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English

The program aims to equip English majors with knowledge and skills in meeting the challenges
of present-day English language teaching thereby producing quality English language teachers,
practitioners, and researchers who passes a deep sense of commitment, professionalism, integrity
and nationalism.

Specific Objectives:

 To demonstrate competence and expertise in English language teaching through


knowledge and skills gained in the various specialization courses;
 To use different strategies in the teaching of the four macro skills, namely, listening,
speaking, reading, writing, inculding grammar and literature;
 To exhibit proficiency in the use of English in day to day classroom discussions, tasks,
and activities;
 To effectively use educational tools and appropriate technology in enhancing and
facilitating the teaching and learning of English in and outside of the classroom;
 To demonstrate a culture of research using the knowledge and skills gained in the various
course offering; and
 To apply knowledge and skills gained and experiences acquired to world outside.


 Free English Proficiency Course (EPiC) for Filipinos (students, professionals,
OFWs, etc), international students (Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, etc) and
expatriates in Metro Manila.
 Time and venue: Every first Saturday of the month, 3 to 5 PM at the Baptist Bible
Church (3970 Sociego St. Sta. Mesa, Manila, near V. Mapa LRT Station and
opposite SM Centerpoint. Other schedules may be arranged for interested groups on
Tuesdays or Thursdays (6:30 to 8:30 PM or 7 to 9 PM). For more information or
changes in the schedule, please contact Atty. Gerry T. Galacio at
gtgalacio@yahoo.com or call the church at 716-0803.

 The English language: Gateway to the world


 The English language in its different varieties (American English, British English, etc)
is the gateway to the world of education, business, technology and inter-people
communication. More than a billion people speak the English language, and there
are only a few places in the world where English is not understood.
 The goal of this website
 If you are a teacher or student from grade school up to college, a professional, an
entrepreneur, an employee in government or in the private sector, this website can
help improve your mastery of the English language. Proficiency in English will help
improve your grades and create opportunities for advancement in work and career.
 The design of this website
 The website is divided into the traditional classification of English grammar of the
eight parts of speech, plus sections on idioms, vocabulary, spelling, listening,
speaking, pronunciation, and writing. Based on these divisions, we have searched
for and selected good discussions and interactive exercises from more than a
thousand ESL (English as Second Language) and EFL (English as Foreign
Language) websites.
 The websites we have chosen are consistently good, fast loading, and generously
offer to their users, free of charge, a wide range of resources. Besides the materials
listed in this website, these excellent sites offer a tremendous range of valuable
resources in learning the English language.
 While broadband connection is becoming more accessible and affordable for homes,
most of you probably still have online access either through slow dial-up connections
or through rental by the hour services of Internet cafes. This website thus uses
predominantly text links, with very few graphics.
 The Filipino diaspora
 Here in the Philippines, English is the language of government, education,
commerce and industry. The Philippines has a population of around 78 million. As of
December 2004, there were more than eight million overseas Filipino workers
(OFWs) employed in over 180 countries as nurses, engineers, doctors, entertainers,
domestic helpers, seamen, business management experts, etc. The term "Filipino
diaspora" has been used to describe this scattering of Filipinos all over the world.
Foreign employers prefer Filipinos, not only for their industry and technical
competence, but for their ability to communicate in English.
 There are also thousands of Filipinos pursuing their studies in colleges and
universities in English-speaking countries.
 Exceptions rather the rule
 Thousands of Filipinos are also employed in the call center companies here in the
Philippines. Acceptable fluency in the English language by Filipinos is one big factor
for the booming call center industry in our country.
 However, Filipinos who can speak, read and write excellent English are the
exceptions rather than the rule. Studies have shown that the Filipinos' grasp of the
English language is slipping, and other Asians are fast catching up, thanks to their
governments' aggressive English language training programs.
 According to one media report, only two out of ten applicants in call centers
eventually get hired, the rest having failed in the English proficiency tests. Those
who do get hired are often required to undergo a rigorous review of English. The
same report also stated that many graduates from our top universities have English
language skills comparable only to 2nd grade children from Western countries.
Another news item reported that out of 100 Filipino nurses who take the English
proficiency exams abroad, only 50 percent or less pass.
 To address this problem of decreasing competence in English among Filipinos, Pres.
Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo directed in early 2007 the Department of Education to use
English as the medium of instruction in all school levels.
 In Congress, House Bill 305 or the proposed "Act to Strengthen and Enhance the
Use of English as the Medium of Instruction in Philippine Schools" is expected to be
passed in 2008. Under Section 4 of this bill, English will be the medium of instruction
starting from Grade 3 up to high school. In addition, HB 305 will encourage the use
of English in language interaction in schools and the organization of English-based
clubs such as book, oratorical, debating, writing and related associations. Under
Section 5 of the bill, the use of English will be required for government examinations
and entrance examinations in public schools, state colleges and universities.
 Differences between American English and British English; an emerging
standard of Philippine English
 Please take note that these websites either teach American English or British
English. Although American English is the standard in the Philippines, we have
included websites on British English since the countries Filipinos have gone to as
workers or students include those where British English is the standard. For a better
understanding of the differences between American and British English, please read
the following articles : (1) American and British English differences from Wikipedia;
and (2) Differences Between American and British English from About.com.
 According to scholars (Dr. Teodoro Llamzon,1969; Bro. Andrew Gonzales, FSC of
De La Salle University, 1981; and recently, Dr. Ma. Lourdes S. Bautista, Professor
Emeritus, DLSU), there is now a brand of English known as “Standard Filipino
English” or “Philippine English”. Dr. Llamzon described it as “the type of English that
educated Filipinos speak and which is acceptable in educated Filipino circles.”
 Except for three or four websites, the sites we have included here come from
American, Australian, British or European sources. Thus, Filipinos may sometimes
find it difficult relating with the situations or the contexts of the discussions and
interactive exercises. As soon as we find online English lessons with an Asian
context, we will include them here.
 How to answer the interactive exercises
 In answering the interactive exercises, you should follow carefully the prompts and
directions. You should read each sentence or part aloud before clicking the answer
you think is right. After the correct answer is displayed, think it over as to why it is the
correct answer. (Please take note that the correct answer may depend on whether
the exercise comes from an American English or a British English website.) After
doing so, read the complete sentence again aloud with the correct answer.
 To train yourself to think in English, try to recite the sentences with the correct
answers from memory and at your full speaking volume. Or you can ask a friend to
read out loud the sentences with the correct answers and you repeat them without
looking at the computer screen.
 Special features of this website
 The section on "Spoken English Learned Quickly" is a complete course in English
excellent for self-study or classroom instruction and with enough mp3 and PDF
lessons for nine months of study (two hours a day. five days a week). You can easily
download the mp3 lessons, the Instructor's Guide and the 450-page Student
Workbook in PDF format.
 Another unique feature is the section on "Learning English and creative writing
through photographs". While the primary intended beneficiaries of this website are
OFWs, professionals, teachers and students from the Philippines, everyone (from
any country) is welcome to make use of this feature of the website.
 Testing your level of English proficiency

