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Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families

STANDING TOGETHER FOR ISRAEL page 6


TENAFLY SINGER CHANNELS YEMENITE ROOTS page 10
RENOVATING ROCKLANDS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM page 44
FLIX AND MEIRA CHARTS NEW GROUND page 55

Happy Birthday, Baby!


A Toast to Mothers Day
& Much More

Supplement to The Jewish Standard May 2015

APRIL 24, 2015


VOL. LXXXIV NO. 31 $1.00

IN THIS ISSUE

NORTH JERSEY

84

2015

JSTANDARD.COM

Mr. Krugs
amazing
journey
How this local man survived a Siberian labor camp,
learned Chinese, joined the Flying Tigers, worked for
Simon Wiesenthal, and spent the last 25 years
volunteering at Holy Name Medical Center
page 30

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Lchaim!
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Page 3
Hey! Whose logo is that?
and left tropes of the Democratic party.
The usual critics, however, did not seem
to notice that the logo shares an awful
lot with Hadassahs new logo, which was
unveiled in January.
The logos share the capital letter H,
the red and blue color scheme, and an
angular, geometric style.
Hillarys logo does not incorporate the
Hebrew letter hey, although Hadassahs
does. Is she taking the Jewish vote for
granted?

l Critics love to nitpick Hillary Clintons

personal and policy choices, as they have


during the recent email scandal and the
Benghazi kerfuffle.
This time, however, the critics may have
a substantial case against her.
As soon as Clintons campaign was
launched, her logo was lampooned from
all sides. Some called it too simple, others
thought it looked too corporate.
Some were just confused that it features a red arrow pointing to the right
a feature that seems to contrast the blue

Gabe Friedman / JTA Wire Service

A state of happy,
non-religious pessimists
l How does Israel stack up religious-

The nano Tanach


l Around here, the Russell Berrie Foun-

dation is associated with big things.


In Israel, however, it is associated with
the very smallest: the Technions Russel
Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, a joint
venture between Haifas celebrated university and the foundation.
This week, the institute was in the
news as it donated the worlds smallest
Bible to the Israel Museum. The Nano
Tanach is the size of a grain of sugar.
It will be exhibited in the Shrine of the

Book alongside the Dead Sea Scrolls.


The microscopic Tanach was created
by coating a tiny silicon chip with a layer of gold 100 atoms thick. A focused
ion beam blasts away the gold, revealing the dark silicon beneath. Total time
for the microscopic beam to inscribe
the more than 1 million Hebrew letters
in the Tanach: only an hour and a half.
The institute hopes the microscopic
Bible will draw attention to the nanotechnology revolution.
Larry Yudelson

ly compared to other countries?


Not all that well.
Worldwide, according to a survey
by WIN/Gallup International Association conducted in 65 countries around
the world, 63 percent of people polled
describe themselves as religious.
In Israel, only 30 percent identify
as religious. Eight percent identify as
convinced atheists; 57 percent say
they are not a religious person.
This makes Israel less religious than
Western Europe overall, where 43
percent say they are religious and
37 percent say they are not. Israel is
significantly more religious than Sweden, however there 78 percent say
they are not religious or atheist.
Israels younger generation, according to the survey, is more religious, with 55 percent of the 18- to
24 year-olds surveyed describing
themselves that way.
Meanwhile, three quarters of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza
report being religious, versus 18 percent who say they are not.
The question on religion was only

one of a number of questions that


Gallup asks annually as part of its
end-of-year survey.
The poll showed Israelis to be
happy but pessimistic. Nearly half
reported being either happy or very
happy, against 19 percent who were
either unhappy or very unhappy.
Slightly more 33 percent expected this year to be worse than last
year, with 27 percent expecting it to
be better.
Half, however, expected this year to
be one of economic difficulty, with
only 12 percent expecting economic
prosperity. A third expected the
economy to remain the same.
Similarly, half expected a year of
more international discord with only
16 percent expecting a more peaceful year.
Interestingly, most Israelis disputed the idea that Israel is ruled
by the will of the people. Fifty-three
percent said they at least somewhat
disagreed with the idea, against 11
percent who fully agree and 34 percent who said they partially agree.
Larry Yudelson

Israels birthday stats


l Israels population stands at

8,345,000, according to the annual Independence Day report by the Central


Bureau of Statistics. When Israel was
founded in 1948, the population was
just 806,000.
The report shows a two percent
population growth over last years data,
citing 176,000 Israeli babies born and
32,000 new immigrants to Israel.
Israels Jewish population numbers
6,251,000 (74.9 percent). The report says
there are 1,730,000 Arabs (20.7 percent)
and 364,000 (4.4 percent) others (Chris-

tians, non-Arabs and other religions).


In 1948, just 35 percent of Israelis
were sabras. Today, 75 percent of Israelis are born in the country.
The report also highlights the urbanization over the years. In 1948, Tel AvivYafo was the countrys only city that
had a population greater than 100,000.
Today, Israel has 14 cities meeting
those criteria. Of those, six cities boast
a population of more than 200,000
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Haifa, Ashdod,
Rishon Lezion, and Petach Tikva.
Viva Sarah Press/Israel21c.org

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reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. 2015

CONTENTS
Noshes4
oPINION 24
cover story30
Rockland44
dining48
torah commentary 53
crossword puzzle 54
arts & culture 55
calendar 56
obituaries 61
classifieds 62
real estate64

Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015 3

Noshes

I dont hang out on the Upper West


Side during Sukkot.
Departing Daily Show star Jon Stewart, telling the Guardian the one restriction
that fame has placed on his freedom.

AT THE MOVIES:

Adeline takes a
time-travel trip
Adaline is a
romantic fantasydrama. The title
character (Blake Lively)
was born in 1908, and
twenty years later shes
in an accident that
magically stops her from
aging. To avoid attention, she conceals her
changing identities from
all but her daughter
(Ellen Burstyn). Fast
forward to the present,
and she meets a charming and handsome guy
she might want to spend
part of eternity with.
HARRISON FORD, 72,
has a big supporting role
as a friend who knew her
when he was young and
is dumbfounded when
he meets her again in
the present. (Ford is still
recovering from injuries
suffered when he
skillfully landed a
disabled 1942 plane on a
golf course last month
and had to pass up the
press junket for Adaline.)
Fun note: the coscreenwriter, SALVADOR
PASKOWITZ, 43, is the
son of the late DORIAN
Doc PASSKOWITZ,
the patriarch of a family of 11 (including nine
kids) that was called
the first family of surfing. A Stanford-trained
physician who put on
tefillin and prayed every
day, Doc was the subject of many articles in

the general and Jewish press until he died


last November at 93.
He made many visits to
Israel, alone and with his
family.
Little Boy is a film
about a 7-year-old who
is very attached to his
loving father (MICHAEL
RAPAPORT, 45). WWII
comes, and his father
enters the service. The
boy wants more than
anything to bring his
father home safely. He
relies on his Christian
faith to perform a series
of bigger and bigger
miracles, but this isnt an
overtly Christian movie.
Emma Watson and Tom
Wilkinson co-star.
Back in 2004, TV
and (now) web
journalist Katie
Couric revealed for the
first time that her
mother was Jewish,
although she was raised
as a Protestant. There
was speculation that
Couric had disclosed her
background because
she was then engaged
to TOM WERNER, now
65, a prominent TV
show creator and
executive. Well, her
marriage to Werner
never happened, but a
curious friend just
checked, and yes,
Courics husband, investment banker JOHN
MOLNER, 52, whom she
wed last summer, is

Harrison Ford

Salvador Paskowitz

Michael Rapaport

John Molner

Shalom Auslander

Ellen Barkin

Jewish. This is Courics


first marriage since she
was widowed in 1997.
Both Couric and Molner
have children from their
first marriages.
In answer to a friends
query, I confirmed that
Dr. RICHARD BESSER,
56, the chief medical
correspondent for ABC
News, is Jewish. He formerly was acting director of the American Centers for Disease Control.
While checking, I discovered that his brother,
Dr. MITCH BESSER, 59,
an ob-gyn very active
in HIV prevention pro-

grams, has been married


to famous singer Annie
Lennox since 2012. She
had been married to
Israeli film producer URI
FRUCTMANN, 60, and
Fructmann is the father
of her two children.
Happyish, a
comedy/drama,
premieres on
Showtime on Sunday,
April 26. The first
episode will be posted to
the Showtime site shortly
after the premiere and
you can watch it for free
and decide to subscribe
to Showtime, if you dont
already. The series was

created by and is
co-written by SHALOM
AUSLANDER, 45, who
grew up in Monsey, New
York, and lives in Teaneck
now. He has published a
collection of short stories
and a critically praised
memoir (Foreskins
Lament) in which he
chronicles his problems
with strict Jewish
practice and belief in
God. Both he and his
wife, ORLI, also originally
from a religious Jewish
home, are pretty much
estranged from their
respective families.
However, unlike many

Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard

apostates or quasi-apostates, Auslander still is


connected to his general
Jewish background and
has chosen satirical
humor (think David
Sedaris) rather than
vitriol to express what
annoys him about
religious Jewish life
and life in general.
The lead character
of Happyish is Thom
Payne (Steve Coogan), a
44-year-old advertising
man whose happy life
is thrown into disarray
when his 25-year-old
female boss arrives and
he is made to feel like
last years car model. Its
unclear from advance
publicity whether Payne
is supposed to be Jewish. However, a recent
profile of actress Kathryn Hahn, who plays Lee,
Thoms wife, made it
clear that Lee is a Jewish
character who grew
up in a religious home
and is now estranged
from her family and her
faith (very Auslanderish). The profile includes
a scene in which Lee is
trying to introduce her
young son to the basics
of Judaism. Note: look
for ELLEN BARKIN, 61,
in a big recurring role as
Dani Kirschenbloom, a
headhunter who works
closely with Thom and
has a sardonic take on
the dog-eat-dog world
N.B.
of advertising.

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at


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JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 5

Local
Standing together with Israel
Local groups join for evening of unity as they discuss ways to protect Israel
JOANNE PALMER
Lee Lasher of Englewood has a deep
interest in ensuring that different parts
of the local Jewish community come to
trust, respect, and even like each other.
To that end, Mr. Lasher, an alumnus
of the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jerseys Berrie Fellows Leadership
program, and fellow alums and now
friends Ian Zimmerman of Glen Rock
and Ari Hirt of Teaneck, formed a group
called Unite4Unity, which until now has
explored the bridges that actually do
span the community.
Now, the three friends have decided
to multitask. Another cause dear to all
of them is Israel. What could be better,
they thought, than to bring the community together around the Jewish state?
And given their own orientation toward
action, what would be best would be to
give people information they can use to
present Israel positively, to combat such
threats as BDS with knowledge, insight,
and passion.
We are always looking for topics that
will unite the community and allow for
a common conversation, Mr. Lasher
said. And with everything going on in
the world, we thought that support for
Israel is something that can bring everyone together, regardless of their denomination or religious background.
We all felt that there are some great
programs about Israel, and often you go
and learn something, but there is no real
practical take-away. We thought about
what we could do to change that that
was the genesis of this program.
So next Tuesday, Sgt. Anthony Benjamin of the Israel Defense Forces will
keynote an evening that also will include
a discussion with a panel of representatives from StandWithUs, Israels Consulate General in New York, and AIPAC, and
end with the chance to meet in small,
facilitated groups to discuss the evenings
content and other issues.

Anthony Benjamin

The evening is sponsored by a range of


synagogues, from the Orthodox on one
end of the spectrum to the Reform on the
other, and its being held at the Conservative Solomon Schechter Day School of
Bergen County in New Milford.
Anthony Benjamin, who now heads an
organization he founded called Our Soldiers Speak, will discuss his experiences
as a veteran and reservist.
Mr. Benjamin made aliyah to Israel 11
years ago, and I have been in three wars,
he said. Unfortunately, I expect to be in
another one in the not-so-distant future.
He was born in England, as his accent
makes clear; after he graduated from the
University of Manchester there he moved
to Israel and was drafted almost immediately. I am one of seven children; four
of us live in Israel and all of them, three
brothers and one sister, have been in
the IDF, he said. He fought in the second
Lebanon war in 2004, in Operation Pillar

Who: Unite4Unity and the northern New Jersey Jewish community


What: An evening, called Unite and Stand Up For Israel, featuring Sgt. Anthony Benjamin, a panel of Israel advocates, and a chance to talk in small groups
What: On Tuesday, April 28, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Where: At Solomon Schechter Day School, 275 McKinley Avenue, New Milford
For more information: Call Joy Kurland at (201) 820-3946 or email her at joyk@jfnnj.
org
Sponsors: Unite4Unity, Ahavath Torah, Emanu-El of Closter, Beth Rishon, Kehilat
Kesher, East Hill Synagogue, Bnai Yeshurun, the Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jersey, the JFNNJs Jewish Community Relations Council, Solomon Schechter Day
School, Our Soldiers Speak, and StandWithUs
And: Light refreshments!
6 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Lee Lasher

We are always
looking for
topics that will
unite the
community and
allow for a
common
conversation.
LEE LASHER

of Defense in 2012, and Operation Protective Edge in 2014. (We should make
war on whomever comes up with those
names, he said, perhaps half joking.)
Since then, he has toured college campuses; he has spoken at 350 schools on
four continents, he said.
I will be exploring the similarities
between combat on the battlefield and
the fight for public opinion on campuses
and why I believe that victory in the
latter will improve our chances in the
former.
The most immediate parallel between
Israels wars and the situation its advocates face on campus is that those who
support Israel are massively outnumbered, he said. The second is that quality trumps quantity and I do believe
that our most effective advocates are

superior to the anti-Israel lobby.


The third is, frankly, the terrorization of students, both Jewish and nonJewish, who are pro-Israel. They are
feeling deeply intimidated, browbeaten,
and threatened. And not unlike the citizens and soldiers of Israel, they have
nowhere else to go, so they will stand
their ground.
There the parallel breaks down a bit.
They can choose silence, Mr. Benjamin
said. Many are choosing to go silently
into the night. But many do not do so.
And then there is the final, perhaps
most evocative, parallel.
It is teenagers and young adults who
are asked to bear the brunt of this fight.
It is a fight that in most cases most people
would prefer not to undertake but it is
has been thrust upon them.
The fight matters, he continued,
because the military aid and diplomatic
aid from which Israel benefits is judged in
the court of public opinion. The aid is a
direct result of the actions undertaken by
voters, by students, by opinion-shapers.
And so, if people decide not to engage,
we will see a disintegration of military
and diplomatic support as well.
Why is this happening? In my opinion, first and foremost the anti-Israel
lobby has become stronger because of
an unholy alliance between the left and
the Islamist movement, and that seems
to be predicated on a common dislike of
the state of Israel.
Part of that dislike, he said, is due to
the acceptance of false narratives, such
as Israel being an apartheid state. Those
narratives are accepted without any critical analysis, he said. As a result, many
people, even Jews, move away from the
story of Israel.
The anti-Israel lobby is extremely
well-endowed by foreign investment,
he continued. Currently there is massive
Saudi, Kuwaiti, and Qatari investment in
tertiary education in the United States.
The Saudi Arabian kingdom made a
$20 million contribution to Harvard, and
the same to Georgetown. That is a sensible policy for them, because Harvard
is the premier university in the world,
and Georgetown is the premier political
university. It is not surprising that the
recipients of such largesse feel indebted
to their benefactors.
At the same time, Mr. Benjamin said,
Jewish students often arrive on college
campuses without any formal education
in Israels history, so when they hear antiIsrael rhetoric they have no way of refuting it. Thats where the feelings of being

Local
browbeaten and intimidated come in.
Whats missing from the discourse
about the state of Israel is an unreserved,
unbridled pride in Israel, he said. I
intend to do my level best to reinject that
pride into those who are kind enough to
listen to my words.
And that, he added, is a transdenominational feeling. I go to Conservative,
Orthodox, and Reform synagogues, he
said. They are not as divided as they
think they are. Not nearly.
Andrew Gross is the political advisor to Israels deputy consul general in
New York. (He also grew up in Wyckoff
and went to Ramapo High School; I am
a proud Ramapo Raider, he said.) He
plans to talk about Israel as the quintessential start-up nation; it is a way, he said,
to broaden the conversation to think
about Israel the country, not Israel as a
debated political issue.
One of the key elements of my job is
to reach out to different communities,
to build bridges with Jews and non-Jews
alike, by sharing the competitive advantages of Israel. It is a source of inspiration
and innovation.
Israel was ranked the fifth most

innovative country in the world by


Bloomberg this winter the United States
was ranked 11. The Economist ranked Tel
Aviv as the second best start-up ecosystem in the world, after Silicon Valley.
Israels competitive advantage in the
world is our ability to export creativity.
We want to offer a practical guide
to partnering with Israel. There are
lots of ways to be supportive of Israel,
to go beyond a debate about conflict.
If you really want to know how to be a
partner for Israel in Bergen County, we
should talk about how to connect with
diverse communities, like Christians, the
LGBT community, Hispanics, AfricanAmericans, groups that are empowering
women those are the sorts of relationships that Israel deeply values.
To help Israel is to help build bridges.
Shahar Azani, who used to work in
the Israeli consulate, now is the executive director of StandWithUss northeast region. (Avi Posnick, StandWithUss
regional coordinator, will be on the panel
on Tuesday night, but Mr. Azani provided
a preview of his talk.)
StandWithUs is very active in bringing
the community together, he said. We

We want to offer
a practical guide
to partnering
with Israel. There
are lots of ways
to be supportive
of Israel, to go
beyond a debate
about conflict.
ANDREW GROSS

have to be able to counter the nefarious


methods of the BDS movement. That
movement the attempt to boycott,
divest, and impose sanctions against
Israeli goods, services, and performers
is trying all sorts of new, creative methods. At NYU, for example, a BDS group
tried to connect divesting from Israel
with fossil fuel divestment, which is
a more popular cause on campus, Mr.
Azani said.

People always say that BDS groups


are limited to only a few hundred campuses, but it is on many elite campuses.
Its like venom when it penetrates the
body through a bite on your finger, you
cant say its only gotten your finger. Your
whole body is contaminated.
But there is hope, he said. We have to
teach our children. If we plant the seeds
for Jewish continuity, Jewish leadership,
for these kids involvement later in their
lives with the Jewish community, with
professional Jewish life, with the federation world, we have to do it now. We have
to work hard today to make sure that Jewish life is strong tomorrow.
Dan Mitzner is the associate director of
AIPACs real estate division. His response
to a request to discuss his contribution to
the meeting was to email a refusal to talk.
Unfortunately, as per AIPAC policy, I
cannot comment to the press, he wrote.
Mr. Lasher has high hopes for the
evening, both as a practicum on how
to support Israel and as a way for disparate parts of the community to come
together. We should be thinking about
what draws us together, not what drives
us apart, he said.

YOURE INVITED TO A

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND


SPEAKER SERIES BLITZ
Please join us to learn about JNFs partner organizations,
the work we are doing in Israel, and the vital role we play in
enhancing quality of life for all of Israels residents.

First program of its kind!


YOSSI KAHANA, DIRECTOR OF JNF SPECIAL NEEDS TASK FORCE
HOSTED BY: STACEY & RITCHARD ROSEN

Yeshiva University
High Schools
Annual Dinner

Wednesday, May 6, 2015 7:00 pm Fair Lawn, NJ

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

CHUCK FAX, JNF VICE PRESIDENT OF ISRAEL ACTION


HOSTED BY: LISA & JAN SEIFFER

6 p.m. Dinner Reception and Program

Monday, May 11, 2015 7:00 pm Montvale, NJ

GUESTS OF HONOR

SHANI SIMKOVITZ, DIRECTOR, GUSH ETZION FOUNDATION


HOSTED BY: PHYLLIS & BUZZY GREEN
Tuesday, May 12, 2015 7:00 pm Teaneck, NJ

Rabbi Steven 89 and Mrs. Rachel Burg


Mr. Avi 85 and Mrs. Aleeza Lauer
FACULTY HONOREES

REBECCA SHIMONI-STOIL, WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT,


THE TIMES OF ISRAEL
HOSTED BY: CHUCK SHAIN AND JANICE & JERRY ROSEN
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 7:00 pm Teaneck, NJ

ALEXANDER MUSS HIGH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL (AMHSI) PARLOR MEETING


HOSTED BY: JILL & SEFFI JANOWSKI
Thursday, May 14, 2015 7:00 pm Tenafly, NJ

Rabbi Alfred Cohen


Yeshiva University High School for Boys
Maggid Shiur

Mrs. Ruth Fried


Yeshiva University High School for Girls
Science Department Chairperson
Science Institute
Marina del Rey
1 Marina Drive, Bronx, New York 10465

For further information, contact Beth R. Gorin,


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Honoring the 25th anniversary of the Central and MTA Classes of 1990

Please register online at jnf.org/nnjblitz


For more information, please contact Director,
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jnf.org 800.JNF.0099

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 7

Local

Considering German Jews


Woodcliff Lake shul, owner of rare German Bible,
takes a weekend to consider the heritage
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN

ptzle, weiner schnitzel, stuffed


cabbage, and German chocolate cake are on the menu for
Shabbat dinner on May 1 at
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake. Its all part of the shuls
weekend exploration of German Jewish
heritage.
German Jews are known not only for
their signature cuisine, however. They
tend to have a reputation as yekkes
obsessively punctual, punctilious, and a
touch pompous.
The shuls Rabbi Benjamin Shull admits
he bought into that stereotype he is the
descendant of Lithuanian Jews until he
discovered through genealogical research
that he, too, has German-Jewish ancestors. So do about a third of his regular
congregants.
In addition, about 18 months ago
he found a rare 19th

A page from the Phillippson Bible

century German Bible in the congregations library, and that piqued his interest
in pre-World War II German Jewry.
So Rabbi Shull put together a committee of two, both of whom have German
lineage, to organize German Jewry Weekend, offering food for both thought and
stomach.
I think a lot of us have ambivalence
toward anything German, Rabbi Shull
said. But today we can see Germany is
friendly toward Israel and it has a reconstituted Jewish community. Also, much
of modern Judaisms progressive movements originated in Germany, and I
thought it would be interesting to learn
more about that, not only for the past but
for the future, too.
The weekend, open to the community
at large, will kick off at 6:30 Friday night
with the optional dinner; the full menu
also includes potato latkes and braised
cabbage. Reservations cost $25 for adults
and $15 for children 10 and
under.
At 7: 3 0, D r. F r a n k
Mecklenburg will discuss
German-Jewish legacy
and why it should be
preserved.
Dr. Mecklenburg, a
Berlin native, is not Jewish. He is the director of
research and the chief
archivist of the Leo
Baeck Institute in New
York, a research library
and archive that documents the rich history
and culture of Germanspeaking Jewry going
back to the Middle Ages.
We encourage people to
bring family documents
for Dr. Mecklenburg
to look at, said Rabbi
Shull.
Shabbat services at
8:15 will be highlighted

The Phillippson Bibles title page

by a panel discussion with four local residents born in Germany: Margo Berger,
born in Halle A-Saale, who now lives in
Hillsdale; Berta Fromme, originally of
Bad Cannstatt and now of Park Ridge;
Kurt Rosenberg, born in Hessen and now
a Ridgewood resident; and Arthur Hirschberg, a native of Hachenburg who moved
to West Orange from Paramus.
Congregants will have had a chance to
see a video of interviews conducted with

these panelists by the synagogues fourthgrade religious school class. The children
asked them about their lives in pre-War
Germany and their memories of fleeing
the Nazis.
Interestingly, most of them came
from observant families in smaller towns,
whereas we usually assume most German
Jews were assimilated, Rabbi Shull said.
There are some fascinating stories here.
At 9:15 that night, people will have an

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8 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Local

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(former interior designer of model


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opportunity to pose questions to the panelists at an


oneg Shabbat.
German Jewry Weekend will continue on Sunday
afternoon, May 3, with a 3 p.m. talk by Rabbi Dr.
David Fine of Temple Israel in Ridgewood. An adjunct
professor at the Abraham Geiger College, a liberal rabbinic seminary at the University of Potsdam in Germany, he will speak about German Jewry today and in
the future. A rabbinical intern from the Geiger School
recently began working with Rabbi Fine at Temple
Israel.
We will also hear from some members who have
visited Germany within the past couple of years and
learn about their experiences as Jews returning to
their familial home, Rabbi Shull said.
The congregational librarys German Bible is a family edition of the famous Ludwig Philippson translation, which originally appeared in a three-volume set
published in Leipzig in 1858 and is believed to have
been the Bible from which Sigmund Freud was educated as a child.
Philippson, a Reform rabbi who trained as a classicist, presented the sacred text alongside commentaries and some 700 illustrations and wood engravings
informed by the natural sciences, ethnoloy, archaeoloy, and the history of art. This unusual volume
helped spur Rabbi Shulls pet project, discovering
more about life for Jews in Germany.
It is time for us to reevaluate German Jewry and
German Jews, Rabbi Shull said. He added that he is
still in the midst of discovering distant relatives who
once lived, or live now, in Germany.
German Jewish Weekend is sponsored by Ori Eisen
in memory of Rabbi Matthew Kanig. Temple Emanuel
is at 87 Overlook Drive in Woodcliff Lake. For more
information, call the shul ofice at (201) 391-0801.

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JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 9

Local

Connecting through music


Yemenite singer from Tenafly to take stage in Dumont
LARRY YUDELSON

n Israeli who has lived in


Tenafly for almost two years
and a Los Angeles native who
has lived in Israel for the past
seven years are teaming up for a series
of area concerts featuring contemporary
arrangements of Hebrew, Arabic, and
Yemenite songs.
One of the concerts is set for next Saturday night in Dumont.
The duo is promoting the record they
released in February: The Seal of Solomon, which they recorded as Shlomit
and Rebbe Soul.
Shlomit is Shlomit Levi. She grew up in
Kiryat Ekron, a largely Yemenite community in central Israel. Her parents came
from Yemen as teenagers in the 1950s.
Her singing career included recording
with Orphaned Land, an Israeli heavy
metal group, and performing with Boaz
Sharabi.
Rebbe Soul is Bruce Burger. A veteran
session musician, one Yom Kippur, more
than 20 years ago, he was struck by the
beauty of the hymn Avinu Malkeinu. He
recorded a version in his home studio
and it found radio air play. He released
his Rebbe Soul album in 1993, and continued producing what he calls Jewish roots
music.
Ms. Levi and Rebbe Soul were introduced by a business manager to whom
Mr. Burger had turned for help setting up
shop in Israel. On the album, and in the
upcoming concerts, Mr. Burger accompanies Shlomits singing with guitar and balalaika. (It seemed fitting musically and
sonicly, Mr. Burger said of the balalaika.
Not that theres anything Yemenite
about it.)
I heard two kinds of music growing
up: Western and Yemenite, Shlomit said.
Yemenite mainly came from weddings
and family bands, and from my grandmother singing to herself while cooking
and making baskets. I would sit with her
as a little girl.
Ms. Levis mother was clear about
which kind of music she preferred.
When I was a little girl, I used to practice and sing to her something in English
at the top of my voice. She would say,

Save the date


Who: Shlomit & Rebbe Soul
What: Yemenite and Jewish music with
a world beat twist
Where: Our Redeemer Lutheran
church, 344 Washington Ave., Dumont
When: Saturday night, May 2, 8:30 p.m.

10 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Thats nice. I would sing my heart out


and she would say, Thats nice.
Then one day I sang to her in
Yemenite. She said, Now you sing
beautifully.
As a teenager, Ms. Levi turned away
from Yemenite music. I didnt feel that
connected to it. But when she grew up,
I kind of rediscovered my Yemenite
roots.
I heard Ofra Haza, her arrangement
of Yemenite music to Western music.
Suddenly everything changed. I started
training my voice to sing Yemenite. Its
very hard to learn. Its all vocal. People
in Yemen did not use instruments since
the First Temple was destroyed. I dived
into the Yemenite world and found treasures in it.
Some songs on the album will be familiar to most American Jews: Avinu Malkeinu, and the Havdala service. Others,
though, dive deep into Yemenite tradition. There are piyyutim, sacred poems
from the Yemenite prayer book. And
there are new Arabic poems composed
in classical language composed by Aharon Amram, who is at the forefront of the
movement to keep Yemenite Jewish culture alive in Israel. (He is also the author
of one of Ofra Hazas hits.)
Hes one of the greatest poets still
alive, Ms. Levi said. I heard his music
when I was a little girl. I was really lucky
to meet him and let him listen to the new
arrangements we made of his songs. I got
his approval. Its not every day you meet
your idol.
Her first public performance came
when she was 6. I stood up in front of
the whole school and sang, she said.
I remember thinking, its not so scary
standing in front of all those people. Its
kind of fun.
Musically, shes largely self-taught.
When I compose, I just do it by singing,
she said. You find your ways. Sometimes
it turns out special because I do stuff
other musicians wouldnt do I break
the rules because I dont know the rules
of keys and stuff.
She studied cognitive psychology at the
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; her
masters degree focused on user interface design. She toys with returning for
a Ph.D. in the field but for now she is
happy to be working full time in music.
When you learn about human behavior, you can learn about it in a lot of
aspects, she said. I spent six years
learning human behavior through science. It didnt explain that much to me.
I really felt I needed to develop the emotional side after putting so much effort
into the scientific side. Music is a great
journey. It takes you to the deepest

The Seal of Solomon album cover

If that nice
music comes
from those
people, they
cant be that
bad. They
cant be that
different
from me.
AN ARAB MUSIC FAN

places and brings out things that really


connect people together, she said.
She counts herself lucky to have experienced how music and feelings can
change things. Because she sings in Arabic, We have fans from Arab countries,
enemy countries to Israel, which is pretty
amazing. I communicate with them
through Facebook.
One wrote to me that he was brought
up to hate Israel and the Jewish people,
but listening to our music he started
to have tolerance. He said: If that nice
music comes from those people, they
cant be that bad. They cant be that

ILLUSTRATION BY DINA BOVA

different from me. He actually had his


friends listen to our music and gradually
they changed their hatred and became
more moderate.
Mr. Burger is working on another border-bridging project. He is producing
songs for George Simaan, a Christian Arab
oud player who has played with major
Israeli artists but has performed little
on his own. One song combines Hebrew
and Arabic versions of the classic Israeli
love song Erev Shel Shoshanim, with
Ms. Levi singing the Hebrew. Another
track has the lead singer from Mashina,
one of Israels biggest rock bands, singing
the Hebrew. That guest appearance has
brought air play on Israel radio.
Ms. Levi came to Tenafly with her husband, Boaz Arzi, a software engineer for
a video surveillance firm. I found great
friends here, she said. The community
is so it felt like somebody gave us a
huge hug, and helped us with everything.
I was so amazed.
Shes a wonderful singer, Mr. Burger
said about Ms. Levi. Ive worked with great
studio singers who can do anything and she
can hold her candle to any of them.
Shes got such a nice stage presence.
She just lights up a room.
The Seal of Solomon is available
on iTunes and Spotify and other online
music stores. For more information, go
to www.shlomit-rebbesoul.com.

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JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 11

Local

How does this phone work?


