Hollinger Corp.

pH8.5

im
THEBES1
I i|,
ii

0^ ^327

0896
^

1

r

I

I

I

T

j-

ii

B

a

1

r

I

i

J -JL

ENDORSED BY
Christine Niisson,

HAVE RECEIVED
over

Ole Bull,
Clara Louise Kellogg

50 Medals and
Premiums

Firs«

at differ

I

Jerome Hopkins,
Annie Louise Cary,

ent Fairs during the
Fall

of 1878.

Edw. Hoffman,
Geo.

Having received the

W.

Morgan,

HIGHEST AWARD
at

Theo.
and

MIoelling,

every Fair at

a host of other

which they have
been Exhibited.

artists.

PRICES no hl^herthan for otherfirst class Organs and but

little

higherthan are

asked for poor ones. EVERY

ORGAN WARRANTED for FIVE YEARS. Cataloffues sentpee on applicaUon

WOI^GESTEl^.Mass.or
M,iM,i '),iu,iti,n i."^ r

fflOMI TOLEDO,
Ohio.

1^

--m.

WARE, PRATT & CO.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING,

dOS

i£-

412

MAIN STBEET,
ALWAYS
IN

.

.

.

WORCESTEB,

Mass.

STOCK OF FIRST CLASS READY MADE

Of

their

CUSTOM "WORK FOR MEN AND

own Mamifacturo. Togotlicr with a Large Assortment of Common Clothing at Lowest Prices. Headquarters for Boys' Clotliing of all the Lat st and Most Dosirabh' Styles. Large and Choice Varic-lics ot' Clollis, Cassimeres and Tailoring Goods, at Wholesale and Kctail. BOYS, Superior in both Style and Workmanship. Fm-nishing Goods in Great Variety. Scarce and Desirable Goods can be found here.

TERMSr-ONE PRICE AND NO DEVIATION.

TrcszLj^e

witTi

(^il

AS

.

fl.

(jri\Ai\

I

Coniracle,

Agent for the Largest Dividend-Paying

Also representing the

(i)td

and ckdiabk Siwh 6ompank6, c?cmt^nand Jiuwlkun.
Jin ^oUei houQlahhj itdju^ed mid prom^i/if ^aid ut
ilik

QJjm.

35;^

J\IcLij-L

Street^ ove.T^ Citizeixs (^cuik, Worceste?^. ~" — — —

JiIH]VaF«Cl'UREI^S:OK:a^JilE}i:?IjSID KGjlIEvHjaa.SEJiIEJM'l'g,

4?vM^IN:?1'REET,

....

WeRCESTER.vJil^gg.

BENT & BUSR FURS AND
HATS.
387 Washington
Street,

....

BOSTON, Mass.

AD VERTISEMENTS.
IMMENSE SUCCESS OF
)

ilillll
By

tt

Hi

^®fHi

Centrally Located, direct Street to the Depot.

THE GREAT

35, 37

&.

39 Mechanic

St.,

Worcester, Mass.

REVOLUTIONARY DRAMA,
C. H.

WEBBER.

JOSEPH SiOll, Proprietor.
Building and Furniture New- Convenient for Permanent and Transient Boarders.

The finest, most dramatic, and truly beautiful Play ever produced by Grand Army Dramatic Corps. Every Characcredit to the ter an acting Character, and one which does Performer. For terms and further particulars, Address,
C.

PI^ICES I^EASONABLE.

H.

WEBBER,

Salem, Mass.

CITY

DYE HOUSE,

JIGLME?'
Go
This

B0?T0N

6^IiIiERY.
at

(Layard Place, rear Quinsigamond Bank,)

to this Gallery for

FIRST-CLASS Work

24,1 3Iain Street, Worcester, 3Iass. LADIES' AND GENTLEMAN'S

BOSTON PRICES.
is

Card the only place in the City where FIBST-CIASS Photographs can be procured at the low price of

GiRlEIfS DYED OE OLEIHED
WITH NEATNESS AND DISPATCH.

|1.50 Per Doz.

Each Picture Warraijled.

We make

a Specialty of Dyeing, Cleansing and Curling Feathers.

Small Picas perfect after five vears as on the day taken. finest tures copied and finished in Color or Ink by the and warranted, or no charge. Artists,

JOHN

STA.RKIE, Proprietor.

Call

and Examine Specimens, whether a Sitting
is

DOANE & GREENOUGH,
IMia^lllli. ifATiaNERi,
AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, Xo. 110 STATE ST., Boston, 3Iass.
FRANCIS DOANE.
W.
S.

desired or not.

C.

405

MAIN
now

D. HOLMES, STI\EET, Worcester, Mass.
T. F.

MR.
Artist, is

HANLON,

GREENOUGH.

associated with this Gallery, where he will be pleased to see his friends

Comrade JAMES M. ODIE,
DEALER IN WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY & DIAMONDS.
Also, a Fine

4. E^ jQ^miiii.

CARPET CLEANER
—AND—
GENER/IIi

Assortment
a

of Revolvers.

peaSE

CIiE/INING,
Street,

Fine

WATCH

Repairing
All

Specialty.

Also,

Jewelry Repairing.

Work Warranted.

No. 7/ Central

WORCESTER,
%, A. R,
This
is

-

MASS.

CiSa^y; M.U.£fcgtS) l^tt
article designed to

GilMtet

Go^ffl^adgat

a

new

mark

the grave,

and

to serve also as tlie

Hag

Iiolder.

If required, the word Post is placed above tlie letters, O. A. R., and the number of Post below. PRICE: Lots of 25, 75c. each. Lots of 50, 60c. each. Lots of 100, 50c. each. We have a large assortment of Boiiuet Holders at very low prices to the G A. R.

BTJBIER &

CO., 23

Eschange

Street,

BOSTON, Mass.

FIRST

NATIONAL
illliini,

C.

A.

KEYES,
in

Importer and Dealer

German Flower Seeds.
etc., ra.ade to

Bouquets, Wreaths, Crosses,

order,

OF WORCESTER, MASS.
Office,

for ^\ .00

and upwards.
at

Vegetalilcs and

No. 410 Main Street.
D/J?£CTOJ?S:

Flowering Plants

Low

Prices.

VERBENAS AND PANSIE3 A SPECIALT7.
Ashland Greenhouse cor Highland and No.
Office,
Sts.

R. C. Taylor, Worcester. T. W. Wellingto

Hiram Fobes,
n. B. Fay,

Worcester

Bay
ST.,

State

Drug

Store,

Hartley

\'

illiam

W.

11. I>extcr,

C. B. Pratt,
C. S. Turin
1

John D. Lovell, George Draper, Milfurd. Thomas Rice, Hirewsbury.
P. G. Rawson, Boston. A. Norcross, Worcester.

281

MAIN

WOKCESTEK, MASS.

.1.

FASHIONABLE THE LATEST AND MOST
Styles of

Hartley Williams, Treasurer.

Paper, at

Low

Prices.

Chas. B. Pratt, President.
R.

From New

Yorli and Boston.

James Tatman, Secretary

Comic Business Cards, Elegant Line of Visiting Cards, Papers for Fancy Card and Pebble Board, Colored

Ten Eyck &Co.
AUBURN,
EMPLOY AGENTS
to
solicit

Work, Fine stationery. Also, per quire. Writing Paper, four cents Fine
All

N. Y.
liberal

Goods

sold lower for

House

in the City.

same qu.hty than at any other Call and see.

on the most

terms
545

FRANKLIN HILL,
!

orders for their celebrated
I

Mam

St.,

Franklm Sq.. Cor Allen Court, WOKCESTKR, MASS.

India Ink and Oil

PORTRAITS
A

M. A.

BOYDEN.

genteeiTInT^fitable
BUSINESS.
Terms
to

UeiVILvEjNGlMtil^K^
AND SURVEYOR.

Special
Posts.

Members

of

Grand Army

and

information IFrih for Circular containing full R. that you .una this notice in the G. A.
state

406

MAIN STREET.
WORCESTER.

Almanac.

AD VEX TrSEMENTS.

SAFETY!

ECONOMl^' !

.'

COMFOItT/ 1

.'

WEST'S PATENT HON-EXPLOSIVE,

No.

1

Price

$2000.

Price $16.00.

OIL TANK, PRESSED GALVANIZED IRON.
Watei' Wicks Indispensable.
This
lent, the

The
Send

is the Cheapest, the Latest and the Best; tlie most Elaborate and Convermost Powerful, and most Economical. testimonials are numerous, and from persons well calculated to judge.

for circulars at once, as this is the best article ever placed before the people. The ingenious and invaluable device of the Water Wicks, in combination with the Oil Wick*, not onlj' makes explosion absolutely impossible, but also generates an intensely hot vapor with the flame thereby the combustion is rendered perfectly complete. An entire freedom from smell, soot and all other impurities, since the Ciirbon and volatile gases that escape by all other methods, are by this arrangement alone, held and utilized. The heat value of the flame is thus greatly enhanced, its action being concentrated and surprir-ingly effectual. There caii be no explosion, as the Water Tank is between the oil and the iiame. It is also odorless; the food cannot taste or smell of the oil, since the gas is all consumed.
;

PRICE LIST OF LAMPS AND FIXTURES.
Burner, 5 inch wick $- .50 with Stand, 10 inch wick.. 4. .50 " 1.5 " .. 5.50 " " " 20 .. G.oO No. 1, Steamer 3.00
1

No.

2 3 4

Oven Tea Kettle " Copper Bottom No. 1, Steak Broiler
.^.

2. 1. 2-

"

Oven
"

2.00 4.00 3.00

" 2, " " Flat Iron Heater 3 Burner Lamp with Heater

2;00 75 1.00 1.00 75

Heater without Lamj)

75 7.00 2.00

TESTI3IONIALS.
Sir: Having thoroughly tested the Non-Explosive Lamp Stove, sold by C. S. West, of this city, we fi.id that not in any particular liave the claims regarding its merits been exaggerated. Its use may bo recommended with confidence for safety, economy and comfort. THUS. A. CLARKE. I have used West's Patent Oil Stove three seasons, side by side with the most celebrated of other makes, and recommend it as far superior to any of which I know. In baking qualities it is incomparablv in advance of all
others.

Dear

L.

A.

BOSWOTH,

Athol.

SEND FOR CIRCULAR, CONTAINING TESTIMONIALS.
1.18

MAIN STBEET,

WOnCESTER,

3Iass.

AD VERTISEMENTS.

DENHOLM
401
Dealers
in
all

& McKAY,
kinds of

& 403 MAIN STREET, WORCESTER, MASS,

FOfiEIGN UNO

DOMESTIC DRf GOOOS,
RETAIL.

WHOLESALE AND
We
are

Headquarters for

SHAWLS,

CLOAKS, SACKS,
ALL,

DRESS GOODS, MOURNING GOODS, WHITE GOODS, LACES, HANDKERCHIEFS, HOSIERY, GLOVES, HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, NOTIONS, DRESS TRIMMINGS, RIBBONS, Etc.

ONE PRICE FOR
Cor. Main and Mechanic Streets,

BOSTON STORE,
: :
: :

AT THE

Worcester,

Ma ss.

S. P.

LEIGHTON &
Importers and Manufacturers of

CO.,

MILITARY GOODS,
Gold and Silver Laces, Braids, Cords, Fringes, Tassels, Buttons, Embroideries, Swords, Belts, Sashes, Knots, Epaulettes, Gloves, Straps, Hats and Caps.

glliK 7(,MD BajSrailNG Fli^Og

mi>
-

B7I1SIJMER3.

22

WEST

STREET,
full

-

-

BOSTON

sffieiAi.
Constantly on hand, a

Mil mmm,
Price $1.50 each.

i.
also

l
make

i.
liandsome

assortment.

We

a very

iR411
In

ifflff

Milte,
-

Gold and

Also Corps Badges, Military, Masonic and from $25.00 to $50.00. Odd Fellows Badges and Jewels, Presentation Jewels of all kinds.
Silver,

Guild

& Delano,

Jewelers,

4:33 'WcLstvirtgtoi^ Street, Boston.

/

^ND A^^^
OF THE REPUBLIC

ALMANAC
FOR
A Nurse's Story, A Recollection of Gettysburg,
Battle Cry or Freedom
(song),
.

1879.

CONTENTS
34
61

My Boy My
Boy,

Ben,

.....
.....
.... .... .... ....
(gong).

PAGE 49
57

28 72

News from the Front,
Noble Women of the War,
Our Youngest Soldier,
Patriotism,

36
64
41

Clara Harlowe Barton,
Corporal Simpson's Story,
Eclipses in
1879,

42 8

45

He did His Duty Well,
In the Prison Cell (eong),

42 76
.

Phil Sheridan Riding to the Front,

60
8
38 53

Rates of Po.stage,

Jottings from the BattIjE Field,
Just Before the Battle (song),

63 32
30

Regimental Events,
Thanksgiving,

Kingdom Coming

(song),
(song),

The Cooper Shop,

37

Marching Through Georgia

32
53

The Grand Review, The Late Gen. Phil Kearney,
The Seasons,

33
48
8

Margaret Fuller on Women,
Morning and Evening Stars,

.....

Movements and Engagements,
Mrs. Eliza Potter,

When Johnny Comes Marching Home

^

'v5

Entered according to Act of Congress,

in

the y?ar

18

BY HENRY

N.