 “We have to make sure their (the teachers’) English is good. Really, English
is not proceeding anywhere as fast as Math or Science… It is deteriorating.
Something must be wrong with the educational system,” she said.
 Filipinos’ proficiency in English up – Social Weather Stations survey, by Shianee R.
Mamanglu
 The proficiency of Filipinos in written and spoken English has improved in the
last two years, the Social Weather Station (SWS) said.
The survey, conducted from March 30 to April 2, indicated that the ability of
Filipinos to write English recovered from 48 percent in March, 2006 to 61
percent in April, 2008, while their proficiency in spoken English improved from
32 percent to 46 percent for the same comparative years.
 Decline of English, by Adrian Cristobal (Breakfast Table)
 There are a great number of people, from politicians to prelates, business
executives to journalists, who speak and write English but who, by a certain
measure, can hardly be called proficient. They do get by with their English, at
least in bamboozling people who have less English, but they’re not quite in
their element when faced with their counterparts in the United Kingdom and
the United States. This is probably one reason we are so poor in negotiating
for our own interests in trade and diplomacy.
 English lessons to form part of RP tourism package
 The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), the Department of Tourism (DoT),
the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) and the
Bureau of Immigration (BI) yesterday signed a memorandum of agreement
(MoA) on the "English as Second Language" Program (ESL), which aims to
make the Philippines not only a tourist destination but also a destination for
learning the English language.
 Practice makes perfect!
 Founding members of the English is Cool Coalition, the European Chamber
of Commerce of the Philippines (ECCP), Hands on Manila and EON, The
Stakeholder Relations Firm, held the pilot English Camps at the Far Eastern
University, Manila Doctors College, Fort Santiago, and Central Colleges of
the Philippines to encourage the Filipino youth to learn and practice English.
 Improve English education, US envoy urges RP government

(DPA) -- The US ambassador to the Philippines urged yesterday the government to


improve English education in the country or lose foreign investments to other
countries.
re browsing the other sections of this website, it is a good idea to first test yoEnglish
Proficiency (PEP) project

Convergys Philippines donates $5,000 to the Promoting English


Proficiency (PEP) project to put up a Computerized English
Language Center (CELC) at a college in Sta Rosa, Laguna, where
the Convergys Nuvali office is also located. (In the photo, from left:
Mr. Jun Salipsip, Executive Director of the AmCham Foundation;
Mr. John Forbes, Co-Chair of PEP; Ms. Jan Maristell Liamson, PEP
Project Director; and Mr. Aldrin Dulig, Convergys' Senior Director
for Finance.)