Meet comedian, writer, actress, all-around-funnywoman Rita Rudner
HEIDI MAE BRATT

m a minute into a phone conversation with Rita Rudner, explaining that


Im adjusting to a new recording app
set up by my tech-savvy teen daughter when the comedian got it.
Oh, I have a 12 1/2, nearly 13-year-old
daughter myself, she offered.
Who helps you with technology? I asked.
Oh, she does everything for us, she said.
Mom, youre holding the phone upside
down againoh, God.
Mom, youre typing with your old lady
finger, instead of your thumbokay.
It was vintage Rita Rudner. The comedians trademark epigrammatic one-liners,
delivered in her soft-spoken, sharply timed
way, has made her beloved to audiences for
decades. Her solo Las Vegas comedy show
is that citys longest running.
Ms. Rudner will be heading east to share
her witty observations on everyday life, taking the stage at bergenPAC in Englewood on
May 2, in a show that will also feature comedian Louie Anderson.
The bulk of my comedy is about life,
Ms. Rudner said.
Its about love and men and women and
the things that everyone can relate to. Daily
life is what inspires me. Daily life, and the
panic that Im never going to think of anything again. Its always exciting to think
of a new concept or new joke that works
because youre creating something that has
not been in the atmosphere before.
Just this morning, Ms. Rudner said,
she was inspired by something when
she dropped off her daughter, Molly, to
school.
Ill try it. If it works, it works. If it doesnt,
it doesnt.
But being funny, which now seems
natural to her, wasnt something that she
was born with. It was something that she
learned.
Ms. Rudner was born in Miami and
trained to be a dancer. Her father, Abe,
was a lawyer. Her mother, Frances, was a
homemaker. When Rita was 13 years old,
her mother died. Soon after graduating
high school, she headed for New York City
to start a career as a dancer.
It wasnt until she was 25 years old that
Ms. Rudner decided that a comedians life
was longer than a dancers.
There were a lot of dancers, and not a lot
of female comedians, so I thought maybe I
should try, she said. At the time there was
Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller, whom I later
met. They were very nice and encouraging,
but their comedy was much more aggressive than my comedy. I related more to the
quiet comedians, like Woody Allen and Jack
Benny.
I think I had a kind of likability, she
12 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

There were a
lot of dancers,
and not a lot
of female
comedians, so I
thought maybe I
should try.
said. In comedy, you have to like the person standing on stage. People didnt hate
me before I knew what I was doing, so at
least I was encouraged. I said Im going to
do what I do.
People said you have to be more like
this or more like that, but the audience
laughed. Theyre my boss. Its who I work
for.
The years and the discipline she learned
as a dancer served her very well in her
comedy.
I didnt have a lot of confidence, so I
had to be well prepared before I would do
anything. With dancing, you take it step
by step. I approached comedy in the same
way. First I had one joke. Then I had two
jokes, then I had three minutes, then I had

five minutes. So Im still trying to figure out


ways to keep people laughing.
Her big breakthrough was her first solo
HBO special, Rita Rudners One Night
Stand, which was nominated for several
awards. Appearances on David Letterman
and later on the Tonight Show with Johnny
Carson followed.
It took me years to get on Johnny Carson. Finally, I was on Johnny Carson and
he became a fan and I was on loads of
times, she said.
In addition to stand-up which she
says is her favorite form Ms. Rudner is
the author of books, including her bestselling nonfiction titles, Naked Beneath
My Clothes and Rita Rudners Guide to
Men and the novels Tickled Pink and
Turning the Tables. She also has collaborated on several projects with her
husband, the writer and producer Martin Bergman who despite his name is
not Jewish including a film, Peters
Friends. Mr. Bergman wrote the screenplay; Ms. Rudner acted in it.
But unlike some comics men and
women for whom saying what they
think means being shocking or crude, Ms.
Rudner has always stayed clean, never
pushing the envelope, keeping her work
non-offensive.
Ms. Rudner grew up in a Jewish home,
but while she does not affiliate these days,

she does have a routine in her show that


she reserves for her exclusively Jewish
audiences.
I dont talk about it any more, but when
I started, you talk about who you were as a
kid, about being an overprotected child,
she said.
I have a lot of jokes that I only do for
Jewish audiences, when I play the Jewish
benefits.
Ms. Rudner happily has allowed her private life to dictate the course of her career
as well. She explained that her comedy has
changed along the way as she married Mr.
Bergman 20 years ago and then when they
adopted Molly in 2002.
And when it comes to her comedy, the
joke takes the back seat.
Its her marriage and her daughter that
are her priorities.
If my husband doesnt like a joke, it
goes, Ms. Rudner said. If Molly doesnt
like a joke, it goes. I dont want to offend
people. I like to make people happy.
Especially now that Im a mother, I
want to set an example for Molly, she
said. I want her to be proud of me. I do
benefits for her school where all the teachers come, so I wouldnt do anything that
would upset her life.
No. Not at all.
Maybe just hold the phone upside
down.

Mission to Washington

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JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 13

Local

Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot

Rabbi Shmuel Goldin

Balancing attraction
and halachic law
Local Orthodox rabbis meet
with therapists and LGBT Jews
Joanne palmer

n Sunday, some leading


Orthodox rabbis, including Rabbi Shmuel Goldin
of Congregation Ahavath
Torah in Englewood and Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot of Netivot Shalom in Teaneck,
met with mental-health professionals
and members of the Orthodox gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community for a conference on sexual orientation and gender identity in the Orthodox
and chasidic world, as a press release
put it.
The conference, about 150-strong,
held at the Kraft House on Columbia
Universitys campus, was organized by
the modern Orthodox, Upper West Side
Lincoln Square Synagogue; the William
Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychoanalysis and Psychology; and
JQY, a nonprofit that provides support
to young LGBT Orthodox and chasidic
Jews.
The goal was to help the two sides
understand each other; the mere fact
that the conference met is a milestone.
I think that it was a very honest,
forthright program, and it allowed two
very important populations both the
rabbis, and also the therapists who are
dealing with individuals who are undergoing the conflict of same-sex orientation and Orthodox practice and belonging, Rabbi Goldin said.
It was a very positive atmosphere.
Everyone who was there appreciated
each others presence. I thought it
was important to go to share some of
the issues facing Orthodox rabbis and
communities as we struggle with these
concerns.
14 Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015

The issues are that as much as we


desire to be sensitive to the population
involved, the loyalty to our principles
and the loyalty to our law is important
to us, and it should be appreciated by
others as well.
There has to be a mutual recognition
of the validity of each others concerns,
he said.
There can be a home for everybody,
as long as we can respect each others
concerns. You have to deal with it on
a case-by-case basis, and determine
whether they can be comfortable, and
whether we can be comfortable.
The key issue is that on both sides
there has to be an awareness of the valid
concern that each community has. Part
of the problem is that when you are in
a position, as the Orthodox world is, of
having standards and rules and regulations, it often is interpreted as insensitivity. Why cant you just change? Why
cant you just X or Y or Z? Part of what
I was trying to educate was that just
as those who are asking us to change
have their values and the concerns, the
issue of Jewish law and continuity are
a tremendous value to us. Once that is
acknowledged, then there are ways in
which we can meet.
We wont satisfy each other entirely,
but we will find ways to talk, and to make
people feel welcome.
I was pleased to see a recognition on
the part of those in attendance that the
law is a value, and that the Orthodox
community cant be expected to compromise on its fundamental adherence
to the law.
Rabbi Helfgot, who also teaches Judaic
studies at SAR High School in Riverdale,
said that the conference represents

CASH

CALLS

Local
part of a continuum that started a few
years ago, when people, especially in the
modern Orthodox world, became much
more comfortable speaking about the
reality.
We have gay congregants in our synagogues, gay families in our communities,
kids from gay communities coming into
the day-school system, he said.
It is a reality that rabbis and therapists and everyone recognizes. We all
struggle with giving the best guidance
and advice, as Orthodox educators
and rabbis and communal activists on
the one hand, while on the other hand
maintaining our fidelity to halacha and
not fudging the basics of halacha.
We have to be sensitive and welcoming and inclusive to the reality of the Jewish family as it exists today. Gay families,
and people with same-sex attractions,
are one part of the reality. We have a
spectrum of nontraditional families in
our communities. In some communities it is a larger percent, and in others
it is smaller, but we have single parent
families, gay couples, divorced families,
blended families all sorts of scenarios.
We have to understand where people are, the struggles they face, and how
they can find their place in the Jewish
community.
Rabbi Helfgot told a story he had
heard at the conference from Rabbi
Shaul Robinson, the Scottish-born spiritual leader of Lincoln Square. Rabbi
Robinson said that he remembers that
years ago, when he still was living in
England, when people would talk about
these kinds of issues they would snicker,
and even some rabbis would make jokes
about it. He was very pleasantly surprised when he returned to England to
speak at a conference. The subject came
up, and the seriousness and sobriety and

We have to be
sensitive and
welcoming and
inclusive to the
reality of the
Jewish family as
it exists today.

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Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot

respect with which the rabbis addressed


it reflected very positively on the fact
that what they were talking about was
peoples lives.
Although the issues are not new to
him, and he has explored them intellectually, it is very powerful to hear about
it directly, Rabbi Helfgot said. Hearing concerns and issues face-to-face is a
healthy thing.
He left the conference feeling hopeful
but, he said, I didnt come in with any
feelings of hopelessness. I think the community is on a very positive trajectory of
inclusion and discussion and openness
about wanting all of our young people
and older people and middle-aged people to find a place to connect to God, to
connect to the Jewish people, to connect
to Israel, to connect to fellow Jews.
I think that was the undercurrent to
the conference, Rabbi Helfgot said. It
wasnt at all about trying to change halacha. That would not fly. Its about changing attitudes its about inclusiveness,
about sensitivity. Even small things like
training teachers in our schools about
the expressions they use, the examples
they give make a difference.

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Ben Porat Yosef buys its building


Ben Porat Yosef finally owns its Paramus
building.
The building originally was the home
of the Frisch School, which moved into
a new home in 2007. In 2008, Ben Porat
Yosef, a pre-k through eighth-grade day
school, began renting space there. Two
years later, Ben Porat Yosef agreed to
buy the building, making payments over
a five-year period while assuming full
responsibility for it.
Last week, four months ahead of
schedule, Ben Porat Yosef made its
final payment to Frisch and closed on
the building. The school is continuing

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Vote for your favorites! See page 40

Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015 15

Local

Letter from Israel


Peaceful Ashkelon
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN

onsidering the number of Hamas


missiles launched toward Ashkelon last summer (4,564, to be
exact), we did not expect the
Leonardo hotel in this lovely Mediterranean
shore city, eight miles north of the Gaza Strip,
to be filled on a random March weekend.
We had chosen Ashkelon in order to
spend some beach time in a less expensive and crowded city than Tel Aviv or
Netanya, and to give the local tourism
trade a boost after a financially disastrous
summer season.
So imagine my surprise when, just as I
was returning to the scrumptious breakfast
buffet for a second okay, third helping, I
saw a man with a nametag around his neck
reading Robert Levine, Teaneck, NJ.
I nudged Steve. I know that guy! I interviewed him for the Jewish Standard years
ago!
Bob remembered me right away, and
introduced me to some of the fellow Jewish National Fund VIPs with whom he was
traveling to identify needs in Gaza border
towns. As a national vice president, Bob
proudly described recent JNF projects such
as the Beer Sheva River Park and the Sderot
indoor recreation center, which keeps kids
safely entertained no matter what horrors
are happening outside.
The JNF contingent was among many
other guests enjoying the beautiful hotel
and the nearby boardwalk, marina and
archeological park. We were heartened to
see that the Leonardo, where every room
has a sea view, was not lacking for business.
A Holiday Inn down the boardwalk also
seemed busy.
Walking around town, it was difficult to
imagine the city of about 120,000 under
siege less than a year ago. On Thursday
night, we dined at a caf inside Ashkelons
cultural center, a magnificent building
where people were gathered for an exhibition opening.
The seaside national park, rich with
4,000 years of history, was quiet on Friday
morning. About a dozen young men were
surfing the Mediterraneans relatively calm
waves as we watched from a vantage point
studded with ancient ruins. A couple and
their toddler explored the relics and the
wildflowers. Later we walked through the
marina, whose eateries were jam-packed
with patrons in spitting distance of rows of
bobbing boats tied to the wharf.
Whenever we travel in Israel, we try to
attend Shabbat morning services at a local
synagogue, to get a flavor of the community.
Being early birds, Steve and I set out for a
nearby Ashkenazi shul (most of the town
is Sephardi) at about 6:40 a.m. The 7 a.m.
minyan meets in an auxiliary room, leaving
16 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Scenes from Ashkelon National Park.



ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN

the sanctuary available for the main 8 a.m.


service.
Just one problem: the auxiliary space
has little room for women. In fact, there
was a solitary seat in the designated area.
Lacking alternatives, I sat in it. A little while
later, an older woman appeared and smiled
at me kindly. I began to explain in Hebrew
that I was a visitor and I would be happy to
go get another chair, while at the same time
she greeted me and said shed find herself a

chair. The moment we heard one anothers


accents, we switched to English.
And that is how I got friendly with Sarah,
a New York native and longtime resident of
Ashkelon. Apparently the only female regular at the early Shabbat service, Sarah told
me about herself in between the davening
and the Torah reading. She arrived in Israel
in 1961, when she was 19; she went directly
to a kibbutz that today is lush and thriving but then was rather rough around the

edges. After a few years shed had enough


of the awful and scarce food and the belligerent women who never made her feel welcome. She and her British-born new husband
moved to Ashkelon in 1964, when the city
had only 30,000 residents. They had found
their forever home.
Despite its proximity to Gaza, I can easily
understand why people are attracted to Ashkelon. It boasts attractive private homes and
high-rises, plentiful shopping and cultural
activities, a sense of history and modern
amenities. There is a sizable Anglo population and an active social group called ESOA
(English Speakers of Ashkelon).
Myriam Baharav, who works in international client services for a local realty group,
told me that even during the war, We had a
couple and two single women who chose to
emigrate here from America. I was amazed.
(The couple, it turns out, were former members of my mothers synagogue in North
Riverdale. Small world.)
When a permanent peace finally comes
to this tiny part of a tiny country, I have no
doubt that tourists will come flocking. In the
meantime, I do not hesitate to recommend a
stay in Ashkelon to see it for yourself. If you
dont believe me, just ask Bob Levine.

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JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 17

Local

Sol Abrams publicist, 89


Entrepreneurial genius behind Palisades Amusement Park
JOANNE PALMER

ol Abrams of New Milf o rd a n d P a l i s a d e s


Amusement Park were
born for each other.
The park closed in 1971. Mr.
Abrams, who died on April 15 at
89, had many decades of a very
good life after that, but it was the
park that defined him.
The Bronx-born Mr. Abrams
was the parks publicist from
1949 until it closed. As we
described in a long story in this
paper last June 13, he was the
mastermind behind such stunts
as a water-skiing elephant.
Wait. What?
This is how we described it last
year:
Youve got the elephant.
Youve got a body of water big
enough for it the Hudson River.
Oh, and you happen to be on
30 acres that spanned Cliffside
Park and Fort Lee, in southern
Bergen County, not far at all
from the river but the direction
to the river is less east than it is
down. Straight down a jagged
cliff. (Its not called Cliffside Park
for nothing.)
So your next steps are obvious.
You attach some pontoons to a
motorboat, and once thats ready

you lead the elephant down the


windy path on the steep rocky
slope of the Palisades, through
the trees, until you get to the
rivers edge. And then you just
get the elephant up onto the
pontoons, lock it in place, pose
a bathing-suited showgirl next to
it, and drive off down the river.
Piece of cake.
Mr. Abrams ran all sorts of
pageants. He would go to
women with infants, and say,
Do you want to be part of this?,
his grandson, Avi Schneck, said.
Often they would. Infants would
be entered in races to see which
one crawled fastest. That was
called the Diaper Derby. There
would be 20 babies, screaming,
and people would take bets on
how fast they could go, Mr.
Schneck said. There would be
beauty pageants for women,
for teenagers, for young girls.
Little Miss America, Miss Polish
America, Miss Who-Knows-WhatElse, his mother added. And
Buffy and Jody from Family
Affair the youngest children
on a popular sit-com were the
emcees for Little Miss America.
My grandfather was
responsible for bringing in all the
one-hit wonders of the time, Mr.
Schneck said. He would escort

them through crowds of people


trying to get their autographs,
trying to touch them, and they
loved it.
The park also attrac ted
famous people, as famous
as Jackie Kennedy and her
children. Eddie Fisher and
Debbie Reynolds announced
their engagement there. Even
William Shatner showed up.
Bruce Morrow Cousin Brucie
ran a rock n roll show there,
which featured many of the
hottest names of the 1950s and
60s, from Frankie Avalon,
Fabian, and Bobby Rydell to the
Young Rascals, Petula Clark, and
the Lovin Spoonful. Disc jockey
Murray the K emceed there as
well. All of that was done under
Sol Abrams watchful eye.
And then, once the promotion
or the contest or the parade or
the stunt was over, Mr. Abrams
had to write it up and then he
would have to drive it over the
bridge to the news outlets in
New York. It was decades before
press releases could be faxed,
much less emailed.
Mr. Abrams had a career before
he fell in love with the park.
Mr. Abrams graduated from
high school in 1943, but he
SEE ABRAMS PAGE 43

Sol Abrams proposed to his wife, Zelda, at the Palisades


Amusement Parks Tunnel of Love.

Naomi Wilzig, collector and philanthropist, 80


A supporter of Jewish causes built a famed museum of erotic art
America campus in Morristown in honor of her daughaomi Wilzigs phiter Sherry Wilzig Izak of Livlanthropy covingston. She also supported
ered a range of
the United States Holocaust
causes in both
Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and the Florida
New Jersey and Florida.
Holocaust Museum.
It began with the Jewish
In addition to her daughter,
community and reached,
Ms. Wilzig is survived by her
perhaps most singularly, to
Naomi Wilzig
son Ivan, also of Miami Beach,
erotic art.
her son Alan, her daughter-inMs. Wilzig, 80, who died
law, Karin, who live in New York City, and
on April 7, grew up in Newark and lived
four grandchildren.
in Clifton for many years before moving
Speaking after her death, Ivan Wilzig a
to Miami Beach. She was married to the
musician who calls himself Peaceman or
late Siggi B. Wilzig, the oil magnate and
Sir Ivan told the Miami New Times, I
banker who died in 2003. Together, they
feel like the luckiest man alive certainly
were supporters of a number of Jewish
the luckiest son to have had a mother
federations.
who genuinely cared for people and made
Naomi, who was a founder of the
them happy, always putting others before
Had a s s a h Ho sp i t a l i n Je r u s a l e m ,
herself. Im proud that against all odds she
endowed the Chabad Lubavitch Camp
helped the world become more loving and
Gan Israel on the Rabbinical College of

ELAINE DURBACH

18 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

through art helped it be a better place.


Ms. Wilzig began collecting art in the
1980s, and her interest in erotic works
gathered steam in the 1990s, after she went
in search of a conversation piece for
Ivans new home. It was an unusual choice
for someone who grew up, as one of six
children, in a strictly observant home that
she described as filled with prohibitions.
Ms. Wilzig pursued her interest with
characteristic enthusiasm and forthrightness. As she told a reporter from the
Miami Herald in 2002, At this point in my
life, Im a crusader to get John Q. Public
to accept that erotic art is out there. We
accept violence, but we go crazy over the
idea of a nude body.
In 2005, she established the World
Erotic Art Museum in Miami. She ended
up amassing around 4,000 pieces
the largest privately held collection of
erotic art in North America. That put her
12,000-square-foot museum in a league

with those in New York, Berlin, and Paris,


and attracting a flow of tourists. That
earned high honors from Miamis city
fathers.
Her husband was less enthusiastic
about her calling. Naomi, who graduated
from Weequahic High School in Newark
and attended Montclair State Teachers
College, married Siggi when she was 18.
She told an interviewer some years back
that he asked her to halt her pursuit of
erotica, which she did for some time; it
was only after his death in 2003 that she
began to collect seriously, seeking out
works around the world.
In 2006, Ms. Wilzig, a member of the
Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce,
was honored with the Key to the City of
Miami Beach. In 2011 the city proclaimed
October 16 World Erotic Art Museum
Day in honor of her museums fifth anniversary. She wrote five books about the
SEE WILZIG PAGE 43

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JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 19

Local

Rabbi Dr. Donniel Hartman


coming to Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai of Bergen
Lafer in the early 2000s as
County in Tenafly has
the institute grew dramatically in Israel and develestablished an annual
oped the Shalom Hartlecture series in memory of Fred Lafer. The
man Institute of North
first lecture in the series
Amer ic a, which now
is set for Sunday, April
delivers the same level of
26, at 7 p.m., when
scholarship and inspiration for which the HartRabbi Dr. Donniel Hartman, president of the
man Institute is known in
Shalom Hartman InstiJerusalem.
Rabbi Dr. Donniel
tute of Jerusalem, presRabbi Hartman has a
Hartman
ents Talking about
Ph.D. in Jewish philosophy
COURTESY SHALOM
Israel: The Need for a
from the Hebrew UniverHARTMAN INSTITUTE
sity of Jerusalem, a masNew Conversation.
ters in political philosophy from New
Mr. Lafer was a longtime supporter
York University, a masters in religion
and board member of the Shalom
from Temple University, and rabbinic
Hartman Institute, and he chaired the
ordination from the Shalom Hartman
executive committee of the institutes
Institute. He is the founder of some of
board of directors. He first met institute founder Rabbi Prof. David Hartthe most extensive education, trainman zl, more than 30 years ago, at
ing, and enrichment programs for
an event where Rabbi Hartman told
scholars, educators, rabbis, and religious and lay leaders in Israel and
the audience to come to Israel not
North America.
to sightsee, but to study. Mr. Lafer
He is the director of the Hartman
took the elder Rabbi Hartman up on
Institutes iEngage Project, author of
his offer, which started a long relationship of study and friendship. In
The Boundaries of Judaism, co-editor
2010, the Shalom Hartman Institute
of Judaism and the Challenges of Modern Life, co-author of Spheres of Jewhonored Fred Lafer in Jerusalem by
ish Identity, and lead author of Speaknaming him an honorary fellow of the
ing iEngage: Creating a New Narrative
Institute.
I could not be more pleased to
Regarding the Significance of Israel
have Rabbi Donniel Hartman, one of
for Jewish Life. He is also an essayist,
the leading voices in the Jewish world
blogger, and lecturer on issues of Israeli
today, come to Temple Sinai, said
politics, policy, Judaism, and the Jewish
Rabbi Jordan Millstein, spiritual leader
community.
of Temple Sinai. And to have Rabbi
His new book, Putting God Second:
Hartman here to honor the memory of
How to Save Religion from Itself, is
Fred Lafer, whose work as president of
scheduled for publication next year. He
the Taub Foundation, president of the
is working on his next book, Who Are
Shalom Hartman Institute, president
The Jews: Healing A Divided People.
The presentation is co-sponsored
and chair of the Washington Institute
by the Jewish Community Relations
for Near Eastern Studies, and president
Council of the Jewish Federation of
of the American Friends of Hebrew University, made him one of the great JewNorthern New Jersey and the Kaplen
ish philanthropists of his generation.
JCC on the Palisades. The Shalom
We at Temple Sinai are so grateful to
Hartman Institute is a pluralistic center of research and education elevatDeborah Lafer Scher, Freds daughter,
ing the quality of Jewish life in Israel
and congregant, for everything she has
and North America. Temple Sinai is
done to make the Fred Lafer Memorial
at 1 Engle St., in Tenafly. For informaLecture a reality, including bringing
tion, call (201) 568-3035, go to www.
Rabbi Hartman to us.
Donniel Hartman, the son of Rabbi
templesinaibc.org or www.shalomhartman.org/northamerica.
David Hartman, worked with Fred

Moe Liss is Jewish Historical Society honoree


The Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey will honor Moe Liss at a gala celebration at the Bergen County YJCC in Washington Township on Tuesday, May 12. He
will be honored as a teacher, friend, mentor, author, volunteer, and humanitarian.
The societys collection now is stored
in the basement of the former Barnert
Memorial Hospital in Paterson. Contributions are vital to efforts to preserve

and make the history of the Jewish communities in North Jersey accessible. The
group recently contracted to buy a 2,500
square foot location in Fair Lawn. JHSNJ,
a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation, needs
$250,000 for the purchase and renovation of its new home.
The YJCC is at 605 Pascack Road. For
information on the gala, go to jhsnj.wordpress.com.

Participants at a training session for Cohort 2. 

Taglit Fellows accepting


applications for Cohort 3
Taglit-Birthright Israel opened registration this week for Cohort 3 of Taglit Fellows, the professional development program launched in 2014 in partnership
with the iCenter for Israel Education as
an intensive program for exceptional
Jewish leaders and aspiring Jewish educators looking to staff Taglit-Birthright
Israel trips. The first two cohorts included
nearly 200 fellows, selected from more
than 1,000 applicants. The program will
welcome another group of motivated
and talented people, who will increase
the quality of the Taglit-Birthright Israel
experience and play roles in the ongoing
Jewish journeys of young adults. Registration is at www.taglitfellows.com and is
open through May 15, 2015.
The program includes a four-day inperson seminar, interactive training, and
in-depth conversations with master Israel
educators, focusing on a range of areas,
including how effective storytelling is a
tool for education and engagement; how
to create ritual moments with personal
meaning, and what experiential education might look like at a range of sites in
Israel. In addition, fellows engage in online

learning and workshops in experiential


Jewish education, and over time they form
a close network of peers.
The program, funded by the Maimonides Fund, accepts 100 participants,
22 and older, every six months. The majority of fellows become leaders, educators,
and connectors in their Jewish communities, either professionally or personally.
The first fellows staffed winter 2014/2015
trips, and Cohort 2 fellows will begin staffing this summer.
Taglit-Birthright Israel has sent close to
500,000 young Jewish adults to Israel from
more than 66 countries and from all 50 U.S.
states, including students from nearly 1,000
North American college campuses, accompanied by more than 70,000 Israelis.
Taglit-Birthright Israel has a unique,
historic, and innovative partnership with
the government of Israel, thousands of
individual donors, and private philanthropists and Jewish communities around
the world, through Jewish Federations of
North America, Keren Hayesod, and the
Jewish Agency of Israel. Go to taglitfellows.com and follow #TaglitFellows for
information.

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20 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

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We want your business and we go the extra


mile to make you a regular customer

1245 Teaneck Rd.


Teaneck

837-8700

upcoming at

Kaplen

JCC on the Palisades

Spring Boutique

Dont miss this annual shopping extravaganza


featuring jewelry, womens fashions, menswear,
sunglasses, childrens clothing and accessories,
decorative home furnishings and much more.
Its the perfect place to pick up Mothers Day
and Fathers Day and graduation gifts! All
proceeds to benefit the Early Childhood Special
Programs. Call Felice at 201.408.1435 or email
fpopper@jccotp.org. Co-chairs: Andrea Messinger,
Jeanine Casty, Candice Flax and Elysa Todd
Sun, May 3, 10 am-5 pm & Mon, May 4, 9 am-4 pm

JCC U

spring term begins thur, apr 30

Top professors and experts present on diverse


topics including: Buddhism, US entry into WWI, The
Land Art Movement, Interrogational Torture, Coney
Island, The Financial Impact of Fracking, French
Impressionist Music and The Blockbuster Movie
Phenomenon. To register or for more info, contact
Kathy at 201.408.1454 or kgraff@jccotp.org.
4 Thursdays, Apr 30, May 14, 28 & Jun 11,
10:30 am-2:15 pm, $110/$140, 1 Thursday, $32/$40

spring

boutique

Maggie Anton: Enchantress


a novel of rav hisDas Daughter

This novel weaves together Talmudic lore,


ancient Jewish magic and a timeless love story
set in 4th century Babylonia. Maggie Anton
was a National Jewish Book Award finalist
and Library Journals choice for Best Historical
Fiction. Co-sponsored with the James H.
Grossmann Memorial Jewish Book Month.
Tue, Apr 28, 7:30 pm, $10/$12

adults

Above Us Only Sky

Rona Ramon, wife and widow of the


first Israeli astronaut, Ilan Ramon,
speaks of her husbands courageous
life, as well as that of their son, Asaf,
who died in a training accident as a
fighter pilot. Program in English.
Wed, Apr 29, 8:30-10:30 pm, $15/$18
($10 for teens under 18)

Kaplen

music

Master Class

with cellist steven Doane

Gain insight into the music and the artistic


process in this intimate, public coaching
with Steven Doane, an international soloist,
chamber musician and professor of cello
at the Eastman School of Music. Part of the
Sylvia and Jacob Handler Master Class series.
For more info call 201.408.1465 or email
Thurnauer@jccotp.org
Mon, Apr 27, 4-7 pm, Free, suggested
donation $10.

for
all

Norma Wellington

Join us for Norma Wellingtons annual jewelry show and


sale, featuring the 2015 collection of new spring trends and
great Mothers Day gifts. A percentage of all sales will be
donated back to the JCCs Alzheimers programming.
Sun, Apr 26, 9 am4 pm

to register or for more info, visit

jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900.

JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 21

COURTESY SHARSHERET

Local

From left, Linda Gerstel and Ed Joyce, Alissa Zagha

Sharsheret benefit
is set for May 3
Sharsheret, a national not-for-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of women and families facing breast cancer and ovarian cancer, hosts its
annual benefit on Sunday, May 3, at the Marriott at
Glenpointe in Teaneck.
Guests of honor are Linda Gerstel and Ed Joyce of
Manhattan, and Alissa Zagha of Teaneck will receive
the Lisa Altman Volunteer Tribute award.
Linda Gerstel, a Sharsheret board member since
2011, is celebrating her tenth year as a breast cancer
survivor. The Gerstels and their daughters are repeat
members of Team Sharsheret, competing in the NYC
Triathlon and the NYC Half Marathon. Alissa Zagha
has been a Sharsheret volunteer since 2003, working
on in-office projects, participating in Team Sharsheret
breast cancer walks, chairing the annual benefit, and
exhibiting at national conferences.
Local benefit chairs include Batya Paul of Bergenfield and Yocheved Schwartz of Englewood. It features a silent auction with gift packages, electronics,
jewelry, Judaica, sports memorabilia, and fine dining
gift certificates; the auction is headed by chairs Jennifer Aranoff, Shifra Bendheim, and Zahava Reinhart
of Teaneck.
For reservations, go to www.sharsheret.org/benefit,
call (866) 474-2774, or email Ellen Kleinhaus at ekleinhaus@sharsheret.org.

Federation leaders
stop in Paris to shop
for Jewish community
Federation CEO Jason Shames, and Daniel Shlufman,
Federation board of trustees secretary, stopped in
Paris this week before joining a Federation mission to
Israel. The stopover was to show support for the Jews
of Paris by shopping at the recently reopened Hyper
Cacher, the site of the terrorist attack in January. While
there, they spent approximately $1,000 donated by
Federation supporters to buy food for needy Jews of
Paris and to help Hyper Cacher get back on its feet
after having been closed for repairs for months.

Remembering Yom Hashoah in Teaneck


More than 1,100 people came to the
33rd annual Teaneck Yom Hashoah
Commemoration at Teaneck High
School, where they heard Howard and
Nancy Kleinberg talk about the horrors
they endured, how Nancy saved Howards life in Bergen-Belsen, and how
they met again, years later, in Toronto.
The evening began with a dessert
reception for survivors and their families. During the program, Teaneck
councilman Mark Schwartz issued a
proclamation to Bruce Prince, president of the Jewish Community Council.
Teanecks Yom Hashoah Commemoration committee
PHOTO PROVIDED
Steve Fox, co-chair of the commemoration committee, spoke; he informed the
Arline Duker read names. The evening concluded with
audience that plans for a permanent Holocaust memorial
Rabbi Joel Pitkowski of Congregation Beth Shalom readin Teaneck are being finalized. The evening included musical performances by Yitzy Glicksman, Jonathan Rimberg,
ing psalms and Rabbi Yosef Adler of Congregation Rinat
and Stephanie Kurtzman and talks from students. Six mulYisrael reciting Kaddish and El Maaleh Rachamim.
tigenerational families lit candles as Rabbi John Krug and

Gala

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ANNUAL

HONOREES

Melvin & Lillian Solomon

Susan & Moshe Castiel

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

Walter Ramsfelder

SPECIAL RECOGNITION

Rabbi Ely Allen

A Salute to the BCHSJS Graduating Class of 2015


Thursday, May 28, 2015 7 oclock in the evening
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JEWISH STANDARD
APRIL 24, 2015

Nhung, left, one of 16 survivors of the attack on the


Hyper Cacher, with Jason Shames, Nhungs husband,
Francis, Daniel Shlufman, and Benjamin Allouche, a
leader of Paris Jewish community. 
COURTESY JFNNJ

2/26/15 6:34 PM

Ohels groundbreaking
Rising from Divorce
to show in Teaneck Sunday
Ohel recently debuted its new film, Rising From
Divorce, to a capacity crowd in Brooklyn. Continuing the momentum, Ohel is holding screenings and
panel discussions in many communities. This Sunday, April 26, the film will be screened at Congregation Bnai Yeshurun, 641 W. Englewood Ave., Teaneck,
at 7:30 pm.
Rabbi Steven Pruzansky of Bnai Yeshurun; child
psychiatrist Dr. Mark Banschick; Ohels director
of clinical projects, Dr. Hindi M. Klein; educator
Rochel Chofetz, and Ohels N.J. outreach coordinator, Rabbi Jeremy Donath, will discuss the film after
it is screened.
Rabbis, community leaders, educators, and community members are welcome to attend. For information or to view a trailer, go to www.ohelfamily.org/
risingfromdivorce.

www.jstandard.com

Sarita
SCHERER
GROSS

Eleanor

Rachel

EPSTEIN

ADLER

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

Womens Philanthropy

TUE S DAY, MAY 1 2 , 2015

2015 Annual Spring Luncheon


Speaker
Carol Leifer

Comedian, Writer,
Producer and Actress

Wednesday, May 12
Rockleigh Country Club, Rockleigh, NJ

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ARTISTIC TILE
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Rena Klosk
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Register online at www.jfnnj.org/springluncheon or for more information call 201-820-3953.


Minimum gift to attend, a dollar a day ($365) to help support Federations mission to take care of people in need locally, in Israel
and around the world, while supporting a strong, vibrant, connected Jewish community for today and future generations.
For first time contributors, 50 cents a day ($180) welcomes you to this event.
If you have already made your gift to Federation this year, please join us for the cost of lunch. Cover charge of $90 for lunch is in
addition to your Campaign gift (price of lunch reflects our actual cost). Dietary laws observed.
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 23

Editorial
Indomitability

ne of the most wonderful things about


the t ruly amazing job of writing
and editing for this local Jewish newspaper is the chance to
meet some of the extraordinary
people who live, work, or visit
here.
Writers, thinkers, rabbis,
teachers, musicians, hikers,
cooks, photographers, paper
cutters, bakers, spies, broadcasters, actors, mourners this
is just a partial list. Everybody
has a backstory, a vocabulary,
a worldview. They are all (okay,
almost all, but overwhelmingly
almost all) fascinating.
But then there are the Holocaust survivors. They are in
another class entirely.