EVANS,
Washington, D. C.

in the office of th- Librarian at

YES,

SNOW & COUPA
PRINTERS,

WORCESTER, Uk.%%.

PREFACE.
We
from
take pleasure in placing before the public a work which must prove of value to every
in

one interested
1861
to

the

stirring

events

through which our
is

Country passed, during the period
(as

1S65,

inclusive,

and

it

our aim

to

present
in

far

as

may

be)

a

complete

Chronological Record of the Engagements participated

by the Union

forces,

together with

such reminiscences of

Army

Life

as

shall

help to keep alive the love of Country in every

American

heart.

Fourteen years have passed since the close of the great struggle, and yet we have not a

HOME
of

for the Veterans in the old

Bay

State,

who were among

the

first

to

respond to the

call

"To

arms!

to

arms!"
of

Among

our numbers there are
disease contracted

many who

are

unable to gain a

livelihood by reason

wounds and

on the Battle Fields.

Once

niore

we
best

appeal to the public to aid us in securing a ferrfianenl

Home

for

those

who gave

the

days of their lives that our Country might stand undivided under the

Old Flag.
of

We

most earnestly and respectfully ask the generous co-operation

the

public

to

assist

us in this our

good purpose, by purchasing a copy

of the

Grand Army Almanac.

Worcester, Mass., Nov.

1S78.

H. N. E.

«

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
ECLIPSES IN THE
:

YEAR

1879.

In the year 1879 there will be three Eclipses two of the Sun and one of the Moon. I. An Annular Eclipse ok the vSun, January 22. Invisible. Visible to portions of South America and Africa. II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, July I'J. Invisible. Visible to Africa, and to small portions of Europe and Asia. III. Partial Eclipse of the Moon, December 28. Invisible. Visible, more or less, to the world generally, e.xcept to South America and a portion of North America.

A

MORNING AND EVENING

STARS.
;

Mercury will be Morning Star about January 16, May 15, September 9, and December 28 and Evening Star about March 29, July 27, and November 20. Venus will be Evening Star till September 23 then Morning Star for the rest of the year. Jupiter will be Evening Star till February 8; then Morning Star till August 31 and Evening
;
;

Star again the rest of the year.

THE SEASONS.
June
Vernal Equinox ( Spring begins), March 20, 6 h. 26 m. A. Summer Solstice ( Summer begins), 21, 2 h. 35 m. A. Autumnal Equinox (Autumn begins), September 23, 5 h. 9 m. M. Winter Solstice (Winter begins), December 21, 11 h. 18m. A. (Given in Washington time.)

RATES OF POSTAGE.
of the

Postal Cards, costing 1 cent each, can be purchased at any Post Office, and sent to any part United States or Dominion of Canada. Letters to any part of the United States or Dominion of Canada, 3 cents for each i

ounce or part thereof.

Local or Drop Letters,
1

2 cents for

each \ ounce, at

all letter-carrier offices

;

at other offices

cent.

Valuable Letters may be registered on application at the office of mailing, and the payment Fees on foreign letters, of a registration fee of 10 cents, in addition to postage, on domestic letters. variable. Newspapers and Periodicals, mailed from a known office of publication or news agency, and addressed to regular subscribers or news agents, issued weekly and oftener, two cents a pound One copy of a newsfraction thereof; less frequently, three cents a pound or fraction thereof. or paper to each actual subscriber within the County where the same is wholly or partially printed and
published, free, except at letter-carrier offices.

Transient Newspapers and Periodicals, Pamphlets, Proof Sheets, Books, Blanks and all mailable printed matter except circulars, and regular newspapers as above specified, 1 cent for every 2 ounces or part thereof. Articles of Merchandise, Unsealed Circulars, Books, Manuscripts, Corrected Proof Sheets, Seeds, Cuttings, Bulbs, Roots, and other mailable matter, one cent for each ounce or part thereof. Newspaper, Magazine and Music Manuscripts are subject to letter postage. All Packages of mail matter not charged with letter postage must be so arranged that the same can be conveniently examined by the Postmasters; if not, letter postage will be charged. No Package will be forwarded by mail which weighs over 4 pounds. All Postal Matter, for delivery within the United States and Canada, must be prepaid. Leti'ers to Great Britain or Ireland, or the Continent of Europe, 5 cents for each \ ounce. Prepayment optional. Double rates if unpaid. Money Order Post Offices are established in all the large cities and towns, at which orders can be obtained upon any other office at the follov/ing rates of commission On orders not exceeding $15,10 cents; over $15, not exceeding $30, 15 cents; over $30, not exceeding $40,20 cents; over $40 not exceeding $50,25 cents. When a larger sum than fifty dollars is required, additional orders to make it up must be obtained.

:

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
1st

MONTH.

January, 1879.
NEW
H. M.
H. M.

31

DAYS.

MOON'S PHASES.
D.

YORK. WASHINGTON. CHARLESTON
H. M.

CHICAGO.
H. M.
5 5

Full

Moon.

.

.

8

Third Quarter.

4 morn. 7 6 18 morri.
7 7

New Moon.

.

First Quarter.

22 30

morn.

7

o morn.

6 52 morn. 6 6 morn. 6 55 morn. 6 48 morn.

6 40 morn. 5 54 morn. 6 43 morn.

H. M. 6 28 morn.
5

42 morn.

58 morn. 12 morn.
I

6 36 morn.

6 31 morn, 6 24 morn.

6

5 54

morn. morn.

CALENDAR FOR
Boston
;

Calendar for
New
York City; Phil

New Eng
Iowa

Movements and

Er\gagen:\ents

land, New York State, Michigan,

adelphia,
ticut,

Connec NewJersey

Wisconsin,

and Oregon.

Pennsylva'a,Ohio, Indiana & Illinois

January 1861,

— The Confederates siezed the United States arsenal at Augusta, Georgia. 30th. — The revenue cutters, Cass, at Mobile,
2.3d.

and McLelland,

at

New

Orleans, surrendered to

the Confederate authorities.

H.M H.M.

January 1862.
o 55
'

Wed
Thur
3

4
5

Fri Sat

Sim

6
7

Mon
Tues

8

Wed
Thur
Fri Sat

9
ID
II 12

Sun

13 14 15

Mon
Tues

30 4 38 7 30 39 7 30 40 7 30 4 41 7 4 4 7 4 43 7 4 44 7 4 45 7 4 46 7 4 47 7 4 7 4 49 7 50
7 7

1st.— Mason and Slidell

56
I

2 58

England

in the British

4
5

4th. Gen. Milro-y defeated the confederates at Huntersville, Va., and captured $80,000 worth of

left Fort Warren for steamer Rinaldo.

6
5

I

stores.
7th. 8th.

rises.

8

u
1

b 15 7 29 8 43 9 56
10

— Confederates defeated at Romney. —Gen. Palmer defeated the Confederates
Mo.

at Silver Creek,

Union

loss, 4 killed

and 18

wounded.

Wed
Thur
Fri Sat

52 morn.

16
17 18

7 7
7 7

53 54
56I

25
41
1

Z1
51 3

2 56

2

4
5

9
15

4
5

19

Sun

Mon
Tues

7 25 4 5S 7 24|4 59
7 7 7 7

8
2

6

8

6

10th. Col. Garfield defeated the Confederates under Humphrey Marshall at Prestonburg, Ky. 11th. The Brunside expedition sailed from Fortress Monroe. Naval engagement on the Mississippi between the Union steamers Essex and St. Louis, and four Confederate boats; the latter were compelled to seek protection under the batteries at Columbus.

— —

Wed
23 24
25

23
22
21

sets.

sets.

7 23

5 23

Thur
Fri

5 27

Sat

7 20

26
27

Sun

20
5
5

Mon
Tues

6 31 7 37 8 41 9 43
« 10 44

842

6 35 7 39

retary of

Simeon Cameron resigned his position as SecWar, and E. M. Stanton was appointed

in his place.

28

29 30
31

Wed
Thur
Fri
7 7

9 11 46

5 10 morn.

16 5 II 15 5 13
to a gunner,

48
1

51
I

9 43 10 43 11 43 morn. 44 1 46
counsel no blood-

19th.— Battle of Mill Spring, Ky. This battle was fought between 3,000 Union troops under Gen, Schoep and Confederates under Gen. Zollicoffer. The enemy were defeated and Gen, Zollicoffer killed. Union loss, 39 killed and 127 wounded.

A
shed

quaker said
;

" Friend,

January 1863.
defeated the Confederates under Van Dorn, at Hunt's Cross Roads, near Lexington, Tenn. The Union garrison and the
1st.

but

if it

be thy design

to hit the little

man

in the

— Gen. Sullivan

blue jacket, point thine engine three inches lower."

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. 20th. — Confederates evacuate Corinth. January 1863.— Continued. 27th. — Confederate incendiaries steamer Harriet Lane captured Galveston,
at

set fire to the

Texas.

city of

Savannah.

The Westfield destroyed
into the

to

keep

it

from

falling
1st.

February

ISfil.

hands of the enemy.
his vessel.

Commodore Ren-

shaw perished with
3d.

hard battle of Dec. 31, fighting had been going on between the two armies at Murfreesboro. On the night of Jan. 3, the rebels
their retreat. The following is the statement of the Union loss at the battle of Stone river: killed, 1,997, wounded 6,425, and
official

— Since the

Convention passed an ordinance of secession by a vote of 166 to 7, to be submitted
to the people.

— Texas

commenced

The Louisiana authorities seized the Mint and Custom House at New Orleans. 8th. The United States arsenal at Little Rock

surrendered to Arkansas.
9th.

3,550 missing.
burg.

—Jefferson

elected Provisional President
of the Southern Confederacy.

The Federal army withdrew from before VicksThe Union loss in the second attack on
killed, 1,500

Davis and A. H. Stevens were and Vice-President

Vicksburg was about 600 and 1,000 missing.

wounded,

10th. Battle of Arkansas Post. The attack was commenced Saturday night by the Mississippi squadron under Admiral Porter. On the following day, the land forces under Gen. McClernand joined in the fight, and before night all the fortifications were taken. About 7,000 prisoners and a February lS(i2. large quantity of ammunition was captured. The The Federal government decided that the 3cl. Union loss was about 200 killed and wounded. crews of the captured privateers were to be con20th. The Morning I-ight and Velocity, blocksidered as prisoners of war. ading Sabine City, Texas, were both captured by 6th. Commodore Foote with 7 gunboats atthe Confederates. tacked Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. The 22d. Third attack on Vicksburg. After the Confederate commander, General Tilghman, made the capture of Arkansas Post, Gen. McClernand an unconditional surrender. returned to Vicksburg and resumed the siege of Sth. Gen. Burnside captured six forts on that place. Roanoke Island, taking about 3,000 small arms 28th. Gen. Burnside relieved of the command and destroying all the Confederate fleet except of the army of the Potomac, and Gen. Hooker two vessels. Union loss was 50 killed and 212 appointed in his place. wounded. 2,500 prisoners and a large quantify 31st. The Confederate General Pryor made of ammunition were captured. an attack on the Union troops, under Gen. Peck, 10th. Elizabeth City, N. C. surrendered to at Blackwater, Va. The Confederates were

13th. The electoral vote counted. Abraham Lincoln received 180 votes; Stephen A. Douglas, 12; John C. Breckenridge, 72; and John Bell, 39. Fort Kearney, Kansas, seized by the 19th. Confederates. Gen. Twiggs surrendered Government 23d. property in Texas, valued at $1,200,000, to the Confederacy.

— —

repulsed.

January 1S05.
Sth.

Gen. Burnside. The Federal gunboats ascended the Tennessee river as far as Florence, Ala., captured three and destroying six Confederate
boats.

— Gen. Butler removed from
army
of the James,
Va.,

the

command

of the

and succeeded by Gen.

Ord.
11th.

field,

federate force under Gen. Rosser.

was attacked by a ConThe town and with the gunboats, but was compelled to withdraw. The attack on Fort Donelson renewed 15th. a large portion of the force defending it were by the land forces under Gen. Grant, numbering captured. 16th. Fort Fisher, near Washington, North 40,000. Carolina, captured with all its equipments. Bowling Green evacuated by the Confederates.

— Beverly,

— Gen. Curtis took possession of Spring14th. — Com. Foote attacked Fort Donelson
13th.

Mo.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
2d

MONTH.

February, 1879.

^^^^^^-

MOON'S PHy\SES.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. 12th. — The Confederates drven from their February 18G5. works Tenn. Congress abolishes slavery the United — — The Confederates evacuated their works States. — Gen. Sherman occupied Branchville, New Madrid, Mo., such haste as to leave 25 pieces of and a large quantity of military C. stores valued $1,000,000. I7th. — Gen. Sherman's victorious columns 14th. — Gen. Burnside attacked the ConfederC, and burned the tered Columbia, Newbern, N. C. —Gen. Lee assumes supreme command of ates in their
12
1st.

in

at Paris,

13th.

12th.

at

in

S.

artillery
at

en-

S.

city.