Citigroup and AmCham sponsor English training in public high schools


Citigroup presents a $20,000 check to AmCham to set up
three Computerized English Language Centers (CELCs) to
train public high school teachers and students in English.
Present at the check turnover were Mr. Rob Sears,
AmCham Foundation Treasurer; Mr. Sanjiv Vohra, Citi
Country Officer and Amcham Vice President; Ms. Lilibeth
Fajardo, Citigroup Country Corporate Affairs Director;
Mr. John D. Forbes, Promoting English Proficiency (PEP)
project Co-Chair; Ms. Bambina Buenaventura, Hopkins
International Partners Director (authorized Philippine representative of Test of English for
International Communication); Ms. Marife Zamora, AmCham Director and Country GM,
Convergys Philippines and Ms. Marietta Umbay, PEP Project Director

SWS survey: Filipinos' proficiency in English shows "substantial recover"

Filipinos' self-assessed proficiency in the English language has recovered in the last two years
after a decline over the previous twelve years, according to the April 2008 survey of the Social
Weather Stations (SWS). The SWS interviewed 1,200 respondents nationwide for the survey,
which has a margin of error of +-3%.

The April 2008 results showed that, compared with the March 2006 results, more Filipinos rate
themselves proficient in understanding spoken English; reading, writing, and speaking English;
and thinking in English. Three-fourths of Filipino adults (76%) say they understand spoken
English; 75% say they read English; three out of five (61%) say they write English; close to half
(46%) say they speak English; about two-fifths (38%) say they think in English; while 8% say
they are not competent in any way when it comes to the English language.

This is a recovery from the previous survey of March 2006, when about two-thirds of Filipino
adults (65%) said they could understand spoken English; another 65% said they could read
English; about half (48%) said they could write English; about a third (32%) said they could
speak English; a fourth (27%) said they could think in English; while 14% said they were not
competent in any way when it comes to the English language.

The Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) Project of the American Chamber of Commerce in the
Philippines (AmCham), the Makati Business Club (MBC) and SunMicrosystems Phils., Inc.
commissioned the survey. PEP aims to develop a world-class Filipino workforce with English
proficiency that meets high international standards.

"English means jobs," said Rick Santos, AmCham president. "We believe that there are great
opportunities in business process outsourcing (BPO), IT-enabled services, software development,
and tourism in the country."
English is also important for overseas Filipino workers, added John D. Forbes, PEP co-chair for
AmCham. "There are 200,000 Filipinos working on ships around the world, and about a million
Filipinos a year go abroad to find well-paying jobs and support their families back home," he
said.

Philip Morris Philippines Manufacturing Inc. sponsored the latest survey, as it did the 2006
survey. Chris Nelson, managing director of Philip Morris Philippines, said his company funded
the survey and made donations to PEP as part of its corporate social responsibility to help
improve employment in the Philippines. He said, "We aim to improve the level of proficiency in
English among teachers, graduating students, and the Filipino workforce to give them a better
chance of employment and to maintain the country’s English-speaking labor force."

In 2005, the company started funding Computerized English Language Centers (CELCs) in three
colleges in Batangas, the host province of its manufacturing facility and has been helping
establish more CELCs all over the country since then. Each center is equipped with DynEd, an
internationally acclaimed and award-winning multimedia learning solution which is used
successfully by schools, companies, training organizations, and government agencies around the
world.

The latest survey shows that more Filipinos rate their personal usage of the English language as
"full use", "fair use", and "partial use" compared with the results in March 2006.

In April 2008, 8% of Filipino adults say they make "full use" of the English language; about two-
fifths (39%) say they make "fair use" of the English language; about three out of ten (29%) say
they make "partial use" of the English language; about a fifth (17%) say they make "almost no
use" of the English language; while 8% say they are not competent in any way when it comes to
the English language.