KEEPING THE FAITH

Sometimes it can be unnerving to talk to someone famous


or accomplished. But no matter how much an honor it may
be it is! it is never as humbling, as terrifying, and as soulshattering as it is to talk to a
survivor.
We have been honored to
be allowed to interview many
survivors over the years, and
to have been entrusted with
the sacred task of telling their
stories. The last few weeks,
leading up to and away from
Yom HaShoah, have been particularly intense. Two weeks
ago, we told the heartbreaking stories of Irene and Manny
Buchman, this week, its the
fascinating, picaresque story
of Walter Krug.

The word amazing has


been overused almost farcically during the last few years,
but its literal in these and
every other Shoah story.
We know that absolutely
every Holocaust survivor has a
story. No one survived without
an entirely unique combination
of luck, strength, and fortitude.
Just as the poet Zelda told us
that Everyone has a name, just
as the Nazis tried to turn those
names into numbers, so we also
know that everyone has a story.
Survivors are indomitable.
They are extraordinary. The rest
of us cannot imagine ourselves
in their nightmare trips, and we
understand how lucky we are.
We are grateful for the blessing of
JP
their shared stories.

Rabbi Aharon Lichtensteins


blessed memory

e are mourning
Rabbi Aharon
Lichtenstein,
who died this
week at 81. Rabbi Lichtenstein
was a leader of Modern Orthodox Judaism. A top student of
Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik
at Yeshiva University, he even
married Rabbi Soloveitchiks
daughter.
Rabbi Lichtenstein never
made any list of top American rabbis, however, because
in 1971 he left his post at YU
to move to Israel, where he
became co-head of Yeshivat
Har Etzion. There he guided
generations of Israeli students
who combined their army service with yeshiva study, and

Jewish
Standard
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Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher Emerita
Marcia Garfinkle

inspired a not insignificant


number of Americans who
spent their year or two after
high school studying in the
yeshiva.
I never studied in the Gush,
as the yeshiva is known, but
about three decades ago I covered a talk he gave at a New
York synagogue. The topic was
political he was arguing in
favor of compromise on the
West Bank, where his yeshiva
is located but he proved a
frustrating figure to report on,
because he did not speak in
sound bites. He spoke in paragraphs, not simple sentences.
He saw many sides of every
issue the complex arguments
and counter arguments. His

Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
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jstandard.com
24 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Talmud students praised his


brilliance, and his subtlety, and
the ethical lesson he taught
them by insisting on puzzling
out the truth from conflicting
ideas.
Seeing complexity did not
stop Rabbi Lichtenstein from
staking out positions or engaging in controversies. But at a
time when much Jewish argument seems to consist of epithets and simplified half truths,
part of Rabbi Lichtensteins legacy is a reminder that it doesnt
have to be that way, that in fact
the Jewish tradition places
higher demands on disputants.
May his memory be for a
blessing.

LY

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Does God really


want sacrifices?

wo weeks ago, in discussing the rehearsal of the Passover


sacrifice put on by a group calling itself the Temple Mount
Institute, I quoted Maimonides as saying that God could
do without sacrifices. I also noted a teaching attributed to
Rabbi Pinchas in the name of Rabbi Levi that argued that the sacrificial cult was a stopgap measure meant to wean Israel away from
pagan practices. (See Leviticus Rabba 22:7-8.)
In my opinion, I wrote, such assertions are possible because sacrifices and other cultic practices were not part of Gods original plan
for Israel, and this is provable by the Torah itself.
Let us begin with Noah and the Great Flood. Morality had so deteriorated in the world that God despaired of His creation, and decided
to end all life (save Noah and his family) and start all over again. Judging by what He says in chapters 8 and 9 of
Genesis, what particularly irked God was
the bloodlust that had taken hold of both
humankind and the animal world.
When the waters abated and the dry land
appeared, God said to Noah (Genesis 8:17),
Bring out with you every living thing of all
flesh that is with you: birds, animals, and
everything that creeps on earth; and let
them swarm on the earth and be fertile and
Shammai
increase on earth.
Engelmayer
What does Noah do? He proceeds to
sacrifice a slew of animals and birds, even
though God said nothing to him about that.
Then the Torah says something peculiar (verse 21): The Lord
smelled the pleasing odor, and the Lord said to Himself: Never again
will I doom the earth because of man, since the devisings of mans
mind are evil from his youth....
What a strange thing to say. If the odor of the sacrifices was pleasing to Him, why does God declare that the devisings of mans mind
are evil from his youth?
The comment only makes sense if the odor was pleasing to Noah,
not to God.
God, in chapter 9, makes a huge concession to human bloodlust
(meat-eating is allowed with some restrictions), but He says nothing
about wanting sacrifices.
After He appears on Mount Sinai, God acknowledges that people
will want to offer sacrifices, but He insists on it being a low-key affair.
Do it simply, on an altar of earth or unhewn stones. (See Exodus
20:21.)
Forty years later, as Israel is about to cross over into the Land,
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel Community Center |
Congregation Heichal Yisrael in Cliffside Park and Temple Beth El of
North Bergen.

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r
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t
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Opinion
meaning that it is 39 years since they inaugurated and
have been using the fancy altars and accoutrements
of the Tabernacle (the Mishkan), God again asks for
a simple altar of unhewn stones (see Deuteronomy
27), this time for use in a covenant renewal ceremony.
While He does ask for sacrifices, that is probably
because in the ancient world sacrifices were considered mandatory for such ceremonies. The Israelites
would not have seen this one as valid otherwise. (In
the original covenant ceremony in Exodus 24, Moses
also calls for sacrifices to seal the deal.)
Until the Golden Calf episode, God never asks anyone for any sacrifice. Interestingly, when Moses asks
God to forgive Israel for that great sin, God does not
say, I will, but only if they kill a bunch of animals
first. What He does say is, I have pardoned, as you
have spoken. Moses prayed and God heard, and He
pardoned.
Here are some facts to ponder:
The only time God asks anyone for a sacrifice is at
the Akedah, the Binding of Isaac, which actually was
meant to be a non-sacrifice. True, Abraham ends up
sacrificing a ram, but nothing in Genesis 22 has God
telling him to do so.
In Genesis, too, we have the so-called brit bein habsarim, the covenant between the pieces. There,
God does tell Abram, as he was then known, to kill
some animals and birds, but the whole incident
occurs in a dream, not in reality. And when the sun
was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and...
it came to pass, that, when the sun went down, and it
was dark [and he was in a deep sleep!], behold a smoking furnace, and a burning torch that passed between
those pieces. (See Genesis 15.)
Unlike the patriarchs following their indirect
encounters with God (He only appeared to them in
visions and dreams), Moses builds no altar after meeting God at the burning bush, let alone offers any
sacrifice.
When he is saved from Gods wrath on the way back
to Egypt, Moses again offers no sacrifice and builds
no altar.
Moses calls for no sacrifice as the Exodus gets under
way. The Passover sacrifice he calls for in Exodus
12:21 is not a sacrifice in the traditional sense; rather, it
seems to be a way to guarantee that the lamb the people were to eat that night would be hurriedly roasted,
not slowly boiled in water. Indeed, nowhere in chapter
12 does God refer to this as a korban. That comes
later, after the Golden Calf.
Moses calls for no sacrifice either before or after
Israel is rescued from Egypts attack at the sea. Indeed,
the Song of the Sea indicates that Moses saw prayer,
not sacrifice, as the proper way to worship God.
Finally, when his father-in-law sacrifices to Israels
God in Exodus 18, Moses is conspicuously absent from
the guest list, which includes Aaron and the elders.
This suggests the possibility that he may have been
unwilling to participate in what he saw as an alien,
pagan ritual.
So why did God authorize sacrifices and in such
great detail?
To again quote Rambam (see Guide to the Perplexed 3:32), it is not possible to suddenly go from
one extreme to another, and the Golden Calf incident
proved that.
The sacrificial cult was inaugurated, but with so
many rules and restrictions as to make it obsolete over
time.
Obsolete it should remain. All God ever asked for are
observance of His mitzvot and an occasional prayer.

Sky and me
How your dog can remind you
of what matters in your life

ast Thursday, I officially became one of those


women who cook for their dogs.
It wasnt my choice. The day after Passover, I
gave my dog a tin pan to lick clean, a pan that had
contained some very tasty potato chip chicken. There was
nothing unusual about this. Hes been licking tin pans since
he came to live with us.
But this time, he became ill.
To us, it has always seemed that Sky has nine lives. When he
was six months old, he galloped out the door and into a main
artery, where a car struck him. A talented and dedicated thief,
hes eaten chocolate, raisins, and grapes, all deadly to dogs;
hes eaten popsicle sticks and tin foil and dead birds and
thats just the stuff I know about.
In other words, hes no stranger to an upset tummy. Until
now, hes always shaken it off in a day or two. But this time was
different. He couldnt keep anything down. He looked miserable. His fur looked dull. He had
no appetite. Clearly, I had to get
him to the veterinarian.
On the vets table, he tolerated the gentle pokes and
probes. I held his beautiful
head, whispered to him reassuringly, looked into his unhappy,
almost-human eyes, and steeled
myself for the worst. After all,
Helen
hes 12 1/2 years old.
Maryles
When Sky arrived, he was a
Shankman
fluffy little package of fur stuffed
into a cat carrier. His round,
wide eyes, as pale as moonstone, as blue as the sky, peered worriedly at us through the
perforations.
Lets call him Sky, my husband suggested.
For a while, I tried to crate-train him. Thats where you put
your puppy in a cage to teach him not to pee or poop in the
house. Id put him to sleep with a towel and all his toys, tell
him goodnight, and then Id go upstairs to put my little ones
to sleep. Sky didnt approve of this at all. Night after night, he
woke up promptly at 4 a.m. and howled his head off. For a
couple of weeks, no one got any sleep. Finally, in desperation,
I hooked him onto the leash and let him sleep on the floor
next to my bed. From then on, he was perfectly quiet. After
all, he just wanted to be near Mommy.
Hes too big for it now, but 12 1/2 years ago, he was so little
that I could stow him under my arm like he was a stuffed animal. My daughter dressed him in her jumpers and t-shirts. My
son brought him to school for show and tell, proudly carrying
him around his kindergarten class so that the kids could take
turns petting him. My 2-year-old wasnt talking yet beyond the
word Dis, but with Skys arrival, he began to spout full sentences. Two years later, when I had a baby, Sky was the first
to reach him when he cried, lovingly licking his scrunched-up
face to comfort him.
When Sky was young, my children were little.
When Sky was young, I was new to the suburbs.
When Sky was young, I was new to owning a house,
new to schools, new to carpools and afterschool activities.
When Sky was young, I still had my mother.
When Sky was young, my knee didnt hurt.

When Sky was young, the kids on our block were still in
elementary school.
When Sky was young, I still had toddlers who were too
little for school.
When Sky was young, my kids couldnt ride a bicycle,
let alone drive a car.
When Sky was young, I was still a new mom.
Now my baby is 10, my daughter is away on her gap year in
Israel, and the son who carried the puppy around his kindergarten class is looking at colleges. The boy who wasnt talking
yet is taller than I am, and growing a scruffy beard.
As for Sky, he has silver around his eyes and muzzle where
there used to be copper, hes a bit deaf, and he doesnt run as
fast or jump as high as he used to. Like the old man that he is,
hes a bit stiff in the joints. It takes him a while to get up and
down the stairs. But hes still thrilled to play with his toys, to
chase tennis balls, to chew on a nice big rawhide bone, to be
petted by the people he thinks of as family.
The vet told me what a handsome and sweet boy he is.
Hes dehydrated, she said. Id like to do some tests. She
took blood, gave him some fluids, and sent me home with
medication and instructions on how and what to feed him.
It was so much better than what I feared. But for the first
time, I hear the clock ticking.
Our pets are wild animals that choose to live among us.
They listen to us talk. They follow us from room to room. They
clown. They dance. They sing. They beg. They fetch balls for
us to throw. They look guilty when they do something bad.
They let us hug them when we cry. They insist that we pet
them. They love us for no good reason. And they are living
reminders of the fleeting passage of time.
Sky isnt just my dog. Hes a furry symbol of 12 1/2 rollercoaster, event-packed years. Together, we leave the age of the
playground behind for a new era in our lives.
Helen Maryles Shankmans short fiction has appeared in many
publications, including the Kenyon Review and JewishFiction.
net. Her debut novel, The Color of Light, is available on
Amazon. She lives in Teaneck.

Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of the Jewish Standard. The Jewish Standard
reserves the right to edit letters. Be sure to include your town. Email jstandardletters@gmail.com. Handwritten letters will
not be printed.
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 25

Opinion

Letters

Challenges facing a 67-year-old

Wrong about WOW

Looking at America then and Israel now

his week marks the 67th


To a great extent, the United
anniversary of Israeli
States was an armed camp and
independence.
not just in the Southwest. The
On this milestone, worthy of
storm of rancorous internal dissension that would lead to civil
celebration by Israeli citizens and admirers of the Jewish state, as well as by all
war already was gathering. In
advocates of democracy around the
1843 a young Ulysses S. Grant was
world, we gratefully marvel at the longraduated from the United States
gevity of the State of Israel, now well into
Military Academy at West Point.
its seventh decade of sovereignty. NotHe ranked an unremarkable 21 in
withstanding profound challenges and
a class of 39.
shortcomings besetting it, the miraculous
With grave concern, American
quality attending its founding is comJews watched signs of mounting
pounded with each passing year.
anti-Semitism in Europe in 1843.
At the same time, we properly are filled
Fra Vincenzo Soliva, Inquisitor
with wonder and concern at the relative
of Ancona, decreed that Jews
youth of the State of Israel. In the history
were forbidden to live outside
of nations and all the more so in the
their Italian ghettos. It is perhaps
history of the Jewish people a span of
no coincidence that in the same
67 years is but the blink of an eye. The
year, Bnai Brith was founded in
American experiment dating to our
New York City.
own independence in 1776 soon will
In 1843, Charles Dickens published A Christmas Carol and
celebrate a venerable 239 years.
President John Tyler
Edgar Allan Poe published the
In order more fully to appreciate the
macabre short story, The Tellchallenges facing the Jewish State at 67,
a measure of comfort, and the perspecTale Heart.
it is instructive for Americans to reflect
tive and wisdom that comes with age,
A seemingly distant memory, Ameron the conditions that confronted the
ica of 1843 may bear little resemblance
to those who today celebrate Israeli
United States at the same age.
to the United States we know today.
independence with full (if not tell-tale)
America celebrated 67 years of independence in 1843. A vital, charismatic
The conditions endured by our own
hearts. Mid-nineteenth-century Americans haltingly and by all measures,
John Tyler occupied the Oval Office.
67-year-old republic, however, offer
imperfectly navigated the considerHaving succeeded to the
valuable insight into the
able challenges they faced to bequeath
presidenc y upon the
challenges confronting
to their 21st-century successors a truly
untimely death of William
the State of Israel 67 years
exceptional nation: a military and ecoHenry Harrison, our ninth
after its founding. The Jewish state is an armed camp,
nomic superpower, a champion of
president, Tylers elevation as the nations chief
besieged by hostile neighdemocracy, an exemplar of freedom
bors who not merely disexe c u t ive re p re s e n te d
and opportunity.
pute its territorial claims,
an unprecedented test of
The State of Israel, blessed with military, technological, and political advanbut deny its very right
the Constitution and our
tages that Americans could not have
to exist. Concerns about
national character. Tyler,
Rabbi Joseph
imagined in 1843, can both learn from
intensifying anti-Semitism
consequently, was widely
H. Prouser
(and, God willing, avoid the worst of )
in Europe not only occupy
referred to by a skeptical
our considerable historic mistakes and
leaders of the Jewish state,
public as His Accidency.
far more importantly be fortified by
but animate Jewish organiIn 1843, the very year
zational life and communal agendas in
the precedent of our astounding sucin which Francis Scott Key, author of
cesses to persevere in achieving its own
the United States as well. Multilateral
The Star-Spangled Banner, died, the
unique and manifest destiny.
elections in Israel robust, genuine,
American flag, marking the growth of
True! wrote Poe in 1843, nervous
free, and democratic reveal a divided
the nation, bore but 26 stars. Party Politics were alive and well in 1843 Amer very, very dreadfully nervous I had
and skeptical electorate. Prime Minisica. Governors of the 26 states included
ter Benjamin Netanyahu the ninth
been and am but I gratefully embrace
leaders affiliated with the Democratic,
Israeli to lead his nation still struggles
a defining faith in the lessons of history
Whig (including William Pennington of
to form a government, simultaneously
and in the God of history. The striking
New Jersey), and Law and Order parties.
testing and reflecting Israels national
similarities between 1843 America and
Among the political issues to be
character. Like his American counter2015 Israel are no accidency. The
part of 1843, Bibi faces the daunting
addressed by the new leader of this
State of Israel, too, has a bright and long
challenge of balancing the aspirations of
young republic was that of disputed
future, filled with blessing. I pray that
a vocal settler movement (and a sympaterritory. Mexican President Antonio
this faith increasingly will be shared by
thetic nationalist sentiment among his
Lpez de Santa Anna warned the United
the citizenry of the Jewish state, and by
political base) with his responsibility to
States that he would consider American
their American supporters and admirers good people of many faiths.
maintain democracy, secure fluid borannexation of Texas to be an act of war.
ders, and pursue the ever-elusive prosIn that effort, as in 1843 God bless
Settler activity also included the departure of the first wagon train from Indepect of regional peace and domestic
us. Every one.
pendence, Missouri, for the Oregon
tranquility.
Joseph H. Prouser is rabbi of Temple
Territory. More than 1,000 pioneering
A retrospective of 1843 a thoughtful
Emanuel of North Jersey in Franklin
Americans thereby initiated the Oregon
visit with the Ghost of America Past
Lakes.
Trail.
if in some ways unsettling, should offer
26 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Lesley Sachs has been a strong advocate


for WOW and for womens rights (Praying
while female at the Kotel, April 17). She
errs, though, on several points. The Mandleblit proposals were basically the same
as Sharanskys. To reject one and accept
the other is illogical. As a board member
who resigned due to the agreement to
enter negotiations with Secretary Mandleblit, I can attest that the WOW board did
not think that Mandleblit was offering anything more than Sharansky was.
Board members were convinced that
now was the time. Sachs misleads when
she says WOW wants to bring pressure to
allow Torah reading at the womens plaza
of the Kotel. Why then enter in negotiations to abandon the Kotel and move to
Robinsons Arch?
Cheryl Birkner Mack
Jerusalem

How to save gas

Edwin Black hits the nail right on the


head when he writes about our use of oil
for transportation (Want to stop Irans
nukes?, April 17). Americans drive their
automobiles and trucks far more than
any other nation on earth. In 2014, the
Americas consumed 30.6 millions of barrels per day, compared to Asia/Pacific at
30.7 mbpd, and Europe at 14.3 mbpd.
The United States alone accounted for
19.4 mbpd more than the combined
total of all European nations.
If you look at oil consumption in terms
of per capita use, it is clear that America
is driving its bus in the fast lane. And no
matter what the price of oil is, $50 per
barrel or $150 per barrel, Americas consumption creates a gigantic transfer of
wealth to oil producers, of which Iran is
one. That fact props up a regime that is
bent on converting economic power into
political and military power.
On the other hand, Mr. Black then recommends that Americans consider the
use of flex-fuel vehicles as an easy solution. The environmental science community does not universally support this
approach, since it affects agriculture and
food markets. Some of the downsides
are an increased price of corn, leading
to lower demand for corn-based foods,
which is having an adverse impact on the
diets of low-income populations in South
and Central America. It is also leading
to accelerated rainforest destruction in
Brazil, as forest is turned into soybean
plantations. Finally, flex-fuel vehicles are
not more fuel efficient. Their mpg ratings
typically decline, since E85 fuel packs
less energy into a gallon than does normal gasoline.
There is another answer, and it does
not cost a cent. Drivers can simply choose
to slow down. Each 5 mph you drive over
60 mph can decrease fuel economy by
7 percent. So here is a challenge. If you
drive at 65 mph (as do I), reduce your
speed to 55 mph. Spend a little more time

Letters
in your car, getting where you have to go.
Youll lower your fuel consumption by
about 15 percent. And the next time you
go shopping for a car, get the EPA Fuel
Economy Guide and pick from among the
fuel economy leaders.
Full disclosure. This writers family has
two hybrid vehicles and a 34 mpg (combined) turbo-diesel, which can go 500
miles between pit stops.
Send the Iranian mullahs a message.
Drive slowly and smile, as you save gas.
Eric Weis
Wayne

Obama and Pollard

Although it is a good sign that the President has met with Jewish leaders and
avers that he is deeply sympathetic to
their concerns (Obama meets Jewish
leaders and donors, April 17) actions
speak louder than words, and obviously
actions like suspending the delivery of
Hellfire missiles needed by Israel during
last summers Gaza war was an action
that has many Jewish voters wondering
if he really cares about Israel.
If President Obama is truly sincere in
his stated desire to mend fences with the

Jewish community, there is one action


that he and only he, as president can
take, and that is to give a long overdue
pardon to Jonathan Pollard, now serving
a life sentence for giving information to
Israel while others convicted of spying
even for enemy nations have received far
more lenient sentences.
Laraine Fergenson
Tenafly

The lifestyle puzzle

Reading Mr. Levins letter made me


very angry at all of my gay friends and
co-workers(They should be celibate,
April 17). I mean, Im friendly, cordial
and respectful to them. We have great
conversations, enjoy a beer on occasion
and yet none of them has ever let me in
on the mystery of the gay lifestyle that,
apparently, Mr. Levin has been privy to.
It made me wonder what this lifestyle was all about. And that got me
wondering about my own and, presumably, Mr. Levins heterosexual lifestyles.
Mr. Levin: is your lifestyle nothing but
fornication? Dont you take a break to
read an occasional book, have dinner
with family, go to work, get some coffee

with friends or pop into the post office to


buy a roll of stamps before they raise the
prices again?
All of that, and more, is what I feel my
lifestyle is about. And that, as far as I can
see, is what the gay lifestyle is about too.
I suppose gay people enjoy sex as part of
their lives. But I have no reason to believe
it defines their lifestyle any more than it
does yours or mine.
So lets assume for a moment that male
homosexual sex is prohibited. And that
same-sex marriage is prohibited by the
Torah. I say we should assume, because
we have done such a marvelous job of
applying creativity to essentially eliminate so many other inconvenient laws
from our lives with such innovations as
prozbul and heter mechira that it makes
me wonder why we couldnt do the same
here.
But lets leave that for another day.
Even if male homosexual sex is prohibited and same-sex marriage just cant
happen within the confines of halacha,
why would you say that the lifestyle of
gays cant be permitted? Their whole lifestyle? Does the Torah ban gay post office
visits and gay chats over coffee?

I grew up in an Orthodox community


here in Bergen County. Throughout my
childhood, I watched people who didnt
keep Shabbes, or who couldnt complete a single sentence without speaking
lashon hara, or who were just generally
odious still be welcomed and embraced
by the Orthodox community. Nobody
declared their lifestyles impermissible.
They were even called to the Torah and
given various other honors in shul.
What that taught me is that the Orthodox community is more than comfortable with people whose lifestyles are
prohibited. But apparently we will take a
stand here and defend the ramparts from
the gays. Why do you suppose that is?
Heres what I propose. Lets acknowledge that nobody is perfect. Lets recognize that in the mix of our full, hectic
lives that some of what each of us does is
wrong. Lets let God judge peoples lifestyles and focus our efforts on greeting
everyone bsever panim yafot.
And if any of you get a line on this mysterious gay lifestyle, send me a note. Im
dying to know!
Adam Schorr
Englewood

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28 Jewish standard aPriL 24, 2015

very time I learn


fantastically outrageous
about the latest
offenses that he never
antics of the anticommitted.
Israel thought
The main offense, levpolice on university cameled by Pessins one-time
puses, I find myself offerstudent, Lamiya Khandaing silent thanks that they
ker, is that of racism.
are, for the moment, just
After reading his Facethought police.
book post a full eight
Ben Cohen
Because if these kids
months after it appeared
and their faculty supportonline, Khandaker, who
ers ran a real police force,
began her career as an
the pro-Israel students and academics
SJP activist at Brooklyn Technical High
they didnt manage to arrest would be
School, emailed him to say that she
driven underground.
deemed what shed read as racist.
In case you think Im being hyperPessin apologized and removed the
bolic, consider the case of Andrew
post, but also clarified that his referPessin, a philosophy professor at Conence to a pit bull was directed at
necticut College and a pro-Israel voice
Hamas, and not Palestinians in general
on that campus. The target of a perse and as the indefatigable David Bercution campaign spearheaded by one
nstein pointed out on the Washington
of his own students, who just happens
Posts Volokh Conspiracy blog, I
to be a leader of Students for Justice in
have seen his previous Facebook posts
Palestine, Pessin stands accused of havon the Gaza war last Summer, and they
ing directly condoned the exterminaare full of criticism of Hamas, and dont
tion of a people.
say anything nasty about Palestinians
Did Pessin urge the annihilation
more generally, suggesting that he was,
of the Palestinians the people in
in fact, referring to Hamas.
question? The answer is a no that
But Khandakers political agenda
is so resounding, you have to wonder
always was going to be more important
whether the authors of the libel against
than giving Pessin a fair hearing. She is,
Pessin have been studying how Chinas
after all, a leader of the openly bigoted
ruling Communists enforced the party
SJP, and she has posted her own share
line during the Cultural Revolution.
of offensive material; for example, after
Pessins actual words the source
Turkish President Reccep Tayyip Erdoof his tribulations on campus took
gan compared Israel with Adolf Hitler,
the form of a Facebook post he wrote
she derided his critics by declaring on
on August 11 last year, at the height of
her Facebook page, Everything is antiIsraels war with the Hamas regime in
semitic to people wtf. Its pissing me
Gaza. It was a poor post, lacking claroff. Clearly, shes a tolerant soul.
ity as well as being clumsy in its use
Whats truly disgraceful is how Conof an animal metaphor. One image
necticut College has enabled the SJPwhich essentializes the current situaled inquisition campaign against Pestion in Gaza might be this, he wrote.
sin. The history department issued a
Youve got a rabid pit bull chained in a
statement condemning speech filled
cage, regularly making mass efforts to
with bigotry and hate particularly
escape.
when that speech uses dehumanizing
But where in that statement is there
language and incites or celebrates vioa call for annihilation, or anything
lence and brutality. The Center for the
that could be remotely read as one? As
Comparative Study of Race and Ethone commenter on the article in which
nicity also chided Pessin in a similarly
this accusation was made wrote, It is
worded statement. Then, at the begina massive stretch from Pessins actual
ning of April, the college canceled all
beliefs and actions and only goes to
classes so that students could attend a
show the authors didnt even consider
mandatory session on racism, during
engaging Pessin about this or giving
which Pessins post was bracketed with
him a chance to speak for himself
racist graffiti against African-Americans
which he is entitled to.
daubed on a bathroom wall.
The annihilation accusation is
At each turn, the accusations and
connected to what Pessin said only in
insinuations against Pessin have grown
the way that secretly reading Animal
louder and more outlandish, to the
Farm by candlelight is connected to
point where his principle antagonist,
membership of the CIA. The accusation
Khandaker, now is accusing the college
against him, in other words, was preorof institutional racism by continuing
dained: by challenging left-wing orthoto employ him. Plainly, these fanatdoxies on the Palestinian issue, Pessin
ics wont rest until the college hands
was inevitably going to be accused of
Pessin his notice, leaving him to fend

Opinion

Pessins
experience
conforms to a
wider pattern
observable on
American
campuses.
for himself, with his reputation in tatters
through no fault of his own.
Remember, all this hysteria was generated by an old Facebook post that was, at
worst, injudiciously worded, like so much
of the material that gets passed around on
social media. For that reason, we have to
conclude that Pessins post was mere cover
for the real reason that hes being treated so
shamefully: that hes a Jewish academic who
supports Israel and isnt afraid to say so.
Pessins experience conforms to a
wider pattern observable on American
campuses. Weve seen prospective student council members who are Jewish
being grilled about their views on Israel.

(Imagine the outcry if a Muslim student


was similarly grilled about terrorism.) At
the same time, weve seen anti-Zionist
academics inciting against the Jewish state
with abandon; when someone dares to
criticize them, they are then elevated to
free speech martyr status.
What all this tells us is that it is no longer controversial on campus to portray
an affiliation with Zionism and Israel as a
thought crime. With this disturbing groupthink in place, pretty much anything that
is ideologically unsound can be deemed
offensive or hateful.
Khandaker herself illustrates this
last point rather nicely. In her article
denouncing Pessin, she complained that
he offended her by also arguing, Muslim
terrorists were at the top of the totem pole
as perpetrators of violence. Ask any Arab
Christian or Kurd or Yazidi what they think
of that statement, and they likely would
underline its truth. Indeed, many Muslims
will tell you the same thing, since it is Muslims who constitute the largest proportion
of the victims of Islamist violence.
But the time for a political debate is
past us. Pessin, it has been reported, is
now on medical leave as a result of the
stresses of the past few months. The

A change.org petition on the free speech rights of Connecticut College philosophy professor Andrew Pessin.
Screenshot of change.org

Jewish community and its leaders must


now come to his aid, by urging Connecticut College to treat him with the collegial
respect he deserves. Additionally, we have
to be on the lookout for similar travesties
at other campuses. And we have to be educating students, administrators, and those
faculty members who will listen about the
toxic nature of groups like SJP, emphasizing that we will no longer tolerate their
manipulation of the language of liberalism
and human rights to promote their rigid,

anti-Semitic doctrines.
Because, just like the Ku Klux Klan, this
here is a hate group.


JNS.org

Ben Cohen, senior editor of the Tower,


writes a weekly column for JNS.org. His
writings on Jewish affairs and Middle
Eastern politics have been published in
Commentary, the New York Post, Haaretz,
The Wall Street Journal, and many other
publications.

Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015 29

Cover Story

Brains, luck, nerve,


and true Grit
Local man details his extraordinary life, from pre-war Germans
through Asia to an honor from Holy Name Medical Center
JOANNE PALMER

ometimes you just listen to a story


with your mouth hanging open.
Walter Krugs story is like that.
Mr. Krug, who is 92 but doesnt
look it, is a warm, genial man; his posture
is as upright as his German birth might dictate, and although he credits himself with
a bad temper, his outlook is formidably
positive. His life story is a journey of reversals, unlikely situations encountered, analyzed, and overcome, horror endured and
surmounted, and eventually joy achieved.
It is a very long story. Here is a condensed version.
Walter Krug was born in Frankfurt in
1924. His father, Isador, owned a clothing factory that employed 1,200 people,
included weaving mills and a tailoring department, and made the family
extremely comfortable.
(Later, Mr. Krug said, the Nazis used
the factory for uniforms for its troops.
The Americans bombed it into rubble.
The Germans refused to pay restitution
for it, because they had not destroyed it,
although they had created the conditions
that led to its destruction.)
The Krugs belonged to the liberal Jewish community, which was the precursor
of todays Reform movement. Walter and
his sister, Lotte, went to a Jewish school
a school that provided them with such
treats as a sightseeing flight over their city.
Although they had to live through the grief
that came with Isadors early death, at first
the family flourished.
Isadors wife, Hilda Adler Krug, oversaw
the family and the factory. She was one of
11 children, but when her siblings scattered
around the world, building new lives for
themselves in New York, San Francisco,
Palestine, Argentina, and Australia, among
over places, she stayed at home, taking
care of her children, the business, and her
30 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Walter Krugs family, including grandchildren and great-grandchildren, call him Grit.

own mother.
Mr. Krugs life was going to be straightforward. His family had a plan for him. He
was going to go to university, and then he
was going to run the family business. A

Ever since 1935,


my mother
always had our
suitcases packed.
wife, a family the future was mapped.
But of course this was Weimar Germany.
Evil was on its way. Its advance team had
made its presence known for some time,
but arrived with trumpets blaring on
November 9, 1938. Kristallnacht.
On Kristallnacht, the Nazis got me

to haul the smoldering lumber from the


burning synagogues to the river, with a
beer wagon and two beer horses, Mr.
Krug said. He was 14 years old.
Shortly thereafter, I was put in a forced
labor camp, he said. We worked for
17 hours a day, unloading scrap metal
from railroad cars. The factory made
munitions.
The laborers imprisoned in the camp
were all Jews, men and boys of all ages.
My sister was put into a forced labor
camp in Berlin along with other women,
he said. Years later, he learned that she
died soon thereafter, of tuberculosis. She
was 16.
Mr. Krug stayed in the camp for seven
months, but then, evincing, he said, the
bad temper he claims he still has, Someone called me a name I didnt appreciate,
and I made mincemeat out of him.
And then I immediately went over the
wall.