18th.

fortification

at

the Confederate armies,
of the blacks.

and recommends arming After a

fight of four hours, the

enemy

retreated,

ammunition, proCharleston, S. C, evacuated and taken posses- visions and stores in the hands of the victors. Six thousand bales of The Union loss was 91 killed and 466 wounded. sion of by Gen. Gilmore. 16th. Commodore Foote commenced the Ammunition stored in the cotton destroyed. Confederates defeated railroad depot exploded, and many lives were attack on Island No. 10. lost. Gen. Gilmore hoisted the old flag over Fort at Cumberland Mountain, Ky. 18th. Confederate fortifications at Acquia Sumter.
leaving a large

quantity of

— Fort Anderson, N. C, taken. — Fort Armstrong, N. C, taken. 22d. — Wilmington captured by Gen. Schofield. — Raleigh, N. C, captured. Governor
19th.
21st.
2.3d.

Creek evacuated.
Confederates defeated at Salem, Ark. Battle of Winchester, Va. The Confederates were defeated and retreated to Stras23d.

Vance captured.

burg, leaving their dead and
field.

wounded upon
killed

the

March 1861.

The Union

loss

was 103

and 466

— Inauguration of Lincoln, President of the United States. 6th. — Fort Brown on the Rio Grande, was sur4th.

wounded.
28th.

— Fight
The

Union troops
Texans.

at Pigeon Ranch, between 3,000 under Col. Hough, and 1,100

The Federal rendered by special agreement. troops evacuated the fort and sailed for Key West and Tortugas.
3£arc7i 1SG2.
1st. Fight at Pittsburg Landing between two Union gunboats and a Confederate battery. 8th. Battle of Pea Ridge. Total defeat of the enemy. Union loss was 212 killed and 920 wounded. The Confederate steamers, Merrimac, Jamestown and Yorktown, attacked the Federal fleet at Hampton Roads, destroying the Cumberland and Congress, and damaging several other

battle

was a drawn one.

7th.

— Gen. Minty attacked a —A

March 1863.
Confederate cav-

— —

alry force at Unionville, Tenn., capturing their
tents, and about 60 prisoners. band of Confederate cavalry passed through the Union lines, entered Fairfax, Va., and captured Gen. Stoughton and a few privates. 17th. Two hundred cavalry under command of Gen. Averill crossed the Rappahannock near Kelly's Ford, where but a single horseman could cross at once, and in the face of a most terrible fire from sharpshooters charged the Confederates

wagons, horses, and
9th.

vessels.
9th.

Battle between the Confederate iron Merrimac, and the Federal floating battery. Monitor; the former compelled to retire. This the first contest between iron-clads which the world had ever seen was studied by the naval departments of all civilized powers, and a reaction took place against wooden vessels. 11th. Gen. McClellan took command of the army of the Potomac; Gen. Fremont, of the Mountain department; Gen. Halleck, of the department of the Mississippi.
clad,

in their entrenchments, killing or capturing nearly

ihe whole force.
cavalry,

They then encountered

Stuart's

and

after a desperate hand-to-hand en-

counter for five hours, routed them with great
slaughter, capturing 80 prisoners.
20th.

— John

totally defeated

Morgan with 4,000 men was near Milton, Tenn., by Col. Hall

with 1,4C0 mounted men. The negro brigade took Jacksonville, Florida. Major-Gercral Burnside appointed to command the department of the Ohio.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
3d

13

MONTH.

March. 1879

31

DAYS.

MOON'S PHASES.

14

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
April ISdl. — Continued.
7,721

— Major for New York. 18th. — U.
14th.
S.

Anderson and

his

men

sailed

federate Gen. Johnson
8th.

wounded, and 3,956 missing. The Conwas killed. Island No. 10 captured 5,000 prisoners,
;

Arsenal at Harper's Ferry destands of small arms, 2,000 hogsheads of sugar, stroyed by Lieut. Jones, to prevent its falling into and a large quantity of clothing, tents, and amthe hands of the enemy. Col. Coke, with 400 munition. men of the 25th Pennsylvania regiment arrived 11th. Fort Pulaski, commanding the entrance in Washington. These were the first troops to to Savannah, surrendered after a bombardment enter the city for its defence. of thirty hours. Gen. Mitchell occupied Hunts19th. Steamer Star of the West seized by ville, Ala., taking 200 prisoners, 15 locomotives, the Confederates at Indianola, Texas. and a large number of cars. Congress passed The 6th Massachusetts regiment, while passing the bill abolishing slavery in the District of through Baltimore, was attacked by a mob; two Columbia. soldiers were killed. The troops fired upon the 12th. Gen. Mitchell captured 2,000 prisoners mob, killing 11 and wounding many. President at Chattanooga. Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring the ports The Confederates attacked General 18th. of South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Smith's division at Yorktown, but were repulsed. Louisiana and Texas in a state of blockade. Fight between Gen. Burnside's troops 19th. 20th. The U. S. Arsenal at Liberty, Mo., and the enemy near Elizabeth City, N. C. The seized by the secessionists, and the arms disUnion loss, 11 killed. defeated. latter were tributed among the surrounding counties. The Gen. Reno, with 2,000 Union troops, defeated the Gosport Navy Yard destroyed by Gen. McCauley, enemy at Camden, N. C. to keep it from the Confederates; the war vessels Com. Farragut arrived at New Or25th. Delaware, Pennsylvania, Columbia, Germantown, Fort leans, and took possession of the city. Merrimac, Raritan, Dolphin, and United States* Macon, Georgia, surrendered after a bombardwere scuttled and set on fire; the Cumberland ment of eleven hours. Gen. C. F. Smith died at

100 siege guns, 24 pieces

field

artillery,

5,000

— — —

was towed out. Savannah, Tennessee. 22d. U. S. Arsenal at Fayetteville, N. C, Forts Jackson and St. Philip sur•28th. seized by the Confederates. rendered. Fort Smith, Arkansas, seized by the 24th. 29th. Gen. Mitchell defeated the ConfederConfederates under Senator Boland. ates at Bridgeport, Ala. Major Libby surrendered 450 U. S. 25th. troops to the Confederate Col. Van Dorn, at

— — —

— —

April 1S63.
camp near

Saluri,

Texas.

29th.

— The

Maryland
6;5

House
to
1.3.

of

Delegates

6th.

— Gen.

Mitchell, with .300 cavalry, dashed

voted against secession,

into a Confederate

Nashville, on a

April 1SG2.
Gth.

sabre charge, capturing 5, killing 15, and capturing all their tents, arms, horses, and equipments.

The Federal Attack on Charleston. 7th. of Shiloh. The Confederates under Gens. Johnson and Beauregard attacked fleet was composed of nine iron-clad vessels under Gen. Grant's army at Pittsburgh Landing. The the command of Commodore Dupont. The fight Union forces were driven back to the river and a began in the afternoon of April 7, and lasted •* The Keokuk was so badly about two hours. number of prisoners captured. The battle of Shiloh renewed. Gen. damaged that she sunk in a few hours. Several 7th. Buell arrived during the night with reinforce- other vessels were temporarily disabled. The ments. The battle lasted throughout the day fleet was then withdrawn. Gen. Van Dorn's forces attacked Gen. 10th. with varied success, but the Confederates were finally defeated and driven to their fortifications Granger at Franklin, Tenn., and were driven

— Battle

at Corinth.

The Federal

loss

was

1,614 killed,

back with

loss.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
4th

IS

MONTH.

April. 1879.
BOsroN.
H. M.
5 40 eve. 9 25 morn.

30 DAI'S.

MOON'S PHASES.
Full Moon.. Third Quarter.
.

NEW

YURK. \V.\.SHINGTON, CHARLESTON.
H. M. 5 16 eve.
H. M.

CHICAGO.
H. M.

New Moon

.

.

First Quarter.

JO.

9 II morn. 9 32 morn.
^ '

H. M. 5 28 eve. 9 13 morn. 8 59 morn.

9 20 morn.

morn. 8 47 morn. 9 8 morn.
9
I

4 eve. 5 8 49 morn. 8 35 morn. 8 56 morn.

4 34 eve. 8 19 morn. 8 5 morn. 8 26 morn.

CALENDAR FOR
Boston;
land, State.
;

CALENDAR FOR

New Eng New York City; Phil New York adelphia, Connec Michigan, ticut, New Jersey;
Iowa
Pennsylva'a.Ohio Indiana & Illinois

April 18G3. — Continued.
Banks' command left Baton Rouge, fouglit three battles, two on land and one on Grand Lake, capturing 2,000 prisoners. Our
loss
17th. — Gen.

Wisconsin,

& Oregon.

was

700.
fleet

Six vessels of Porter's

ran by the Con-

federate batteries at Vicksburg.
Fayetteville, Ark., attacked by 3,000 18th. Confederates with four pieces of artillery; Union forces numbered but 2,000. The Confederates killed and IT were repulsed. Our loss was
.5

H. M.

H.M. H.

H. M.
2 y^

Tues

2

Wed
3

39

5436
5 5
5

Thur
Fri

3 II 3 40

42I6

406
38i6

3 8 3 38

wounded.
22d. The ram. Queen of the West, was captured in Grand La^e, with Capt. Fuller and all her officers and crew, numbering 90. Col. Mulligan repulsed by the Con30th.

4
5

Sat

4 6 4 31
rises.

4

5

5 37:6 5 3516 5
5

4 32
rises.

6
7

Sun

Mon
Tues

8
30 29
27
5 25

3

34 6

7

59

8

9
10
IX

Wed
Thur
Fri Sat
5

9 24
10 42
11

326

5 30,6

9 19 10 35
11

federates at Fairmont,

West

Va., and the B.

&

O.

50

5 29,6
5

12

Sun
14
15 16
17 18

Mon
Tues

Wed
Thur
Fri

24 5 22 5 20 5 19

morn, o 46
2

266
226
186 166 156 136 126 116

5 24|6

43 morn. 40 1 25
2
I
"ii

R. R. bridges blown up at Fairmont and Cheat
river.

April 1864.
8th.

6

5

— The advance of

Gen. Banks' expedition

2

34

5 2I;6

2 2

^6
5 14
5 5 5 5

2 58

5 19,6

56

3 20 3 40

3 19

19

Sat

126
6 6 6 6

Sun

4 o 4 21
sets.

3 40 4 2 4 24
sets.

up Red river, under the direction of Gen. Stone, was repulsed near Shreveport, La.; but on the following day our men defeated the enemy. Our loss was about 2,000 and the enemy's the same.
12th. Gen. Forrest captured Fort Pillow, and immediately after commenced an indiscriminate massacre of our wounded soldiers, both colored and white, not excepting women and children who had taken refuge in the fort.

Men
Tues

Wed
Thur
Fri
Sat.

Sun

Men
Tues

59l6

6 6 11 12 'II 57 6 6 55 morn 56 o 37
I
I

8 22 9 22 10 20

96 86 66
46 26
I

8 16 9 16 ID 13 II 6
II

52

morn.
31
1

A2)ril
1st.

1S65.

Wed
What
on a
rear.

57 sb,6 58

10

'6

6

38

06

I

36

military order

is like

a lady crossing the street
front,

-wet

day?

— Dress up in

and close up

in the

— Victory of Five Forks, Va. at Petersburg carried. 2d. — Lee's 3d. — Richmond taken. — Surrender of Gen. Lee and his whole Appomattox Court House, Va. army — The Union hoisted Ft. Sumter.
lines
9th. at

12th.

flag

at

Mobile, Ala., captured.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. defeated. Union loss about 300 killed April lS(i5. — Continued. Wilkes wounded. 14th. — President Lincoln shot by — Gen. Milroy attacked the enemy Mr. Ford's theatre, Washington Booth,
i6
J.
;

and

8th. at Mcin Dowell's, Va. After a fight of five hours he was Seward and his son wounded. Vice- forced to withdraw. Death of President Lincoln. 15th. 9th. The Confederates evacuated Pensacola, President Johnson sworn in as President of the and destroyed the Navy Yard. United States.

2Gth.

— Gen. Johnson surrendered.
May
1861.

1st.

— President Lincoln called for 42,000 three —

Federal forces took possession of Norfolk, Va. Gosport Navy Yard destroyed by the Confederates. Gunboat fight on the Mississippi,

— 10th. — The

near Fort Wright;

the Confederates were

years volunteers; 22,000 troops for the regular

repulsed, losing two vessels.

army, and 18,000 seamen. 11th. The Confederates blow up their iron4th. Gen. McClellan placed in command of clad, Merrimac, to prevent its capture by the the department of Ohio, comprising the States of enemy. Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. 12th. Natchez, Miss., surrendered to Com. 5th. Gen. Butler took possession of the Re- Farragut. lay House, Maryland. 16th. The Union Gunboats repulsed at Fort 11th. Blockade of Charleston, S. C. estab- Darling. lished, by the steamer Niagara. 17th. Confederates driven across the ChickaGeneral Scott ordered the fortification hominy, at Bottom Bridge. 16th of Arlington Heights. Confederates defeated at Lewisburg, 23d.

— —

1

8th.