On the other hand, in March 2006, 5% of Filipino adults said they made "full use" of the English
language; a third (35%) said they made "fair use" of the English language; a fourth (27%) said
they made "partial use" of the English language; about a fifth (19%) said they made "almost no
use" of the English language; while 14% said they were not competent in any way when it comes
to the English language. "The recovery pattern persists across English-related factors of social
class, education, and occupation", said SWS president Mahar Mangahas. "This recovery is
clearly no accident."

Mangahas attributed the recovery to a greater awareness among Filipinos to improve their skills
in written and spoken English. "This is a result of the movement by the people to develop
themselves actively and not just be passive recipients of a program," he said. Ramon del Rosario
Jr., MBC president, credited market forces, specifically in the BPO industry, for prodding
Filipinos to boost their English competence. He said, "There has been a lot of talk about the
difficulty in recruiting qualified employees because they lack proficiency in English." Statistics
from the Business Processing Association of the Philippines and the Call Center Association of
the Philippines show that out of every 100 call enter applicants, only five are hired because they
have adequate English skills. Edilberto de Jesus, former secretary of the Department of
Education, agreed that the improvement in how Filipinos rate their own English competence is
market-driven. However, he found the survey results "surprising considering a turnaround in just
two years." He expressed a cautious optimism: "Losing and gaining a language is not like turning
a light switch off and on. Language improvement is a long-term project which requires sustained
effort."

Panelists and guests of the press conference are (from left): Mr.
Ramon del Rosario; Jr. (chairman, Makati Business Club); Dr.
Edilberto de Jesus (former DepEd secretary); De. Mahar
Mangahas (president and CEO, Social Weather Station); Ma.
Jamea Garcia (executive director for Talent Development,
Business Processing Association of the Philippines); Dr.
Teresita Inciong (assistant secretary for projects, Department of
Education); Mr. Rick Santos (president, American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines);
Mr. Peter Perfecto (associate director, Philippine Business for Education); Mr. John D. Forbes
(PEP Co-Chair for AmCham); Catherine Caspe (Program Manager, PEP); Mayet Umbay
(Project Director, PEP).

The The SWS survey was sponsored once again by Philip Morris Philippine
Manufacturing, Inc. (PMPMI). Mr. Chris Nelson, Managing Director of PMPMI
speaks to the media during the presscon.

UP Diliman Receives English Proficiency Training from UPS-PEP Project

Some of the nation's best and brightest students and teachers at the University of the Philippines
in Diliman can now take advantage of an award-winning language courseware and an
internationally recognized test as they work toward academic excellence. They received
computer-assisted English proficiency training and testing program under the United Parcel
Services-Promoting English Proficiency (UPS-PEP) project.
UPS is the world's largest package delivery company and a global leader in supply chain and
freight services. The PEP project is an initiative of the American Chamber of Commerce of the
Philippines and the Makati Business Club. It aims to develop a world-class Filipino workforce
with English proficiency that meets high international standards through a three-part program of
advocacy, refresher training and certification:

 PEP engages in an information, awareness, and advocacy campaign to highlight the


critical importance of English language proficiency for the success of Filipino workers.
 PEP emphasizes refresher and spoken English training for Filipino professional workers,
students soon to enter the labor force, and teachers using a blended approach of
classroom teaching and computer-aided instruction.
 PEP promotes the certification of Filipinos using internationally recognized tests, such as
the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC), and encourages
employers to adopt higher standards of certification for the hiring and advancement of
employees.

"This initiative is important because it's one way to raise the bar as far as English language and
proficiency are concerned", says Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jose Wendell P. Capili. "It's time we Filipinos regained our edge in English proficiency."

For Capili and his fellow teachers and school administrators, English communication skills are
essential in and out of the ivory tower of academia. Sadly, a nationwide survey conducted by the
Social Weather Station in 2006 showed that, compared to 1993 figures, fewer Filipinos
understand spoken English, read, write, and speak English, and think in English.

A 2006 survey conducted by the Personnel Management Association of the Philippines confirms
this fact. The survey showed that poor spoken English is one of the reasons many job applicants
fail to make it past the initial interview. As a result, many entry-level positions in accounting and
finance, sales, certain IT and engineering positions, and customer service go unfilled.

The UPS-PEP Project aims to improve English proficiency levels at UP Diliman by: providing
600 freshman and sophomore students with DynEd English Language Learning Solutions in a
laboratory set-up; and certifying 50 teachers and graduate students using the TOEIC. Overall, the
project covers five schools—two high schools and five state colleges—in Metro Manila: Las
Piñas East High School, Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Muntinlupa, Parañaque National High
School, University of Makati, and UP Diliman. Its purpose is to train 2,000 students and 300
teachers.