Unlike the walls of concentration


camps, infamously capped with barbed
wire, the walls at the forced labor camp
were covered with glittering, lethally
pointed shards of glass, embedded in the
concrete. I went over them I was pretty
cut, pretty roughed up and I went home
and told my mother about it.
She immediately kicked me out.
That sounds harsh, but it wasnt. Ever
since 1935, my mother always had our suitcases packed, he said. We always had
tickets in it.
We had the so-called stateless passport,
with the swastika on the front, and my
mother kept buying false visas from Panama, Honduras, places like that. How did
you get those visas? Mr. Krug grinned and
rubbed his fingers together. For money,
he said.
So, at 15, he left home. My mother literally kicked me out, because she knew that
they would be after me, he said. But I
was long gone by then.
My mother put me on a night train
from Frankfurt to Berlin, from Berlin to
Warsaw, and from Warsaw to the Russian
border.
He never saw his mother again. Years
later, he learned that she had died at
Auschwitz.
When European trains got to the Russian border, they had to stop, and passengers going further east had to change
trains. Russian trains ran on a wider track.
I was going east on a Trans-Siberian
express. When we came to Moscow
we included two other fleeing Jews he
met on the train we stayed at the Savoy
Hotel. Even then, you had to have a tourist guide with you. We did, and the guide
showed us the Great Synagogue, Red
Square, and Lenins grave.
The men got on the train again. It was
a 16-day haul across the Russian steppes,
but then, in Novosibirsk, in the middle

Cover Story

Left, the Flying Tigers famous nose art; above, Walter and his baby sister, Lotte,
with their mother, Hilda, and their grandmother, Marianne Adler.

of Siberia, they took us off the


train, all three of us, and brought
us to a gulag. Why? Because
they thought that the Trans-Siberian visa was a fake.
They were wrong, Mr. Krug
said. That was the only visa in
the passport that was not a fake.
Dressed in sealskin coats
and boots, the gulag captives
chopped trees all day long.
There was a huge need for
wood, because every single car
on the railroad had to be heated
separately. Each car had two
woodstoves, one at each end of
the car.
Each stove had its own attendant, he added; the attendants
were always women because the
men always were off at war.
After several weeks, when his
captors realized that his visa
was real, and therefore he was
being held illegally, they took
me back to the train by sled. It
was winter in Siberia. It was the
worst temperature I ever experienced, Mr. Krug said. It was
71 degrees below zero. But really,
once it gets below 30 below, it
really doesnt matter. You just
keep moving. You must never
stand still.
He never saw his two companions again.
The train carrying Mr. Krug
went through Ulan Yde, crossed
the border into the Chinese province of Manchuria, and went on
to Harbin, which had a large
Jewish community, White Russian Jews, who were very hospitable, he said. Soon, though, he
was ready to continue his trip. I
was supposed to get on a train

to Vladivostok, where I should


have caught a ship to America.
But he got on the wrong train.
I ended up in Dalian, he said
ruefully. Dalian, also called Port
Arthur, is on the coast, close to
Korea. Instead of going due east,
I started going south. Which of
course I didnt know.
Next, Mr. Krug found himself on a Japanese freighter,
the Hoten Maru, and disembarked in Shanghai. He had no
idea where he was at first, he
said, he didnt realize he wasnt
in New York. Everyone looked
different, and they spoke a language he did not begin to understand check, and check.
Soon, though, it became clear,
and he knew that he would have
to figure something out. I knew
nothing, he said. My sister
took English in school, but I took
French. He had brought some
valuables with him as he left
home, including a Leica camera, but when they transferred
the luggage from the Polish to
the Russian trains, the trains left
without our luggage. They confiscated everything.
He h ad h i d d e n 2 0,0 0 0
Deutschmarks in the sole of his
shoe. When I got to Shanghai, I realized that I had nothing except what I wore and the
German marks. But really I had
nothing, because I found out
that the marks werent worth
the paper they were written on.
So I was absolutely
penniless.
What to do? Mr. Krug figured
it out.
I learned to speak Chinese,

Their family commissioned many photographs of Walter and Lotte.

Hilda and Isador Krug

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 31

Cover Story
he said.
What? How? You start communicating, he said. At first, with your hands.
He gestured, telling the story.
Shanghai was an international city, a
British colony with many foreigners and a
babble of languages. It also was cheap to
live there, Mr. Krug said; three local coppers made one British penny, and you
could buy a loaf of bread for a copper. But
he didnt know how to earn any coppers
at all, let alone pennies or anything more.
When he first got to Shanghai, he lived
under a bridge, and he ate what he could
scavenge. There were a lot of hotels
there, and the food was good, he said.
It was cold the only clothing I had was
what I wore, he said but he was determined. When you have to survive, you do
what you have to do to survive, he said. I
consider myself a survivor.
Soon, he discovered a safer place to
live. I found a British police station, and
I walked in, and they took me in, and
they also gave me a pair of boots. During another excursion, he saw a beautiful

Lotte and Walter as teenagers, with


their mother.

building. I couldnt read what it said on


the outside, but it happened to be the British Jewish Club of Shanghai. Its members
were families like the Hardoons and the
Sassoons prominent, successful, entrepreneurial Baghdadi families who contributed to the citys rich Jewish life. And
guess what? My luck the building was
occupied by the Fourth U.S. Marine Division on a permanent basis.
I walked in, I spoke with some security
guards in Chinese, and when some of the
Marines found out that I spoke Chinese,
they were very interested in me. When
they wanted to go out on dates with local
Chinese women, they needed someone
who spoke Chinese.
So they immediately taught me English Marine English! so eventually, after
several months, I became the interpreter
for them when they wanted dates.
The relationship went both ways. I
explained to some of them that ever since
I was 5 years old, when we had that sightseeing trip over Frankfurt, that I wanted
to be a pilot.

One of my boys said to me, Oh, wait a


second. There is a flying outfit in the north
of China, in Chunking. The Flying Tigers.
Well get you up there.
And they did.
The Flying Tigers was a group of volunteer airmen, mostly American, many of
them members of the American military,
whose mission was to protect China from
Japan before and during World War II. Its
members officially were members of the
Chinese air force. The United States did
not yet have an air force, although its predecessor, the Army Air Corps, did exist,
and the country was not yet at war with
Japan.
Mr. Krug spent about six months in
Shanghai. When he went to the Flying
Tigers, it was early 1940. He was 16, pretending to be 17, he said. I learned to fly.
There were 26 in our class. I was the
only Jew; there were some Americans
and some were British. The lessons proceeded; after some time, the instructor
said to us, Each of you is taking a plane
up now. If you take the plane down, you

Marion and Walter on their wedding day, with Marions parents,


Samuel and Deborah Horngrab.

Walter Krug with


Simon Wiesenthal,
center, and
Congressman
Charles Dornan

Walter Krug
with a young
Jerry Brown,
then as now
governor of
California

32 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

get your wings. And if you dont, we dont


have to worry about you, and there are
two others waiting to take your place.
Mr. Krug earned his wings.
Flying was different then, he said. We
had no computers. Entirely different.
Most of the time, Mr. Krug flew transport planes. They were C46s and C47s. Big
planes. Jets hadnt been invented yet, he
said. He flew materials necessary to build
the Burma Road, which ran from Rangoon
to China.
It was a dangerous job.
I was shot down over Burma, Mr. Krug
said. It was in 1942, after the war in the
Pacific had started. I was a guest of the
Japanese for 2 years. In other words, he
was held in a prison camp.
All in a days work, he said.
Remember the movie Bridge Over the
River Kwai? the acknowledged masterpiece directed by David Lean, starring
Alec Guinness and William Holden. That
was an accurate rendition of the brutality
he encountered.
I was imprisoned not in Burma but off

Walter wore his Air Force uniform at his


wedding.

Cover Story
the east coast of China, on an
island, he said. They refused
to let us put red crosses on the
roofs, so as a result the Americans bombed us twice.
To this day, I have a piece of
shrapnel that I found inside one
of these barracks.
He was in the camp until
the beginning of 1945, but
then another lucky thing happened to me, he said. They
had caught me in an American
uniform, but I had a Chinese
passport. Remember, the Flying Tigers were an American
volunteer group, so no citizenship went along with it. And Mr.
Krugs only passport had been
the stateless one from Germany.
So I applied to the Chinese government for a passport during
his time in Shanghai, and he had
obtained it.
The Japanese wanted nothing to do with the Chinese, he
said. The Chinese didnt forget
that the Japanese had occupied
parts of China in 1937.
That included a part of Manchuria, he said, following a trail
off the main path of his story.
When I was in the train, and
we went through Manchuria, we
were literally imprisoned in that
train, with every window closed
and a Japanese soldier standing
in front of every window. We
were not allowed to look out.
So when his Japanese captors
found my Chinese passport,
they literally took me out of the
camp, and the International Red
Cross took me to Saint Georges
Hospital in Bombay.
I weighed 86 pounds and
I could not walk on my own.
I have a picture to prove it. In
order to take the photo, they
had to prop me up. And there
was no uniform that fit me.
If he had stayed in the camp,
surely he would have died
before the war ended.
Once he was healthy, he
went back to the Flying Tigers.
I had no other profession, he
said. This was my profession.
By that time, the volunteer air
corps had turned into part of the
U.S. Air Force. We became the
14th Air Force.
By law, foreigners who serve
in the American armed forces
for 90 days or more become citizens. So Walter Krug, who was
born in Frankfurt and made his
way east across Europe and Asia
but had never been to the Americas, who served the United
States but had never set foot in
it, became an American citizen.

In Europe, they had naturalization teams going around and


swearing people in, he said. In
the Pacific, there was really no
need for it. There were very few
people in his situation. So they
just handed you an American
passport, and you are now an
American.
He wasnt given naturalization
papers until 1953, when he met a
judge in Philadelphia, had lunch
with him, and then the judge
handed them over.
In 1947, they wanted to give
me a rest, so they sent me to the
United States by ship, Mr. Krug
said. It was a 27-day journey,
because mines were still floating in the Pacific, so we had to
follow minesweepers. He disembarked in Hawaii, and then
I finally ended up in San Francisco, his destination so many
years and many adventures ago.
He was stationed in St. Louis
and then in Middletown, Pa.,
where aircraft damaged in the
Berlin airlift were repaired.
Then he was sent to Wiesbaden,
West Germany; it was from that
air force base that he made the
trip to England that changed his
life once again.
His parents and the parents of
Marion Horngrab, the woman
who later became his wife, had
used the same laundress in
Frankfurt. The owners of the
laundry had hidden a lot of Jewish materials, silver and gold,
he said. He went to see the
laundresss family in 1950, and
they were surprised that I was
still around. They asked him to
deliver a package to London.
It was a foggy day, and it
took Mr. Krugs plane three
tries before it could land, in an
airport well north of London.
Eventually he got there, on a
Friday morning, and told his
future wife that he had a package for her family. She said,
Why dont you come this afternoon? He did, and they invited
him for Shabbat. He was stuck.
I had entirely different plans.
And they were Orthodox and
I was not.
He had been very connected
to the Jewish world, he said.
We had only one Jewish chaplain, Felix Adler. He was a roving chaplain, so we seldom saw
him. But I had gone to a Jewish
school, and we learned Hebrew,
so from time to time I officiated
at services in the Pacific. But
only from time to time!
Now here he was, at Shabbat
dinner. I have never had a drop

Mr. Krug has eight children and nine grandchildren;


here, as always, he revels in them.

After she retired


from the American
Jewish Joint
Distribution
Committee (see
Mr. Krugs hat),
Marion Krug
trained as a
therapeutic clown.
She called herself
Libby, playing on
the Hebrew for
my heart.

of alcohol in my life, he said. I dont like the smell.


But my future father-in-law went out and bought six
bottles of whisky. He was really disappointed that an
American shouldnt drink.
That was March 10. He went back to Wiesbaden,
and Marion Horngrab bet her friends that she would

never see him again. She lost that bet although it


is fair to say that she won. I fooled her I did come
back, he said. Nineteen days later, we got engaged.
We got married on June 6, 1950, civilly, at the registrar in London, because a rabbi was not authorized
to perform a civil ceremony. And then, on June 11,
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 33

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work
for the queen, Mr. Krug said.
She would have lost money on it.
They didnt pay. And you had to sit
for days and days and days.
His mother-in-law was a beautiful woman, he added. I fell in love
with her first, before I met my wife.
Walter and Marion Krug were
married for 54 years. Mrs. Krug died
in 2004.
After they left England Mr. Krug
had transferred there from Germany
after the wedding the air force
offered him a position in Mobile,
Ala. I told them point blank that I
did not believe in segregation, and
neither did my wife, he said. I said
I refuse to go to Mobile. If I have to, I
will get out of the service today, even
if it is a dishonorable discharge. He
was sent to Denver instead. (Unfortunately, our household goods all
went to Mobile, he said.)
His loathing of segregation was
visceral, but he also had a personal
run-in with it. I flew into Valdosta
one time, and I was almost lynched,
he said. I made a mistake and put a
nickel into a Coke machine that was
for Negroes. I had to run for my life.
I remember railroad stations
with different waiting rooms for
blacks and whites, different water
fountains He knew he could not
live that way, and he certainly could
not bring up children that way.
Meanwhile, at work, I flew all
the time, he said. I told my commanding officer that I was too old
to fly a jet, that my reflexes werent
fast enough. He looked at me out of
the corner of his eye and I transitioned to jets.
Mr. Krug was in the Air Force until
1955. They were going to send me
to Korea, he said. I promised
myself that I would never go back to
the Pacific. So he left the active service, although he remained in the
reserves until 1971, and retired from
that body with the rank of lieutenant colonel.
The Krugs son, John (now Rabbi
Dr. John Krug, dean of student life
and welfare at the Frisch School in
Paramus), was born in England, and
their daughter, Sharon, in Denver.

Just out of the military, the Krug


family moved to Forest Hills, N.Y.,
and we immediately joined the
Young Israel of Forest Hills, Mr.
Krug said. I became a volunteer.
Volunteerism, both in and out of
the Jewish community, has shaped
and defined Mr. Krugs life. He
started his volunteer work in 1946,
when he still was in the Air Force,
with the Red Cross.
Young Israel of Forest Hills had
been meeting in a butcher shop; as
it grew, Mr. Krug chaired its move
into its own building and oversaw
the construction. And then I made
a huge mistake, he said, his eyes
twinkling. I became its executive
director.
The family moved to Baltimore,
where Mr. Krug became the executive director of Beth Jacob Congregation, one of the citys largest
Orthodox shuls, and the president

miles a day, taking patients to


appointments, was enough.
(I had to take a lot of patients
to Bergen Pines for lithium shots,
he said. They were violent on the
way over, and they slept on the way
back.)
When he left the Red Cross, Mr.
Krug began to work at Holy Name
Medical Center in Teaneck. He
began there at three days a week,
and spent another day at Bergen
Pines, where he led Jewish services.
He since has cut back at 92! to
two half days at Holy Name, beginning at 5:45 in the morning.
That is why Holy Name has
named Mr. Krug not only its volunteer of the week but a volunteer
extraordinare. His 25 years of work
for the medical center has encompassed more than 14,000 hours.
Holy Names president, Michael
Maron, so values Mr. Krug that he

I retired on a Tuesday, and


on Wednesday I started
driving for the Red Cross.
of the national association of Orthodox executive directors. The family
then moved to Owings Mills, Md.,
and soon he took a job at the JCC in
Washington.
In 1983, Mr. Krug went to Los
Angeles to help with the construction of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He stayed there for 2 years;
during that time, he protected the
center against protests when Vanessa Redgrave, a fiercely vocal Palestinian supporter notorious for
her reflexive Israel-loathing, played
a Holocaust survivor, Fania Fenelon,
in a film, Playing For Time. As horrified as both he and his friend Ms.
Fenelon were by the casting, it was
Mr. Krugs obligation to make sure
that the films opening, at the center, would go smoothly. It did.
It was during his stay in Los Angeles that Mr. Krug met David Dubin,
then the executive director of the
(not-yet-Kaplen) JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly. Mr. Dubin lured
Walter and Marion Krug to Bergen
County. (It likely would have been
an easy sale anyway, but the fact that
their son and his family already lived
in Teaneck made the offer ideal.)
Mr. Krug was the JCCs director of
administration, overseeing its move
into its new building. When that job
was done, in 1982, he retired.
I retired on a Tuesday, and on
Wednesday I started driving for
the Red Cross, he said. In 1990,
I decided that driving 200 to 300

included the volunteer among his


guests as he was honored by the
Sinai Schools this winter. For 25
years, Holy Names been fortunate
to have such a dedicated volunteer
as Walter, Mr. Maron said. His
incredible energy and enthusiasm
is an inspiration to our patients, to
staff, and to his fellow volunteers, as
well as to me.
Marion Krug, who had been an
executive with the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee,
retired in 2002, and immediately
went to Bergen Community College
and became a clown, working with
sick children.
Both my wife and I insisted that
our children learn to work not only
with their brains, but also with their
hands, Mr. Krug said. His two children and eight grandchildren all volunteer, and they all know how to fix
things; soon that will be true of his
nine great-grandchildren as well.
Mr. Krug is so widely known by
his nickname, Grit, that many people who know him have no idea that
his first name actually is Walter.
The name evolved through a young
granddaughters mispronunciation
of Grandpa, and it stuck, but clearly
it is much more than a childish malapropism. It is, instead, an elegantly
descriptive name for a man whose
life has demanded huge amounts
of courage, resilience, persistence,
faith, and hope.
In other words, true Grit.

Jewish World

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, greets Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor
Liberman at Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv, on June 25, 2012.
ISRAELGOVERNMENTPRESSOFFICE/KOBIGIDEON

Russia jolts Israel


with Iran missile deal
Silent strategy on Ukraine backfires
CNAANLIPHSHIZ

fter Russia invaded Ukraine


in March 2014, Israel resisted
pressure to join the United
States and its European allies
in condemning the move, citing in particular its concern not to antagonize Russia for fear it could provide Syria with a
powerful anti-aircraft missile called the
S-300.
Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman
was eager to mollify the Obama administrations anger over Israels refusal to

Putin announced that he would sell


S-300 missiles not to Syria, but to Iran
a move that defense analysts say is guaranteed to complicate any aerial strike on
Irans nuclear facilities and tip the military scales in favor of the Middle Easts
Shiite axis.
By charting its own appeasement
policy on Russia, Israel under Netanyahu and Liberman further alienated
the United States, our strongest ally, with
little to show for it, said Roman Bronfman, a Ukraine-born former Israeli lawmaker with the left-wing Meretz party

Israel maintained relative


silence on Russias actions
in Ukraine, even as some
of its closest allies were
ramping up their criticism.
endorse sanctions on Russia or support
a U.N. General Assembly resolution condemning Russias annexation of Crimea,
according to an op ed published last
year by Israels former U.S. ambassador, Itamar Rabinovich, and noted concerns about the possible missile sales
in a meeting with U.S. national security
adviser Susan Rice.
But if Israeli silence indeed was
designed to keep S-300s from its doorstep, then that policy clearly has failed.
Ignoring vociferous Israeli protests,
on April 16 Russian President Vladimir

and a television commentator on RussiaIsrael relations.


Until now, Russia and the former
Soviet states had been a rare foreign
policy success for Israel amid its escalating crisis with the Obama administration
and growing isolation in Europe.
Israel maintained relative silence on
Russias actions in Ukraine, even as some
of its closest allies were ramping up their
criticism. As recently as last year, Israel
pulled out of a deal to supply Ukraine
with military hardware to avoid angering
SEE RUSSIA PAGE 36

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Russia, Israels Channel 2 reported at the time.


Russia reciprocated by muting its criticism of Israels
military campaign against Hamas in Gaza, according to
Zvi Magen, a former Israeli ambassador in Kiev and Moscow, and now a senior research fellow at Tel Aviv Universitys Institute for National Security Studies.
Both sides were careful, Magen said. For years Russia refrained from supplying balance-disturbing weapons like the S-300 to the region; not to Iran, Syria or
Egypt.
The arrangement now appears to be in tatters.
Within hours of Putins announcement, Netanyahu
said that Israel views it with utmost gravity, and several Israeli media outlets quoted unnamed defense officials threatening to sell arms to Ukraine and Georgia,
which has also had a territorial dispute with Russia. Even
the United States, despite its harsh criticism of Putin,
has held off supplying arms to Ukraine so far, though
it recently began training Ukrainian military personnel.
Putin responded publicly to the Israeli threats with
a message of his own, saying in an April 18 interview
with Rossiya 1 TV that Israeli arms sales would merely
increase the death toll from the conflict without changing the outcome.
Its a choice for the Israeli leadership to make, Putin
said. They can do what they see necessary.
Russias silence, and its refusal to alter the military

balance in the Middle East, were not the only dividends


Israel drew from the rapprochement Liberman led with
Russia and other Eastern bloc countries.
Under Liberman, Israel signed visa waiver agreements
with nearly all the countries that once made up the
Soviet Union, paving the way for improved business ties
and luring hundreds of thousands of tourists to Israel.
Those successes were part of a broader policy that saw
Israel invest in new and lucrative partnerships including with Japan, India and China.
But to Bronfman, the crisis in relations with Russia is
proof that those efforts have their limits, and that Israel
overreached when it charted an independent course on
Ukraine.
Israels foreign policy is dependent on its best strategic partner, the United States, Bronfman said. Israel
needs that partner if it is to exist in its problematic
neighborhood, and these crises will just keep occurring
as long as Israel doesnt accept that.
Magen, however, says the crisis with Russia is a limited
one, and could even offer Israel a potential silver lining.
Putin is pushing the S-300 deal not because he wants
to harm Israel, but because he is advancing Russias
interests, Magen said. Putin does not want relations to
be ruined, and that means that the Russians could offer
some compensation for the sale of S-300s [by] using
the Russian vote at the U.N. Security Council to Israels
advantage when it comes to the Palestinian issue.


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Jewish World

Whos giving?
Republican candidates
and their Jewish backers
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON Election Day is 19 months
away, but the campaign already has begun.
Aside from Democrat Hillary Clinton, three
Republican candidates with reasonable
chances at the nomination have declared
and several others are on the cusp.
The Republican Party says its been making inroads with Jewish voters, who traditionally have favored Democrats by 2-to-1
margins.
Heres a rundown of the views of three
declared Republican candidates and
two likely candidates on issues of Jewish interest, and their connections to the
community.

Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)


Age: 43
Campaign status: Declared

was quick to propose the demand as an


amendment to a bill requiring congressional review of any Iran deal.
The drama that followed Rubios proposal, which the Obama administration
declared a poison pill, is illustrative of
Rubios tendency to move between
extreme to moderate positions. He withdrew the amendment on April 14, the
day the Senate Foreign Relations Committee considered the broader bill,
which ultimately passed unanimously.
Similar back-and-forth characterizes
his immigration record. Rubio helped
shepherd comprehensive immigration
reform through the Senate in 2013, but
after it failed in the U.S. House of Representatives, Rubio retreated to more
hawkish positions popular with the
Republican base, including tougher border security. He says the reform bill he
once embraced was the right way to go
at the time, but now say political realities
dictate a piecemeal approach.

Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas)


Age: 44
Campaign status: Declared

The future is
in your hands.
Senator Marco Rubio speaks at
the First in the Nation Republican
Leadership Summit on April 17 in
Nashua, N. H.

DARREN MCCOLLESTER/GETTY IMAGES

His Jews: Norman Braman, a car dealership


magnate who moved to Florida in 1994
after selling his stake in the NFLs Philadelphia Eagles, is a principal backer. A past
president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Braman has been close to Rubio
since his meteoric rise through the Florida
Legislature. Braman accompanied Rubio to
Israel in 2010, just after his election to the
U.S. Senate. Rubios ties to the broader Jewish community also extend back to his
career in the Florida state legislature, and
communal professionals credit him with
being accessible.
His views: Rubio has blasted President
Barack Obama on Israel, saying in his April
13 campaign launch that the administration
bears hostility toward Israel.
When Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu demanded recognition of Israel as
part of a final Iran nuclear deal, Rubio

Senator Ted Cruz addresses the First


in the Nation Republican Leadership
Summit in Nashua, N. H.

DARREN MCCOLLESTER/GETTY IMAGES

His Jews: Last year, Cruz tapped Nicolas


Muzin, a soft-spoken Orthodox Jew from
South Carolina, as an adviser. Muzin is
credited with helping catapult Senator
Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the first black senator
elected from the South since the 19th
century, to a national career. Muzin has
introduced Cruz to Orthodox Jewish
funders, including telecommunications
and energy magnate Howard Jonas, and
staged events for him in fancy kosher
eateries like Abigaels on Broadway.
His views: Cruz talks a hard line on Israel,
aligning himself with some of the Obama
SEE CANDIDATES PAGE 38

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and will begin her career at Ernst & Young in the fall.
She is among the 90% of YU students employed, in
graduate school or bothwithin six months of graduation.*
With nearly double the national average acceptance rates
to medical school and 97% acceptance to law school and
placements at Big Four accounting firms, banks and
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YU_JStandard_drop3.indd 2

11:21 AM
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL4/21/15
24, 2015
37

Jewish World
Candidates
FROM PAGE 37

administrations harshest critics. After Rabbi Shmuley Boteach advertised an upcoming panel discussion on Obamas
Iran policy in March with an ad that seemed to link national
security adviser Susan Rice to the genocide in Rwanda, one
of the featured speakers, Representative Brad Sherman,
(D-Calif.), dropped out, saying Boteach had crossed a line.
Cruz, also a featured speaker, stayed in.
Cruz likes to ask the administration tough questions on
Israel. He accused the Obama administration of playing politics with the Federal Aviation Authority during last years
Gaza War, when the FAA stopped flights to Tel Aviv for a day
or so because rockets had struck near the airport. Cruz said
no such order was in place for Ukraine, although a missile
had downed a plane there (in fact, there was such an order).
Cruz also has sought to distance himself from neoconservative hawks, arguing that his model is President Ronald
Reagan, who Cruz said favored clearly defined objectives in
any military action and opposed nation building.
Cruz shares with Rubio a biography of being born to
Cuban refugees from the Castro regime. Unlike Rubio, he
has maintained a consistently tough line on immigration,
advocating blocking Obama judicial nominees until the
president retreats on executive orders that have cleared a
path to citizenship for some undocumented immigrants.

MORE THAN JUST A CAMPING STORE

Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.)

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Age: 52
Campaign status: Declared

His views: Pauls father is the former Representative Ron


Paul, a Texas Republican who ran several times for president on a libertarian platform that included cutting off aid to
Israel. The elder Paul also was notorious for his broadsides
against the pro-Israel community, and newsletters published under his name veered into anti-Semitism, although
he has denied writing the content.
When Rand Paul ran for Senate in 2010, he would not
return calls from Kentucky Jewish leaders asking for a meeting. At first, Paul seemed to mirror his fathers positions,
telling CNN in an interview that he would include Israel in
his pledge to cut off all foreign assistance.
Since then, Paul has been more open to Jewish outreach and has visited Israel. Republican Jews like to
say his views on the country have evolved; he still
counsels cuts in foreign assistance, but adds that these
should be prioritized, with countries he deems hostile
to U.S. interests first on the list.
Paul counts Israel as a close U.S. ally, and the sole focus
of the Israel page on his campaign website is his bill to cut
assistance to the Palestinian Authority precisely because of
its parlous relations with Israel. (The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee, notably, does not support the bill.)
Pro-Israel groups remain wary of Paul, in part because he
is one of two Republicans in the Senate who will not back
bills seeking greater congressional involvement in the Iran
nuclear talks. (The other is Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona.)
Paul is a relative moderate in his party on immigration,
favoring legal status short of citizenship for undocumented
immigrants.
People who seek the American dream are not bad
people, he said a year ago.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker


Age: 47
Campaign status: Likely

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Senator Rand Paul speaks at the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference in March 2014.

GAGE SKIDMORE

His Jews: Paul has cultivated Richard Roberts, an Orthodox Jew and major New Jersey philanthropist. In 2013,
Roberts helped fund a tour of Israel for Paul and evangelical Christians. A year ago he led Paul on a tour of the
sprawling Orthodox yeshiva, Beth Medrash Govoha, in
Lakewood, which Roberts supports. Roberts has suggested, however, that he favors Wisconsin Governor Scott
Walker, who has yet to formally declare his candidacy.
Paul also shares with Netanyahu a digital consultant, Harris Media in Austin, Texas. Vincent Harris, the firms CEO,
led digital strategy in Netanyahus recent reelection campaign and is now chief digital strategist to Pauls campaign.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker at his election


night party, November 4, 2014, in West Allis, Wis.

DARREN HAUCK/GETTY IMAGES

His Jews: Walker has yet to declare, but if and when he


does, the New Jerseyan Roberts would appear to be in his
camp. Sheldon Adelson, the casino magnate and Republican Jewish kingmaker, also has backed Walker in his
gubernatorial races. A Chanukah greeting last year to a
Jewish constituent was infamously signed Molotov he
meant Mazel tov.

Jewish World
His views: Walker has earned his conservative chops principally on the basis
of his record as a governor facing down
unions in a liberal state. He now wants
to burnish his foreign policy credentials
and traveled to London in February,
but got demerits for dodging foreign
policy questions. He says he wants to
go to Israel soon. His criticisms of how
Obama has handled the Israel relationship and the Iran nuclear talks have been
pointed in their language but vague in
particulars.
On immigration, Walker has backed
reforms that include a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants,
but more recently his focus has been on
seeking to dismantle Obamas executive
orders that would provide such a path.

Former Florida Governor


Jeb Bush
Age: 62
Campaign status: Likely

Jeb Bush has surrounded himself


with foreign policy advisers who
have worked for his father and
brother as he eyes a run for the
presidency.
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES)

His Jews: Bush has been able to tap into


a broad network of fundraisers who
were loyal to the presidencies of his
brother, George W., and his father,
George H.W. Among the former are Mel
Sembler, a shopping mall magnate in
Florida who backed Bush during his
gubernatorial runs. In New York, equity
billionaire Henry Kravis hosted a lucrative evening for Bush in February.
Bush also has Jewish George W. Bush
Cabinet members on his foreign policy

Bush takes advice


from his fathers
secretary of state,
James Baker,
who angered
conservatives
last month when
he delivered a
speech critical
of Netanyahu at
J Streets annual
conference.
team, including Michael Chertoff, the
former Homeland Security secretary,
and Michael Mukasey, the ex-attorney
general who has been notable in his postBush career for his strident criticism of
what he depicts as the spread of radical
Islam. More controversially, Bush takes
advice from his fathers secretary of
state, James Baker, who angered conservatives last month when he delivered a
speech critical of Netanyahu at J Streets
annual conference. Bush has distanced
himself from the speech, although not
enough to please Adelson, who reportedly was incensed by Bakers speech.
Bushs rivalry with his one-time protg Rubio and his closeness to Baker
have put him in an odd position: He has
the enthusiastic backing of some prominent Jewish GOP backers, like Sembler
and Kravis, while others, like Adelson
and Rubios backer Braman, are lining
up to keep him from winning the GOP
nod.
His views: Bush has been critical of
how Obama has handled nuclear talks
with Iran, blaming him for allowing differences with Israel over the talks to spill
out into the open. He has visited Israel
five times.
On immigration, Bush, who speaks fluent Spanish and whose wife, Columba,
was born in Mexico, has been perhaps the
most outspoken about embracing immigration reform and a path to citizenship
for undocumented immigrants. He has
made a point of forcefully making the case
even in front of those groups most likely to
JTA WIRE SERVICE
oppose such reforms.

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24, 2015
39

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Jewish World

Met museums new president likens role to managing Yanks


HILLEL KUTTLER
HAVERFORD, PA. Visiting the Memorial de Caen
museum in Normandy, France, in 1996, Daniel Weiss
was captivated by eight photographs showing the
public hanging of three partisans in Minsk, Belarus,
on October 26, 1941.
The two male victims identities were known, but
the woman was anonymous, and Weiss set out to
learn who she was. By the following year, Weiss had
co-authored an article in the journal Holocaust and
Genocide Studies revealing that the 17-year-olds name
Masha Bruskina was long known. It had been suppressed, however, because she was Jewish. In 2009, a
new plaque including Bruskinas name was placed at
the execution site.
Weisss research was off the beaten track, given that
he then was a professor of art history at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. In an interview, Weiss
explained that he was motivated to discover the truth,
just as he was when he conducted research in his own
field of expertise.
I have wide-ranging interests, said Weiss, now the
president of Haverford College. And when I saw that
photograph, I was just drawn to it.
The scope of Weiss career will expand significantly
this summer, when he leaves Haverford to become
president of one of the countrys great cultural institutions, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan. As president, Weiss will be responsible for running much of the day-to-day operations of the third
most-visited museum in the world, according to the
London-based Art Newspaper.
In 2013, the Met had $661 million in revenue, 2,547
employees, and $3.3 billion in net assets. Besides
its flagship building on Fifth Avenue, the museum
includes the Cloisters Museum of medieval art uptown.
Next year, it will add a third site, this one in midtown.
Its something like being the manager of the Yankees, Weiss said of his new gig.
Those who know Weiss, 57, say he brings a rare combination of art expertise, academic standing, business
experience, and leadership skills to the position.
Raised in Queens and then on Long Island, Weiss
possessed a commanding presence that was evident
by the time he was 6, when he organized the neighborhood boys in an army-like outfit and marched them in
formation down the street, according to his mother.
Queens also was where Weiss saw his first masterpiece, Michelangelos sculpture The Deposition, at
the 1964 Worlds Fair. A moving sidewalk took spectators past the dramatically lit work an interesting
combination of the celebration of Renaissance art and
a tribute to modernity, Weiss said.
Weiss went on to study art history at Johns Hopkins
and earn his MBA at Yale. In 2005, he became the
president of Lafayette College in Pennsylvania. Eight
years later, he took the same post at Haverford. He will
depart after completing two school terms at the suburban Philadelphia campus.
On an afternoon in March, Haverford students
entered the cafeteria for an event billed as Donuts
With Dan. With a fire roaring nearby, the students
encircled Weiss, their friendly banter with the ultimate
authority on campus suggesting a sweet comfort.
Hes very easygoing, said Claire Dinh, a student
council co-president who meets with Weiss weekly.
But if theres something that needs to get addressed,
he does it right away.