— Military Department of Virginia created,
;

comprising Eastern Virginia, North and South Federal headquarters at Fortress Monroe Carolina troops at Front Royal, Va., was attacked by commander. General Butler. a large force of the enemy and defeated with a Fortifications of Ship Island destroyed heavy loss. 22d. to keep them from the enemy. General Banks defeated at Winchester, 25th. 24th. Thirteen thousand troops crossed the Va., and xlriven across the Potomac. Potomac into Virginia. Alexandria occupied by 27th. Confederates defeated at Hanover, Va. Federal troops. Col. Ellsworth shot by Jackson Union loss, 35 killed and 220 wounded. Arlington the murderer was instantly killed. Confederates evacuated Corinth, Miss. 29th. Heights occupied by Union troops. The Confederates Under Gen. John31st. 26th. The Port of New Orleans was block- son attacked the left wing of the Army of the aded by the sloop-of-war Brooklyn. All postal Potomac, commanded by General Casey, at Fair service in the seceded States suspended. Oaks. Union forces were driven back. Corinth taken.

— — — — Virginia. 24th. — Col. Kenley, commanding the — — — —

— —

3Iai/ 1802.
Confederates evacuated Yorktown, Jamestown, and Mulberry and Gloucester Islands, leaving ammunition, camp equipage, and 100 guns behind. 5th. Battle of Williamsburgh, Va. The Union troops were commanded by Gens. Hancock and Hooker. The Confederates were defeated, and retreated in the night towards Richmond.
3d.

— The

Mai/ 1863.
1st.

— Gen. Carter with 5,000 men attacked the
them from the
field.

Confederate forces at Monticello, under Pegram,
driving

Gen. Grant defeated Gen. Bowen, with a loss of 1,550 men and 5
pieces of artillery.
2d.

Battle of Port Gibson.

Gens. Franklin and Sedgwick, with a force of 20,000 men, were attacked by Gen. Lee. The Confederates were
7th.

— Battle of West Point, Va.

— On

1863, the 6th

the morning of the 17th of April, and 7th Illinois cavalry, 900 strong,

under

command

Illinois, set

of Col. Grierson, of the 6th ott from Lagrange, Tenn., marched

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
5th

17

MONTH.

May, 1879
BOSTON.
H. M. I 2S morn. 9 52 eve.
I

31

DAYS.

MOON'S PHASES.
Full Moon.. Third Quarter.
.

NEW
H. M.

YORK. WASHINGTON. CHARLESTON.
H. M.
I 4 morn. 9 28 eve. o 42 morn. 6 28 eve.

CHICAGO.
H. M.

.

New Moon.

.

6 morn.

I 16 morn, 9 40 eve. o 54 morn,

o 52 morn. 9 16 eve.

o 22 morn.
8 46 eve.

First Quarter.

6 52 eve.

6 40 eve.

o 30 morn. 6 16 eve.

o
5

I

morn.

46 eve.

c

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
May 1S63.— Continued.
13th.

Mai/ 1865.

4th. Joseph F. Johnston Gen. Dick Taylor surrenders. and captured Jackson, Miss., with 7 cannon and 10th. Jefferson Davis captured at Irwinville, large quantities of military stores, besides 400 75 miles southwest of Macon, Ga., by the 4th prisoners. The State capitol was destroyed by Michigan cavalry, under Col. Pritchard, of Gen. fire. Wilson's command also, his wife, mother, Post15th. Battle of Baker's Creek, Miss. The master-General Regan, Col. Harrison, private Confederate army, under Gen. Pemberton, and secretary, Col. Johnson and other military the Union forces under Gen. Grant, About characters. 25,000 men were engaged upon each side. The 24th. Grand review of Gen. Sherman's army Confederates met with a disastrous defeat, losing at Washington. 2,600 in killed and wounded, 200 men prisoners, The last 26th. Kirby Smith surrendered. and 29 pieces of artillery. armed Confederate organization has succumed. 17th. Battle of Big Black River. Grant 31st. Confederate General Hood and staff again attacked Pemberton, and defeated him surrendered.

— Grant

defeated

— —

;

— — —

— Investment of Vicksburg by the Federals under Gen. Grant and Admiral Porter. 27th. — Gen. Banks commences the siege of
18th.

with a total loss of 2,600

men and

1

7

cannon.

June 1801.
Kelly defeated the Confederates at Col. Kelly was severely Phillippi, Va., killing 15
3.
;

— Col.

wounded. ' Gen. Beauregard arrived and assumed com3Iay ISO Jr. mand of the Confederate forces at Manassas 6th. Gen. Grant crossed the Rapidan, and Junction, Va. Three regiments 10th. Battle of Big Bethel. Lee fell back towards Richmond. Battle of the of Union troops, under the command of General Wilderness. 7th. Grant still advances, driving Lee's Pierce, were defeated with a loss of 16 killed, among them Major -Winthrop, and 41 wounded. forces before him. Confederates evacuated Harper's Ferry 14th. 8th. Sherman occupied Dalton.

the forts at Port

Hudson, Miss.

9th.

— — — After

three days' hard fighting,

Lee's

forces retreated, leaving 3,000 killed

wounded on
army.
12th.

the field in possession of the

and 10,000 Union

— Battle of Spottsylvania.
They capture

— i5th. — Brig Perry arrived at New York with the privateer Savannah. 17th. — Wheeling Convention unanimously deafter destroying all available property.

Union troops clared Western Virginia independent
federate portion of the State.

of the

Con-

victorious.

4,000 prisoners and 25

pieces of artillery.
13th.

— Gen.

General Lyon defeated

the

Confederates at

Sheridan, with cavalry, reached

Booneville, Mo., with a loss of about 30 killed

enemy near Hanover Junction, breaking two railroads, capturing several locomotives, and destroying Lee's depot for supplies at Beaver Dam, containing over 1,000,000 rations. 15th. Sherman forced Johnson to evacuate Resaca, after two days' fighting. Union defeat at Newmarket, Va. Army of the Potomac flanked the Con23d. federates under Lee, and forced them to evacuate their fortifications near Spottsylvania Court-house. Grant crossed the Pamunkey, and 27th.
the rear of the

and 50 wounded; Union loss, 2 killed and 9 wounded. 20th. Gen. McClellan assumed c<mimand in person of the army in Western Virginia. The United States gunboat. Pawnee, 24th.

— —

attacked
Point.

the

Confederate

battery at

Mathias

A spy

arrested at Washington, with full
of troops
city.

details of the

number

and

batteries,

and

best plan of attack on the
27th.

— occupied Hanovertown. 28th. — Battle near Dallas, Ga.

steamers Pawnee, Resolute, and a second attack on the Confederate battery at Mathias Point Captain Ward, commanding the Federal force, was killed.
Freeborn,

— The

made

;

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
6th

19

MONTH.

June, 1879.
BOSTON.
H. M.

30 DAYS.

MOON'S PHASES.
D.

NEW

YORK.

Full

Moon.

.

.

4

8 52 morn.
12 eve. 3 35 eve. 1 12 morn.

Third Quarter.

New Moon.

.

First Quarter.

Black River, Missouri. command of the Western Department, consistConfederates under Johnston attacked Oster- ing of the State of Illinois and the States and haus' division and were defeated with great territories west of the Mississippi and east of
23d.
of Big

— Battle

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. June 1863. — General Fremont appointed
6th.

to

the

slaughter.
25th.

— — — Morgan defeated by Gen. Burbridge, near Lexington, Ky. — Gen. Hancook drove the Confederates from Bottom Bridge the point of the bayonet. 15th. — Gen. Smith attacked with a force of
8th.

the Rocky Mountains. Headquarters at St. Cap, between Louis. a Confederate division under Clayborne, and 10th. Skirmishes at Laurel Hill, Virginia; Willich, Wilder and Carter's brigades. The Con- Confederates defeated. Union loss, 2 killed and federates fled in disorder. 2 wounded. 26th. Rear Admiral Foote died in New York 12th. Battle of Rich Mountain. The Federal City. troops under command by Colonel Rosecrans, 20th, Gen. Hooker was relieved of his com- defeated the enemy under Colonel Pegram, mand of the army of the Potomac at his own Confederate loss, 150 killed and wounded, and request, and General Mead succeeded him. 800 prisoners. 13th. The Confederates, under Gen. Garnett, June 1864. were defeated at Garrick's Ford, Virginia. The 3d. —Battle of Coal Harbor, in which the Confederate General Garnett was killed. Union Confederates are routed; heavy loss. loss, 2 killed and 10 wounded. 5th. Sherman flanked Johnson, and captured Battle of Screytown, Va. The Federals under Ackworth Station. Colonfil Lowe were defeated with a loss of 9 7th. Gen. Hunter defeats the Confederate killed and 40 wounded and missing. General Jones, near Staunton, Virginia.

— Another

fight at Liberty

12th.

at

16th. Tilgram, a negro, killed three of a Confederate prize crew on the S. J. Warring, and brought the vessel into New York. 18th. Fight at Blackborn Ford. The Federal troops under command of General Tyler made

15,000 men.

the attack, but

— Battle of Lost Mountain, Georgia. 19th. — The Confederate cruiser Alabama
1

6th.

sunk by the U.
English
23d.

S. frigate

Kearsage,

in

the

Channel.
attack

after three hours'^ fighting, were back to Centerville; their loss was 19 killed and 64 wounded and missing. The department of Maryland created, and Gen. John A. Dix placed in command head-

ordered

;

— Confederates
— Sherman
Weldon

cock, capturing three full

Wright and Hanregiments, after which
attack

quarters at Baltimore.
19th. Gen. Banks superseded Gen. Patterson; headquarters in the field.
21st. of Bull Run. The army of the Potomac, about 45,000 strong, under command General McDowell, which left of Brigadier

they are repulsed.
27th.

made an unsucceessful
from 1,000

— — Battle

on the enemy's men.
28th.

position, losing

to 3,000

— Left wing of
Jtilf/

Grant's army take posses-

sion of the

railroad.

1861.
defeated
the

2d.

— General

Patterson

Con3

federates at Falling Water, Va.»;
killed
5th.

Union

loss,

and 10 wounded.

— Battle

of Carthage,

Mo.
1,500,

Confederates
,

Washington July 17th, attacked the Confederates, about equal in numbers, at Manassas, Va., where The chances they occnpied a strong position. were at first in favor of the Federals, but the Confederates receiving large reinforcements under General Johnson, the scale was turned. Panic seized upon the Union troops, and they commenced a disorderly retreat towards Wash-

were

commanded by Governor Jackson

the

Federal troops, numbering
loss, 14 killed

by Col Sigel.

Colonel Sigel retreated to Springfield.

Union

and 31 wounded.

The Union loss was, 481 killed, 1,011 wounded, 1,216 missing. Confederate loss, as reported by General Beauregard, i64 killed and 1,843 wounded.
ington.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
7th

MONTH.

July, 1879.
BOSTON.
H. M.

31

DAYS.

MOON'S PHASES.
Full

NEW
H. M.

YORK. WASHINGTON. CHARLESTON.
H. M.

CHICAGO.
H. M.

Moon
.

Third Quarter.

New Moon

.

4 54 eve. 4 ID morn. 4 22 morn.
5 52

4 42 eve. 3 58 morn, 4 10 morn,
,s

4 30 eve.
3 46 morn. 3 58 morn.
t;

H. M. 4 18 eve.
3 34 morn. 3 46 morn. 5 16 morn.

3 48 eve. 4 morn. 3 3 16 morn.

First Quarter.

morn.

40 morn.

28 morn.

4 46 morn.

CALENDAR FOR
Boston
;

land, State.

CALENDAR FOR New Eng New York City; Phil adelphia, Connec New York Michigan, ticut. New Jersey,
Iowa
Pennsylva'a.Ohio, Indiana & Illinois.

July 18G2.
1st.

— Battle of
battles.

Malvern

Hill,

and

last of the
re-

Wisconsin,

Richmond

The Confederates were

&

Oregon.

pulsed at every point. The Union loss during the six day's fighting
before

Richmond was and 5,958 missing.

1,561 killed, 7,701

wounded

President Lincoln calls for 300,000 additional
volunteers.
H. M. H. M.
11th.
all

Tues

Wed
3 4
5

41 41

1

2

44 42

Thur
Fri

Sat

6
7

Sun

Mon
Tues

8 9 ID
II

Wed
Thur
Fri

40 40 40 40 39 39

rises.

8 29

9

I

4 4 4 4 4

327
33i7

1

51

the land forces of the United States.
1.3th.

2

49

— Gen. Halleck appointed commander of — Fight Murfreesboro, Tenn; Union
at

337
34 7 35 7 35

rises.

8 24 8 58

troops surrendered.

9 28 9 51

926
9 50
10 13

10 13 10 37 38 10 55 37 11 18

36 36
37

t

387 387
39i7

10 35 10 58 11 22
II

General Morgan captured Lebanon, Kentucky, burned part of the town and robbed the bank. Severe skirmish at Memphis, Tenn19th. essee Union loss, 6 killed and 32 wounded. The siege of Vicksburg abandoned. 22d. Confederates defeated at More's Hill, 28th.
;

— — —

12

Sat

II

45

50

Mo.

13 14 15 16
17 18

Sun

morn.
36 o 17 56 35 35 1 43 34 2 38 33 sets. 32 7 47 8 16 3 31 8 41 30 9 5 29 9 29 28 9 54 27 ID 23 26 ID 58
II

407
41 7

morn.
23
3 1 55 2 52
1

Jult/ 1863.
1st.

Hon
Tues

— Battle of Gettysburg, Penn.

Gen. Meade

417
427-

Wed
Thur
Fri

437
7 7 7
7 7

sets.'

attacked the Confederates near Gettysburg, and after a three day's battle drove them from the field, leaving 5,000 killed and wounded in our
hands.

