand
washing
Learner knowledge regarding cross

How was the data collected?


You MUST provide copies of the actual data
collection instruments/evaluation forms.
Pre/Post Assessment (attached)a

What were the Results (please attach copies of the actual data that were collected)?
Descriptive data (i.e. means, standard deviations, percentages, etc.)
See below

Pre/Post Assessment (attached) a

See below

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


contamination prevention
Learner knowledge regarding food
allergies
Learner knowledge regarding food
safety
Learner knowledge of proper
temperatures and sanitation steps.
Learner knowledge regarding child
nutrition offer versus serve (OVS)
Manager observation of employee
compliance with food service safety
and OVS guidelines.
a

97

Pre/Post Assessment (attached) a

See below

Pre/Post Assessment (attached)b

See below

Pre/Post Assessment (attached) b

See below

Pre/Post Assessment (attached)

See below

Pre/Post Evaluation (attached)

See below

These assessments are combined


These assessments are combined
*All pre/post-assessments were the same before and after the inservice. Refer to Step Three for copies of pre/post-assessments.
b

Results of pre/post assessment

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

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99

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100

Data Collection tool for pre/post-survey of manager observations

SCHOOL/MANAGER____________________________
Please complete ASAP and return before holiday. Fill this out honestly, as it will not affect you in
any way but help us with training.
*In each category, please mark the box that represents how
YOUR STAFF, as a whole, follows proper food safety techniques in the following areas without you
intervening:
Task
Clean/Sanitize any surface that touches food
Clean & Sanitize using proper steps and
equipment
Uses a three-compartment sink properly.
Take temperatures of ALL foods cooked AND
served that day- (including documenting prep,
serving, and cooling temperatures)
Cooks food to proper minimal internal
temperature (is knowledgeable of the temperature
food should be)
Thaws food separated from ready-to-eat foods in
the cooler or thaws under running, draining water
in food prep sink
Cools food down in smaller pans- moves
temperature to 70 degrees within 2 hours

Every time

Most of
the time

Rarely

Never

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101

Reheats leftovers to 165 degrees and documents


on log that day serving
Washes hands to the length of the happy birthday
song
Washes hands at appropriate times
Changes soiled gloves at appropriate times

*Are there any other areas (concerning food safety) in which you feel your staff are not properly
following proper food safety techniques?
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________
*Please indicate using a 1-5 scale how well you feel your employees understand and enforce Offer
Versus Serve (OVS) guidelines with:
1 being- NO, DOES NOT DO WELL
5 being- YES, DOES VERY WELL
1. ALL of my employees are able to identify in which food group each item on the menu belongs (ex: mashed
potatoes/French fries is a vegetable, chicken nuggets is a meat, macaroni and cheese is a grain)
1

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

102

2. ALL of my employees are able to identify a missing component on a tray (example- if child didnt get fruit or
vegetable OR 3 components)
1

3. ALL my SERVERS say something to a child if they are missing a required meal component
1

4. ALL my CASHIERS say something to a child if they are missing a required meal component
1

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT


Results from pre/post manager observation surveys

103

HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION PROJECT

104

Discussion of Results
According to the data collected from the pre- and post-assessments, the healthy eating with offer versus serve greatly
improved the learners knowledge. Average scores improved from 55% to 65% between pre- and post-assessments. These results meet
the proposed objectives including improvement of at least 10% following the implementation of the lesson. Participants who answered
100% of questions correctly increased from 5% to 23% between pre- and post-test results; those who answered 75% of the questions
correctly improved from 26% to 31%. Also, participants who did not answer any questions correctly decreased from 6% to 1%
between pre-and post-test results.
Opinions also changed regarding child nutrition and the importance of the offer versus serve guidelines following the
presentation of the lesson. Individuals who reported that they would be very likely to encourage fruit and vegetable intake in the
cafeteria increased from 92% to 96% following the lesson. Individuals who reportedly strongly agree that offer versus serve
guidelines are important for promoting nutrition school meals increased from 41% to 48% following the lesson presentation. These
results support that the healthy eating with offer versus serve lesson improved participants knowledge and opinions on the
importance of these principles.
Conclusion
One recommendation to improve this program would include the simplification of pre- and post-assessments. According to
audience feedback from comments and body language, it appeared that participants became frustrated with the length of the questions
and quizzes. Assessments were also read aloud to participants to ensure all participants could comprehend the questions; while this

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105

was necessary to eliminate the risk of reading difficulties with participants, this action was time consuming and frustrating for many
participants. To improve this portion of the program in the future, assessments should be simplified to four questions per topic. While
this would decrease the amount of knowledge tested and data collected, this would possibly improve results by decreasing the chance
of participants rushing through the assessments.
Condensing the quizzes to four questions per quiz would also simplify the data collection and interpretation of the data.
Because results were analyzed in increments of 25%, individual results and improvement scores could have been analyzed further.
This also would have equally weighted each quiz, therefore more evenly distribute scores of individuals quizzes and topics.
Prior to beginning the program in the future, objectives may need to be altered or simplified. More uniform objectives should
be developed for each individual lesson for easier interpretation following data collection. If quizzes were simplified to four questions
and analyzed at 25% increments, objectives should also be simplified to align with these results. For example, objectives would reflect
a score of 75% as the passing rate; therefore, the objective may seek for 80% of participants to pass with a score of 75% on each
assessment or quiz.
According to the improvement in pre- and post-test results and the interaction and participation from the audience, this
program appears to be overall successful in improving foodservice knowledge regarding hand washing and food safety, sanitizing and
temperatures, and offer versus serve. Participants were very involved in each lesson, interacting with the presenter and providing
positive feedback throughout the lessons. Similar programs are conducted each year to ensure that participants have sufficient
knowledge in foodservice practices and guidelines. According to participant comments and manager feedback following the lesson,

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106

the participants reported enjoying this program more than the previous lessons. Similar programs may be employed in the future to
provide a fun and engaging environment for school foodservice training.
All newly hired foodservice workers should receive immediate food safety training, especially due to the high turnover rate in
the foodservice industry. With a constant influx of new employees, there should be food safety policies and procedures in place to
ensure adequate and continued training of all workers. Training should not solely be focused on how to practice food safety, but also
why to practice food safety. Employee understanding of the harmful consequences of poor food safety may increase their likeliness to
follow food safety practices.

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Appendix

Promotion Flyer

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