DynEd courses have won an impressive list of over 40 major awards. They have been approved
by Ministries of Education in several countries, including France, Turkey, and China. Schools,
companies, training organizations, and government agencies around the world use these courses
successfully.

TOEIC is an internationally recognized English language proficiency test taken by more than
five million people worldwide every year. It measures the everyday English skills of people
working in an international environment.
For further information:

 To arrange an interview or to find out more about the UPS-PEP Project, contact Mayet
Umbay, PEP Project Director, at 885 7867 ext. 326, (0922) 812 5829, and
pep@sun.com.ph or you may visit the website at www.promote-english.org
 To find out more about TOEIC, contact Hopkins International Partners Inc., TOEIC’s
Philippine representative, at 895 9944, 896 5808, and info@toeic-phil.com. Their website
is at www.toeic-phil.com.
 To find out more about DynEd, contact Interactive Language Solutions Inc., DynEd’s
Philippine representative, at 895 7647, 897 2160, and ils_management@yahoo.com or
the visit the website at www.dyned.com.

PEP and Teledevelopment Services Partner to Arrest Decline of English Proficiency among
Filipinos

TDS-PEP MOA signing was participated by Mr John D. Forbes (PEP Co-


Chair for AmCham), Mr. Jon Kaplan (US President, Teledevelopment Services, Inc.) and Mr. Robert Sears
(Executive Director, AmCham)

AmCham member firm TDS, led by its President Jon Kaplan, will support AmCham's advocacy
to enhance economic development and employment in the county through enhancing the English
proficiency skills of the workforce. According to Kaplan, "We are excited about this project. We
are hopeful and very positive that we can help improve the current state of English competence
in the country and promote remedial English language training to better equip teachers and
students entering the workforce".

Mr. Kaplan was joined by Robert Sears, AmCham Executive Director, and John Forbes, Co-
Chair for PEP. Alberto Lim, Executive Director of the Makati Business Club, is also a signatory
to the MOA.

PEP, since its launching in 2003, has implemented a three-part program of Advocacy,
Certification and Training. It has established almost 50 Computerized English Language Centers
(CELC) nationwide and certified more than 3,000 teachers and students. "With TDS as a partner,
adds Mr. Forbes, "PEP's roster of certification tools and training components will be further
enriched, thereby allowing PEP and TDS to jointly reach out to more schools and help provide
language proficiency interventions to teachers and students. In addition, TDS is also willing to
initiate research efforts on English language proficiency issues in the country and otherwise
contribute significantly to the PEP advocacy campaign."

Under the MOA, TDS will provide certification and assessment of English proficiency using
"ProSpeak", the first remotely-accessed fully automated English skills assessment tool in the
Philippines, as well as its successful English language training programs as part of the
partnership with the PEP project. To find more about their tools, visit their Philippine site at
www.teledevelopment.com/PH.

"This partnership clearly shows that the state of English proficiency is a concern that has
attracted the attention of the foreign business community. AmCham welcomes the contribution of
the latest PEP partner Teledevelopment Services to meet the challenge of poor English
proficiency among the country's youth" Mr. Sears remarked during the MOA signing event.

Community effort marks English proficiency campaign in Pangasinan

Team Energy and PEP raises the flag of Pangascasan Integrated School in
Sual, Pangasinan

As part of its corporate social responsibility (CSR) program, Team Energy (formerly Mirant)
Foundation has partnered with the Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) project of the American
Chamber of Commerce, Inc. and Makati Business Club (MBC) through a donation of 1 Million
Pesos to implement English Language proficiency programs in two public high schools.

Team Energy's CSR initiatives have mainly sought to benefit the communities where they
operate and this latest partnership with PEP is no exception. The foundation has donated a school
building and Computerized English Language Center (CELC) to the first beneficiary,
Pangascasan Integrated School in Sual, Pangasinan. The CELC houses 25 computers with
English training software, which will support the PEP program while the school building will
accommodate two to three grade levels.

Those who will benefit from the Team Energy-PEP program are public school teachers, as well
as, high school students. Their English skills will be enhanced through a blended approach of
computer-based learning using DynEd English training software and teacher facilitation.
On September 5, 2007, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed between Team Energy
and the project proponents during the turnover ceremony of the newly-constructed school
building.

The Sual undertaking is remarkable because the entire community is involved in ensuring that
the program will succeed. This was apparent in the MOA signing, where Sual Mayor, Rodney
Arcinue, barangay officials, the parent-teacher association, and the local government were united
in their commitment to support the project.