19

Sat

7

43

20

Sun

7
7

Mon
Tues
23 24 25

8 13 8 40

Meade took 20,000 prisoners. Maj. Gen. Reynolds, commanding the first corps of the
Union army was
killed.

437
43 7 44 7 45

9

5

Wed
Thur
Fri

7

497
5017

9 31 9 57
10 27

26
27

Sat

46
47

517
4 4 4 4 4
52 7 21 II 45 morn, 53 7 38 5417
55 7

Sun

28 29

Men
Tues

30
31

Wed
Thur

4 4 4 4

48 49 50
51
live

39 morn.
31
1

Rosecrans drove Bragg from Tullehoma. Gen. Prentice defeated the Confederates 4th. under Holmes, at Helena, Ark. The siege of Vicksburg by the Union army under Gen. Grant commenced May 18th and was

2

33 43

567

40 2 49
1

pressed forward with vigor until July 4th, when Pemberton surrendered to Gen. Grant 27,000 prisoners, 132 cannon and 50,000 stand of arms.
8th.

— In

the

month

of

Vermonters known. There that they have forgotten who they are, and there are no neighbors living who can remember.

to a great age, as is well are two men up there so old

invested Port Hudson.

Two

May Gen. Banks grand attacks were

made by land and water on

the 27th of May and 14th of June, in which portions of the enemy's

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. Juhj 1804. tTnly 1S03. — Continued. — The Confederates under Early invade works were taken. At on the 8th of July, Maryland. the commander. Major General Gardiner, 13th-15th. — The Confederates under Gen. rendered with 7,000 prisoners, 60 cannon, and
last,

5th.

sur-

10,000 stands of arms, to General Banks.

Forrest defeated in five different battles, near

Morgan's raid into Indiana and Ohio; crossed Pontotoc, Mo. 17th. The Confederate army was driven the river into Harrison county, Ind., and marched rapidly through the southern part of the State within the fortifications at Atlanta. 20th. The enemy assaulted Gen. Sherman's into Ohio, committing numerous depredations. Oh the 18th he lost his artillery and 1,300 lines three times, but were repulsed each time prisoners. With a mere fragment of his com- with severe loss. General Averill defeated the mand he retreated to Columbiana county, Ohio, enemy near Winchester, Va. 22d. A great battle was fought before where, on the 20th, he surrendered to General Atlanta, resulting in the complete defeat of the Shackleford.

— —

13-16th. Riots take place in New York, Confederates. 30th. A mine containing six tons of powder, Boston and other Union cities, in consequence of under a Confederate fort at Petersburg, exploded, the enforcement of a conscription decree. Draft riots in New York destroying the fort and garrison. 13th, 14th, 15th. Chambersburg, Penn., burned by the Concity. Mobs had possession of the city for three

Offices where the draft was going on were demolished, and the buildings were burned. The

days.

federates.

Auffust 18(il.

mob

directed

their

fury

particularly

against

negroes, several of

whom

were murdered.
Fifth
Collisions

colored orphan asylum on
pillaged and burnt down.
the

The Avenue was
between

— The Confederates retreated from Flarper's Ferry to Leesburg. 2d. — General Lyon defeated the Confederates
1st.
;

mob and

military frequently occurred.

persons were killed during the prevalence riot. The city paid above $1,500,000 as indemnity for losses that occurred during the riot. 17th. Gen. Sherman attacked Jackson, Miss.,

Union loss, 8 killed at Dug Spring, Missouri Many and 30 wounded. 5th. Commodore Alden bombarded Galvesof the
ton,

Texas.

7th.

— — The
;

village

of

destroyed by the Confederates.

Hampton, The

Virginia,
privateer,

stores were

routed Johnson and occupied the city. Large captured, and also 40 locomotives,
all

and

the rolling stock of three railroads.

Gen.

Ransom captured Natchez with a large quantity of
ammunition, 13 cannon, 2,000 head of cattle, and 4,000 hogsheads of sugar. A severe fight occurred on Elk Creek, Ark., between Gen. Blunt and the Confederate Gen. Cooper the former was vicUnion loss 40, that of the Confederates torious.
;

York, burned by the United States gunboat Union crew taken prisoners. 10th. Gen. Lyon with 5,000 troops attacked a Confederate force double that of his own at Wilson Creek, near Springfield, Mo. After a hard fight of six hours. Gen. Lyon being killed, the Union troops under the command of Col. Sigel and Major Sturgis, retired to Springfield. Gen. Fremont declared martial law in 14th.

184.

23d.

— A gallant

Gap,

in

utterly

fight occurred near Manassas which 800 men of Gen. Spinola's brigade routed twice their number of Georgia and

— — Gen. Wool took command Fortress Monroe. 26th. — The 7th Ohio regiment, 900 strong,
St. Louis.

16th.

at

North Carolina troops, with 17 cannon. were surprised at Summerville, Virginia, but Kentucky again invaded. Kit Carson with a fought their way out with a loss of six officers. part of the first New Mexico regiment, defeated The Hatteras expedition sailed. Capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark, 29th. the Navajoe Indians in a severe fight beyond Fort Canby. N. C; Confederate loss about 1,000; Federal

loss none.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
8.h

23
DAYS.

MONTH.

August, 1879.
BOSTON.
28 morn. 25 eve.

31

MOON'S PHASES.
D.

NEW
H. M.
2 16 9 13 3 14 10 16

YORK.
morn.
eve. eve.

WASHINGTON. CHARLESTON.
H. M.
2

CHICAGO
H. M. 22 morn. 1 8 19 eve. 2 20 eve. 9 22 morn I 8 eve.

Full Moon.. Third Quarter.
.

9
3 ID
I

New Moon.
Full Moon..

.

First Quarter.
.

26 eve. 28 morn,
14 eve.

4 morn. eve. 2 eve.
I

morn.
eve.

4 morn.
50 eve.

H. M. 1 52 morn. 8 49 eve. 2 50 eve. 9 52 morn. I ^8 eve.

c

24

GRAiXD

ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
September 1861.
6th.

7th.

August 1S03. — Continued. — President Lincoln rejects the demand for

— Gen. Grant took possession of

Paducah,
troops

the suppression of the conscription in the State
of

Ky.
10th.

New York.
of the 9th
Illinois

— Gen.

Rosecrans

with

4,500

17th.— Lieut. Col. Phillips Mounted Infantry attacked
under

the

Confederate

forces at Grenada, Miss., consisting of 2,000

men

command

of

Gen. Slimmer, and drove

near Carnifex Ferry. After several hours' fighting, darkness put an end to the contest. During the fight Floyd retreated, burning the bridge over

attacked

the Confederates

under

Floyd

them from the place. He then destroyed all the Gauley river. 12th. Fight at Cheat Mountain. Col. J. A. ordnance and commissary stores, burnt the depot and machine shop, tore up the railroad track, Washington, proprietor of Mount Vernon, was and destroyed 57 locomotives and more than killed. Union loss, 9 killed and 12 wounded. 21st. John C. Breckenridge fled from Frank400 cars. fort, Ky., and joined the Confederates. General 20th. The town of Lawrence, Kansas was Lane defeated a confederate force at Papinsville,

surprised in
guerrillas

the

middle of
the

the

night by 300
of Quantrell.

under

leadership

Missouri.
23d.

The town was set on fire and 182 buildings Confederates, after a siege of four months. burned to the ground, and ^2,000,000 worth of property destroyed, 191 persons were killed, many September 1862. of whom were helpless women and children; 581 1st. Fight at Britton's Lane, Tenn. Conwere wounded, many of them mortally. About federates retired, leaving their dead on the field. 80 of the murderers were killed. Union loss, 5 killed, 78 wounded, and 92 missing. 22d. Gen. Blunt with 4,500 men attacked Fight at Chantilly, Va. The Union troops were Gen. Cooper with 11,000 Confederate troops in commanded by Gens. Hooker, Reno and Kearney. the Indian Territory and compelled him to retreat The Confederates retired, leaving their dead and to Red River. wounded on the field. This was the last fight in 29th. The Confederate army in Arkansas which General Pope's army was engaged. under General Price severely pushed by the 2d. Gen. McClellan appointed to the comUnion forces under Gen. Steele. mand of the troops for the defense of Washing-

— Capture of

Federal

loss, 17 killed.

Lexington, Missouri, by the

ton.

August 1804.
5th.

— Commodore
destroyed.

Farragut's

Forts Morgan and Gaines. ram Tennessee was captured and
vessels

passed The Confederate
fleet

into Maryland.

— Confederates began crossing the Potomac 7th. — General Banks assigned to the command
5th.

several other

of the fortifications in

and around Washington.

Fort Gaines surrendered and Fort Powell was evacuated.
Shortly after
7th.

— Gen.

Averill

defeated the

enemy

at

Morefield, Va.

— The Confederate Gen. Wheeler 18th. — The Weldon railroad seized by Gen. Grant. 23d. — Fort Morgan surrendered. 25th. — Gen. Hancock, who held the Weadon
15th.

re-

pulsed at Dalton, Ga.

railroad south of

Ream's Station, was attacked
repulsed
the

several

times,

but

enemy each

General McClellan took the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac. 12th. Fight at Middletown, Maryland. Union loss, 80 killed and wounded. 14th Gen. McClellan overtook the enemy at South Mountain, Md. A general engagement took place. The fight was severe, and the loss heavy on both sides, the Unionists losing 443 killed and 1,806 wounded. Gen. Reno was among the killed. The Confederates retreated towards the Potomac. Harper's Ferry surrendered after two 15th. days' fighting, to the enemy, with all the garrison,

time.

consisting of 8,000 men.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
9th

?S
30 DAYS.

MONTH.

September, 1879.

MOON'S PHASES.

26

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC. — Fight Fredericktown, Missouri. Septemher 18G3. — Continued.
21st.

at

The
and

menced by General Bragg in the morning and continued all day. At night both armies occupied nearly the same position that they did in the morning. On the next day the battle was renewed by the Confederates and lasted until dark. The Union army was defeated and driven back to Chattanooga. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed, 9,500 wounded, and 2,500
prisoners.

Confederates defeated. about 60 wounded.
Battle
of
Ball's

Union

loss, 6 killed

manded by

September 1804,
1st. Gen. Sherman defeated the enemy at Johnsboro, Ga. The Federal troops took possession of 2d.

Union forces comGen. Stone failed to cross the Potomac to his support, and after a severe fight, in which Col. Baker was killed, the Federals retreated. Union loss was 223 killed, 266 wounded and 455 prisoners, including 100 wounded. Gen. Zollicoffer, with 6,000 Confederates, attacked the Unionists at Camp Wild Cap, Laurel
Bluff.

Col. Baker.

— — Atlanta. 4th — Morgan's
ville,

county, Ky., and was repulsed.
killed

Union
Mills,

loss,

4

and

21

wounded.
at

22d.— Skirmish
25th.

Buffalo

Mo. Con-

federates lost 17 killed and 90 prisoners.

forces were routed at Green-

Tennessee,

and

100
staff,

of

his

captured, including his
killed.

and 75

men were of his men

Romney,

— General Kelly defeated Virginia. 26th. — Gallant charge of Maj.
loss
of

the

enemy

at

Zagonyi, with

General Gillem commanded the Union

150 of Fremont's body guard, on a large force of Confederates near Springfield, Mo. The enenry

forces.
7th.

— The Confederate General John
of

Morgan

was routed with a
prisoners.

106

killed

and 27

was

killed near Greenville, Tennessee.

A

force

2,000

Confederates

defeated at
4th.

Readyville, Tenn.

October 1S62.

— Gen. Sheridan gained a complete victory the Shenandoah over the enemy the Confederate Fisher's 22d. — Battle
19th.
in

— Battle of Corinth, Miss.
defeated

valley.

ates

were
loss

with a
killed

heavy

The ConfederThe loss.

at

Hill,

army defeated.

October ISOl.
.3d.

Reynolds made an armed recon- of Buell's army was attacked at Perryville, Ky., noissance of the enemy's position at Greenbrier. by a superior force of the enemy under Gens. The Confederates evacuated Lexington, Mo. Jackson and Terrel. The Confederates retreated The steamer Monticello shelled the during the night. Union loss was over 3,000 5th. Confederates at Chicamacomico, under Barlow, killed and wounded. 10th. The Confederate cavalry under Gen. and drove them to their boats. The Confederate iron-clad steamer Mer- Stuart entered Chambersburg, Pa., and captured 7th. rimac made its first appearance within sight of a quantity of small arms and clothing. The Confederate General, Morgan, oc18th. Fortress Monroe. Confederates made an attack on Santa cupied Lexington, Ky. 9th. The Confederate General, Forrest, 19th. Rosa Island, but were defeated. Union loss was defeated near Gallatin, Tenn. 13 killed and 21 wounded. Gen. Blunt defeated the Confederates 22d. Col. Geary, with 400 Pennsylvania troops crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry and at Maysville, Ark., capturing all their artillery. Gen. Herron defeated the Confederates 28th. captured 21,000 bushels of wheat. Confederate steamer Theodore escaped near Fayettville, Ark. 1 1th. Gen. Rosecrans assumed command of 30th. from Charleston, S. C, with Mason and Slidell the armv of the Cumberland. on board.

— Gen.