For Weiss, a specialist in medieval art, the Met job


brings his professional and geographic arcs full circle. As
a professor of art history, he brought his undergraduate
students to the Met on field trips.
It is one of the great cultural institutions in the world,
said Weiss, who calls himself culturally Jewish. The
opportunity to become part of an organization that has
that kind of reach and that kind of capacity and that kind
of talent its a great place to be.
The demands of running the institution may slow his latest intellectual endeavor: a biography of Michael ODonnell,
an American helicopter pilot shot down over Laos in 1970.
As he did with Bruskina, Weiss is delving into the life

of a young person killed in wartime and deserving of


acclaim. In his wallet, Weiss carries a poem composed by
ODonnell, and he reads it aloud for a visitor.
Weiss began exploring ODonnells life after reading the
untitled poem in a book. He located the friend to whom
ODonnell had sent his poem, then the soldiers sister, and
compiled every imaginable scrap of paper on the man.
The ODonnell files are an incredible, historical trove of
documents that tell the story that the family has entrusted
to me, and so I feel bound to do that like for Masha
because it speaks to me, Weiss said. I guess Im drawn to
stories about courageous people who have sacrificed and
JTA WIRE SERVICE
whose stories arent otherwise told.

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 41

Jewish World

Intermarried rabbis?
Reconstructionists consider dropping ban as its seminary numbers drop
URIEL HEILMAN

he Reconstructionist movement
is on the cusp of making a historic decision about whether to
drop its longstanding ban against
intermarried rabbinical school students.
If the policy change passes, as most
expect, Reconstructionism would become
the first of Americas four major Jewish
religious denominations to ordain intermarried rabbis.
Supporters of the change argue that the
ban hews to an outdated way of defining
Jewish identity and community, and that
eliminating the ban would reaffirm Reconstructionisms commitment to progressivism and inclusivity. In 1985, the movement was the first among the major Jewish
denominations to ordain openly gay rabbis. And it embraced its first woman rabbi
in 1974, just two years after the Reform
movement. Last year it became the first
to install a gay rabbi, Deborah Waxman,
at the helm of its flagship seminary, the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.
The Jewish world should steer away
from looking at those who marry nonJews as second-class citizens, Rabbi Doug
Heifetz of Oseh Shalom, a Reconstructionist congregation in Laurel, Maryland, said.
Reconstructionism is based on the idea
of Judaism as an evolving religious civilization of the Jewish people. We cant expect
our demographic profile to be exactly like
what it was 50 to 100 years ago. I think its
appropriate for us to at least discuss rabbinic policies that reflect the changing
nature of the Jewish people.
For opponents of the change, dropping
the ban which bars admission to the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical College or
ordination to those with non-Jewish partners would undermine the movements
commitment to Jewish peoplehood and
the legitimacy of Reconstructionist rabbis
within the wider Jewish world.
We think its a misguided, wrong decision to take, Rabbi Ron Aigen said of his
congregation, Dorshei Emet in Montreal.
We dont think it promotes peoplehood.
It undermines the credibility of rabbis who
are trying to promote in-marriage. If rabbis
can model intermarriage, then it doesnt
help make the case for trying to create Jewish families that are totally committed to
Judaism. And we dont think its going to
bring in better students.
This issue is different from ordaining gay
or female rabbis, Aigen said, because marrying a non-Jewish partner is a matter of
choice.
Rabbi Lester Bronstein of Bet Am Shalom in White Plains, New York, wrote a
widely circulated letter within the movement warning that the change would take
42 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Reconstructionism in a new and unrecognizable direction, assigning equal value to


in-married unions and intermarried ones,
and dramatically altering the idea of Jewish peoplehood in ways that would be bad
for the Jewish people.
I believe in continuing to privilege inmarriage, for all the emotional, historic,
and even statistical reasons I have always
believed in it, Bronstein wrote, referring
to data that show children of intermarriage
are far less likely to be Jewishly engaged
than children of in-married parents. Bronstein wrote that if the policy changed, his
congregation would consider quitting the
movement.
It feels like a deal breaker for me,
Bronstein said.
Though movement leaders are loath to
talk about it, the Reconstructionist movement also is considering the policy change
for a practical reason: Classes at the rabbinical school, which is in the Philadelphia
area, have become so small that the viability of the entire seminary is at risk. Last
year it ordained just six new rabbis.
In 2014, Americas two main Conservative rabbinical seminaries ordained 31, and
the Reform schools 35.
The question becomes, can the college survive period, said one recently
ordained Reconstructionist rabbi who
asked that her name not be used. You
have a small teaching faculty and a lot of
layers of administration. If youre going to
have classes of two students, its very hard
to justify this whole structure.
Waxman, the president of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, declined to
be interviewed for this story. But an article
she wrote in April 2014 on The Reconstructionist Movement and Peoplehood
hints at where she stands on the issue.
Peoplehood is widely seen by individuals and organizations alike as an
end in and of itself rather than a means
to an end. This is counter to classical and
contemporary Reconstructionist aspirations, she wrote. The Jewish people in
America are moving from being primarily
a community of descent (that is, defined
by biology) to a community of consent.
In the face of many choices and porous
boundaries, the challenge to communities
of descent is to find ways to renew ourselves so that our children might choose to
devote their energies to us even after experiencing opportunities for affiliating with
other groups and other types of people.
Launched by the late Rabbi Mordecai
Kaplan, the Reconstructionist movement
envisions Judaism as a constantly evolving religious civilization stemming from
Jewish history and culture. It really came
into its own in the 1960s, when several
Reconstructionist congregations formally

Newly ordained rabbis Ilanit Goldberg, left, and Nicholas Renner drape a tallit
over Malka Packer during her ordination ceremony at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical Colleges 2014 commencement.

COURTESY OF RRC/JEWISH RECONSTRUCTIONIST COMMUNITIES

took root and the college was created. The


movement now has more than 100 congregations across North America, with some
dually affiliated with other liberal denominations making Reconstructionism a distant fourth to Americas three main Jewish
denominations.
In a bid to cut costs, the seminary and
the movements congregational arm,
the Jewish Reconstructionist Federation,
merged in 2012, becoming the Jewish
Reconstructionist Communities.
Intermarried families are very common in Reconstructionist congregations,
as they are in other liberal American Jewish streams. At the behest of the college,
the movements congregations have been
debating this issue for the past few months
and reporting their sentiments back to the
movements leaders. In some congregations, a significant number of intermarried members support the existing ban
on ordaining intermarried rabbis. Overall, however, most congregations appear
to back changing the policy, according to
synagogue leaders who have spoken with
college officials about the issue.
The movement already has some intermarried rabbis men and women whose
unions were consecrated after ordination.
Rabbi Michal Woll, who leads the Ann
Arbor Reconstructionist Congregation in
Michigan, is married to a practicing Catholic who goes to Mass every Friday. Woll
says the colleges rule is too arbitrary to
account for contemporary Jewish life.
That rule is too blunt an instrument for
the world we live in now. It doesnt have
the ability to suss out all the complications
of our lives, said Woll, who was ordained
at the college in 2007, when she was single
and dating mostly Jews.
There are lots of men out there who are
Jewish who have no interest in Judaism, no

interest in Jewish practice, and could not


tolerate the fact that Im a rabbi. If you are
going to evaluate any of our partners, you
should evaluate all of our partners, she
said. Just being Jewish by label doesnt
get you very far. Is it important to me that
somebody can be identified as Jewish? No.
Whats important to me is that somebody
has an active Jewish life.
Supporters of the ban say the argument
in favor of embracing intermarried clergy
is belied by the landmark Pew Research
Centers survey of American Jews, which
found that the children of intermarriages
are far less likely to identify as Jewish than
the children of in-married parents.
Its not clear when the Reconstructionist
Rabbinical College will make a final decision on the policy change.
Regardless of the outcome, congregations will retain full autonomy to hire
rabbis of their choosing, Josh Peskin,
the colleges vice president for strategic
advancement, said.
Whatever ultimately is decided, Bet Am
Shaloms Bronstein says it could splinter
his congregation, one of the movements
oldest. If the college elects to drop the ban,
some members are going to insist the synagogue disaffiliate; others will insist it stay
in the movement. Either way, some probably will quit in protest, he said.
Even if the ban stays in place, Bronstein
faces an uphill battle winning back the
confidence of intermarried congregants
who feel alienated by the intensity of the
debate.
This debate has begun a process of
destabilizing the stasis weve created here
for decades so intermarrieds could feel
welcome and involved, Bronstein said.
No matter what the college decides, the
worms are out of the can here.


JTA WIRE SERVICE

ion

SE
HOU

Abrams

to the New Milford Jewish Center, and then to the JCC


of Paramus. He had been and continued to be deeply
connected to the Jewish community, and a resolute Zionist.
In fact, his grandson said, his grandfather always kept
kosher, so he could not eat much at the park. Hed go
across the street to Hirams a famous hot-dog stand in
Fort Lee, both then and now but hed only eat eggs.
His mind was American, but his heart was Jewish, Mr.
Schneck said, and some of that sensibility translated itself to
the park, in its family-friendliness.

FROM PAGE 18

21

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A
M
did not go straight into military service.
Despite his
fathers plans to keep him out of the war, Mr. Abrams
was desperate to enlist, but, ironically, the Army did
not want him. His eyesight was abysmal. He was so
dedicated to the United States that he wrote letters to
Eisenhower and to all the other generals, pleading to
be let in, Mr. Schneck said.
Eventually Mr. Abrams private campaign worked.
USE
H O 1945,
He was allowed to enlist, but by then it Lwas
L
and the war had ended. He was assigned to Bolling
Field in Washington, where he worked on the bases
newsletter. He rose quickly, becoming first its public
relations director and then, two copies later, its chief
editor. He kept every copy he ever worked on, Mr.
Schneck said. He had fun with it he knew he was
entertaining people.
He discovered his niche.
After his discharge in 1948, Mr. Abrams went to
NYU, where he earned a degree in public relations.
At first he worked as a pr consultant, shuttling from
job to job, but his obvious passion for Palisades
Amusement Park, and his genius at coming up with
stunts to promote it, soon led to a full-time job there.
By then, Palisades Amusement Park was owned
by Irving Rosenthal, another true character. He
was about three feet tall, and very demanding, Mr.
Schneck said, again retelling family lore. He had a
real Napoleon complex. He was always dressed very
nicely. Very expensively. His wife, Gladys Shelley, was
a lyricist and composer. It was Ms. Shelley who came
up with the parks jingle, a tune that anyone who was
sentient by 1971, when the park closed for good, has
permanently encased somewhere in his or her mind.
Sol Abrams job was to promote the park, and he
did it in increasingly outrageous ways. The park was
the essence of fun, and he was the king of publicity
stunts, Mr. Schneck said. Hed be quiet, and then he
would just look at two things, and put them together,
and say Oh, thats possible. I just have to work it out.
And then he would.
After the park closed, Mr. Abrams continued
working as a publicist. He and his family belonged

, 2015

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Palisades Amusement Park has been closed for decades


now; the last generation of children who remember it are
closing in on late middle age. But it truly is a mythic place;
ask anyone who was there and you see it.
Much of that was thanks to Sol Abrams.
Mr. Abrams is survived by his wife, Zelda; their three
children, Jill Schneck of North Caldwell, Sue Finkel of
Raleigh, N.C., and Gary Abrams of Centerville, Ohio, and
six grandchildren.
Palisades Amusement Park is survived by memories.

TION FU
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, 2015
21
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Federation Full House


May 21, 2015
The Alpine Country Club
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Dinner and Cocktails at 6:30 pm
Tournament at 7:30 pm
A fabulous poker tournament and event for
professionals and philanthropists in support
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RA

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NEW
JERS
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21
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Jewis
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, 2015

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This story first appeared in the New Jersey Jewish News

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collection and took pride in the stringent accuracy


of its classification by date and origin.
Ms. Wilzig also remained constant in her connection to the Jewish community. There was a mezuzah
on the entrance to the museum, and in 2009, she
presented a restored Torah scroll to Chabad in South
Beach. For the past five years, she underwrote Holocaust Education Week in Miami.
Daniel Staffenberg, the executive director of the
Jewish Community Foundation of Greater MetroWest, where the Wilzigs were active before their
move, said, Naomi was a woman who lived life
with passion and commitment in everything she did.
Whether it was her philanthropy, art, friendships or
family, Naomi was all in.
She was one of those people who cherished each
relationship and moment. You walked away from
a meeting with her uplifted and smiling, each and
every time. She always made time for you, made you
feel special and that your work together had meaning and importance in her life.

PLAYER SPONSOR
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Jewish Federation

FROM PAGE 18

FE

TION FU

Jewish World

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HOU

FE

FE

Chairs
Daniel Herz
Jason Schwartz
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Jared Bluestein
Clive Gershon
Michael Gutter
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Erik Maschler
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For more information, please contact Beth Jenis, 201-820-3911

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 43

FE

DE

Rockland
Rockland Holocaust Museum set for renewal
Renovations about to begin at new home in Rockland Community College
LARRY YUDELSON

efore the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in


Washington or the Museum
of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan, there was the Holocaust Museum
and Study Center in Spring Valley. With
its roots in the Rockland County Legislature, which launched the Rockland
County Commission on the Holocaust
in 1979, in 1988 the museum opened in
a building belonging to Spring Valleys
public library.
Now, more than a quarter century later,
the museum has a new home and a new
name, and it is about to start building a
larger exhibition with state-of-the-art interactive exhibits.
The new home is less than four miles
away, at Rockland Community College. There the center will occupy a
6,000-square-foot floor of a library building. Last week, a hundred museum supporters took a tour of the soon-to-be-renovated space, before joining an audience of
500 for a Yom Hashoah lecture.
For the Holocaust Museum, the new
home is about more than space.
The new partnership is truly the fulfillment of a dream, said Paul Galan, co-president of the museums board of trustees.
For years, the board had wanted to find
a home in an educational institution. We
needed to broaden the scope of the work
we were doing, he said. Eventually we
were able to get the college and the county
to consider our dream.
The college has welcomed us with
open arms. Its been bending over backward to help us establish and
settle in in the most incredible ways. Their hospitality is
overwhelming.
The campus location
puts the museum in a cultural and diverse hub of the
county, said Andrea Winograd, the museums executive
director. Think about the
student body: 8,000 students
of different races, religions,
and creeds.
Reflecting this broader
scope, the museum is changing its name to the Holocaust
Museum and Center for Tolerance and Education.
We really look at genocide through the
lens of the Holocaust, Mr. Galan said. In
the new expanded exhibition, We are

44 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Paul Galan, inset left. Artists design for new museum exhibit, above.

going to be dealing even more extensively


with other forms of genocide, but defining
the Holocaust as the greatest genocide of

all.
Mr. Galan is a Holocaust survivor
originally from Slovakia and a retired
filmmaker.
I wanted to put my communication
skills to communicating about the Holocaust, he said.
And indeed, 18 interviews he filmed of
survivors from Rockland and Bergen provide the core of an interactive exhibit,
where visitors will be able to watch the
testimony in short segments.
Students who are interested in different subjects can touch on that and just
learn about that subject, Ms. Winograd
said. Its quite a masterpiece.
The planned exhibition will open with

the question of What is genocide and


present the Holocaust, and smaller genocides in places including Rwanda and
Sudan. Visitors will walk along a timeline
of the Holocaust, from the anti-Semitism
that produced it through liberation. The
display will link concepts from the Holocaust to their recurrence in other genocides. For example, a discussion of Nazi
propaganda is followed by a discussion
of propagandas role in the Cambodian
genocide.
The renovations should begin within
the next month or two, and are expected
to last a year and a half. The museum will
remain open meanwhile, and its educational programs will continue.

Rockland

Laugh with comedian Carol Leifer


Womens Philanthropy, a division of the Jewish
Federation of Rockland County, will host a spring
outreach and fundraising event featuring comedian Carol Leifer at the Rockleigh Country Club
in Rockleigh on Thursday, May 14.
Ms. Leifer, a comedian, writer, and actress
whose career began in the 1970s, is a three-time
Emmy Award nominee and a writer/producer
known for her work on Seinfeld, Saturday Night
Live, the Larry Sanders Show, and the Academy
Awards. She has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show, Real Time with Bill Maher, the Howard Stern show, and Fresh Air with Terry Gross

to promote her bestselling book When You Lie


About Your Age, The Terrorists Win. Last year,
she released her second book, How to Succeed
in Business Without Really Crying.
The evening with Leifer begins with a private
meet-and-greet at 6 p.m., where attendees can
have their picture taken with her. Buffet dinner,
the auction, and the program begin at 7.
For information or to buy tickets, go to www.
jewishrockland.org/spring-gala before May 7,
the registration deadline. Leifers appearance is
made possible by the generosity of local sponsors, including Riviera Produce Corporation, TD

BRIEFS

Temple Beth El
to host talk
on Life in Israel
The National Council of Jewish Women, Rockland
Section, presents Life in Israel, a talk by Timna
Mekaiten, the Rockland community emissary from
Israel, through Jewish Federation of Rockland County.
Timna, who grew up in Jerusalem and graduated from
Hebrew University, teaches about Israeli culture and
current events.
The program starts at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 6,
at Temple Beth El, 415 Viola Road, Spring Valley. The
free program includes refreshments and is open to the
public.

L Shana
L

Shana
Shul displays flags to remember victims
Tovah!
Tovah!

Carol Leifer

For the past few years we have copfew different colors, each flag representied a Holocaust Commemoration I first
ing 10,000 civilians murdered in the Holocaust, causes drivers and walkers to stop
observed set up by the Hillel group at
and read the poster describing the display.
University of Colorado in Boulder, Rabbi
After helping to plant the flags, Hebrew
Ariel Russo of Congregation Sons of Israel
school students participated in a teaching
in Upper Nyack reports. The lawn display,
program
ceremony
led byHarvey
Rabbi Russo.
which is made of 1,200
colored
flags
of a Dranow
Jamie
and
Steven
and
Larry
A. Model
Schwartz

Wishing you
a sweetyou
newa sweet
year. new year.
Wishing

Jamie
and Steven
Dranow General
Larry A.Manager
Model Harvey Schwartz
Gregg Brunwasser
Michael
L. Rosenthal,
Gregg Brunwasser Michael L. Rosenthal, General Manager
As your local Dignity Memorial providers, we wish you
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May 29 ...........................................8:02
pm

Candlelighting

Large display on premises. 845-425-2256


Large display on premises. 845-425-2256

Hellman Memorial Chapels

Jewish Preschool
of the Nyacks
receives license

15 State Street Spring Valley, NY 10977

845-356-8600

www.hellmanmemorialchapels.com
DignityMemorial.com www.hellmanmemorialchapels.com
DignityMemorial.com
www.jewishmemorialsofrockland.com
www.hellmanmemorial.com

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BE OUR GUEST
FOR OUR
SPRING EVENTS

q Yoga with Rhonda

CLUBHOUSE
H

THE

The Jewish Preschool of the Nyacks was accredited by


the New York State Office of Children and Family Services in February. The action enables the preschool,
housed at Congregation Sons of Israel in Upper Nyack,
to accommodate 34 preschoolers and 12 toddlers for
full-day programs.
Founded three years ago, the preschool began with
three children and one teacher, and has grown to
three classrooms, five teachers, and 17 students.
The school was praised by Rebecca Stiles, a preschool parent. Our son has thrived at the Jewish
Preschool of the Nyacks, she said. He loves going
to school every day, interacting with his friends, and
learning with his wonderful teachers. As parents, we
love the small class sizes, the patient and talented
teachers, and the opportunity to get to know other
families in the community.
Now a part-time program, the preschool plans to
expand the number of students and instructional
hours.
The program focuses on socialization, fine and gross
motor skills, awareness of society, Jewish values, and
academics. It includes music, yoga, Torah, occupational therapy, and Hebrew.
Congregation Sons of Israel is an egalitarian Conservative congregation of 200 families in the heart of the
Nyack area, along the Hudson River.

Bank, and Harrington Press.


The Jewish Federation of Rockland leads
efforts that strengthen Jewish life and meet
the critical needs of the Jewish community
in Rockland County, Israel, and around the
world. As a member of Jewish Federations
of North America, the federation is part of
a network of 157 such organizations across
the continent. The Jewish Federation of
Rockland County is a non-profit 501 (c) (3)
organization with offices at 450 West Nyack
Road, West Nyack. Check www.jewishrockland.org.

A
A T
T

C
C O
O L
L L
L E
E G
G E
E

R
R O
O A
A D
D

POOL SPA FITNESS

Thursday, April 30 11 a.m.

q Brain Education &


Fitness Training with
Greg

Wednesday, May 6 11 a.m.

Heart-healthy lunch following


each event. Tours available

2014

Beautiful Apartments.
New Clubhouse. Kosher Dining.
2000 FountainView Drive Monsey, NY
F O U N TA I N V I E W. O R G

RSVP to 888-831-8685
Today!
PA RT N E R

Supporter of the
Jewish Federation of
Rockland County

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 45

Rockland
Cooking demo
and tasting
A pinch of this, a dash of that is the theme
for a cooking demonstration and a chance
to taste delicacies to benefit the Holocaust
Museum and Center for Tolerance and Education in Suffern May 20 at 7 p.m.
The menu includes iced tea fruit sangria, watermelon feta salad, New York
cheesecake, and lots of schmoozing. The
$36 charge benefits the museum. RSVP
to amy@mj-enterprises.com as space is
limited. The event is at a private home in
Suffern.
To stay updated on Holocaust and Tolerance Education Programs and other
events, text 22828 and enter HMSC.

Temple to honor
its long-time
congregants
To celebrate long-time congregants, Temple Beth Sholom of New City will hold a
Milestone Membership service on Friday,
May 29. Thirty-six synagogue members
who have been members for 36 years or
longer will be honored with a gift from the
congregation.
Membership in a synagogue represents
a commitment to ensuring that Judaism will
continue to flourish, Rabbi Brian Leiken
said. Over the years, synagogues have
been losing members due to challenges in
financial constraints, the prioritization of

other memberships and beyond. The commitment of Jews to retain membership in a


synagogue represents a commitment to the
future of Judaism itself. Long-term members
are not only remaining for themselves but
also for the future generations.
There are many synagogue leaders who
feel that the synagogues priority should
be gaining new members, he continued.
While new members are important, we
must do our job in educating members
about the importance of staying. The synagogue is the one place where Judaism is
communal, where life is seen through the
lens of the community
The synagogue is about much more
than personal relationships with God. It
is ultimately about the relationships we

have bnei Adam lchaveiro, between a


person and his/her fellow, Rabbi Leiken
concluded.

Array of services
offered survivors
of the Holocaust
Rockland Jewish Family Service can help
Holocaust survivors age with dignity. Assistance includes home health care or companion service, case management, help
with pension forms, food aid, medical and
dental expenses and transportation needs.
To learn more or for help, call Doris Zuckerberg at (845) 354-2121, ext.198, or email her
at dzuckerberg@rjfs.org.

APS Driving Lessons

Bergen/Rockland

Alan Schlesinger
704-996-1082

Classic Tile

Visit our beautiful, huge showroom


Our expert staff will guide you

Expert Sales & Installation Referrals Residential & Commercial

Ceramic Glass
Natural Stone Porcelain
BATHROOM KITCHEN INTERIORS OUTDOOR LIVING
34 West Washington Ave. Pearl River, NY 10965 (845) 735-7400
Mon. Tues. Wed. 9-5 Thurs 9-8 Fri 9-3

OPEN SUNDAY 11-4

tbw rmw

PRESENT

JCC Rocklands 5th

WOMENS HEALTH &


WELLNESS SYMPOSIUM
IN MEMORY OF DR. MINNA JOSEF

Tuesday, May 19, 6:15pm


Join us for a girls night out
Dinner Speaker Demos
For more information contact Julie Sadowski at
845.362.4400 ext 175 or julies1@jccrockland.org

JCC Rockland

450 West Nyack Road


West Nyack, NY 10994

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Iris Krasnow
Journalist, Professor and
New York Times bestselling
author of Sex After
Women Share How Intimacy
Changes as Life Changes.

Visit jccrockland.org/whs

46 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Former DMV Examiner


National Safety Council Certified
National Traffic Safety Institute Certified
Instruction in Parents Car
American Safety Institute for Point
and Insurance Reduction Certified
Find Testimonials @ Facebook.com/APSDrivingLessons

Singles 65+
Get Together
40

50

60

30
20
10
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Sun. May 17, 11 a.m.


JCC Rockland
405 W. Nyack Rd.
70
W. Nyack, NY
80
Refreshments $3
90
RSVP Gene Arkin
845-356-5525

Laugh with
Comedian Carol Leifer
Come and

May 14
7:00 PM

The Rockleigh

cocktails
buffet
auction

Jewish Federation of Rockland County Womens Philanthropy

SPRING GALA

Learn more and register at


jewishrockland.org/spring-gala
or call 845-362-4200 x121
Made possible by

Jewish World

Shabbat Tent offers peace and good vibes at Coachella


Gabe Friedman
During the Coachella Valley Music and Arts
festival, nearly 100,000 people descend
upon the Colorado Desert in Indio, California, for what has become the worlds highestgrossing music festival.
For most normal people, the festival doubles as an extreme endurance test. Temperatures regularly creep toward 100 degrees during the day without the added heat from
large, dancing crowds and the music blasts
for 12 hours, starting at around 11 a.m.
Just outside the main concert grounds,
where thousands of people sleep in tents
to prepare for the next day of the three-day
party, festival-goers can find the Shabbat Tent
described by its leader as an oasis of hospitality in the crazy festival environment.
Its a little bit like the Jewish people in the
desert, the tent director, Rabbi Yonah Bookstein, said. I think putting up a tent and welcoming people is in our DNA.
The Shabbat Tent, now in its third year
at Coachella, is exactly what it sounds like.
Under Booksteins direction, a group of 10
or so volunteers, all in their 20s, helps run
a Shabbat service and Friday night dinner

before the main acts hit the stage. On Saturday, the tent holds an 11 a.m. service followed
by lunch. Jews from all over the world, of all
denominations (and varying levels of sobriety) stop in to hang out, meet new friends or
just snack on some challah. After the music
ends on Saturday night, the tent hosts an
open jam session.
Bookstein, 45, is the rabbi of the newly
formed Pico Shul in Los Angeles and is the
rabbi in residence at the University of Southern California Hillel. He runs the tent with
his wife, Rachel, and tries to see a few of the
musical acts during the weekend, but he usually gets caught up in the tents activities and
social atmosphere.
People are coming in and out all day and
all night, Bookstein said. Maybe at 3 a.m.
theres no one there.
As an organization, Shabbat Tent has
existed since 2000. But since Bookstein
took over five years ago, the venture has
broadened its scope, setting up shop in as
many as seven festivals per year. Among
others, Shabbat Tent has visited Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn.; the High Sierra Music Festival
in Quincy, Calif.; and the Sundance Film

The Shabbat Tent provides a Jewish-oriented reprieve from the heat at the
Coachella Music and Arts Festival.
Courtesy of Shabbat Tent

Festival in Park City, Utah.


Musicians and artists often join in the services. Bookstein credits Matisyahus visits to
the Shabbat Tent at some festivals for boosting the organizations profile.
The premise has been such a success that
Bookstein is working to develop a Shabbat
Tent app, which would keep users informed
about the organizations events and help Jews

at festivals without a Shabbat Tent create one


on their own.
At Coachella two years ago, Bookstein said
a young woman with tattoos and dreadlocks
asked him about the tent as the festival was
winding up on Sunday.
She said, If I had known that being Jewish
was this cool, I never would have left after my
bat mitzvah, Bookstein said.JTA Wire Service

Coming soon

Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015 47

Dining Guide

THE RECORD

Where Good Food


Meets Good People

MEZE

COCKTAILS

Available for private parties & catering

FINE
ITALIAN
DINING

LUNCH
DINNER &
COCKTAILS
Variety of
Pasta Dishes,Veal,
Chicken, Steak,
Chops &
Fresh Seafood

18 PIERMONT ROAD TENAFLY, NJ


201-569-5999 AXIATAVERNA.COM

Ossys
Cafe

Rated

DINNER

CRAINS NY

Elegant Dining
In a Casual Atmosphere

LIVE MUSIC EVERY TUESDAY

LUNCH

NewGreek

Experience the vintage era


of old New York. Featuring
an extensive menu of
old-fashioned homemade
diner classics, fresh seafood,
chopped salad station,
sandwiches, Italian gelato,
delicious desserts
and a full bar.

Daily Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials

SALADS SANDWICHES BURGERS


PANINIS WRAPS SOUPS PASTA
STEAKS SEAFOOD

Free Delivery No Minimum Order Required


201-398-9700
39-10 Broadway Fair Lawn NJ
201-943-5664
Fri. & Sat. Open 24 Hrs.

550 Bergen Blvd. Ridgefield NJ


www.gothamcitydiner.com
Open 7 Days A Week 6am-2am

FRIDAY
NIGHT CHOP
SPECIALS
LAMB
VEAL

Book now for your special occasions:


graduation, proms, weddings & more
TRY OUR
ALFRESCO
MARTINI

Private Rooms Available


seating 30, 70 and 120 guests

www.ossyscafe.com

Visit our site & see video of our rooms,


restaurant & check our reviews

160 Lincoln Ave., Hawthorne


973-423-9203
OPEN 6 DAYS CLOSED MONDAYS
RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED ON WEEKENDS

Est. since 1991

CHINESE CUISINE COCKTAIL LOUNGE


HILLSDALE

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE SUSHI BAR


FRANKLIN LAKES
Daily Luncheon Specials Take out or Dine in
Ample Parking Reservations Recommended
Gift Cards Available
Best Chinese
Restaurant Party Facilities Available for up to 100 People

Happy
Mothers Day
Special Gift For You
Any Purchase of $50 or more
and receive an elegant gift
(4/22/15-5/10/15)
Dine in only
Limited supply while they last

Recommended by: Rated Excellent by The Record


Accepting
The Best Chinese Restaurant in the Pasack Valley Zagat
Reservations
Best Sushi
Great service, great food, and is arguably one of the consistently best For Mothers
Restaurant
Day
Chinese restaurant in the Rockland/Bergen area
Rated by The Courier Rated by Gail Gerson for the NY Daily News
Everything on the menu there is good. New Jersey Monthly
2014
READERS
CHOICE

2ND PLACE

CHINESE RESTAURANT

295 Kinderkamack Rd, Hillsdale 201-358-8685

825 Franklin Lakes Rd, Franklin Lakes (By Market Basket) 201-891-7866
www.goldendynastynj.com

48 Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015

Come Celebrate
Mothers Day
With Us!
641 Main St. Hackensack, NJ
(201) 489-3287 (Eats) Fax (201) 489-4442
Sun-Thurs 7am-11pm Fri, Sat 7am-Midnight
Email: fairmounteats@aol.com www.fairmount-eats.com

LET US HAVE YOUR FAX NUMBER.


WE WILL FAX YOU DAILY SPECIALS AND SOUPS.

Dining Guide
SAKURA offers a dining
experience to suit any taste.
The atmosphere is elegant,
the cuisine is more like what
you get in Japan.