Citigroup Donates to Promote English Proficiency Program for Metro Manila Schools

MANILA (7 February 2007) - Citigroup will help improve English skills among students and
teachers in Metro Manila through a grant to the Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) project, an
initiative founded by the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines, Inc. (AmCham)
with the Makati Business Club and its expanding group of partners.

Citigroup and AmCham today signed a Memorandum of Agreement for the grant project, which
will establish Computerized English Language Centers (CELCs) in two Metro Manila high
schools to which Citigroup has previously donated computers.

Under the Citigroup-PEP program, the CELCs will be equipped with DynEd Interactive
Language software licenses to train about 1,200 public high school students and teachers. DynEd
International is the world's leading developer of English Language Learning solutions. The grant
will also fund the production of posters to boost PEP's advocacy campaign.

Citigroup Country Officer Sanjiv Vohra, AmCham President Roger Dallas, and AmCham
Foundation Treasurer Robert Sears signed the agreement.

Witnessing the signing were Lillibeth Fajardo, Citigroup Director for Country Corporate Affairs;
Mai Gacilo-Sangalang, Citigroup Corporate Affairs Manager; John D. Forbes, PEP co-chair;
Bambina Buenaventura, Interactive Language Solutions President (a PEP training partner); and
Jo-Anne Loquellano, PEP Project Director.

"The PEP program perfectly complements Citigroup's goal of enhancing the Filipino youth's
education and making them more competitive in the global workforce by increasing their English
proficiency. We are happy and proud to be a partner of AMCHAM in this advocacy campaign,"
said Mr. Vohra.

A survey commissioned by PEP and conducted by the Social Weather Stations in March 2006
revealed an alarming deterioration of English skills in the Philippines since 1993. The largest
deterioration was in the self-assessment of ability to speak English, which fell from 54% in
September 2000 to 32% in March 2006, a deterioration of 41% in six years.
"This partnership enables PEP to extend its reach to earlier years and complements ongoing
efforts to retrain teachers and college students," added Mr. Dallas.

The PEP project is dedicated to a world-class Filipino workforce with English proficiency
meeting high international standards through a three-part program of advocacy, refresher training
and certification. To date, PEP partners have established 25 CELCs throughout the country
operating approximately 500 computers with DynEd software.

UPS Foundation Grants $50,000 to Promote English Proficiency in Public Schools

(24 January 2007) - UPS Philippines will help improve


English skills among students and teachers in Metro Manila
and Pampanga through a $50,000 grant to the Promoting
English Proficiency (PEP) project, an initiative founded by
the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines, Inc.
(AmCham) with the Makati Business Club and its expanding
group of partners.

The grant project, formalized today through a check turnover at the AmCham General
Membership Meeting, will establish Computerized English Language Centers (CELCs) in five
public colleges and high schools in Metro Manila and Pampanga.

UPS Supply Chain Solutions Country Manager Mark Khambatta and Country HR Manager
Rolando Nierva presented the check to Roger Dallas, AmCham President, Robert Sears,
AmCham Executive Director and AmCham Foundation Treasurer and Trustee, John D. Forbes,
PEP co-chair for AmCham, and JoAnne Loquellano, PEP Project Director. Also present was
Tom Brennan, Deputy Commercial Manager from the US Embassy.

Representing UPS were John Queng, Business Development Manager; SB Lim, Senior Finance
Manager; Maya Guilatco, Assistant HR Manager; Vanessa Pascual, HR Manager Supply Chain
Solutions; Evelyn Abreu, Ocean Freight Manager Supply Chain Solutions and Jonel Guittap,
Marketing Supervisor.

"UPS firmly believes in giving back to the community where we work and live in. As we enter
our centennial year, we will continue the legacy of helping the less fortunate in the Philippines.
UPS is excited and looks forward to working with AmCham in fighting poverty and improving
the competitiveness of the Filipino workforce," says Mr. Khambatta.

A survey commissioned by PEP and conducted by the Social Weather Stations in March 2006
revealed an alarming deterioration of English skills in the Philippines since 1993. The largest
deterioration was in the self-assessment of ability to speak English, which fell from 54% in
September 2000 to 32% in March 2006, a deterioration of 41% in six years.
"The lack of English skills has repeatedly been identified as a barrier to getting good jobs,"
related Roger Dallas, president of the American Chamber of Commerce. "This significant
contribution by UPS to PEP will help meet the burgeoning demand for qualified Filipino workers
in various industries," added John D. Forbes, PEP co-chair for AmCham.