— Confederates attacked General Palmer's Lavergne, Tenn., but were defeated. brigade — Battle Perryville, Ky. The advance
6th.
at

Union

was 315

and 1,802 wounded.

8th.

at

— — —

— —

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
loth

27
DAYS.

MONTH.

October, 1879.
p.

31

MOON'S PHASES.
Third Quarter.

New Moon
Full

.

.

First Quarter.

Moon

;

28

in-chief

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC AL ATANAC. Xovemhei' ISfil. 11th. — Gen. Ransom defeated the ConfederWoodward, — General Scott resigned as Commanaer- ates under A cavalry near Garretsburg, Ky. I7th. — took place near Kingsof the armies of United States. Gen. N. C. McCIellan was appointed his place. 28th. — Batt.e of Crane Ark. The Union 2d. — Gen. Hunter superseded Gen. Fremont
1st.

fight

tlie

ton,

in

Hill,

command of the Western department. Gen. Blunt. 7th. The naval and military forces, under with a heavy command of Commodore Dupont and General
in the

army, numbering 1,000 men, was commanded by The Confederates were defeated
loss,

and retreated

to

Van Buren.

Sherman, captured Forts Walker and Beauregard, at Port Royal entrance. They also took possession of the town of Beaufort and Hilton Battle Cry of Freedon Island. The Union loss was 8 killed and 25 wounded. Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys, we'll rally Gen. Grant, with a force of 2,800, attacked a once again. Confederate camp at Belmont, Mo., driving the Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, enemy out, destroying the camp and taking a We will rally from the hill-side, we'll gatncr from quantity of arms; but, reinforcements arriving at the plain. Columbus, the Federals were compelled to reShouting the battle-cry of Freedom. treat; their loss was 84 killed, 288 wounded, and The Union for ever, Hurrah, boys. Hurrah 235 missing.
11th.

I

— Guyandotte,
— The U.

Virginia,

burned by the
of the

Down

with the traitor.
rally

Up

with the star
flag,

Unionists.

While we

round the

boys, rally

Gen. Halleck takes department.
15th.

command

Western

once again. Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

S. frigate,

San

Jacinto, Capt.

Wilkes, arrived at Fortress Monroe with

Mason

and Slidell, the Confederate commissioners to Europe, taken from the British mail steamer, Trent, Nov. 8. 21st. The U. S. vessel, Santee, captured the privateer, Royal Yacht, off Galveston, Texas. 23d. Fort Pickens, and the United States war vessels, Niagara and Colorado, bombarded

We

are springing to the call of our brothers gone
before.

— —

Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, And we'll fill the vacant ranks with a million Freemen more. Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom Chorus. ,

the Confederate fortifications at Pensacola.

Port of Warrenton burnt.

We will
And

Lyons, the British minister at Washington, receives instructions from Earl Russell to leave America within seven days, unless the United States government consent to the unconditional liberation of Messrs. Mason
30th.

— Lord

welcome and brave.

to our

numbers the

loyal, true

Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, although he may be poor, he shall never be
a slave.

and

Slidell.

Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. Chorus.

Jefferson Davis elected President of the Confederate States.

So we're springing to the from the West,

call,

from the East and

November
5th.

lS(i2.

— Gen.
of the

And

Shouting the battle cry of Freedom. we'll hurl the rebel crew from the land we
love the best.

mand

army

McCIellan relieved of the comof the Potomac, and General

Burnside succeeds him.

Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. Chorus.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
nth

29
30 DAYS.

MONTH.

November, 1879

MOON'S PHASES

!

;

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
December 1861,

Kingdom Coming.
Say, darkeys, hab you seen de massa,

5th.

— Engagement

between the Confederate

gunboats^ and Federal vessels at Cape Hatteras. According to the reports of Secretaries of War

and Navy, the Union forces numbered 640,537 volunteers, 20,334 regular soldiers, and 22,000
seamen.
9th. The Confederate Congress passed a bill admitting Kentucky into the Southern Confed-

Wid de muffstash on his face, Go long de road sometime dis mornin
Like he gwine to leab de place? He seen a smoke, way up de ribber. Where de Linkum gumboats lay He took his liat, an' lef berry sudden. An' I spec he's run away

,

eracy.

Freestone Point, Va.. shelled by the National gunboats and captured.
13th.

— Engagement

at

Camp

Allegheny, Va.,

De massa run ha, ha De darkey stay? ho, ho
?
!

!

which Gen. Milroy defeated the Confederates under Col. Johnson. Union loss, 21 killed and 107 wounded. 17th. Fight at Munfordsville, Ky. Drawn battle. Union loss, 10 killed and 17 wounded. General Pope captured 360 secessionists at
in

must be now de kingdom comin', An' de year ob Jubilo
It
!

Osceola, Mo.
18th.
ates, a

Pope captured 1,300 Confederand wagons, and 1,000 stand of arms at Milford, Mo. Union loss, 2 killed and 17 wounded. Stone fleet sunk in

— Gen.

number

of horses

Charleston Harbor.
20th.

— Battle of Gainesville, Va.,

six foot one way, two foot tudder, An' he way tree hundred pound, His coat so big, he couldn't pay de tailor. An' it won't go half way round. He drill so much dey call him Cap'en An' he get so drefful tann'd, I spec he try an' fool dem Yankees For to think he's contraband. Chorus.

He

in

which the

Confederates were defeated by the Union troops under Gen. McCall. Union loss, 7 killed and

De darkeys
Dey move

feel so

lonesome libing

wounded. 23d. Troops despatched to Canada by the British government as a precaution against aggression by the U. S.
61

In de log-house on de lawn,

dar tings to massa's parlor

For to keep it while he's gone. Dar's wine an' cider in de kitchen. An' de darkeys deyTl hab some
I

;

December 1802
7th.— Battle of Prairie Grove, Ark. The Union army was commanded by Gens. Blunt and Herron. The Confederates were defeated with heavy loss and retired during the night. 1 1th. The city of Fredericksburgh bombarded by the Union troops, under cover of which they crossed the Rappahannock.

spose dey'll all be cornfiscated When de Linkum sogers come.

Chorus

De

13th.

— Battle of

Fredericksburgh, Va.

Con-

federate works were attacked by the

Union troops in three divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin, who were repulsed. Federals lost 1,512 killed, 6,000 wounded and 100 prisoners. 14th. Gen. Banks superceded Gen. Butler at

oberseer he make us trouble, An' he dribe us round a spell We lock him up in de smokehouse cellar, Wid de key trown in de well. De whip is lost, de han'-cuff broken. But de massa'll hab his pay; He's ole enough, big enough, ought to known
better

Dan

to went an' run away. Chorus.

New

Orleans.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
12th

31
DAYS.

MONTH.

December, 1879
NEW
H. M.

31

MOON'S PHASES.
Third Quarter.

YORK.

W.\.SHINGTON. CHARLESTON.
H. M.
2 35 eve. 5 56 6 7 II 7

CHICAGO
H. M.
I

New Moon.

.

First Quarter. Full Moon

59 eve. 6 20 morn. 6 31 morn.
2 Ti

H. M. 2 47 eve.

H. M. 2 23 eve.
5 5

53 eve.
1

6 8 morn, 6 19 morn,
II

31

morn.

19 morn.

morn. morn. morn.

45 morn. 55 ii^orn.

5

5

5 25

10 5 5 morn.

10 2 5

morn. morn. morn.

——

;

; :

32

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Decetnbev 1S04.

Marching Througt\ Georgia.
Bring the good old bugle, boys we'll sing another song Sing it with a spirit that will start the world

— Fort McAllister captured by General Sherman's army. 16th. — General Thomas defeated the enemy
1.3th.

ing a large

NashviHe, Tennessee, with heavy loss, capturnumber of guns and prisoners. The Confederates, under Gen. Breck. 20th. enbridge, defeated in southwestern Virginia, and
at

— along —

!

Sing

it

as

we used
strong,

to

sing

it,

fifty

thousand

the salt works destroyed.
21st.

— General
— —

While we were marching through Georgia.
the city of

Sherman entered

cotton,

CHoRi's Savannah, capturing 150 cannon, 30,000 bales of Hurrah Hurrah we bring the Jubilee and a large amount of munitions of war. Hurrah Hurrah the flag that makes you free First bombardment of Fort Fisher. 24th. Hood's army crossed the Tennessee So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea, 29th. While we were marching through Georgia. river, thus ending the Tennessee campaign.
! ! ! ! !

!

Just Before the Battle.
Just before the battle, mother, I am thinking most of you
;

How

the darkeys shouted
joyful
I

when they heard

the

While upon the field we're watching. With the enemy in view. Comrades brave are round me lying. Filled with tho'ts of home and God; For well they know that on the morrow,

sound How the turkevs gobbled which our commissaiy found I low the sweet potatoes even started from the ground, While \\e were marching thrc ugh Georgia.
!

CHORUS.
Yes, and theic were Union
j

Some

men who wept
flag

witii

will sleep

beneath the sod.

When
Farewell, mother, you

oyful tears, they saw the honor'd

they had not

may never

Press me to your heart again. But, O, you'll not forget me, mother,
I'f

seen for years Hardly could they be restrained from breaking
forth in cheers.

I'm numbered with the

slain.

While

v^e

were marching through Georgia.

Oh I long to see you, And the loving ones
!

CHORUS.
mother,
at

home

;

"Sherman's dashing Yankee boys
re ach the coast,"

will

never
boast^

But

never leave the banner, Till in honor I can come.
I'll

So the saucy rebels

said, 'twas a

handsome

Tell the traitors

around you. That their cruel words we know
all

Had
Chorus

they not forgot, alas! to reckon with the
host.

In every battle kill our soldiers. By the help they give the foe.

While we were marching through Georgia.
CHORU.S.

Hark

!

I

hear the bugles sounding,

'Tis the signal for the fight;

So we made a thoroughfare
her train,
.Sixty

for

Freedom and
to the

How

may God

protect us, mother,

As He ever does
Hear the

the right.

miles in latitude

— three

hundred

battle cry of

Freedom,
;

main

Now
Oh, yes

it

swells

we'll rally

Or

we'll

upon the air round the standard perish nobly there. Chorus.

Treason fled before us, for resistance was in While we were marching through Georgia. CHORUS.

vain.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

ZZ

From

a Me7)iorial

Day

Address by Chaplain-in-CJiief, J. F. LovcTing

A
war

closed, since

DOZEN years have passed since the its sword was sheathed,

in that

mighty host, men who had won

bars, or leaflets, or eagles, or stars

since the banner of rebellion

and bars

— the
in

stars trepid bravery,

by inby unchallenged courage.

trailed in the dust,

and once But there were other heroes

— men

in the
..

again the grand old Stars and Stripes
the Flag of the

ranks, sergeants with three bars and a

the lozenge, corporals with two stripes, and clear and radiant sunshine under a peace- privates who, in simple blue uniform, ful sky. The days just before our armies were equal to captain, major, colonel or

Union

—floated

were disbanded will never be forgotten general, in stalwart courage and heroic by any who composed them. The peace- manhood. We remember them with enful camp fires burned. The hill-sides thusiasm. Every patriotic heart delights flamed at night with beacon-fires and to honor them. But have we only the memory of that rockets. Through the day laughter and song took the place of the sharp move- grand review.? No, no, most emphatically ments of drill and bugle calls. Those no. Look up There is a grander review. whose wounds were fresh, thought of the Look up See the hosts assembling upon
! !

battle as of a dream,

and looked forward the parade ground

of the heavens.
!

eagerly for the return to northern homes. mighty army is above set their names upon At last came orders for a grand review
the grand review of the

What What heroes have What its roster.

tomac

what inestimable worth, what dauntless heroism they represent expect to Let the living pass. Give way, comrades I never of all our armies. The whole scene is of the Grand Army of the Republic. see a nobler sight. steady Give way to the Grand Army of the I see the vividly before me. From what battle fields sweeping advance of infantry. I see the Immortals.

— the fighting army,/^'/'

army

of the Po- matchless valor,
excellence,

Fredericksranks are recruited burg, Shiloh, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, the silent now, heavy batteries of artillery the swamps but speaking with convincing eloquence thickets of the Wilderness, Even as today of the Chickahominy, the trenches of yesterday ago. a short forms come under the spell of memory I recall that Petersburg. What familiar There is the See to greet us. grand review, my heart throbs more forth with age who was warmly, my pulse beats more quickly, and 'old man, his hair gray There wounded at Spotsylvania. "Ah, uncle quivers and thrills.

noble squadrons of cavalry.

I

see the their

!

every nerve

were generals, and colonels and captains John,"

I

said to

him

then,

"I am sorry

!