HHHH

New York Times & Star Ledger

RESTAURANT

Fabulous Traditional
Italian Food

JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Middle Eastern Restaurant

Delectable Entrees
Extraordinary Service
Family Friendly Fresh Fish Daily
Sushi / Sashimi Bar

2014
READERS
CHOICE

Charming & Casual Atmosphere


Newly Remodeled Party Room
25 to 60 people
CLOSED ON TUESDAY

371 FRANKLIN AVE., WYCKOFF 201-848-6988/6989


44 ESSEX ST., MILLBURN 973-379-4900
Open 7 days Lunch: MonSat 113
Dinner: MonThurs 3-10, FriSat 311, Sun 12:309:30

www.sakurawyckoff.com

SPECIAL
OFFER

12 TAPPAN ROAD
HARRINGTON PARK, NJ
Tel. 201-767-4245
Fax 201-768-9271
www.dinoshp.com

FIRST PLACE
EARLY BIRD

TOP 3

HUMMUS
MIDDLE EASTERN
RESTAURANT

40%
OFF

BOTTLE OF
WINE
With coupon. Exp. 6/11/15

178 Piermont Road Cresskill, NJ


(201) 816-7343 Fax: (201) 816-0254

www.samdanrestaurant.com

B R I GAN T I N E

SE A FOOD

RESTAURANT &
FRESH FISH MARKET
All food prepared
with the finest ingredients
LUNCH & DINNER
Offering Sustainable Fish &
Organic Farm Raised Fish
We Select Fresh Fish Daily
From The Fulton Fish Market
Seafood Party Platters

Chef Owner Alfred Ianniello


formelry of Stony Hill Inn, SPQR,
and Umbertos Clam House.
Eat in
or
take out

Ample parking
in rear

Off premise catering


for all occasions, corporate luncheons/
business meetings

112 Lincoln Ave., Hawthorne, NJ

973-949-5600
Mon-Fri Noon to 10 Sat 1:30-10 Sun 3-10
www.BrigantineSeafoodNJ.com

INDIAN CUISINE

Finest in Rockland & Bergen Counties


Since 1986

MOTHERS DAY
BRUNCH

12:00-3:00 $14.95
FREE GLASS OF WINE
OR SOFT BEVERAGE
Mention this ad

DINNER 5-10

LUNCH MENU
TUEs-Fri 12:00 To 2:30
Sat. 12-2:30 Regular Menu

GoUrMET
DiNNEr & CoCkTaiLs
Tues. thru Thurs. 5-10 pm
Fri. & Sat. 5-11 pm Sun. 1-9:30 pm
All major credit cards accepted
Find us on the web
www.priyaindiancuisineny.com

36 Lafayette Ave. Suffern, NY


845-357-5700 Fax 845-357-5821

Fine Dining in
a Relaxed Atmosphere
Before or After Dinner
Enjoy Live Music
in our Lounge
Fri. & Sat. Evenings
The Dispatch 7/11/87
and The Herald News 8/12/87
The Record 8/14/98 - 2/1/02
Excellent - Zagat
1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2014

OPEN FOR MOTHERS DAY


Lunch 11:30 am - 3 pm Dinner 5 pm - 11 pm
Lunch on Saturday from 1:00 on
Open Monday-Sunday for lunch & dinner
Ask about our party facilities

53 W. Passaic St., Rochelle Park

201-843-1250
Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015 49

0003574344-01_0003574344-01 10/4/13 4:12 P


Dining Guide

Mothers Day

La Lanterna Cafe & Grill


29 West Ridgewood Avenue, Ridgewood
201-444-5520 www.lalanternaofridgewood.com

Mothers
Day
Mothers BRUNCH
Day
BUFFET
SUN, MAY 10, 2015

Lunch
Afternoon Tea
Baby Showers
Bridal Showers
Private Parties

Join us for
Mothers
Day
Weekend

Small but elegant Tuscany setting,


where food and great service make
friends out of our customers.

GRAND
SUN, MAY 10, 2015

SUN, MAY 10, 2015

BRUNCH

BUFFET
BUFFET
BRUNCH

RESERVE NOW
Graduation Parties,
Bridal & Baby
Showers

1030 a 1230 p 230 p


$40 adults | $20 kids (<3 NO CHARGE)

1030 a 1230 p 230 p includes coffee, tea, soda


1030
1230 ap complimentary
230 p
alsoa enjoy
mimosa or bloody mary
$40 adultsMoms
| $20 kids
(<3 NO CHARGE
)

$40 adults | $20 kids (<3 NO CHARGE)

includes coffee, tea, soda

includes coffee, tea, soda

PRIX-FIXE

Moms also enjoyMoms


a complimentary
mimosa ormimosa
bloodyormary
also enjoy a complimentary
bloody mary

SUNDAY BRUNCH

DINNER
DINNER
DINNER430 p 700 p
PRIX-FIXE
PRIX-FIXE

430 p 700 p
Open for Dinner Tues-Thurs 5-10 Fri & Sat 5-11
430
p

700
Served until noon every Sunday
Sun 5-9 Closed Mondays
A lovelypdinner!
four-course
dinner!
A lovely four-course
| $45 per
person* | $45 per person*
A lovely four-course dinner! |*excluding
$45 taxper
person*
& gratuity
*excluding tax & gratuity
wine pairing optional
*excluding tax$25
& gratuity
Open Saturday and Sundays
$25 wineBibiz
pairing
optional
224 Fairview Ave., Westwood
Restaurant | Lounge
$25 wine pairing optional
for |Private
Lounge Parties
284 Center Ave,
Westwood, NJ Bibiz Restaurant
Bibiz Restaurant
| Lounge
201-664-2608
La Lanternas
CustomerNJParking lot is available
Ave, Westwood,
284 Center Ave, Westwood,
NJ 284 Center
201.722.8600
Open Tues-Sun 11am-5pm
www.harmonytearoom.com

201.722.8600

0003574344-01_0003574344-01 10/4/13 4:12 PM Page 1

0003574344-01_0003574344-01 10/4/13 4:12 PM Page 1

Accepting
Reservations for
Mothers Day

GRAND
OPENING
GRAND OPENING

Limited supply while they last

Mothers Day
Brunch
Kids under 10

Special Gift For You


(4/22/15-5/10/15)
Dine in only

Join Us
to
Celebrate
Mom

11.00am - 3.00pm
Adults $18.99
Kids $8.99

Happy
Mothers Day
Any Purchase of $50 or more
and receive an elegant gift

behind the restaurant off Liberty St.

201.722.8600
Major Credit Cards Accepted

Gift Certificates Available


Lunch Specials
GiftDaily
Certificates
Available
CHINESE
CUISINE
Ample Parking

Best New
Restaurant

Take-Out / Dine-In

Reservations Recommended

Scan Code for


Menu & Website

BYO

201.529.8288
Scan Code for

Scan Code for

Menu & Website


at:www.imperialdynastynj.com
our website
Visit
Fri. & Sat.
11:30am
11:00pm
Sun. 12:00 noon 10:00pm
Menu & Website

3 Franklin Turnpike, Mahwah 201.529.8288


Visit our3website
www.imperialdynastynj.com
Mahwah 201.529.8288
Turnpike,
Franklinat:
Visit our website at: www.imperialdynastynj.com
50 Jewish Standard APRIL 24, 2015

Nellies Place

9 Franklin Turnpike
Waldwick NJ 07463
201.652.8626

DailyGift
Lunch
CertifiSpecials
cates Available
Take-Out
/ Dine-In
Ample
Parking
Daily
Specials
Ample Parking
Mon. Lunch
Thurs. 11:30am
10:00pm

Fri. & Sat. 11:30am 11:00pm Sun. 12:00 noon 10:00pm


Take-Out/Dine-In
Mon. Thurs. 11:30am 10:00pm

Mahwah
3 Franklin
Mon.
Turnpike,
Thurs.
10:00pm
Fri.& Sat. 11:30am 11:00pm Sun.
12:00
noon11:30am
10:00pm

Includes Salad Bar


&
Complimentary glass
of champagne
for guests over 21

Dining Guide

TAVERNA

RESTAURANT, OYSTER BAR


& SEA GRILL
THE RECORD
ZAGATS RATED
NEW YORK STYLE
ATMOSPHERE

Authentic
Greek
Cuisine

LARGEST VARIETY OF
FRESH SEAFOOD FOR
SEAFOOD LOVERS

LUNCH & DINNER

PRIME SELECT BLACK ANGUS BEEF

201-703-9200

PRIVATE PARTIES AVAILABLE


TEL. 201-796-0546
INFO@OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM

SPACE IS LIMITEDRESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED MELTINGPOT.COM


(201) 664-8877 WESTWOOD, NJ 07675

238 Broadway Rt. 4 East


Elmwood Park, NJ 07407

WWW.OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM

PL

1S T

EA R S

Other Packages Available, Call For Details


ExcellentThe
Record, 3/17/2000
Open Seven Days For Lunch
& Dinner

IAN

TE

T
-I

AL

Birthdays, Anniversaries, Corporate Functions


Shower Packages From $20 Per Person

ST

F
O

R
PA
O D F E S T I VA L

TY

Excellent

The Record
3/17/2000

IN

2010, 2011, 2012,


2013, 2014

W
RO

Private Room Available For All Occasions

E5Y

FE

Specializing in Seafood and Steaks

AC

2014

2012
#2 Best Italian
#2 BYOB
#2 Prix Fixe Menu

EN

Why Go to Newark? Come Once, Youll be Back!

2011
#1 Best
Restuarant
#1 BYOB
Restaurant

RG

2009
#1 Italian
Restuarant
#1 BYOB
Restaurant
#1 Family Friendly
Restaurant

WWW.TAVERNAMYKONOS.COM

BE

Spanish & Portuguese Restaurant

2-27 SADDLE RIVER ROAD


FAIR LAWN, NJ

*Valid at this location only.


See store for details or restrictions.

PO

H & DINNE

EX

NC
LU

At The Melting Pot Restaurant, we offer a


dining experience like no other. A unique,
interactive dining experience creating
memorable moments with family and
friends. From the time the first piece of
bread is dipped and the last piece of
dessert is savored, you'll be graced with
the time to converse, laugh, and come
together.

&

Sunday, May 10th, 12-9

RISTOR

AN

RISTORANTE

Parties up to 120 to fit any budget,


call Jimmy. Book your Parties Now!

Voted
of tothe
Most
Popular
PartiesOne
up to 120
fit any
budget,
call Jimmy.Italian Restaurants
in All
of Bergen
County by Top Vote-Getters from
Beautifully
Renovated
TAKE OUT AVAILABLE
ExcellentThe Record, 3/17/2000
#1 Italian Restaurant
#1 BYOB Restaurant
Various Magazines
and Newspapers

Full Bar and Extensive Wine List

* Voted By The Wine


and Dine Restaurant
Researcher Society &
The Record
120 Terhune Drive
Wayne, NJ
973.616.0999
Call For Reservations

www.VilaVerdeRestaurant.com

#1 Best Prices #1 Family Friendly Restaurant

fit any budget, call Jimmy.


Voted TopSo
5
Come
See
Why
We Are
Popular!
Beautifully
You dont have to break theRenovated
bank for top-notch BYOB

Parties
to Sept
1202009
to
Bergen
Health up
& Life,

Restaurant

Italian
fare atRestaurant
this charming Dumont
eatery. All
#1
Italian
#1 BYOB
Restaurant
Spring 08
regular dinner menu entres cost under $20, and on

#1
Family
Friendly Restaurant
#1
Best
Prices
Mondays through Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Best Value
diners can order off the specially priced Sunset
Even
during
these
Dinner
menu,have
which
appetizer
choice of
You dont
to includes
break theanbank
for top-notch
soup orfare
salad,
an entre,
fresh
fruit and
coffeeAll
or tea
Italian
at this
charming
Dumont
eatery.
economic
times,
you
(price
levels
range
from
$13.95
tounder
$17.95).
regular
dinner
menu
entres
cost
$20, and on
Bergen
Health
& Life,toSept
2009
Mondays through Thursdays
from
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
diners can
can orderafford
off the specially
priced
Sunset
to
dine
Best
Value
evenincludes
duringanthese
economic
Dinner
menu, which
appetizer
choice of
times,
can
afford
to dine
Mulino.
soup or you
salad,
anIl
entre,
fresh
fruit at
andIlcoffee
or tea
at
Mulino.
(price levels range from $13.95 to $17.95).
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009

Open 7 Days
A Week
Bergen Health & Life, Sept 2009

Voted Top 5
BYOB
Restaurant
Italian
Spring 08
Restaurant
Winner 2009

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Dvar Torah

Tazria-Metzora: Community and isolation

have eczema. Its sometimes scaly


and itchy and I often wish that there
was a cure and it would just go away.
Ive had it my whole life and I know
that it is not contagious. It gets worse when
it is cold or when I am stressed. No doctor
has ever been able to explain how eczema
is caused and no medicine has ever made
it completely disappear.
Every year when we get to Parashat
Tazria-Metzora, I think about the affliction of tzaraat, commonly translated
as leprosy, and I wonder if my eczema
might have been caused by something I
said or touched or if it is just supposed to
be my personal reminder to treat others
with kindness and compassion because
though some have an external skin affliction, we never really know the internal
afflictions that affect our friends, neighbors, and loved ones.
Our sages have taught us that tzaraat,
an external condition, is really a sign of
an internal moral condition. Though outwardly tzaraat would seem to be a mysterious skin disease, inwardly it reveals
something about the human condition,

totally clean! This certainly


and offers an ancient explanation for an outward human
makes little medical sense.
ailment that has seemingly
Instead, I would suggest it
existed for all time.
is a hint about the spiritual
The Torah really doesnt
nature of the problem.
describe the disease known
Our ancient rabbis argued
today as leprosy; the sympthat tzaraat refers not to a
toms described in our parabodily disease but to a physsha with much emphasis
ical manifestation of a spiriRabbi Sharon
tual malaise; it was a physion small white patches simLitwin
ply do not correspond to any
cal ailment that afflicted
Director of
symptoms of modern day
someone who probably
Congregational
leprosy. The Cohen or priest
needed to do some form
Learning,
inspects the affected skin after
of heshbon hanefesh, soul
Congregation Bnai
Israel, Millburn,
a week, but again, leprosy
seeking, or teshuva, repenConservative
tance, and look inward to
in modern times progresses
think about what he or she
much too slowly to see a difference in that time.
might have said to hurt another.
The Torah commands that the one
Also, the Torah has a very strange
afflicted with tzaraat would spend a
prescription for a total outbreak of
week or more outside of the camp,
tzaraat:The priest is to examine him,
away from the community, isolated and
and if the disease has covered his whole
socially excluded. And I think that there
body, he shall pronounce that person
is a modern day parallel. Not that we can
clean. Since it has all turned white, he is
say now that my eczema is a punishment
clean.(Leviticus 13:13)
for some kind of anti-social behavior, but
What an amazing paradox: If a person is totally covered, then he or she is
rather that the Torah is teaching us that

one of the worst things that can happen


to us is to exclude others, to hurt peoples
feelings, to make others feel that they are
smaller or lesser than we are. Today we
are not afflicted with leprosy when we
act out of pride or selfishness or we fail
to respect others. But we may instead be
afflicted with an internal, invisible ailment instead, which may lead to our own
isolation. And the last thing we would
want was to be socially isolated from our
community.
It is not good to be isolated. It is not good
to treat others with malice or anger or to
speak badly about a person or shame someone. When we do these things, we create
conflict in our communities and families
and we isolate ourselves from the people
we most want to be with. As we read Tazria and Metzora this week, instead of being
repulsed by the graphic descriptions of skin
ailments, instead of thinking this has nothing to do with us, lets think about taking
account of how we speak and how we treat
others, to insure that no one need to be isolated and alone, away from community.
Shabbat Shalom.

BRIEFS

Iran wont allow IAEA technicians


to re-inspect Parchin military base
Behrouz Kamalvandi, a spokesperson
for Irans Atomic Energy Organization,
said the Islamic Republic will not allow
the International Atomic Energy Agency
nuclear watchdog to inspect its Parchin
military base for a second time.
The IAEA has been raising the issue
for years, Kamalvandi said at a news conference in Tehran, Reuters reported. It
is important for their propaganda. They
know we will not allow them to visit the
Parchin base again, but they think raising
the issue benefits the propaganda.
The West has suspected Iran of using
the Parchin base for nuclear weapons
research, while Iran claims Parchin is an
ordinary military base not involved in

nuclear research.
In a meeting between [Iranian]
President [Hassan] Rouhani and [IAEA
chief ] Yukiya Amano, President Rouhani
reminded him that, When you requested
to visit the facilities in Parchin for the first
time, I said yes, you can go to Parchin and
everywhere else, and you can collect samples. But it can be allowed just for once as
it is a military base. A second visit will not
happen, said Kamalvandi.
The remarks come shortly after Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei said that America is responsible for creating the myth of Irans
nuclear weapons in order to portray the
JNS.ORG
country as a threat. 

Fatal Jerusalem car ramming


confirmed as terrorist attack
I wanted to murder Jews, an Arab man,
Khaled Koutineh, 37, who drove his car
into a bus stop in Jerusalems French Hill
junction last week, reportedly told Shin
Bet security agency investigators, confirming their suspicions.
The Shin Bet had suspected that the
incident, which killed Shalom Yohai
Sherki, 26, and seriously injured Shira
Klein, 20, was a terrorist attack, but
also pursued leads suggesting an accident. According to Israels Channel 2,
Koutineh, who holds an Israeli ID card,

told investigators that he was driving


around Jerusalem in his car looking to
murder Jews over what he called his
miserable life, saying he and several of
his relatives had been detained at a security checkpoint in eastern Jerusalem.
During questioning, Koutineh reportedly said he decided Sherki and Klein
were Jews by the way they were
dressed. He further confessed that he
initially sought to use a pre-existing mental condition to claim he was insane and
shirk responsibility for the attack. JNS.ORG

presenting the FOURTH ANNUAL


Congregation Ahavath Torah

starring

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SATURDAY NIGHT, MAY 16, 2015, PARKER FAMILY BALLROOM

DOORS OPEN AT 9:30PM, SHOW BEGINS AT 10:00PM

CONGREGATION AHAVATH TORAH - 240 Broad Avenue in Englewood


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$50 per person/$75 per couple/$75 at the door, per person

DEADLINE TO PURCHASE TICKETS IN ADVANCE IS 5.5.15


SPECIAL UNDER 32 RATE AVAILABLE & SPONSORSHIPS AT $360 PER COUPLE
For more information, please contact the Synagogue Office at 201.568.1315

Committee Members: Adeena Csillag, Greg Haber, Jordan Katz,


Judah Malka, Yaakov Ottensoser, Michael Ratzker, Lindsay Setton
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 53

Paramus Antiques
Estate Buyers

Paying Cash for:

FREE
APPRAISALS

Crossword
CHARACTER ACTORS BY MICHAEL WIESENBERG
EDITOR: DAVID BENKOF@GMAIL.COM
DIFFICULTY LEVEL: CHALLENGING

Dishes Glassware Watches


Stamp Collections Old Toys Lamps
Paintings Dolls Hummels
Jewelry - Rings, etc. Flatware Coins
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Buying Musical Instruments of All Kinds

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Buying Anything Old!


One Piece or a House Full
Will Travel - House Calls
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by appointment

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facebook.com/jewishstandard
54 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Across
1 Sukkah protection for when its raining
5 The Defiant Ones Oscar nominee
Williams
9 Leave a poker game
12 Intel Israel customer
13 Newsman David dubbed The Brain
by his CNBC co-workers
14 Rachels is found in a Muslim cemetery
on the outskirts of Bethlehem
15 Familiar PM
16 Rebound of sorts
17 Uzi fodder
18 They might request help getting
started
20 Someone who likes to cane you?
22 Approximation phrase, for which
Israelis might say Berech
23 Temple Emanu-El, Washingtons first
synagogue, is in this city
24 Like a Jewish name ending in -wich
or -witz
27 Emulates Emma Lazarus
28 Rabbis or Hebrew school teachers,
often
31 Spoon-bending Geller
34 States like 15A
35 Lod fig.
36 Gimme for Amy Alcott or Bruce
Fleisher
38 How long it takes to say Amen, for
short
39 Cry that may accompany a shot
41 They let people watch SNL on a
Tuesday
43 ___ page 237 in your siddurim
44 Speak clearly
47 Herzl, for short
48 Makes claims, as 15A is wont to
49 Playground equipment that hangs on
a pole
53 Climb ___ Mountain: from Rodgers
and Hammersteins The Sound of
Music
54 Many an Israeli start-up
56 Jacob to Rachel and Leah: ___ that
your fathers attitude toward me is
not what it was before (Genesis 31:5)
57 Aleph-___
58 Speak, as 15A did before Congress on
March 3, 2015
59 Israeli pickles usually come in them
60 America Ferreras Ugly ___
61 I ___ Teenage Werewolf (early
Michael Landon vehicle)
62 It could be mistaken for a vowel

Down
1 Klezmer instrument
2 Where Israel technically is found
3 Country singer who starred on
Broadway in 2001 as Irving Berlins
Annie Oakley
4 Original or most effective force in an
undertaking or work
5 Capital SSW of Jerusalem
6 Aleph-bet equivalent
7 ___ Speedwagon songwriter Adrian
Gurvitz
8 Original models
9 Punctuation mark missing from the
Torah
10 Capital E of Jerusalem
11 ___ connected to the...
13 The Creation of Adam, for one
14 Eshet Chayil verse: She sets about
her work vigorously; her arms are
strong for her ___
19 Emulates Elijahs cup
21 Va-ed
23 Sound of a dropped scoop of Cherry
Garcia
24 Ladino ladies: Abbr.
25 Subject of King Davids poetry
26 Whom Carrie referred to when she
said Help me Obi Wan Kenobi.
Youre my only hope
29 What a shmegege might be said to be
30 Initials at Lod
31 Modeh Ani (prayer ___ wakening)
32 Makhtesh Ramon, essentially
33 Haaretz supplies this, informally
36 More emesdik
37 Richard Simmons specialty
39 Chagall exhibition, e.g.
40 Psst, you!
41 Hed Arzis music used to be on this
42 Common Jerusalem street sight
44 Either side of a 50-50 proposition
45 Northern Canadian territory
46 He was born Jerome Lester Horwitz
47 Phi Delta ___ (fraternity that barred
Jews until 1954)
49 Neon fish
50 Bimheyra beyameinu
51 Night show host who spoke to
Torontos UJA Campaign Launch
2015
52 ___ We Forget (Holocaust slogan)
55 A Gershwin

The solution for last weeks puzzle is


on page 63.

Arts & Culture

Flix and Meira

An outside look at chasidic life and some words from the director
ERIC A. GOLDMAN

ne of the more exciting developments in cinema over the


last decades is an effort to
contemplate aspects of ultraOrthodox Jewish life.
Though you might think that the unseen
and somewhat mystical world of the chasidim would invite cinematic study, few
narrative and documentary filmmakers
have done so. Adapting Chaim Potoks
novel for the screen in 1981, Jeremy Paul
Kagan gave us The Chosen, and 16
years later, Menachem Daum and Oren
Rudavsky brought us the documentary, A
Life Apart: chasidism in America. In the
years that followed, a few Israeli filmmakers, including Amos Gitai, made unflattering movies about that world. Now, Maxime
Girouxs Flix and Meira, a powerful
study of disparate worlds colliding when
a young chasidic mother unexpectedly
meets a non-Jewish man as he struggles
to come to grips with his fathers death,
charts new ground.
The film is set in Montreals Mile End
district, home to one of the largest ultraOrthodox communities in the world,
where French Canadian Catholics live
next to chasidim of all persuasions. A
chance encounter at a local bakery brings
the films two protagonists together as
they forge what begins as an innocent

friendship. The two are so totally different


and that clearly is part of the attraction
between them. The film turns out to be a
powerful study of two people struggling to
break free of the worlds that confine them
and turning to each other for aid, comfort,
and guidance.
Filmmakers are captivated by those
Jews who either relinquish their Judaism or seek a way to reconnect as Jews.
In Israel, Shuli Rand dealt with this subject in the 2004 Ushpizin, a film that he
wrote and in which he starred. Rand had
grown up in a religious home, but he gave
up religion when he chose a career in theater. Then, after several years as a successful actor, he became a baal teshuva, a Jew
who embraces (or reembraces) Judaism,
and he has lived his life as a charedi Jew
ever since. In Ushpizin, Rands character struggles with his life as an ultra-traditional Jew living in Jerusalem. During Sukkot, he meets non-religious Jews, friends
from his previous life. He takes hold of the
situation and invites them in, not just to
his sukkah but to his world.
In contrast, Adam Vardys 2003
Mendy focuses on a man who has fled
the Brooklyn chasidic community, hoping
to find a life in Manhattan free from what
he perceives as the indentured framework of the chasidic world. The film provides a fascinating look at what a former
chasid must tackle as he changes his life.

He must confront loss of community and


structure and the ambiguities of life in the
outside world. Boaz Yakin tackled some of
these same issues in his 1998 film, A Price
Above Rubies, starring Julianna Margulies
and Rene Zellwinger.
In Flix and Meira, there is no kiruv,
no drawing people into the community, as
in Ushpizin. Nor is there total rejection,
as we saw in A Price Above Rubies and
Mendy. Nor is this a warm and thoughtful study of the charedi world, as we saw in
Israeli director Rama Burshteins 2012 Fill
the Void. This film looks at two worlds
and the affection that two people from
those worlds hold for each other. It studies
the way they handle the quandaries their
connection creates. Flix introduces Meira
to the outside world, where she struggles
with the meaning of family, community,
and relationships. In turn, Meira gives
Flix a sense of self and purpose, which
he always had lacked.
Quebecois director Maxime Giroux
and his screenwriter, Alexandre Laferrire, have always been fascinated with this
world next door, a world they never quite
understood. In a conversation with the
director, he told me that it was his curiosity that drew him to try to understand who
these Jews were. The more I studied, the
less I understood, he said. And so he studied more.
Israeli actress Hadas Yaron, who played

the lead role of Shira in Fill the Void, is


Meira. Giroux initially avoided choosing
her because of her previous work, but she
is superb. The film was eye-opening, Yaron
told me. I found that I became prejudiced
but the other way around. I was so in
love with the chasidic community because
of my work on Fill the Void. Then I came
to realize that this chasidic world is more
complicated than I had thought it was.
Her co-star, Luzer Twersky, who left the
chasidic world in real life, and who does a
fine job as Meiras husband, Shulem, gave
her another perspective. In Fill the Void,
Yaron played a woman in a film made by
members of the charedi world. Now, she
was playing a very different role, created
by outsiders. The result is a very different
portrayal.
Flix and Meira is a beautiful, low-budget Canadian-made film that asks tough
questions and provides us with a penetrating look at life in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. It raises tough questions,
while giving us trenchant insights. Go see
it! It is playing in New York uptown at Lincoln Plaza Cinema on the Upper West Side
and downtown at Sunshine Cinema on
Houston Street.
Eric Goldman teaches, lectures and writes
about Jewish and Israeli cinema. He is
adjunct professor of cinema at Yeshiva
University.
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 55

Calendar
Book discussion/nosh
in Pompton Lakes:

Friday
APRIL 24

As part of the One


Book One Community
project, sponsored by
the Jewish Federation
of Northern New
Jersey, Congregation
Beth Shalom offers a
discussion, Modern
Day Golems,
12:15 p.m. 211 Passaic Ave.
(973) 835-3500 or www.
bethshalomnj.org.

Shabbat in Wayne:
Shomrei Torah has tot
Shabbat, with stories,
songs, and snacks,
for young children
and their families.
5 p.m. 30 Hinchman Ave.
(973) 696-2500.

Shabbat in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishons
music-filled Celebrate
Israel service features
choral pieces and folk
songs in honor of Yom
Haatzmaut and Israels
67th anniversary, 7 p.m.
Musical accompaniment
by Kol Rishon, the
Temples adult choir,
Cantors Ilan Mamber
and Summer GreenwaldGonella, Itay Goren, and
Jimmy Cohen. Oneg
Shabbat with Israeli
desserts. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466 or www.
bethrishon.org.

Shabbat in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel and Jewish
Community Center
offers family services
for 4 to 13-year-olds,
led by Cantor Caitlin
Bromberg on her guitar,
7 p.m. Oneg Shabbat
follows. 475 Grove St.
(201) 444-9320 or www.
synagogue.org.

Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel holds its monthly
learning service in
celebration of Israel,
7:30 p.m. 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272 or
www.bisrael.com.

Saturday
APRIL 25
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Rabbi Jeremy Stern
speaks twice at
Congregation Beth
Aaron. At 6:15 p.m., the
topic will be Breaking
the Chain: A Road
Map to Resolving the
Agunah Crisis. At a
shiur after Mincha at
7:20, he discusses In
the Trenches of Agunah
Advocacy. Rabbi Stern
is executive director of
the Organization for the
Resolution of Agunot.
950 Queen Anne Road.
(201) 836-6210.

Sunday
APRIL 26
Jewelry show/sale
in Tenafly: Jewelry
designer Norma
Wellington gives a
benefit show/sale at
the Kaplen JCC on the

JCC on the Palisades,


4 p.m. (201) 408-1465 or
jccotp.org/Thurnauer.

Tuesday
APRIL 28

Camp open house in


Haledon: Camp Veritans
offers an open house
with walking tours,
1-4 p.m. 225 Pompton
Road. (973) 956-1220 or
registrar@campveritans.
com.

Rona Ramon speaks at the Kaplen JCC


on the Palisades on Wednesday, April 29,
at 8:30 p.m., about life after the loss of
her husband, Ilan Ramon, the first Israeli
astronaut, and their oldest son, Asaf. Ilan Ramon
was killed in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster in
2003, and their son, Asaf, who followed in his fathers
footsteps as a fighter pilot, died in a training accident
in 2009. In their memory, Rona Ramon established the
Ramon Foundation, which seeks to promote personal
and social excellence, impart leadership in the spirit of
the Columbia crew, and encourage groundbreaking
advances in space and aviation, as well as science and
technology. She is the author of Above Us Only Sky,
a collection of Ilans and Asafs personal journals and
letters about their lives and passion for Israel. www.
jccotp.org or call Aya, (201) 408-1427.

APR.

29

Palisades, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.


A large percentage of
sales will benefit the
Kaplen Adult Reach
Center, a day care
program for seniors
with Alzheimers disease
and related forms of
dementia. 411 E. Clinton
Ave. (201) 408-1450 or
jnahary@jccotp.org.

Student music recitals


in Tenafly: The JCC
Thurnauer School of
Music at the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
offers performances
by Thurnauers young
musicians, 4 and up,
performing as soloists
and in groups, on a wide
range of instruments.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m., and
noon. (201) 408-1465 or
jccotp.org/Thurnauer.

Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds MazelTots
for 3-year-olds and their
parents/grandparents,
10 a.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801.

56 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Blood drive in Emerson:


Congregation Bnai
Israel holds a community
interfaith blood drive
in conjunction with
Community Blood
Services, 10 a.m.3 p.m. Co-sponsored
by churches in
Westwood and Park
Ridge, including the
Lebanon Baptist Church,
Parkside Community
Church, Zion Lutheran
Church, Westwood
Methodist Church,
Grace Episcopal Church,
St. Andrews Church,
and the PPT Worship
Center. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272 or www.
bisrael.com.

Book discussion/
breakfast in Paramus:
As part of the One Book
One Community project,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey, JCC
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah offers a
discussion by Carolyn
Kaufman on this years
selection, The Golem
and the Jinni, 11 a.m.
304 East Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

Former Knesset
member in Teaneck:
Rabbi Dov Lipman,
director of Government
and International Affairs
for the Michael Levine
Lone Soldier Center
in Israel and a former
Knesset member, speaks
at Congregation Beth
Aaron, 11 a.m. 950 Queen
Anne Road. (201) 8366210.

Women Internationals
Skyview chapter meets
in the community room
of 200 Winston Drive
to hear Marty Schneit, a
licensed New York City
tour guide, discussing the
History of the Borscht
Belt, 12:30 p.m. Light
lunch. (201) 969-1592.

War on terror: The

Authors in Park Ridge:


Howard Siegel and his
granddaughter, Lilli
Abraham, discuss and
read from their book of
short stories, Stories My
Grandfather Told Me, at
the Club House at Bears
Nest, 2 p.m. Coffee and
snacks. Reservations,
bearsnestadmin@
optonline.net.

Israeli soldiers visit


Englewood: As part of
StandWithUs, two young
reserve duty Israeli
soldiers will talk about
their combat experiences
in the Israeli Defense
Forces with students of
the Bergen County High
School of Jewish Studies
at the Moriah School,
11 a.m. A delegation
of high school juniors
visiting from Nahariya,
Israel, in a joint Young
Leadership program
with BCHSJS students
will kick off the program.
53 South Woodland St.
(201) 488-0834 or www.
bchsjs.org.

Borscht Belt talk in


Cliffside Park: Jewish

Chabad Center of Passaic


County in Wayne begins
a two-part class, Justice
and the War on Terror,
7 p.m. Series concludes
May 5. 194 Ratzer Road.
(973) 694-6274 or
Jewishwayne.com.

Campus life for Jews:

Music/entertainment
in Fair Lawn: Lazer
Lloyd, Israels king of
blues rock, makes his
Northeast U.S. debut
at a concert at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel,
7:30 p.m. Doors open
at 7. The Connecticutborn entertainer is also
a writer and storyteller.
10-10 Norma Ave.
(201) 796-5040.

Monday
APRIL 27
Master cello class in
Tenafly: Steven Doane,
an international soloist,
chamber musician, and
cello professor at the
Eastman School of Music,
offers a master class as
part of the Sylvia and
Jacob Handler Master
Class series at the Kaplen

Rabbi Brandon Bernstein,


the Reform Outreach
Initiative rabbi from
Rutgers University
Hillel, discusses The
New Jew on Campus:
A Report from the
Field, at Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley in
Closter, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112.

Interfaith families:
Beth Haverim Shir
Shalom in Mahwah
hosts New Jersey native
Jane Larkin, originally
of Verona, author of
From Generation
to Generation,
7:30 p.m. The book is
about intermarriage
and Jewish continuity.
280 Ramapo Valley Road.
(201) 512-1983 or www.
interfaithandjewish.com.

Calendar

1666 Windsor Road.


(201) 833-1322.

Stop domestic violence:

Author in Tenafly:
The annual James H.
Grossman Memorial
Jewish Book Month
at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades features
Maggie Anton, author
of the acclaimed
historical trilogy Rashis
Daughters, 7:30 p.m.
She will discuss and
sign copies of her new
book, Enchantress.
www.jccotp.org or Ruth,
(201) 408-1418.