Under the UPS-PEP Project, DynEd courseware, a software developed by DynEd International
of California, the world's leading developer of English Language Learning solutions, will be
installed in dedicated laboratories of 20 computers.

The CELCs will enable focused training for 2,000 graduating students in 2008 and teachers over
one year in fields where English skills are considered important, such as Accounting and
Financial Services, Health Services, Cyberservices and Tourism. About 8,000 undergraduate
college and high school students will also benefit from presentation-style DynEd lessons.

The UPS-PEP Project also provides for 250 teachers and UPS volunteers to take the Test of
English for International Communication (TOEIC), an internationally-recognized certification
standard used by employers in several countries to assess the English proficiency skills of their
employees.

UPS' involvement is made possible through the auspices of the UPS Foundation, the charitable
arm of UPS. Since its inception, the Foundation has consistently supported its three main areas
of focus: promoting volunteerism, combating hunger and reducing illiteracy.

Mindanao schools receive education support from USAID and the American Chamber of
Commerce of the Philippines

Davao City - Two major universities in Mindanao were recently chosen to participate in an
initiative to improve the English Language proficiency of teachers and students in tertiary
schools. The University of Mindanao (UM) in Davao City, and the Notre Dame University
(NDU) of Cotabato City, are pilot schools in Mindanao to benefit from a partnership between the
Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) Project, an initiative spearheaded by the American
Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines, Inc. (AmCham) and its expanding group of partners
and USAID's Growth with Equity in Mindanao (GEM) Program.

The PEP-Mindanao Project utilizes a combined approach to proficiency training that includes
classroom teaching and computer-aided instruction. As recipients of the project, UM and NDU
students and faculty will benefit from the use of internationally-acclaimed instructional software
called "DynEd English Language Multimedia Solutions" developed by DynEd International, a
global company that develops technology-assisted English language training programs. The
acquisition of improved English skills will be measured by the internationally accepted Test of
English for International Communication (TOEIC), which is being used by employers in many
countries to assess the English proficiency skills of their employees.
UM and NDU will work with PEP to establish Computerized English Language Centers
(CELCs) in their respective schools. CELCs are equipped with computer work stations running
the DynEd software. Placement tests will be conducted among the participants before and after
the project to determine the extent to which English Language skills have improved.

Over the ten-month duration of the project, 20 DynEd trainers, 100 English teachers and
instructors of other subjects taught in English, and close to 2,000 college students from several
disciplines will receive English skills training.

To initiate the project, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed at the GEM Office in
Davao City to formalize the PEP Project's implementation. Among the signatories to the MOA
were: Michael Langsdorf, Deputy Program Manager, GEM; Robert Blume, Director, American
Desk, AmCham; Corina Unson, Director, Interactive Language Solutions, Inc; Guillermo Torres,
Jr., Chief Operating Officer, UM; and Dr. Oscar Kinazo, Assistant to the President, NDU.

Under the MOA, AmCham, through its PEP Project Secretariat, will oversee the overall
implementation of the project and USAID's GEM Program will provide funding and monitoring
assistance. Each university will assign a Project Coordinator and will dedicate at least 12
computers to be utilized for DynEd "hands-on" English training sessions. Both universities will
also train selected public school teachers from schools that have received assistance from other
GEM programs.

The project's implementation comes at an opportune time, when employers in both the public
and private sectors are adopting higher standards in hiring, especially when evaluating the
English proficiency of their future employees.

The PEP Project has established partnerships among corporations, business associations,
educational institutions, non-government organizations, and government agencies committed to
improve English proficiency levels across the country and is operating similar programs in
Luzon and the Visayas.

AmCham Director Robert Blume believes this initiative will help to enhance the skills of the
labor force in the country, especially in Mindanao.

"With the increasing demand for call centers and other IT-related services, and the jobs that such
services create in the Philippines, it is important that the English Language skills of students are
high enough to meet employers' needs," he said.

Aside from establishing CELCs and providing TOEIC certification, PEP includes information
awareness programs and advocacy campaigns to highlight the critical importance of English
language proficiency in the success of Filipino job seekers.

Students and Teachers in Sagay, Negros Occidental to Get English-Trained


(07 September 2006) - At least 500 students and teachers in Sagay City, Negros Occidental, will
be trained in international business English over the next 12 months under a project initiated by
the Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) project.

"Workers with good English skills are highly needed in today's globalized economy, and this
project will help increase the employability of Sagay's future graduates," says PEP project Co-
Chair John Forbes.