34

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
hurt, but the

you are
perate,

wound
if

is

not des-

A N urse's

Story.
I

we

shall see

you well again soon."
I

It was at Memphis that

saw one

of

" Perhaps so, chaplain,
little rest,

could get a the most affecting scenes, in my whole but there's too much old blood experience as nurse. Some one came up
start in

in

the one day to the hospital and told me that There he a boat had just come from Vicksburg, is, above, with the smile of eternal youth loaded with wounded, in a very suffering I had no one of my own sex soldier under the Great condition, upon his face Captain of our salvation. And there with me at the time, save a young girl, a why there I see the boy who came to me daughter of one of the wealthiest and with a face beardless as a woman's, a once most prominent men of the vicinity a secessionist, by the way. patient in the hospital, with no sickness The girl Olive Lancaster of course upon him, but homesickness. It was so had left lonely, he said, and as I talked with him, I cannot give her real name he told me of the dear mother at home her father's house to nurse wounded Sj'mpathy was LTnion soldiers, greatly to the disgust of he so longed to see. medicine to his heart, He went back her family, who at once disowned her Alas, the next battle not at all, however, to the daunting of to his company. brought him again to the hospital to die the brave girl. She had been educated in a Northern of wounds, to die with a smile on his face and the sweet word, mother, on his school, and she told me sometimes of a And there are others, how many young Northern cousin, whom she loved lips. beyond cousinly limits I whose memories we cherish. very dearly others, for her cheek took a richer From what experience, from what scenes fancied of trial and anguish they went forth to carmine when she talked of him, and

my

veins to stand a move, and

ambulances

an hour."

— —

swell the ranks above.

her eyelids drooped, as eyelids are not

Thus the army above was gathered. apt to droop for cousins. It was from it will help your patriot- him, more than any other Northern asLook up to it ism. Look up. How gladly they rejoice sociation, she had got those sentiments that their names are honored. How they which banished her from her father's exult that the flag, under which they house, and made her a tender and

fought and

for

which

they died,

still

efficient

nurse of our loyal defenders.

I

waves above

knew how fearfully she watched Comrades who have been promoted, for his face among the wounded who we salute you. Comrades of the host came to us. above,' we swear to be true to your She was very beautiful, this Olive Lanmemory, and true to our country and our caster. The circumstances under which flag, till Death, your recruiting officer, I knew her were enough in themselves to permits us to put our names beside yours make her lovely in my eyes, but she was upon the roster of the Grand Army of undeniably beautiful aside from that a
their unforgotten graves.

alone,

the Immortals.

brunette

— dark

but

clear,

with a tropi-

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
cally scarlet
;

35

lip, and faintly flushing weaker brother had tasted it and others, and the soft darkness of her delirious, babbled of home, sweet-heart, She went or wife, "Johnny," or "little Joe." eyes was like a June evening. There was one, among the last that I with me down to the landing, each of us carrying a basket of such necessaries as bent over, and toward whose handsome, we knew by experience would be most boyish-looking face I had glanced more acceptable. It It was a terrible sight. I than once as I moved along the line. have seen other terrible sights since, but was a young face handsome as a girl's, then I had had no such experience as and with a patient sweetness about the that, and I thought when my foot first mouth that touched me exceedingly. His touched that awful deck that I should eyes were closed, and he lay so still, so faint. without sound or movement, that I could These poor wounded soldiers lay as not tell whether he was dead, or only thickly as they could be put, upon the fainting. open deck, and the blood from their But he was neither, for when I touched wounds had literally drenched the whole him, speaking, he opened his eyes and floor, so that we could not step without looked at me, and smiled as I offered putting our feet in pools of it. him wine. Such a smile I have never Olive did not once falter. Glancing in my life seen any thing like it and the the expressiveness at her sometimes, I saw that her face lustre of those eyes was very white, but she stepped quietly that was in them, and that I can no more along among them and her eyes had a paint to you that I can the awful reality I looked look in them that I thought must of itself of the tragic scene about me. be as much, almost, to those fainting at him in amazement, thinking he was men, as the wine and food she put to either delirious or unhurt but he was not the first, and his whole right side was their pallid lips.

cheeks,

!

;

;

After the
fright

first

sickening sensation of oozing scarlet.

"You haven't got much of that left, and appalling, I was strong enough. One could not be weak at such a time, and the others need it more than I do," with such moans in our ears, such he said, with a gesture of his well hand awful need lifting hollow hungry eyes at toward my wine bottle and then, as I us. Some had fainted from exposure, hesitated an instant, "I've got something Let me alone, please, privation, and loss of blood others were better than wine. so near fainting that it was long before and come back when you've attended to they could be sufficiently revived to be the rest of those poor fellows." I passed removed in the litters which were waiting on, wondering, and got back to him as Some were soon as possible, vaguely uneasy. to take them to the hospital. Olive was only a few steps away, comfor lack, perhaps, of those quite dead very offices we were rendering to their ing toward us, as I knelt beside him, and the heroes his glance tried to reach her he could surviving comrades. Some refused the succoring drauHit till a not move his head, and his face was
; ;

;

"

!

;

; : !

"

;

;

36
turned

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

" Is it Olive ? " he News froir\ the Front. from her. In an instant it flashed " Hold there, courier, what news from the front ? Go not bO fast on your galloping way even before over me who he was Have the armies met, has a battle been fought? with a low cry, had dropped beside Olive, Tell us which side has won the day, him, and was covering his face with her And who is living, and who lie low

asked, eagerly.

* kisses and tears. " I knew you were there," he said

We
''
;

all

have friends

in the ranks,

you know."

I
"

heard your voice, and it was better than a bottle of wine to me." " You knew I was here, and yet waited without calling to me.?" Olive said,
reproachfully. " You couldn't have
gently.

The armies met but

a few days since,

And

a terrible battle has been fought

We

are the victors, thank the Lord But the victory, oh, it was dearly bought, For the ground is littered with Union dead, And the trampled grass with their blood is
red."

come

to

me

with" Tell

out leaving others, you know," he said,

How
girl's

me, courier, say if you can it has fared with my own brave boy
the last of five gallant sons,

?

The
" It

only answer was a kiss and
to

He was

a sob, and then she said
is

me,

my

cousin Philip."

His mother's only remaining joy." Thus spoke a woman wrinkled and gray, As the courier paused a while by the way.
?
I

Of course it is, Olive," I said, " and " Your boy, good woman Alas he is killed it is time he was removed to the hospital. In the front of battle I saw him fall. She got up then, blushing deeply as she With his face to the enemy he lay, waitShot through the heart by a rifleman's ball saw the men waiting with a litter
"

ing with a respectful, sympathetic look, that spoke plainly enough their appreciation of the scene.

But

tell

More dear than our cause
strife
.'

me, mother, was your boy's life in this deadly

Poor
that
it

Philip

was so badly wounded

"Courier,

I

have already said
five to

hurt him terribly

when

they lifted

He was
I

the child of

him.

But though

his lips whitened,

and

have given

my later years our noble cause

;

And

the

Lord

will

drops forced out by agony stood on his forehead, he made no moan.

'Tis hard with one's flesh

wipe away these tears: and blood to part,
all

But

I yield

them

with a willing heart."

Olive several times cried out sharply "Courier," said a young wife then, " Is my husband living, and is he well ? as though they had hurt he?; and wrung "My Captain, lady, was wounded at first, her hands at the pain it was to him.
Close by my side in the fight he fell it was with the loss of And asked that this token to you I'd give, and just before I left his right arm For he knew himself that the could not live." Memphis I was present at a ceremony in which my sweet and brave Olive "O God, he is dead! 'tis my picture this; I bade him wear it on every field exchanged the name of cousin for that of Close to his heart, where I placed it then. left them both there, both nurses, I wife. Praying his precious life it might shield; since Philip could no longer fight. And I strove to keep the tears from my eyes When I gave him to God a sacrifice 1"

He

lived,

but
;

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
"

37
soldiers.

And, courier, what of Walter Holt ? Pray tell me if of him you know aught " This from the lips of a fair young girl. " I know how bravely and well he fought, And I know as well that he lost an arm. But otherwise he is safe from arm."
"

distribution of

coffee

to

the

The men soon became
for the

interested

and

set

themselves to work to procure supplies

women,

in their

labor of

love.

Oh, courier,

tell

him when you return

How
That
I

that of one thing he

may be
will

sure

:

am

his

whenever he

And

'though he has lost an arm, and is poor, Bid him remember that I have two, And will prove what a Yankee girl can do."

Then
"

the courier spurred his foaming steed, Thinking aloud as he rode away Oh, when will the night of battle clear.

And show

us the

dawn

of a brighter da)',

When

these groans of anguish and grief shall
"
.''

cease
In the golden sunrise of perfect peace

For a few days, these refreshments were collected and served under the trees in front of the cooper-shop, owned by Mr. William M. Cooper, on Otsego street, near Washington avenue, Mr. Cooper, whose patriotic heart burned within him, saw what was needed, and immediately tendered to this committee the use of his large shop. The building was at once cleared of the barrels, hoop-poles and staves, and the first regiment was fed under its roof May 12, 1861. Across the street always hung a banner, with the followins: in lar^e letters:

Tt\e

Cooper Refresl:\ment Roorr\s at
Philadelphia.

COOPER SHOP
Regiment Mass.
Hat.i.,

[From MSS. History of
Vols.,

the ^"jtk

VOLUNTEER
REFRESHMENT SALOON. F II E E.
Soon
after the

prepared by

J.

Brainerd

of

JVorcester, ^fassJ]

The Cooper Refreshment Rooms has
a history which would
fill

a book larger

than this

is

expected to be.

Early in the

cooper-shop was opened,

war, the wife of a mechanic that lived the

so great that another near the landing of the Camden & Am- set of rooms near by was opened attached boy Railroad terminus, in that City, went to the last, was a temporary hospital. out one morning with her coffee-pot and In these two places 1,200,000 soldiers a cup, and gave about a dozen soldiers a were fed ; 40,000 were accommodated
:

demand became

This hint of that noble with a night's lodging; 15,000 freedmen warm drink. woman was the gem from which sprung and refugees cared for, and 20,000 had
a system of relief, which will always be
their

wounds dressed

by those

in

at-

remembered by every

soldier that passed

tendance.

The rooms were at all times liberally through that "City of Brotherly Love," during the late war of the Rebellion. supplied by the citizens of Philadelphia, The hint was quickly imitated by At all hours of the day or night, these heroines, when a little others, who immediately formed them- self-sacrificing selves into a committee, for the general signal gun kept for the purpose an-


GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
:

38

nounced the approach of a regiment or the same day of his burial the following company, would repair to the saloons, in relation to him was written and with the greatest cheerfulness, dispense the generous bounty of their Head Quarters Co. "C." 57th. In the Field. Near Pegram's Farm, Va., Oct. 23, 1874. fellow-citizens. These rooms were not
closed until August, 1865,

When visited

"

Dear

.

*

*

*

jj-^

reply

by the 57th, many of the tools and ap- to your inquiries about Ira B. Bullard, pliances still hung in their accustomed I will state that he was wounded in action. 24th, at the battle of North Anna, places before the change from a shop to May and afterwards died of wounds in hospital a Soldiers' Refreshment Saloon. I took him from the field at Washington. in one of my ambulances I was attached I\egimer\tal Ever\ts. to the ambulance train at that time * * The following accounts of two of the I had quite a long talk yesterday with The Lieut. Colonel Tucker about Ira. members of the 57th Mass. regiment, and Colonel, you know, formerly commanded their sufferings and death, will be of inCo. " M."

terest to

many

:

He
Mills, Va., June
7,

Near Gaines
:

1864.

an excellent plucky in a

said that Ira proved himself to be soldier, both cool and
fight,

and always

faithful

* * * I do not when on duty. The Colonel in speaking are aware that Cor- of Ira's conduct in the battle of the poral Bullard has been wounded ; he was Wilderness, related a circumstance illuswounded at North Anna river, in the trative of Corporal Bullard's coolness arm and leg ; has had a bone taken out under fire. Ira's rifle having become foul, of his arm, I believe, and at last accounts so that he was unable to discharge it, he was doing well ; he is probably now in quietly took his wrench from his cartridge Washington I am told by Sergeant Allen box, unscrewed the cone on which the that Ira fought like a hero, cool and caps are placed, took his primer and * * he has proved that the cleaned out the cone, then screwed it on plucky, Bullard blood comes from good fighting again and blazed away all this under " * * * stock. a heavy fire of musketry from the talking I have just been "Johnnies." George. E. Barton. with the Color Sergeant ; he says of Ira, he was the best Corporal I had on the On Sunday, October 23, 1864, Corporal " Color Guard," always in his place, Ira B. Bullard, of Co. M., was buried close to the colors. He fell fighting by the from the Baptist Church, West Sutton. old flag, and went to the rear without Corporal Bullard was wounded at the assistance. A day or two before the fight at North battle of North Anna River, Va., May Anna River, Ira was quite sick and was 24, 1864, which wound caused his death away from the Regiment about half a at Mount Pleasant U. S. Army General day, but this did not suit him at all. He Hospital, in the suburbs of Washington, joined the " Color Guard " and went in D. C. He was spoken of as a brave with the Regiment. Most men would have
; ;

Dear know whether you

soldier

and a worthy young man.

On

taken advantage of their sickness

and

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
remained
in the rear, but this was not Corporal Bullard's style. He made this remark to the Color Sergeant when he joined the Guard "If I weie only well I could do my duty, but I want to be with the Regiment wherever they are." * * *
:

39

George

E.

