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Fundamental of Momentum

Transport
Lecturer : Dr. Tantular Nurtono

presentation. Ali Altway. Ed. Prentice Hall. Wilson. SugengWinardi. Heat and Mass Transfer. Wicks. . Charles E. assignment. Christie John Geankoplis . 5th. Rorrer. Proses Perpindahan. Gregory L. 2012. and Robert E. Transport Processes and Separation Process Principles (Includes Unit Operations).4th. : James Welty. ITS Press. Fundamentals of Momentum. Heru Setyawan. Wiley. Ed. (2007). (2003).Course description  3 credits :  2 credits (tutorial)  1 credit (exercise)  Duration  Evaluations  Reference : 1 session (100 minutes)/week : 1 session (100 minutes)/week : 16 weeks : quiz.

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 Topics :               concept of momentum transfer fluid statics description of a fluid in motion Conservation of Mass: Control-Volume Approach Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Control-Volume Approach Conservation of Energy: Control-Volume Approach Shear Stress in Laminar Flow Analysis of a Differential Fluid Element in Laminar Flow Differential Equations of Fluid Flow Inviscid Fluid Flow Dimensional Analysis and Similitude Viscous Flow Flow in Closed Conduits Fluid Machinery .Course description  Aims : to obtain a basic understanding of the transport process of momentum transfer.

Course Schedule of 2014 Week Date Topic Reference 1 8/9 + 10/9 Introduction to momentum transfer Chapter 1 2 15/9 + 17/9 Fluid statics Chapter 2 3 22/9 + 24/9 Description of a fluid in motion Chapter 3 4 29/9 + 1/10 Conservation of Mass: Control-Volume Approach Chapter 4 5 6/10 + 8/10 Quiz 1 6 13/10 + 15/10 Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Control-Volume Approach Chapter 5 7 20/10 + 22/10 Conservation of Energy: Control-Volume Approach Chapter 6 8 27/10 + 29/10 Shear Stress in Laminar Flow Chapter 7 9 1/11 + 3/11 Analysis of a Differential Fluid Element in Laminar Flow Chapter 8 .

Course Schedule of 2014 Week Date 10 11 8/11 + 10/11 15/11 + 17/11 Differential Equations of Fluid Flow Inviscid Fluid Flow 12 22/11 + 24/11 Quiz 2 13 14 15 16 29/11 + 1/12 6/11 + 8/12 13/11 + 15/11 20/11 + 22/11 Dimensional Analysis and Similitude Viscous Flow Flow in Closed Conduits Fluid Machinery 17 Topic Evaluation and Result Reference Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13 Chapter 14 .

and bioe-ngineering. biological materials is overlapping more and more with the other processing-engineering fields of ceramic engineering. .Introduction  The field of chemical engineering involved with physical and physical-chemical changes of inorganic and organic materials and.  Momentum transfer in a fluid involves the study of the motion of fluids and the forces that produce these motions. process metallurgy. wastewater-treatment (civil) engineering. heat and mass transport and the separation processes are widely used in these processing fields.  The principles of momentum. to some extent. etc. agricultural food engineering.

FLUIDS AND THE CONTINUUM  A fluid is defined as a substance that deforms continuously under the action of a shear stress. PROPERTIES AT A POINT  When a fluid is in motion. the quantities associated with the state and the motion of the fluid will vary from point to point. there can be no shear stresses. .  An important consequence of this definition is that when a fluid is at rest.  Both liquids and gases are fluids.  Most engineering work is concerned with the macroscopic or bulk behavior of a fluid rather than with the microscopic or molecular behavior. In most cases it is convenient to think of a fluid as a continuous distribution of matter or a continuum.

The density. the density may vary greatly throughout the fluid. The density of a fluid is defined as the mass per unit volume. particularly in gases. Under flow conditions. at a particular point in the fluid is defined as ∆𝑚 𝜌 = lim ∆𝑉→𝛿𝑉 ∆𝑉  where m is the mass contained in a volume V. and V is the smallest volume surrounding the point for which statistical averages are meaningful. r. . Density at a Point.

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∆𝐹𝑛 ∆𝐹𝑠 𝜎𝑖𝑖 = lim ∆𝐴 𝜏𝑖𝑗 = lim ∆𝐴 ∆𝐴→𝛿𝐴 ∆𝐴→𝛿𝐴 . Stress at a Point. The force per unit area or stress at a point is defined as the limit of F/A as AA where A is the smallest area for which statistical averages are meaningful.2.  The force F is resolved into components normal and parallel to the surface of the element. Consider the force F acting on an element A of the body shown in Figure 1.

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for example. gravity and electrostatic forces.  surface forces.  Body forces are those which act without physical contact. As a surface is required for the action of these forces they are called surface forces. .  On the contrary. Forces acting on a fluid are divided into two general groups:  body forces. pressure and frictional forces require physical contact for transmission.