The project will create a Computerized English Language Center (CELC) at the Sagay National
High School through DynEd Interactive Language software licenses sponsored by Philip Morris
Manufacturing Philippines, Inc. (PMPMI) and the local government of Sagay City. DynEd
International is the world's leading developer of English Language Teaching solutions.

An estimated 250 students and teachers from the school will be trained at the CELC during each
of the two semesters covered by the project. In addition, the Department of Education (DepEd)
Division in Sagay has committed to have their teachers undergo intensive English training at the
CELC over the summer school break.

The Sagay CELC is the first of three to be set up with a $10,000 donation from PMPMI. The two
others will be located in Cagayan de Oro and Cavite City. Last year, a $20,000 donation from
PMPMI sponsored the creation of CELCs in three Batangas Colleges.

The Sagay CELC is also PEP's first CELC established with a counterpart financial contribution
from the local government.

Negros Occidental Governor Joseph Marañon, who was present at the signing of the
Memorandum of Agreement last September 7 in Sagay City, expressed interest in replicating the
project in other parts of the province.

"We do hope that Governor Marañon sees the benefit of English training and supports the
project's expansion throughout the province," says Mr. Forbes.

The PEP project is an initiative of the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines and
the Makati Business Club, with an expanding group of partners, that aims to develop a world-
class workforce with English proficiency that meets the highest standards.

The survey was commission by the PEP project and the English is Cool campaign of the
European Chamber of Commerce and EON The Stakeholder Relations Firm, and funded by
PMPMI and the Joint Foreign Chambers of Commerce.

Project to Train Students and Teachers in Cagayan de Oro in Business English


CAGAYAN DE ORO (14 September 2006) - At least 500 students and teachers in Cagayan de
Oro will be trained in international business English over the next 12 months under a project
initiated by the Promoting English Proficiency (PEP) project, made possible by a grant from
Philip Morris Manufacturing Philippines, Inc. (PMPMI).

A Memorandum of Agreement was signed today for the project, which will create a
Computerized English Language Center (CELC) at the Mindanao Polytechnic State College
(MPSC). The affair was graced by City Mayor Vicente Emano and Vice Mayor Michelle
Tagarda-Spiers.

The CELC will be equipped with 15 DynEd Interactive Language software licenses, 10 of which
are sponsored by PMPMI and 5 shouldered by the local city government. DynEd International is
the world's leading developer of English Language Teaching solutions.

About 250 students and teachers from the school will be trained at the CELC during each of the
two semesters covered by the project, including 10 scholars whom PMPMI will select from the
city. The local government of Cagayan de Oro city will contribute P200,000 to cover incidental
expenses related to the project.

"Workers with good English skills are highly needed in today's globalized economy, and this
project will help increase the employability of Cagayan de Oro's future graduates," says Bambina
Buenaventura, PEP Co-Founder and President of Interactive Language Solutions, a PEP training
partner.

The MPSC CELC is one of three established in 2006 through PMPMI's support. Last week, a
Memorandum of Agreement was signed for a CELC in Sagay City, Negros Occidental, and
another will be set up in Cavite City later this year. In 2005, PMPMI sponsored the creation of
two-year CELCs in three colleges in Batangas, the host province of its manufacturing facility.

"Through projects like this, we aim to improve the level of proficiency in English among
teachers, graduating students, and the Filipino workforce to give them a better chance of
employment and maintain the country's highly-skilled and English-speaking labor force," said
PMPMI Managing Director Chris J. Nelson to an audience of graduating students, professors and
media gathered at the signing ceremony in MPSC.

The PEP project is an initiative of the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines and
the Makati Business Club, with an expanding group of partners, that aims to develop a world-
class workforce with English proficiency that meets the highest standards through a three-point
program of advocacy, refresher training, and certification. To date, PEP already has 20 CELCs
throughout the country.

According to a nationwide survey conducted by the Social Weather Station in March of this year,
Filipinos are no longer as proficient in English as they seem. Based on the survey results, today

 65 percent of Filipinos understand spoken English compared to 74 percent in the year


1993
 65 percent read in English as against 73 percent in the year 1993
 48 percent write in English in contrast to 59 percent in the year 1993
 32 percent speak in English compared to 56 percent in the year 2000

The survey was commissioned by the PEP project and the English is Cool campaign of the
European Chamber of Commerce and EON The Stakeholder Relations Firm, and funded by
PMPMI and the Joint Foreign Chambers of Commerce.

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