Wednesday
APRIL 29
Heartburn: Thoracic
surgeon Dr. Mark Shapiro
of the Valley Hospital in
Ridgewood offers a talk,
Feeling the Burn? at
the Bergen County YJCC,
7 p.m. 605 Pascack Road.
(201) 666-6610, (800)
Valley1.

Thursday
APRIL 30

National Council of
Jewish Women, Jersey
Hills section, meets at
Temple Beth Sholom in
Fair Lawn, 7:30 p.m. Shira
Pomerantz from Project
Sarah (Stop Abusive
Relationships at Home),
a division of Jewish
Family Service of Clifton/
Passaic, will discuss
domestic violence in
the Jewish community.
40-25 Fair Lawn Ave.
(201) 791-1096.

Author in Woodcliff
Lake: The sisterhood
of Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
presents Maggie Anton,
author of the acclaimed
historical trilogy Rashis
Daughters, 8:20 p.m.
She will discuss her new
book, Enchantress: A
Novel of Rav Hisdas
Daughter. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-8089 or
www.tepv.org.

Friday
MAY 1
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
family services, 7:30 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel of

Yom Hashoah film in


River Edge: River Dell
Hadassah, the Friends
of the River Edge
Library, and the River
Edge Cultural Center
host a screening of a
documentary, Two Who
Dared: The Sharps War,
at the River Edge Public
Library, 7 p.m. Dr. Michael
Riff, director of the Gross
Center for Holocaust
and Genocide Studies
at Ramapo College,
will lead a discussion of
the film. 685 Elm Ave.
(201) 261-1663.

Book talk in Teaneck:


Temple Emeths
Viewpoints Committee
offers a discussion on
Elana Dykewomons
book, Beyond the Pale,
7:30 p.m. Viewpoints is
a shul committee that
was formed to celebrate
the diversity of the
Jewish community and
includes programs that
highlight the interfaith
and LGBT communities.

the Pascack Valley holds


a weekend devoted to
the heritage of German
Jewry, beginning with a
German-Jewish themed
dinner, 6:30 p.m. At 7:30,
Dr. Frank Mecklenburg,
director of research and
chief archivist of the Leo
Baeck Institute, discusses
What is the German
Jewish Legacy and Why
We Preserve It. Services
at 8:15 p.m., with German
cantorial pieces by
Cantor Mark Biddelman
and stories by Germanborn congregants. The
weekend concludes on
Sunday at 3 p.m., with a
talk by Rabbi David Fine
of Temple Israel & JCC
in Ridgewood, German
Jewry Today and in the
Future. 87 Overlook
Drive.(201) 391-0801.

Saturday
MAY 2
Music in Wayne: The
Simon & Garfunkel
Songbook performed
by Aztec Two-Step
is at the Rosen
Performing Arts Center
at the Wayne YMCA,
7:30 p.m. Proceeds
benefit the Rosen

Theater renovation. The


Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100 or www.
wayneymca.org.

Sunday
MAY 3
War veterans meet
in Hackensack: The
Teaneck/New Milford
Post #498 Jewish War
Veterans meets for
breakfast at the Coach
House Diner, 9 a.m.
Prospective members
welcome. Route 4 East.
Past Commander Stan
Hoffman, (201) 836-0814.

Casino trip:
Congregation Shaarey
Israel in Montebello, N.Y,
offers a trip to the Sands
Casino in Bethlehem,
Pa., leaving the shul at
9:30 a.m. $40 includes
a $30 slot voucher and
$5 food voucher. Outlet
shopping. 18 Montebello
Road. (845) 369-0300 or
(845) 362-3585.

Jewish mysticism: As
part of the One Book
One Community project,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey, Temple
Beth Rishon in Wyckoff
offers a discussion, Seek
My Face; Speak My
Name: Jewish Mysticism
and How It Relates
to the Modern Jew,
with Rabbi Art Green
of Bostons Hebrew
College. Breakfast,
9:45 a.m.; program at
10. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466 or www.
bethrishon.org.

Blood drive in Leonia:


Congregation Adas
Emuno holds a blood
drive with New Jersey
Blood Services, a
division of New
York Blood Center,
10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 254
Broad Ave. (201) 592-1712
or www.adasemuno.org.

Bagels and bling:


The sisterhood of the
Orangetown Jewish
Center holds Bagels,
Baubles and Bling,
10 a.m.-1 p.m., a sale
in its gift shop of
new and gently used
jewelry and handbags.
8 Independence Ave.,
Orangeburg, N.Y.
(845) 359-5920 or
theojc.com.

Spring boutique in
Tenafly: The Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
offers a vendor boutique
with items including
jewelry, womens
fashions, stationery,

sunglasses, childrens
clothing, and accessories,
10 a.m.-5 p.m., and on
Monday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Proceeds benefit the Early
Childhood Department.
411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1435 or email
fpopper@jccotp.org.

NY Times writer in
Fair Lawn: Jewish
Family Service of North
Jerseys Sam and Nina
Wolff Caregiver Center
sponsors a breakfast
with New York Times
New Old Age columnist/
award-winning journalist,
Paula Span, The Years
Ahead Caring For
Yourself & Your Loved
Ones: Wellness, Purpose
& What Keeps Us Going.
The program is at 10 a.m.,
at Temple Beth Sholom.
40-25 Fair Lawn Ave.
www.jfsnorthjersey.org or
call (973) 595-0111.

Temple Beth Rishon in


Wyckoff, 6:45 p.m. Gala
will benefit Academies
at Gerrard Berman Day
School in Oakland. 585
Russell Ave. (201) 337-1111
or www.ssnj.org.

Decoding Judaism in
Fair Lawn: The Jewish
Learning Institute begins
Judaism Decoded: The
Origins and Evolution
of Jewish Tradition,
a six-session course,
at Anshei Lubavitch,
8 p.m. 10-10 Plaza Road.
(201) 794-3770.

In New York
Tuesday
APRIL 28

Charity walk in Suffern:


The Chabad Jewish
Center of Suffern, an
affiliate of Chabad of
Rockland, holds its
first Rockland Walk 4
Friendship at Rockland
Community College,
noon-4 p.m. Activities
include challah baking
with the Challah Fairy,
inflatables, resource fair,
robotics, BMX show, and
lazer tag. Enter at the
Viola Road entrance.
145 College Road.
(845) 368-1889 or www.
RocklandFriendshipWalk.
com.

Lag BOmer in Wayne:


Shomrei Torah offers
a picnic for all ages,
with outdoor games,
crafts, and lunch,
noon-1:30 p.m. 30 Hinchman
Ave. Reservations,
(973) 696-2500 or
office@shomreitorahwcc.
org.

between Urbanization
and Development, is at
Weissberg Commons
on YUs Wilf Campus,
2495 Amsterdam Ave.
Valid photo ID needed
for admission. E-mail
Lawrence Gillig at gillig@
yu.edu.

Singles
Sunday
APRIL 26
Singles meet in
Caldwell: New
Jersey Jewish Singles
45+ meet for lunch,
games, and prizes, to
celebrate the groups
fourth anniversary, at
Congregation Agudath
Israel, 12:45 p.m. $10. 20
Academy Road. Sue,
(973) 226-3600, ext. 145,
or singles@agudath.org.

Friday
MAY 1
Singles Shabbaton in
Teaneck: Sharon Ganz &
COURTESY YU

Urbanization and
development: Dr.
Paul Romer, founding
director of the New
York University Stern
Urbanization Project
and director of the
Marron Institute of Urban
Management, gives the
annual Alexander Brody
Distinguished Lecture
in Economics at Yeshiva
University, 7:30 p.m. The
talk, The Power of the
Grid: On the Connection

Friends host a Shabbaton


weekend for Orthodox
Jewish singles, 30s-40s,
at Congregation Bnai
Yeshurun. Rabbi Steven
Pruzansky is the scholarin-residence. There will
be three Shabbat meals,
oneg Shabbat, home
hospitality, singles mixers,
discussions, tour of
Teaneck, and a Saturday
night party. Shadchanim/
facilitators welcome.
Sharon, (718) 575-3962
or (646) 529-8748.

Film in Paramus:
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah screens The
Monuments Men,
starring George Clooney,
Matt Damon, Bill Murray,
and Cate Blanchett,
3 p.m. Deli supper. $12.50;
reservations required for
food. Harry Ettlinger, the
last surviving member of
the Monuments Men, will
speak at the JCCP/CBT
on Sunday, May 17, at a
breakfast at 9:30 a.m.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

Gala with CNN


correspondent: A
Torch Talks gala
featuring Dana
Bash, CNNs chief
congressional
correspondent, and
honoring Laurie Nahum
and Rick Krieger, is at

Swan Lake at bergenPAC


The Bergen Performing Arts Center in Englewood presents Russian National Ballet: Swan Lake, sponsored
by Wilmington Trust, an M&T Company, as part of the
Wilmington Trust Cultural Arts series, on Saturday May
9, at 8 p.m. For information, call (201) 227-1030 or go to
www.bergenpac.org.
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 57

Calendar

The indoor pool area


at Grossingers.
MARISA SCHEINFELD

Borscht Belt photo exhibit


The traveling exhibit Echoes from the
Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs
by Marisa Scheinfeld opens on April 26
at the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst,
Mass. The exhibit, which documents the
dramatic decline of the resorts of New
Yorks Catskill Mountains region, will be
at the centers Brechner Gallery through
October. It was developed and curated by
Yeshiva University Museum.
The exhibit includes resort and hotel
memorabilia that Scheinfeld has collected
over the years, as well as selected images
from her re-photographic series, in
which she used promotional shots from
the regions glory days as inspiration for
new photos showing the same places as
they look now.

Scheinfeld will give two gallery talks at


the Yiddish Book Center, first at 11:30 a.m.
on Sunday, April 26 (the centers free community open house day) and the second on
Sunday, August 2, at 2 p.m.
The Yiddish Book Center also will hold its
Borscht Belt Film Festival in conjunction with
Echoes from the Borscht Belt, with screenings of the documentary Welcome to Kutshers: The Last Catskills Resort on Sunday,
May 10, at 11 a.m., followed by Dirty Dancing at 2 p.m., the documentary When Comedy Went to School on May 17 at 2 p.m., and
A Walk on the Moon on June 7 at 2 p.m.
The Yiddish Book Center, at 1021 West
St., is open Sunday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. For information, go to www.yiddishbookcenter.org.

Focus on ADHD for parents


and professionals
The Orthodox Unions Department of Synagogue and Community Services, together
with Yachad, the OUs National Jewish Council for Disabilities, present ADHD Focus:
Tools and Techniques for Parents and Professionals, a two-part seminar. The program on
Tuesdays, April 28 and May 5, will run from
6 to 7:30 p.m., at OU headquarters, 11 Broadway in Manhattan.
The program will feature Dr. Yitzchak
Goldberg, Ph.D., school psychologist, codirector of the Diamond Summer Program
for children with ADHD, and principal of
Yeshiva Darchei Torah Junior High School.
He will discuss useful strategies for listening

and cooperation; following rules; facilitating self-management and self-regulation;


using effective consequences; managing
and resolving conflicts; developing independence with daily routines; and getting
along with other children.
On-site participation is $25 for each session and $45 for both, which includes a light
dinner and the opportunity to speak with Dr.
Goldberg after the program. The program
will be live-streamed for remote viewing, at
no charge; pre-registration is required.
For information call (212) 613-8188 or email
steinigj@ou.org. Register online at www.
oucommunity.org.

Teen leadership conference on May 1


Jean Kilbourne, internationally recognized for her groundbreaking work on the image of women in advertising, is
the keynote speaker at Media Exposed, a teen leadership conference for students in ninth through twelfth
grades. The conference, co-sponsored by the JCC and the
Bergen Family Center, is at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly, Friday, May 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For information, call (201) 408-1470 or go to jccotp.org/
teen-leadership-community-service.

The Rubin Run: A messenger for


healthy living, Mothers Day, May 10
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades Rubin
Run is a family-friendly community
race that allows everyone to get excited
about physical activity, while teaching
the importance of giving back. The race
on Sunday, May 10, offers a half marathon at 7:30 a.m.; 10K at 8:30; and 5K
at 10.
The race, held annually on Mothers
Day, draws more than 1,300 runners
from as far away as Canada.
According to JCC CEO Avi A. Lewinson, We hope to see runners cross
the finish line on May 10 experiencing
a great sense of personal accomplishment. In addition to completing an
exciting course, many will have raised
funds for vital-life-enhancing programs
at the JCC. We cant think of a more significant way to celebrate Mothers Day.
Moms who run are given a rose as
they cross the finish line; free babysitting is provided during the race; and
there are lots of activities for kids,
including a carnival where families can
decorate a take-home flower pot.
Proceeds from the run help fund
the JCCs wide range of programs for
people with physical and mental challenges and other special needs.
Every gift makes a difference in peoples lives:
$180 provides a week of life skills training for a teen with severe

Athletes warming up before the


race.

developmental challenges; $360 supports a month of music therapy to foster communication abilities; and $1,500
affords two weeks of specialized summer camp for a child with autism.
An early bird discount is available
until April 26. Visit the website at
www.jccotp.org/rubinrun. Families
and teams can register up to midnight,
Wednesday, May 6. Thereafter, participants may register in person at the JCC,
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, and on
race day.
For information and sponsorship
opportunities, call Michal Kleiman,
assistant director of special events, at
(201) 408-1412, or email mkleiman@
jccotp.org.

Announce your events


We welcome announcements of upcoming events. Announcements are free. Accompanying photos
must be high resolution, jpg files. Send announcements 2 to 3 weeks in advance. Not every release
will be published. Include a daytime telephone number and send to:
 Jewish Media Group
NJ
pr@jewishmediagroup.com
201-837-8818

Jean Kilbourne
58 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Runners from last years Rubin Run, from left, Yitz and Adeena Csillag, and
Miriam Cohen, all of Englewood.
PHOTOS COURTESY JCCOTP

Briefly Local
Program participants with TABC students include Teri Normand, far left, TABC
executive director; Jeannine Poler Fejnman, grandmother of TABC student Mickael
Benichou; and Bernard and Henry Schanzer.
DANI HAGLER

PHOTOS PROVIDED

TABC Holocaust commemoration

Federation honors survivors


at Beth Rishon in Wyckoff
More than 400 people attended Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys community Holocaust commemoration at Temple Beth Rishon
in Wyckoff. Dr. Rachel Yehuda, director of traumatic stress studies at Mt.
Sinal School of Medicine, was the keynote speaker.
Children took part in a 72-candle procession, one for each anniversary of
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Survivors,

from left, Myriam Suserman of Hackensack, Siegmar Silber of Paterson,


Abe Citrin and Gregory Abraizov, both
of Fair Lawn, Bella Miller of Wanaque,
and Mali Janower of Monsey, were honored by having their stories narrated
by the young adults behind them, from
left, Julia Holzsager, Jacob Krebs, Daniel Zeilicovich, Harry Winick, Stephanie Shaloff, and Danielle Cohen, all
from Fair Lawn.

After a two minute siren sounding at


school, Torah Academy of Bergen County
students and faculty participated in a special Yom Hashoah program with a candlelighting ceremony. The 12th grade Holocaust studies class performed two musical
pieces and a multimedia presentation,
We Werent Born This Way, was shown.
Twins, Dr. Bernard Schanzer and Henry

Schanzer, who survived the Holocaust due


to acts of heroism by two Righteous Gentiles, also spoke. Henrys grandson, Rafi
Kreitman, is a TABC student. After the program, the TABC student body went to see
the movie Woman in Gold, followed by a
discussion via Skype with Randy Schoenberg, lawyer of Maria Altmann, who is featured in the film.

Yom Hashoah
at Temple
Emeth
Eric Loeb spoke at the Yom
Hashoah Memorial service at
Temple Emeth in Teaneck, followed by a commemorative
planting of perennial flowers
by congregants from the shuls
garden group. Pictured from
left are religious school educator Dora Geld Friedman, student Danielle Norr, Rabbi Steven Sirbu, and congregant Eric
COURTESY TEMPLE EMETH
Loeb.

Acceptance and
Tolerance Week
by BPY students
Eighth graders at Ben Porat Yosef junior
high students performed a monologue
about a person in history, either Jewish
or non-Jewish, who was a victim of genocide, or reacted to others experience
of genocide. Programs that were part of
BPYs Ida Wider Acceptance and Tolerance Week in commemoration of Yom
Hashoah included presentations from
Rabbi Yair Hindin of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Norbert Bikales, a
COURTESY BPY
Holocaust survivor. 
JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 59

Jewish World

Wilshire Boulevard Temple


bets big on the past for its future
ANTHONY WEISS
LOS ANGELES The time has
long since passed when the
Wilshire Boulevard Temples
address on its namesake boulevard was considered glamorous.
Now the surrounding blocks
are the clamorous heart of Koreatown, with all its urban grit: traffic snarls, hulking office buildings, electronics shops, dentists,
and banks with signs in Korean
and some in Spanish. Here the
Wilshire Boulevard Temple the
grand Byzantine-revival synagogue built in 1929 seems like
a relic of another era, before this
citys prospering Jewish community moved west and north, leaving the neighborhood to subsequent waves of immigrants.
But these days, the temple
complex is alive with its own
dust and clamor. Construction
workers are toiling to put up new
buildings and renovate old ones,
part of a multiyear capital project
that has restored the polish to the
once-neglected sanctuary building. The religious school is full,
and a new elementary day school
is growing with each school year.
When all is said and done, the
Reform congregations expansion project will have taken more
than a decade to build and cost
nearly $200 million. The Glazer
Campus, as it is called now, will
fill an entire city block.
If successful, the project will be
not only a stunning rebirth for a
complex that once seemed at risk
of moldering into obscurity, but a
large and expensive commitment
to Jewish presence in the type of
diverse urban neighborhood that
the American Jewish community
once seemed on the verge of
abandoning.
This is really an urban synagogue that has decided to commit to the urban core of a city,
said Rabbi Susan Goldberg, one
of the Wilshire Boulevard Temples eight rabbis to be assigned
full-time to the eastern campus. Its a different way of seeing our strong Jewish identity as
one identity in this multicultural
community of L.A.
At one point, that commitment
to the urban core was in serious
doubt. When Steven Leder took
over as senior rabbi in 2003, the
temple was large and prosperous, with not only the original

Wilshire Boulevard Temples new campus will take up an entire block.



COURTESY OF WILSHIRE BOULEVARD TEMPLE

temple complex but a gleaming


new full-block campus 10 miles
away in wealthier west Los Angeles, a pair of campgrounds, and a
conference center in the Malibu
hills. The membership was more
than 2,000 families.
However, there were festering problems at its original
home. The synagogue building
was deteriorating from years of
neglect, and the size of the kindergarten class at the accompanying east side religious school
was zero. Synagogue leaders
debated whether it was time to
sell the building.
But Leder had fallen in love
with the sanctuary from the first
moment he walked into it in 1987,
when he first interviewed to work
at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple.
He had no intention of selling.
I said to the board, we have
to make this decision, but if you
guys really think its best to sell it
and become an exclusively west
L.A. congregation, you should
look for another senior rabbi,
he said. Im not going to be the
one who turns that place into a
church.
Besides, Leder saw signs of
opportunity. He had noticed
and a demographic study for the
temple confirmed that younger
Jewish families had started moving to the east side again. The
key was to attract them, and that
meant more than simply restoring the old synagogue the result
of that, he believed, would be a
beautiful but empty building.
Working with the firm of architect Brenda Levin starting in
2005, the congregation developed
the ambitious master plan for the
campus a restored synagogue,
a new Jewish early childhood
center, a new Jewish elementary

60 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

school, a social service center, an


athletic field, a community gathering space, and more.
It was a plan that would require
the synagogue to buy up the rest
of its city block and embark on a
massive fundraising campaign,
sustained through the Great
Recession that has raised $126
million toward an apparently
unprecedented total estimated at
$180 million to $190 million.
Theres nothing comparable
in my experience, said David
Mersky, a fundraising consultant
who has worked with a number
of synagogues on fundraising
campaigns and consulted briefly
with the Wilshire Boulevard
Temple. The closest reference
he could recall was a $30 million drive by Central Synagogue,
a congregation on the East
Side of Manhattan, for a 2001
restoration.
(Lincoln Square Synagogue
on Manhattans Upper West
Side spent some $50 million on
its new building, which opened
in 2013. Funds for that congregation included proceeds from
a land swap, and a fundraising
push that included an anonymous $20 million donation.)
Large and expensive projects
are nothing new to the Wilshire
Boulevard Temple. When the
1929 building was constructed,
the synagogue was known as the
Temple to the Stars, and its list
of contributors to the building
fund in the lobby includes such
Hollywood studio honchos as
Jack Warner, B.P. Schulberg, and
Louis B. Mayer.
These days, the membership
leans more toward professions
such as real estate, law, and
finance, sources close to the congregation said, although it is still

home to such members as former Disney board member Stanley Gold and Pulp Fiction producer Lawrence Bender.
But as in the past, the synagogues members have opened
their deep pockets. Erika Glazer,
the daughter of shopping mall
developer Guilford Glazer,
donated $30 million to the restoration and expansion, as well
as another $6 million for a new
early childhood center. An anonymous donor gave $10 million,
and a total of 30 donors have
made gifts of $1 million or more.
The temple is in the midst of
building a four-story garage that
will house parking for 450 cars
and a full-sized playing field on
the roof. The new Karsh Social
Service Center will be on the
ground floor.
The parking garage, field, and
school buildings are expected
to open in September, and the
social service center early next
year. Plans are still being developed for the final construction
phase, a five-story building that
likely will include a banquet hall,
cafe, offices, and only the second non-Orthodox mikvah in Los
Angeles.
The germ of the idea for the
social service center came from
a desire to build a new space for
the temples 28-year-old food
pantry, which lacks proper cold
storage and dedicated distribution space. But the idea quickly
expanded as the temple sought
to join with existing organizations in the community to create
a walk-in center that could serve
as a one-stop shop for a variety of
social service needs.
The synagogue is planning to
partner with the Korean Health,
Education, Information, and

Steven Leder, senior rabbi


at the Wilshire Boulevard
Temple, saw opportunity in
the synagogues deteriorating
landscape.

COURTESY OF WILSHIRE
BOULEVARD TEMPLE

Research Center, which runs a


nearby health clinic, to open a
dental and vision clinic medical services that are not provided
by emergency rooms and thus
are in intense demand among
poorer residents. An array of
nonprofit legal centers, including
Bet Tzedek and Asian Americans
Advancing Justice, will offer lowcost or pro bono legal services on
issues ranging from elder care to
citizenship. And over time, the
temple hopes to add additional
services ranging from grief counseling to resume mentoring.
If we are nothing more than
a landlord that charges no rent,
we are a failure, said Rabbi Beau
Shapiro, who is overseeing the
planning for the social service
center.
On that front, the early signs
are positive. A January workshop for citizenship applications
held at the temple was so popular that it attracted more volunteers than the number of clients
the organization had brought
for the occasion. One of the volunteer lawyers was so moved
by the applicant he was helping
that when he discovered that she
didnt qualify for a fee waiver for
her citizenship application, he
arranged for his law firm to cover
the cost.
We were like, Oh my God, we
hit the jackpot here, said Nasim
Khansari, the citizenship project director for Asian Americans
Advancing Justice, who ran the
SEE WILSHIRE PAGE 63

Obituaries
Monty Gastworth

Monty Gastworth, 64, of


Fair Lawn died April 18.
He was a Fair Lawn High
School graduate. Predeceased by his parents,
Pearl, ne Newman, and
Milton Gastworth, he is
survived by his sister,
Diane Albarella (Michael),
and a niece, Nirali Shah.
Contributions can be
sent to a no-kill animal
shelter or a charity to cure
mental illness. Arrangements were by Louis Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.

Max Gavzy

Max Gavzy, 93, of Pompton Plains, formerly of Fair


Lawn, Hackensack, and
Delray Beach, Fla., died
April 16.
He was a photographer
during World War II on
an island off Panama. For
50 years he owned Max
Gavzy Inc., an insurance
agency in Paterson. He was
a major Jewish philanthropist who gave money, time,
and photographs to Jewish
organizations in Paterson,
Fair Lawn, and Florida.
His volunteer work
included the Community
Chest, Barnert Hospital, the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center, UJA Federation
of North Jersey, and Boy
Scouts of America.
He was president of the
Veritans Club, a lifetime
board member of Jewish
Family Service, and a board
member of the Fair Lawn
Jewish Center, where he was
the Israel Bonds chair for
many years. He and his wife
delivered Wheels on Meals
in Fair Lawn.
Predeceased by a son,
Ike, to whom he donated
his kidney, he is survived
by his wife of 66 years,
Rita, ne Benjamin, his
children, Deborah Gavzy
Nedelman ( Jerry) and
William Gavzy ( Jamie Kreiman); former daughter-inlaw, Catherine Breier, and
five grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Bonnie Sue
Gershon

Bonnie Sue Gershon, ne


Donoff, 72, of Tenafly died
April 20.
Born in New York City,
she was a homemaker. She
is survived by her sons,
Michael and Jonathan; a
brother, Peter Donoff, and
two grandchildren.

Arrangements were by
Eden Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.

Sidney Golob

Sidney Golob, 97, died April


12. He was a CPA.
Predeceased by his wife
of 63 years, Jeanette, in
2007, he is survived by a
daughter, Wendy (Mark),
and four grandchildren.
Contributions may be
made to JFS of the Lehigh
Valley, Allentown, Pa.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Arthur Kresch

Arthur J. Kresch, 88, of Fair


Lawn died April 15.
After serving in the Army
of Occupation in World
War II, he graduated from
the University of Florida at
Gainesville and then owned
Sylvette Shops.
He is survived by his wife
of 64 years, Phyllis, three
sons, Barry (Leslie), Jeffrey
(Debra), and Scott (Laura),
and three grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Samuel Lorber

Samuel Lorber of Fair Lawn


died April 16. Arrangements
were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.

Maurice
Schneigeiger

Maurice Schneigeiger, 92, of


Monroe Township, formerly
of Paris and Fair Lawn, died
April 17.
A Holocaust survivor,
before retiring he owned
an underground sprinkler
business. He was a member
of Manhattan Lodge #473
I.O.O.F. in New York City,
Bnai Brith Lodge #143 in
Paterson, Yiddish Club in
Monroe Township, and the
Bergen County YJCC.

Predeceased by his
wife, Sonia, ne Davidovic, he is survived by
his daughters, Aliette Abo
(Dr. Marc), and Sylvia
Rosenberg (Randy); four
grandchildren, and one
great-grandchild.
Arrangements were by
Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.

David Schwartz

David A. Schwartz, 65,

of Fair Lawn, formerly of


Paterson, died April 17.
Predeceased by his
parents, Jack and Sylvia
Schwartz, he is survived
by his siblings, Gloria
Bergen, Barbara Liss
Goldberg (Ivan), and
Richard (Olga), and
a companion, Annie
Raible.
Arrangements were
by Louis Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.

201-791-0015

Werner Jerry Westheimer

Werner Jerry Westheimer, 88, of Boynton Beach,


Fla., and Mahwah, formerly of Teaneck, died on
April 10.
Born in Germany, he came to America when he
was 10. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. Before
retiring, he was a commercial photographer in
New York City.
He is survived by his wife, Susan, two daughters,
Judi Levine and Debbie Sinert; and 4
granddaughters, Michelle, Erica, Carley, and
Rachel.
Donations can be made to any Holocaust charity
or to Macular Degeneration Research. Burial was
at Cedar Park Cemetery.
PAID NOTICE

800-525-3834

LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.


Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel

Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years


Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefits honored
Always within a familys financial means

13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) Fair Lawn, NJ


Richard Louis - Manager
George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088
1924-1996

Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc


Jewish Funeral Directors

Family Owned & managed


Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services

Our Facilities Will Accommodate


Your Familys Needs
Handicap Accessibility From Large
Parking Area

Gary Schoem Manager - NJ Lic. 3811


Conveniently Located
W-150 Route 4 East Paramus, NJ 07652

201.843.9090

1.800.426.5869

The Christopher Family


serving the Jewish community
since 1900

When someone you love


becomes a memory
that memory becomes a treasure
Unknown Author

Paterson Monument Co.


MAIN
Paterson, NJ 07502
317 Totowa Ave.
973-942-0727 Fax 973-942-2537

BRANCH
Pompton Plains, NJ 07444
681 Rt. 23 S.
973-835-0394 Fax 973-835-0395

TOLL FREE 800-675-0727


www.patersonmonument.us

A Traditional Jewish Experience


Pre-Planning Specialists
Graveside and Chapel Services

Barry Wien - NJ Lic. No. 2885


Frank Patti, Jr. - NJ Lic. No. 4169
Arthur Musicant - NJ Lic. No. 2544
Frank Patti, Sr. Director - NJ Lic. No. 2693
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ

GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT


JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588

WIEN & WIEN, INC.


MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533

402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601


Alan L. Musicant, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
Martin D. Kasdan, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
Irving Kleinberg, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home

GuttermanMusicantWien.com

201-947-3336 888-700-EDEN
www.edenmemorial.com

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 61

Classified
Cemetery Plots For Sale

Cemetery Plots For Sale

ABRAHAM & Sarah, Paramus,


N.J. 4 gravesites, section 2, map
#1455. 561-483-1850

FOUR cemetery plots for sale.


They are all together. Cedar Park,
Paramus, NJ. 770-827-3318 or
email irisjmorrison@gmail.com

CEDAR PARK-BETH EL
Four plots for $5000.00
Buyer to pay
all fees required
Details:
Carl Rod at 603-991-3304
ab1ig@yahoo.com

Antiques

NICHOL AS
ANTIQUES
Estates Bought & Sold

Fine Furniture
Antiques
T
U
Accessories
Cash Paid

201-920-8875

Help Wanted
ADMIN ASST./DESIGN
Part or full time - 10 months
in a private school
in Oakland.
Desired Skills:
Graphic Design, Illustrator,
SEO, Word Press,
Social Media Marketing
and Office skills.
Please send cover letter
and resume to:
jsadow@ssnj.org

Get results!
Advertise on
this page.
201-837-8818

Sterling Associates Auctions

(201) 837-8818

Help Wanted

MAAYANOT YESHIVA
High School for Girls
in Teaneck, N.J. is looking for
dynamic Teachers to join our
team in September 2015.
Open Positions:
Full-time Hebrew teacher
Part-time, afternoon hours:
Physics, Spanish, Nutrition,
Computer Coding
Part-time, morning hours:
U.S. History
Please send all resumes to:
kahanr@maayanot.org

YESHIVA in Northern NJ
seeks the following afternoon
General Studies positions:
Elementary teacher for all
grades (Boys Div.)
Middle School Language Arts
Middle School Science
Music (1 day wk.)
Ivrit
BA or Masters preferred
with experience.
Email cover letter, resume
and references to:

yeshivaconfide@gmail.com

TOP CASH PRICES PAID


201-768-1140 www.antiquenj.com
sterlingauction@optonline.net
70 Herbert Avenue, Closter, N.J. 07642

FREE APPRAISALS TUESDAYS FROM 12-2


IN OUR GALLERY. CALL FOR APPOINTMENT.

We pay cash for


Antique Furniture
Used Furniture
Oil Paintings
Bronzes Silver
Porcelain China
Modern Art

Top Dollar For Any Kind of Jewelry &


Chinese Porcelain & Ivory

ANS A

Over 25 years courteous service to tri-state area

We come to you Free Appraisals

Call Us!

Shommer
Shabbas

201-861-7770 201-951-6224
www.ansantiques.com
62 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

Situations Wanted

Situations Wanted

CERTIFIED AIDE 25 years caring


for elders. Day or Night! Experienced! References. Reliable. Own
car. Call 551-265-7720

DAUGHTER
FOR A DAY, LLC

HHA with 11 years experience, 2


years Nursing School. Live-in/out.
Great references. Reliable, compassionate, dependable. Speaks
English. Drives/own car. 201-9823176

CERTIFIED Home Health Aide. I


take care of elderly people! Liveout. Day or night. Experienced!
Good references! Call for more
particulars. 201-313-6956
CHHA looking for live-in positiion
preferably Monday - Friday or 7
days. Reliable! Own car! Speaks
English! 732-453-4839
ELDER/ CHILD CARE/ HOUSEKEEPING. Livein/out. 20 plus
years experience. Intelligent. References. 201-362-9098

EXPERIENCED
BABYSITTER
for Teaneck area.
Please call Jenna
201-660-2085

LICENSED & INSURED

FOR YOUR
PROTECTION

Handpicked
Certified Home
Health Aides
Creative
companionship
interactive,
intelligent
conversation &
social outings
Downsize
Coordinator
Assist w/shopping,
errands, Drs, etc.
Organize/process
paperwork,
bal. checkbook,
bookkeeping
Resolve medical
insurance claims

Car Service

Free Consultation

A PLUS

SEEKING CONSIGNMENT AND OUT RIGHT PURCHASES


Sculpture Paintings Porcelain Silver
Jewelry Furniture Etc.

Situations Wanted

Limo & Car Service

The most reliable and efficient service


at all times for your transporation needs.
Our professional and courteous team works together for you.

RITA FINE

201-214-1777

www.daughterforaday.com
Established 2001

Serving the Tri-State Area, New York and Bergen County

EWR $39 LGA $42 JFK $59


Tolls, parking, wlt, stops & tps are not included Extra $7 Airport Pickup
Prices subject to change without prior notice. Price varies by locations.

Fuel surcharge may add up to 10% Additional charge may be applied to credit card payment

201-641-5500 888-990-TAXI (8294)

Visit us online at: www.apluslimo1.com E-mail: apluslimo@earthlink.net

HOME HEALTH AIDE

Licensed 10 years experience


Specializes in Geriatric Care
Companionship Do
Errands
Live-in/Out Drive
Excellent References

732-328-0123

LPN to do homecare for adults. Experienced! Very Reliable! Speaks


English! Own car! Worked for Kosher family. 973-338-5013; 718496-2331
NURSES AIDE /CARETAKER
available to care for your loved
ones. Over 17 years experience.
Top of the line references. Very
competent. 201-406-8309
CNA and CHAA Care for elderly
and Alzheimer. Available immediately, 7 days/week. Great references, English speaking, own transportation. Please call Anne 201898-3307
CNA-HHA looking to care for elderly. Live-in/out. 25 years hospital
and home care experience. CPR
training! Reliable! Very caring! 848219-4785
COMPANION: Experienced, kind,
trustworthy person seeking part
time work. Weekends OK. Meal
preparation, laundry, housekeeping. Will drive for doctors appointments; occasional sleepovers. 973519-4911
CHHA looking for position as companion to cre for elderly. 10 years
experience. Loving! Caring! Honest! Reliable! References. Speaks
English. 347-965-1606
LPN with Nursing home and
Geriatric experience will care for
your loved one, in your home or
theirs. Able to give companionship, emotional and personal
care, and household care .8+hr
day. Flexible. Monday-Friday.
Excellent professional & personal references. Call Miriam
201-962-3011; 201-245-0261

Antiques

Antiques Wanted
WE BUY
Oil Paintings

Silver

Bronzes

Porcelain

Oriental Rugs

Furniture

Marble Sculpture

Jewelry

Tiffany Items

Chandeliers

Chinese Art

Bric-A-Brac

Tyler Antiques
Established by Bubbe in 1940!

tylerantiquesny@aol.com

201-894-4770
Shomer Shabbos

Help Wanted
KINDERGRTEN TEACHER
Growing preschool seeks a dynamic, energetic and nurturing
Head Kindergarten Teacher for the coming school year. Responsibilities include planning and implementing both Hebrew
and English curricula, providing differentiated instruction in a
center-based environment, building positive relationships with
students and parents, and being part of a collaborative team.
Candidates must have previous relevant Head Teaching experience and degree, and display warm, patient, and nurturing
sensitivity to all children.
Resumes can be emailed to franandaviva@rynj.org

Heichal HaTorah

Teaching & Administrative


Openings 2015-2016
General Studies positionslate afternoon hours, MondayThursdayin growing yeshiva high school in Teaneck, NJ:
Director of General Studies to supervise curriculum
and personnel. Experience with high school curriculum,
pedagogic supervision and teacher training required.
Full and Half positions in English, Three years
experience at the secondary or community college level
and strong interest in teaching writing required.
Full and Half positions in Western Civilization and
American History. Three years experience at the
secondary or community college level required.
Familiarity with AP curriculum a plus.
Please send resume and supporting documents to
mrichman@heichalhatorah.org

Classified
Situations Wanted

Cleaning & Hauling

2
.
s
-

CHHA with 6 years experience is


willing to care for elderly. Livein/out. Very good references.
Drives/own car. Speaks English.
732-621-9122

CHHA looking for Caregiver position for elderly. Live-in. 10 years


experience. Good references. Reliable. Speaks English. 347-4390104

R
d
.

y
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l
R

Tree Service

JIMMY
THE JUNK MAN
Low Cost
Commercial
Residental
Rubbish Removal

201-661-4940

Cleaning Service
AN experienced European woman
willl clean houses/apartments and
do some laundry one day a week
or every other week. Own car.
Great references & rates. 201-3130849
POLISH Cleaning Lady, experienced, excellent references. Clean
homes, offices apartments. Call
Agnes 201-457-1693

RICKS SAME DAY SERVICE


CLEANOUT, INC.
We clean up:
Attics Basements Yards
Garages Apartments
Construction Debris
Residential Dumpster Specials
10 yds 15 yds 20 yds

ROYAL HEARTS HEALTHCARE


Home Care Agency
Rate: $16.00 to $18.00 per hour
Live-in $150/day
Best Care with Compassion,
Kindness, Humility, Gentleness
and Patience.
862-250-6680
care@rhhealthcare.com

201-342-9333

www.rickscleanout.com

SENIOR CITIZENS 10% OFF


Handyman

Home Health Services

BH

NEW IMAGE PAINTING


Clovis

201-290-9572

Fernando

862-588-8844

Jewish Music with an Edge


Ari Greene 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com

Help Wanted

MORIAH SCHOOL MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS:


The Moriah School, a coed Jewish Day School in Englewood, NJ seeks full time teachers for the
following Middle School grades:
Middle School Jewish Studies Teacher with broad knowledge of Jewish texts, exhibiting strong
skills in classroom management, student engagement, differentiated instruction, and technology integration. This candidate should be one that collaborates well with other staff members and motivates
students academically and spiritually, while serving as a strong role model. Candidates must have
prior experience teaching Middle School or higher, an MA degree, and comfort level with integrating
technology into classroom instruction.

Candidates should submit cover letter and resume to Robin Wexler at rwexler@moriahschool.org.

Home Repair Service

Painting
Carpentry
Kitchens
Decks
Electrical
Locks/Doors
Paving/Masonry
Basements
Drains/Pumps
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Maintenence
Tiles/Grout
Hardwood Floors
General Repairs

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL


24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services
Shomer Shabbat
Free Estimates

JOHNS CARPET &


UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
25 years experience
Owner Operated
Special!! 2 rooms $60.00
Double Method Cleaning

1-201-530-1873
Plumbing

201-487-1176
www.shampoosteam.com

APL Plumbing & Heating LLC

Complete Kitchen &


Bath Remodeling

Boilers Hot Water Heaters Leaks


EMERGENCY SERVICE

Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!

201-358-1700 Lic. #12285


Roofing

HACKENSACK
ROO
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OOFING
CO.

201-487-5050

Residential Commercial

Call for FREE estimate

Middle School History Teacher for the Middle School grades with a focus on American History.
Candidates must have prior experience teaching Middle School or higher, an MA degree, and comfort
level with integrating technology into classroom instruction.

BESTof the BEST

Carpet Cleaning

Free
Estimates

Painting Interior Exterior Wallcovering


Staining Power Washing Tiling
Install, Sand & Refinish Wood Floors

Adam 201-675-0816 Jacob

Home Improvements

201-342-3402

ROOFING SIDING

Call Dovid
for your best price
Free Estimate

Give Your House


A New Look
For The New Season

Middle School Math Teacher for the Middle School grades with a focus on Algebra. Candidates
must have prior experience teaching Middle School or higher, an MA degree, and comfort level with
integrating technology into classroom instruction.

Lic. & Ins. NJ Lic. #13VH05023300


www.yourneighborwithtoolshandyman.com

For all
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and Nursing Needs
We have the best
RNs and HHAs
Free Consultation
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CHHA Classes

201 390-8400

Party Planner

Your Neighbor with Tools


Home Improvements & Handyman
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
Over 15 Years Experience

BERGEN HOME CARE &


NURSING, INC.

VAL-KAM
TREE SERVICE

Cleaning & Hauling

RUBBISH REMOVAL

Home Health Services

Painting/Wallpapering

INC.

GUTTERS LEADERS

Roof
Repairs

83 FIRST STREET
HACKENSACK, NJ 07601

Mohels
MOHEL
Rabbi Gerald Chirnomas
TRAINED AT & CERTIFIED BY HADASSAH HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM
CERTIFIED BY THE CHIEF RABBINATE OF JERUSALEM

973-334-6044
www.rabbichirnomas.com

Wilshire
FROM PAGE 60

workshop.
Johng Ho Song, the executive director of the nearby
Koreatown Youth and Community Center, said he has
been impressed with the temples outreach to community groups like his own and expressed hope that the
temples collaborative vision could become a model for
institutions in other neighborhoods as well.
Theyre making a very conscious decision to work
together and share their resources, which is very
unusual here, Song said. I think theyre really trying
to demonstrate that they like to be involved with the
community, they want to be part of community, and
they want to make a positive impact.
That, in turn, could help nurture a closer relationship between the temple members and the surrounding community.
It builds partnership, it builds trust in the community, Song said. Its an opportunity to break down
some of the differences and cultural stereotypes.
At the same time, Rabbi Goldberg has been tasked
with reaching out to the east sides burgeoning Jewish
community, a task that ranges from teaming with organizations such as East Side Jews to create events from
living room Havdalahs to monthly Friday night services
where everyone sits on the grand sanctuarys bimah to
make the space feel more intimate.
So far, the signs for the new campus are positive
synagogue membership has been stable at around
2,400 members, and Leder notes that the age of membership is trending younger, as new families that are
joining replace older congregants who have died. The

schools are at capacity, with waiting lists.


If Wilshire Boulevard Temples very expensive bet does
pay off in the long run, it will be because what were once
thought to be its greatest vulnerabilities the massive old
sanctuary and the diverse, teeming neighborhood around
it prove to be unique strengths.
Leder argues that the synagogue and the social service
center, on opposite sides of the block, represent the two
portals into Judaism worship and engagement with the
JTA WIRE SERVICE
problems of the world. 

Solution to last weeks puzzle. This weeks puzzle is


on page 54.

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 63

Real Estate & Business


During April, Girard Interiors is helping animals in need
Girard Interiors in Westwood is known for not only helping clients receive the best of the best design expertise,
but they are also credited with saving the lives of innocent animals in need of care.
For the past seven years, every April the Westwood
Avenue shop has donated 5 percent of each sale to
Friends of the County Animal Shelter (FOCAS). Last
years total was $4,500, a sum that company owner
Wendy Girard hopes to exceed this April.
The money raised through Girards effort will help
FOCAS, a group of volunteers whose mission is to provide for the well-being of pets at the Bergen County Animal Shelter.
As FOCAS explains on its website, the organization is
a voice for the animals to strongly advocate in their
best interest at the shelter.
FOCAS was founded in 1984 for the protection and
preservation of animals. Unlike the Bergen County Animal Shelter, FOCAS is not funded by tax dollars, nor
is it funded by endowments as many private shelters
are. FOCAS is entirely dependent on fundraising to sustain life saving care for homeless animals in dire need
throughout the local communities.
Specifically, FOCAS Angel Fund was established to
provide immediate veterinary services, often emergency
surgeries that cost more than typical shelter operations
can afford, to animals in need. Contributions to this
fund are used specifically for this purpose. The Angel
Fund has saved hundreds of lives of homeless dogs and

64 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

cats with money raised at various fundraisers each year.


Its Girard Interiors wish to help FOCAS sick or
injured animals and to ensure they get the assistance
and love they desperately need.
At Girard Interers, the fundraising effort started with
mostly residential clients participating. Little by little,
year by year, local businesses and now large corporate
clients have made donations.
Once again, in addition to residential customers and
local businesses, corporate accounts are encouraged to
participate in Girard Interiors offerings.
A large volume project could really give FOCAS the
help they so desperately need said Girard.
Does your conference room need updating? Does your
office, carpeting or desk look shabby? Now would be
the time to do a renovation project while also helping
FOCAS. Any corporate order will also donate 5 percent
to FOCAS and your company name will be announced
as a contributor to this fundraiser.
Not ready to complete your project now? No problem!
The purchases of gift certificates will also donate 5 percent to FOCAS. Gift certificates can be used anytime for
any project.
So, what are you waiting for? Visit Girard Interiors
today at 69 Westwood Ave., Westwood, and make your
donation or call (201) 263-1332.
Girard Interiors offers a variety of products, services
and expertise. Its staff members are experts in window
treatments, including Hunter Douglas Window Fashions,

FOCAS Angel Fund


was established
to provide immediate
veterinary services,
often emergency
surgeries that cost
more than typical
shelter operations
can afford.
and the store carries the largest selection of wall coverings and fabrics in Bergen County.
In addition they carry all types of blinds, shades and
shutters, custom bedding, quality furniture, sunsetter
awnings, carpeting, upholstery and slipcovers. Glass
tinting service is also available to prevent fading and
reduce unwanted heat.
Girards professional interior designers offer free inhome or business design consultations. They can be
reached at (201) 263-1332.
As featured in the PASCACK PRESS

Real Estate & Business


Teaneck Chamber calls for award nominees
The Teaneck Chamber of Commerce is soliciting nominations from the Teaneck public for the upcoming Community
Awards Dinner to be held in October. Categories include Educator of the Year, Business of the Year, Physician/Healer of the
Year, Youth Achievement Award, Humanitarian of the Year,
Cultural Arts Award, and Lifetime Achievement Award.
To nominate a person or business for an award, please send

a brief essay (no more than 500 words please) along with a
photo of the nominee/business to info@teaneckchamber.org
with the subject line of CAD Nominee 2015 no later than
June 1. All nominations will then be reviewed by the Chambers board and committees and a final determination will be
made by August 15.
For more information, visit www.teaneckchamber.org.

OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY, APRIL 26


TEANECK

TM

Ap S OP
r. 2 UN EN
6 DA
1- Y
4P
M

VERA AND NECHAMA REALT Y


A DIVISION OF V AND N GROUP LLC

SUNDAY APRIL 26 TEANECK OPEN HOUSES

TEANECK

DELIGHTFUL

$389,000

Affordable exclusive beauty, first time listed, spacious updated sunny home, living
room w/fireplace, formal dining room, lovely eat-in kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
finished basement, large deck overlooks garden.
DIR: Teaneck Rd to Canterbury to 1041 Alpine Dr.

ALPINE/CLOSTER
TENAFLY
RIVER VALE ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS TENAFLY

894-1234
768-6868

CRESSKILL
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389

666-0777

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COME TO FLORIDA!
Now Selling Valencia Cove

1303 Somerset Rd
1285 Hastings St
1435 Hudson Rd
1279 Princeton Rd
203 Carlton Ter
971 Phelps Rd

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$1,275,000
$587,000
$499,000
$499,000
$480,000

JUST SOLD
51 Wilbur Rd, Bergenfield
1556 Victoria Rd, Teaneck
UNDER CONTRACT
393 Winthrop Rd, Teaneck

1-3pm
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601 S. Federal Hwy


FORMER NJ
Boca Raton, FL 33432
RESIDENTS
SERVING BOCA RATON,
Elly & Ed Lepselter
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(561) 826-8394
AND SURROUNDING AREAS
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Valencia Isles, Valencia Pointe, Valencia Palms, Valencia Shores,
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TM

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TEANECK

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ALPINE/CLOSTER
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894-1234
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CRESSKILL
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666-0777

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NEW LISTING
128 Wilbur Rd, Bergenfield 469,000

facebook.com/jewishstandard

1402 Milford Ter.

$359,000

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Prime W Eglwd Col. 3 Brms, 2 Updated Baths. LR/fplc, FDR,


Den, Skylit MEIK, Fam Rm. Polished, Inlaid H/W Flrs. Gar.

290 Edgemont Ter.

$379,000

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4 Brm, 2 Bath Cape. LR, Kit, Jr Din Rm. Fin Playroom Bsmt/
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257 Edgewood Ave.

$389,000

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1292 Dickerson Rd.

Let Us Finance Your


House Purchase

44 Bennett Rd.

201-692-3700

Direct lender
2 to 3 day approval
Closings within 30 days
Northern NJ Appraisers
FHA loans w/55% debt ratio
Credit scores as low as 580

$399,900

1-3 PM

W Eng Area. Brick expanded cape. LR/Fplc open to Din Rm,


Updated Kit, 4 Brms, 3 Baths, Den. Game Rm Bsmt. 60' X
156' Prop.

vera-nechama.com/contact-us

$599,000

1-3 PM

W Eglwd Col. 60' X 132' Prop. 3 BRs, 2 Full + 2 Half Baths.


LR/Fplc, Lg FDR, Granite Isle Kit, Cov Patio. Fin 3rd Flr. Hi
Ceil Semi Fin Bsmt. C/A/C. Gar.

$899,900

1-3 PM

Sophisticated CH Col. Quality Throughout. Oversized Rms.


3.5 Designer Baths. Spacious LR, Banq DR, Great Rm/Fplc,
Huge Dream Kit, Party Deck. 5 Generous 2nd Flr Brms.
Extras Galore. King-sized Opportunity!

NEW MILFORD

982 Pleasant Dr.

$799,000

1-4 PM

Superb Quality. 7 Year Young. CH Col. 2-Story Ent, LR, Banq


Form Din Rm, Vaulted Ceil Fam Rm/Fple & Skylites, Granite
Floored & Countered Isle Kit, Private Den. 4 Generous Brms,
3 Baths. Huge High Ceil Bsmt. C/A/C, 2 Car Gar, Sprinklers.

BY APPOINTMENT
TEANECK

$519,000. Prime W Englwd CH Col. Ent Foyer, LR/fplc, FDR,


Mod Eat In Kit open to Fam Rm/Sldg Drs to Yard & Patio, 1st
Flr Laund, .5 Bath. 2nd Flr/Master BR/Bath, 3 more BRs, Full
Bath. Gar.
Larry DeNike
President

MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com

Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director

MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com

Classic Mortgage, LLC

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1-3 PM

Col. LR/Library Built-ins, Form DR, Mod Granite Kit/Cherry


Cabs. 2nd Flr: 3 BRs, Updated Bath. Fin Bsmt w/ Recroom,
Office & 4th BR + Full Bath. H/W Flrs, Calif Closets, C/A/C,
Det Gar.

$998,900

Stately colonial in prestigious location offers deep park-like property, sunny granite
eat-in kitchen, mud room, powder room, 4 bedrooms & 3 baths on 2nd floor + guest
suite in basement, stone patio, multi-zone CAC & heat, 2 car
garage. DIR: Sussex to 622 Winthrop Rd.

$499,900

Beautiful Winthrop Rd! Vaulted Ceil Ent, LR/Fplc, Form DR,


Mod Kit/Bkfst Rm. 3 Brms, 1.5 Baths. Fin Bsmt. Gar.

343 Sherman Ave.

FOR ALERTS ON OFFICE EXCLUSIVES


& NEW CONSTRUCTION:

Advantage Plus

311 Winthrop Rd.

Serving NY, NJ & CT

25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ

201-368-3140

www.classicmortgagellc.com

MLS
#31149

ALL CLOSE TO NY BUS / HOUSES OF WORSHIP /


HIGHWAYS / SHOPPING / SCHOOLS & NY BUS
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com

2014
READERS
CHOICE

FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY

(201) 837-8800

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 65

Real Estate & Business


New owners of Carefinders Total Care hope to transform home health services
In the health care ecosystem, home care has
long been viewed as a stepchild of the healthcare industry. As patients are neither acute
nor in need of urgent medical care, home
care all too often gets dropped into a category
of secondary importance.
But tell that to a family whose elderly
loved one has just returned from the hospital or rehab after a serious illness, a fall, or
surgery, or because of cognitive issues can no
longer stay safely at home, said Linda Mintz,
co-chairman of Carefinders Total Care, a
home care agency with locations throughout
northern New Jersey. Home care should be
viewed as a critically important component
at the front line of the health care continuum.
Its what allows people to stay at home longer and what reduces expensive hospital
readmissions.
Mintz and her business partner, Sanford
Hausner, purchased Carefinders last May.
One of the largest home care agencies in
New Jersey, Carefinders currently employs
over 2,000 home health aides and serves
the needs of some 3,000 patients through its
offices in South Orange (which opened last
month), Hackensack, West New York, Elizabeth, and Passaic. In 2015, Mintz and Hausner have their sights on expanding through
organic growth and acquisition.
We believe home care can be so much
more, said Hausner. By working with our
HMO partners and others to deliver a comprehensive total care approach, our goal
is to deliver better quality care, more efficiently and less wastefully, avoid costly hospital readmissions, improve outcomes and

being greater comfort to patients and their


families.
Mintz and Hausner have either already
made innovative moves or have plans on the
drawing board that are intended to accomplish this. Here are some examples:
Expand the use of technoloy, which
ranges from the use of electronic health
records (well-established in the hospital
industry, but virtually unheard of in home
care), to the use of smart phones by aides and
laptops by nurses in order to update patients
electronic health records in real time.
Offer specialized training for home
health aides in areas like Alzheimers care,
diabetes, and autism. Diabetes is at epidemic proportions there are almost one
million people in New Jersey with diabetes
and the high degree of noncompliance
compromises care and raises health care
costs, said Mintz. Think how much money
could be saved if home care could help even
a small percentage of diabetics comply with
their meds and diet.
Foster strategic partnerships with payers and other health care providers to create
an efficient total care offering. This includes
the exploration of new services (ranging
from nutrition and wellness to medication
management).
Implement a proprietary computerized
system to match home health aides and
patients based on language, cultural background, interests, and temperament. This is
particularly important, said Hausner, as the
home care agency caters to many ethnicities, including Hispanic, Korean, Russian,

SELLING YOUR HOME?

Home care is
widely viewed
by government
and HMOs as the
most affordable
type of care
provided to an
aging population.
and Arabic patients. We know our patients
have a more satisfactory relationship with an
aide they feel they can really connect with,
he said.
Home care is widely viewed by government and HMOs as the most affordable type
of care provided to an aging population far
more so than institutional care where people live longer, but in an increasingly fragile
state both physically and cognitively. Studies
show that it is also a preferred model of care,
as nine of every 10 people say they want to
remain in their homes as long as possible.
Neither Mintz nor Hausner, who met
nearly 30 years ago as attorneys at the law
firm Weil Gotshal & Manges, have any prior
professional experience in the health care
industry. Mintz was a mergers and acquisitions attorney running a business advisory
firm, and Hausner a specialist in corporate
and securities law, when they decided to

purchase the 20-year-old home care agency.


Both had personally lived through serious
health scares that emphasized to them the
importance of a new and better type of home
care that would provide a total care experience and an enhanced quality of life.
One of the first things the new owners
did after the purchase was to become more
closely acquainted with the job of the caregiver. This meant, said Hausner, learning to
walk in their shoes. As a means to this, he
completed and passed the intensive 76-hour
training program and is now a certified home
health aide.
A priority is to elevate the value of the services offered by the home health aide, who
has long been viewed as a nonessential provider in the chain of care, said Mintz. This
is unfortunate because the aide is truly the
primary level of care for the elderly patient.
After all, it is the aide who is present in the
most important, safest, and most comfortable place for patients in their homes, day
in and day out.
The industry is beginning to take notice of
the new owners.
The biggest difference is that Linda and
Sandy see things with fresh eyes, said Dennis Marco, managing director of the lobbying
firm Hamilton Public Affairs, which represents the Home Care Council of New Jersey
and is closely involved in legislative matters
concerning the industry. They came in
without any baggage and are not caught up
with whats been done in the past. This has
allowed them to think out of the box and foster a real paradigm change.

Cantorial seminar in Teaneck


The Belz School of Jewish Music at
Yeshiva University has announced the
Bayrish Schreiber Memorial Seminar
in the musical nusach of Shacharit for
Shabbat.
This tuition-free four-week seminar
conducted by members of the Belz
faculty will take place at Congregation
Bnai Yeshurun on Thursdays, 8-9:30
p.m., from April 30 through May 21.
Both experienced and aspiring prayer

leaders are invited to attend these sessions, which will grant a certificate of
completion to all who finish the series.
Learn the beautiful, accurate nusach of
the Belz School, and discover facts that
you never knew about Tefillat Shacharit. This seminar is free and open to all
residents of Bergen County.
For further information, please call
the Belz School at (212) 960-5353, or
email to goffin@yu.edu.

Like us
on Facebook
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com

Cell: 201-615-5353

2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

66 JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015

facebook.com/jewishstandard

The Art of Real Estate


NJ:
NY:

Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
TENAFLY

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

201.266.8555
T: 212.888.6250
T:

TENAFLY

J
SO UST
LD
!

201.906.6024
M: 917.576.0776

Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ

M:

ENGLEWOOD

ENGLEWOOD

O
SU HO PEN
ND US
AY E
14

O
SU HO PEN
ND US
AY E
14

Unique Contemporary w/fab open floor plan. $1,890,000

Storybook lush property with gazebo.

119-B EAST PALISADE AVENUE $725,000

90 CHESTNUT STREET $1,175,000

ORADELL

PARAMUS

DEMAREST

CLOSTER

SO

LD

J
SO UST
LD
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SO

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SO

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Beautifully appointed 5 BR/3.5 BTH Colonial.

Spectacular top-of-the-line construction.

Classic architecture with attention to details.

Magnificent construction on a cul-de-sac.

FORT LEE

FORT LEE

TEANECK

TEANECK

SO

LD

AM EVE
EN RY
ITY
!

CO

NS NE
TR W
UC
TIO

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N!

Fabulous southeast views of NYC skyline.

Phenomenal 3 BR corner unit. $399,900

Time to customize. Oversized lot. $929,000

Charming Tudor. Prime area. Close to all.

BROOKLYN HEIGHTS

CENTRAL PARK

CLINTON HILL

CHELSEA

2 BR/2 BTH brownstone-style condo.

The Greenwich House. A Chelsea gem.

UPPER WEST SIDE

WILLIAMSBURG

J
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LIS JUS
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Gorgeous 3 BR/3.5 BTH renovated brownstone. The Hermitage. Incredible condo. $1,050,000

GREENWICH VILLAGE

J
SO UST
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THE HAMILTON. GORGEOUS ALCOVE STUDIO.

CENTRAL HARLEM

J
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THE DOUGLASS. 2 BR/2 BTH W/COURTYARD.

J
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THE BROMLEY. CORNER 2 BR CONDO W/VIEWS.

J
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STYLISH LUXURY BLDG. HEART OF BROOKLYN.

Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!

www.MironProperties.com
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.

JEWISH STANDARD APRIL 24, 2015 67

STORE HOURS

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666

SUN - TUE: 7AM - 9PM


WED: 7AM - 10PM
THURS: 7AM - 11PM
FRI: 7AM - 2 HOURS
BEFORE SUNDOWN

Tel: 201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225

Sign Up For Your


Loyalty
Card
In Store

Sale Effective
4/26/15 - 5/1/15

6 2

99

$
FOR

69

Round & Blade Bone

$ 99

Save On!

Fresh

32 OZ

Save On!

Kedem
Original Tea
Biscuit

DAIRY

Original

Tropicana
Orange Juice

$ 99

89 OZ

Assorted

Sabra
Salads

2 5
$

14 OZ

Shtark Shredded
Cheese

$ 99

2 LB

Qt.

16 oz.

Kugels & Souffles

3
French Onion
$ 99
2

Sweet Noodle
Kugel

16 oz.

$ 99

16 oz.

15.5 OZ

$ 99

48 OZ

Save On!

Tnuva
Muenster Slices

$ 99

6 OZ

Assorted

Chobani
Flips or Oats

99

5.3 OZ

2 $7

16 OZ

$ 99

21 OZ

FROZEN

Assorted

Amish Organic
Milk

$ 99

64 OZ

Assorted

Breakstones
Cottage Cheese

2 $5
16 OZ

Save On!

Manischewitz
Matzo Ball
Mix

4 $5

32 OZ

5 OZ

Natural & Original

Assorted

Golden
Blintzes

2 6
$

13OZ

Vegetarian or Potato

TaAmti
Cigars

$ 99

14.4 OZ

2 4
7.2 OZ

Save On!

Bounty
Bundle Pack

15

99
15 PK

Save On!

Bodek
Broccoli Florets

$ 99

24 OZ

Cherry & Rainbow

Marino
Italian Ices

2 $5
6 PK

LB.

Breaded
Tilapia

$ 99
LB.

Pepper
Crusted Tuna

1699

LB.

Check Out Our New Line of Cooked Fish

HOMEMADE DAIRY

Ossies

Eggplant
Parmesan

$ 99
EACH

BAKERY

Cinnamon Loaf
Babka
Vanilla
Cupcake

20 OZ

Dairy
Tiramisu

$ 99

20 OZ

1299

Cedar Market
Gefilte Fish

$ 99

Scottish
Salmon Fillet

6 PK
CUPS

Assorted

Of Tov
Chicken Nuggets

$ 99

2 LB

Save On!

International
Chopped Beef Liver

$ 99
12 OZ

ea.

FISH

Motts Apple $
Sauce

Original, Everything Or
Buffalo Wings Only

ea.

995

Lb

Save On!

Hoffmanns
Pizza Snaps

6 OZ

Assorted

24 OZ

Family Pack

La Yogurt
Yogurt

10 $5

$ 79

12 OZ

Save On!

$ 99

Califia
Iced Coffee

Crispy
Roll

$ 99

Save On!

Natural Earth
Soy
Vay
Sushi Rice
Organic
White Quinoa Veri Veri Teriyaki White or Brown
Sauce

Assorted

Fresh

495

Lb

Lamb
Shwarma

Lb

ea.

Spicy Kani
Roll

Jason
Hunts Manischewitz
Toasted Egg Seasoned Bread Snack Factory
Manwich
Crumbs Pretzel Crisps
Barley
Original

Natural Earth

10

495

99

4 PK

Cucumber
Avocado Roll

Beef
Scallopini

99 2 $4

Save On!

Save On!

FISH
`
SUSHI

American Black Angus Beef

Hunts
Snack Pack

7.5 OZ

16 oz

DELI, SOUPS, SALADS, KUGELS, DIPS, APPETIZERS & MUCH MORE

Original Strawberry Gel 0r


Original Chocolate Pudding

99

8 OZ

2 LB

4.2 OZ

Assorted

Save On!

5 $2

Carolina
Jasmine
Rice

2 $5 5 $2
5

Lb

2 $4 2 $5 3 $4 4 5

13 OZ

16 oz.

Hearts of Palm

Olive Dip

$ 99

Hunts
Paesana
Tomato California Chopped
Sauce
Garlic

Save On!

Parmalat
Lowfat
Milk

Wolffs
Kasha

3
$ 99
4
$ 99

$ 49

Lamb Shish
Kebab

Reg. & No Salt

16 OZ

2% Only

Whole Only

Lb

Grilled Corn Salad

Savory Dips

Ready To Grill

$ 99

Lb

Riverhead
Pearl
Barley

48 OZ

Gourmet Salad

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

$ 99

$ 99

Lb

Onion Crusted
Chicken Cutlets

2 $5 2 $7 4 $3
14.75 OZ

DELI SAVINGS

Chicken Broth
Split Pea Soup

Silver Tip
Roast

Ready To Bake

Save On!

Wesson
Canola
Oil

$ 79

lb.

MARKET

Homemade Soups

American Black Angus Beef

$ 99

Lb

$ 99

Lb

GROCERY

$ 69

Turkey
Cutlets

Ground
Lamb

Shoulder Lamb
Chops

Bumble Bee
Pink
Salmon

Organic

Green
Squash

Fresh

$ 29

Lb

Save On!

lb.

Super Family Pack

$ 69

14 OZ

lb.

Chicken
Legs

Super Family Pack

Season
Whole Hearts
of Palm

2 6
$

FOR

Fresh

Chicken
Cutlets

Save On!

69

Organic

Romaine
Hearts

CEDAR MARKET

Loyalty
Program

at:
Visit Our Website om
et.c
www.thecedarmark

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

MARKET

TERMS & CONDITIONS: This card is the property of Cedar Market, Inc. and is intended for exclusive
use of the recipient and their household members. Card is not transferable. We reserve the right to
change or rescind the terms and conditions of the Cedar Market loyalty program at any time, and
without notice. By using this card, the cardholder signifies his/her agreement to the terms &
conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Offer. *Loyalty Card
must be presented at time of purchase along
with ID for verification. Purchase cannot be
reversed once sale is completed.

Cedar Markets Meat Dept. Prides Itself On Quality, Freshness And Affordability. We Carry The Finest Cuts Of Meat And
The Freshest Poultry... Our Dedicated Butchers Will Custom Cut Anything For You... Just Ask!

Fresh

69

2 5

MEAT DEPARTMENT

Farm Fresh

Granny Smith
Apples

$
FOR

each

lb.

Slicing
Tomatoes

Sweet
Pineapples

89

lb.

Fresh

Golden

Yellow
Onions

59

lb.

SUNDAY SUPER SAVER


2 Lb. Bag

Bosc
Pears

Suntan
Peppers

Sweet
Papayas

Sweet
Corn

Crunchy

Farm Fresh

Sugar

Loyalty
Program

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

SUNDAY SUPER SAVER

CEDAR MARKET

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

PRODUCE

Fine Foods
Great Savings

5
$ 49
5
$ 49
4
$ 49

16 OZ

6 pk

9 OZ

PROVISIONS

Hod Golan Ultra Thin

Turkey Slices

2/$
5 OZ

Aarons

Beef or Classic
Franks

$ 99

13.5 OZ.

We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale. While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.