Barton.

wounded on the North Anna, and was sent to Port Royal for transportation to Washington, but of his own account, returned to his Regiment, joining it at Coal Harbor. While preparing for the charge upon the enemy's works, on the 1 7th, beyond the Dunn House, he
slightly
'

said to the Chaplain, I intend to be the At the time of Schneider's death, Mr. C. Cfirst one to enter their works.' Coffin (Carleton), of the Boston yournal, wrote " The charge was made. How grandly a just and beautiful tribute to his memory. It things which have already ap- they moved through the woods contains some How
!

peared, but
full.

it

has been thought best to give
:

He

says

it

in

quickly they swept up to the rebel line of defensive works, like the ocean billow

While riding up from City Point to upon a break-water, rolling over it, enall beyond The brave young Christian Commission, pointed out a soldier tried to make good his words. grave by the roadside, near the 5th Corps With eager feet he lead the advance, hospital, about a mile east of the Dunn breaking out from the line and keeping House. For me it had a special interest, a rod or two in advance. He was almost as it will have for thousands the grave there, not quite, almost near enough of Edward M. Schneider, 57th Mass. to feel the hot flash of the rebel musketry " When the Regiment was formed in his face, near enough to be covered he was a student in Phillip's Academy, with the sulphurous cloud from the canAndover. From motives of patriotism non, when he fell, shot through the
the front to-day, a friend, attached to the gulfing
I

"

purely, against the wishes of his friends,

body.
"

he

left

the literature of the ancients, the

He

history of the past, to
in the present,

become an

actor six

was carried to the hundred and fifty of

hospital, with

his

Division
turn.
lips.

and to do what he could for the future. His father is the well known Missionary of the American Board at Aintob, Turkey and the son did what he thought would meet his approval. "The Chaplain of the Regiment, Rev.
;

comrades.

He

lay

all

night with his

wounds undressed, waiting his There was not a murmur from his

The Chaplain looked "What do you think of it

at
.''

wounds. "Seeing it was
his

mortal, he could not articulate a reply

Mr. Doshiell, has kindly given me in- neither could he restrain his tears. He formation of what he has done for his remembered the last injunction of the country. On the march from Annapolis, young soldier's older sister " I commit he, though but seventeen years old, and him to your care." The young hero inunaccustomed to hardships, kept his terpreted the meaning of the tears that place in the ranks, not once falling out his wound was mortal. "Do not weep,"
:

from the encampment by the waters of he said, "it is God's will, I wish you to the Chesapeake, to the Rapidan. He was write to my father and tell him that /

;

40 have tried to God."
to

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
do

my

duty

to

my country and
effects,

the 17th of June, eighty-nine years ago, the sons of freedom freely gave their lives

He

disposed of his

on Bunker Hill for the cause they loved. Not less worthy of remembrance are to his friends. Tiien, in the simpHcity those who fell in front of Petersburg on " I have a good this memorable day. of his heart, he said " Not many days hence, a gray haired many friends, school-mates and companions. They will want to know where man, far away in the Orient, will receive I am, how I am getting on. You can let the tidings. The affliction may be severe; them know I am gone, and that I die for, loving his work, serving his Master,
$'20 to the

giving $10 to the Christian Commission,

American Board, and
:

trifles

coming years, and beheld the boy succeeding him as a Missionary of the Gospel ; but in his affliction will he not to him and tell him To stand by the thank God that he had such a son 1 old flag and cling to the cross of He has not lived in vain. He has done Christ! " his work, and has gone home to engage
of

and Chaplain, the boys in the ; Regiment. I want you to tell them to STAND BY THE DEAR OLD FlAG and there is my brother in the Navy, write
content

he doubtless has looked down the vista

!

in a high service. It was not for him to "It is my duty to tell you, have all his heart's desire here, to be that you will soon go home," he said. the first to stand upon the ramjDart of "Yes, Doctor, I am going home, I am the enemy's works, but fearlessly and not afraid to die. I don't know how the triumphantly he vanquished the last valley will be when I get to it, but it is enemy, and came off a mighty conqueror. all bright now." Then gathering up his "I die content," said the heroic and waning strength, he repeated the verse noble Wolfe, at Quebec, when told that often sung by the soldiers, who, amid all the French were fleeing. Stand up for the whirl and excitement of the camp and Jesus," said Dudley Tyng ip his last " Let me die with my face to battle-field, never forget those whom they hours. have left behind them, mother, sister, the enemy," was the last command of father, brother. Calmly, clearly, distinct- General Rice, the Christian, the Soldier, ly, he repeated the lines, Patriot, at Spottsylvania the chorus of the but the song equally worthy of a place in the memories " Soon with angels I'll be marching, of men are the words of Edward M.

"The Surgeon came and examined

the wound.

:

— —
on

:

J

With bright
I

laurels

my brow
now."

Schneider,
charge,

— the boy, the
his brother.
all

student, hardly

have for

my

country fallen.

eighteen years of age, the leader in the

Who
"

will care for sister

— to
of

They

are the

and Tyng, and on apace. He suffered intense pain ; Rice uttered in their last moments. His but not a murmur escaped his lips. grave is by the road-side, marked by Sabbath morning came, and with the a rude paling erected by Rev. Mr. coming of the light ho passed away. On Doshield. The summer breeze sweeps
that Wolfe,

The

night wore away.

Death came essence

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
through the sighing pines above the heaved-up mound. Mournful, yet sweet the music of the wind's harp ; mournful, in that one so young, so full of life, capable of such a future, should go so soon ; sweet that he did his work so well.
while living, and

41

mourned

for

when dead

;

never have I felt a profounder reverence for departed worth than for
but
him.

— Asleep beneath

the pines, uncof-

unshrouded, wearing, as when he fell, the uniform of his country. His last Had he lived a century, he could not words the messages to his comrades, to made it more complete. It was a short his father and his brother will live so
fined,

extending only from the peaceful long as the flag of our country shall shade of Old Andover to the entrench- wave, or the cross of Christ endure. " Stand up for the Dear Old Flag, ment of Petersburg ; but oh, how full
life,

have given the record as narrated Chaplain and by members of the Christian Commission, who were with him in his last moments. It is plain,
I

"

AND CLING TO THE CrOSS OF ChRIST
They
are the

!

by

his

emblems
eternity.
life.

for time

and

complete,
!

his

our hopes Short, full, round, Glorious such a
of
all

simple, true.
is

I

am
Will

refreshed.

The

future death

not dark.

the tree of

Liberty

"

Carleton."

become diseased and fall prematurely into the sear and yellow leaf, if nourished No. There is comby such vital blood
.-'

Our Your\gest

Soldier.

pensation in
to

God's economy.
;

It is costly

Sergeant John Clem, Twenty-second
was the He was

sow such seed
pain,

but return will

abundant, the harvest golden.
the the
anguish, the
heartstrings, waste

Amid

all

be Michigan Volunteer Infantry, youngest soldier in our army.

tearing of only 12 years old, and small, even for his and desolation of war, age. His home was in Newark, Ohio. we have such compensation. There are He first attracted the notice of General thousands who are ready to fall where Rosecrans at a review at Nashville, where he marched to the cannon's mouth ; and he was acting as marker of his regiment. there are other thousands who have not The General attracted by his youth and yet taken their places in the ranks, young intelligence, invited him to call upon him as he in years, who, as they read this whenever they were in the same place. patriotic record, will feel the flame Rosecrans saw no more of Clem until his return to Cincinnati, when one day kindling as never before. " One week ago this Sunday morning coming to his room at the Burnet House, he passed, from the din of the dry, hot, he found the boy awaiting him. He had dusty, bloody field of battle, to that land seen service in the mean while. He had where peace floweth like a river for- gone through the battle of Chicamauga, evermore. I have stood by the mould- where he had three bullets through his ing dust of those whose names are great in hat. Here he killed a rebel Colonel. history, whose deeds and virtues are cut The officer, mounted on horseback, enin brass and marble, who were reverenced countered the young hero, and called out.

;; ;

;

42

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Corporal Sirr\pson's Story.
" It

"Stop, you little Yankee devil!" By way of answer the boy halted, brought his piece

was a grand ride and adventure to "order," thus throwing the Colonel " that we had last week! off his guard. In an other moment the The boys drew closer to^ the fire they piece was cocked, brought to aim, fired, and the officer fell dead from his horse. knew my story was worth hearing, and,
;

achievement Clem was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and Rosecrans bestowed upon him the Roll of honor.

For

this

lighting
listen,

their

pipes, they got ready

to

" Yes. a right jolly ride

!

You remem-

ber,

He
Come

did His duty Well.

bear him to his resting place
still

With

and solemn

tread,

No

crown of

laurel shall be placed

on the 25th of March Captain Gere of the Griswold Light you have fought at their side Cavalry more than once was sent out with a hundred or so of men to the neighborhoods of Berryville and Winchester, on a
boys,
that

Above

his youthful

head
his

scout.

Well,

we encamped

at Millwood,

No words

of praise

upon

tomb

a straggling sort of place, you remember,

To speak of how he fell Only the honest epitaph,
"

He

did his duty well."

near and gaze upon the dead Ere laid beneath the dust, Gaze on the calm and settled face With still and solemn trust Look on him, let your grief be still, And do not mourn as they

Come

about seven miles from Berryville. After built, rations not being over-plenty, Dick Weatherbee, sergeant, private Harry Johnson and myself deterthe fires were

Who
Or

mourn a youthful

spirit lost,

birth-right cast away.

mined to indulge in a little foraging on our own account, and in prosecuting our laudable purpose, went some two miles from camp to a farm-house, where we ordered supper from an old woman, ajDparently the only occupant of the premises.

How
Her

might a mother's heart rejoice
the brave,

To know amid

son, the brightest

and the
;

best,

Had found
Amid

his early grave

the foremost ranks had fought
fearless eye,

With bold and

And

felt

within his noble heart
to die.

'Twas honor thus

Then bear him to his resting place With still and solemn tread,

No crown
Upon

of laurel shall be placed
;

head words of praise upon his tomb, To speak of how he fell Only the honest epitaph,
his youthful

No

"

He

did his duty well."

She didn't seem to care about giving us what we wanted, but we sat down resolutely by the fire, giving her to understand that we meant to stay until our wants were supplied and so at last she went She moved about preparing us a meal. very slowly, however, and seemed feverish and uneasy, as if she was waiting for something she did not wish us to know Finally, however, the supper was about. ready, and we were just sitting down at the table, when we were treated to a 'surprise' we had not bargained for. Suddenly several revolvers advanced threateningly
;

GRAXn ARMY OF THE
into the room, each having a

J^E PUBLIC
Paris, ten

ALMA A'AC.

43

shaggy

fel-

or twelve miles, you

remem-

low behind

it

with 'shot' in his eyes, and ber,, away.

a firm set in his

mouth

that wasn't at

all

pleasant, considering

how

close the pistols

were to our heads. Now you know, boys, I'm not a coward, but I didn't like the was one of
'

The ride was by no means a quiet one, Mosby constantly taunted us Were you with Colonel with questions. Cole when I thrashed him at Upperville?'
'

his

first

queries, to which,

situation

'

just at the

moment.

I

recog- however, he got no satisfactory response.

nized the foremost of the three
into the

room

as Mosby, and I

was not apt to care where his and besides, the Captain and Lieutenant said that wasn't the only instance of a who accompanied him did not look as if rascal riding on an honest man's horse, they were given to straining the quality at which the Captain and Lieutenant Then Mosby began to brag of mercy. Upon their demand, therefore, laughed. that we should surrender, we signified 'Don't you Yanks, now, fear me more than immediate assent, but not without a pang the regular cavalry .?' 'How do you like that we were to lose our supper, which my style of fighting ? and a dozen other seemed all the more tempting now that questions were addressed to us in swift succession, showing how little of a hero they were beyond our reach. " Mosby, however, was anything but and how much of a braggart this fellow, depressed. Indeed, he was in the joUiest with all his feathers, really is. Of course humor possible, and indulged in all sorts we were mad; but we held our tongues of jokes at our expense. We didn't, how- as well as we could, and rode on with as
'

who came Then, after a while, he asked, 'What do knew he you think of my gray nag I took him from a Yankee Lieutenant.' Weatherbee bullets hit

We much apparent indifference as possible. " As we went along, frequent pauses worse scrapes, a great deal, than that, and we did not altogether were made at farm-houses along the road, despair of geting out some way or other. and at each, two or three recruits were " After helping himself to what supper secured for Mosby's gang. Nearly every he wanted, Mosby told us we must follow house appeared to have some friend of him to Paris, where he had his head- his in it. He would ride up to a place, quarters, and we accordingly went out, call Jim or Jake, tell them that he wanted watched by the Lieutenant, to get our men at such an hour at the usual place, horses, which were tied near the barn. and that they must tell Joe and Mose, Johnson, somehow, managed to give the and then would ride on, leaving his Lieutenant the slip, and instead of getting friends to come on at their leisure. A his horse, hid in a haystack, and so got good many of these fellows I had seen and all claimed to be Union off, Mosby not daring to wait and hunt before, him up lest some of our fellows should citizens Some of them, I know, had taken the oath of allegiance, and no doubt had pounce down upon him. "Well, Weatherbee and 1 mounted, in their pockets passes to come into our and under strict goiard we started for lines and go out whenever they chose. I
ever, lose our wits in our misfortune.
in

had been

\

!

"

'

44

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
" 'What's all this infernal

marked some of these chaps, and we must attend to them, boys, the first chance we can get. "Well, we got to Paris at last. I had marked the road pretty closely, thinking that maybe I might want to travel it some time and I was all the while on the look-out for some means of getting away. The chance came before I expected it. Mosby, as he came up to the house where he had his head-quarters, dismounted and
;

row about

.''

"We
him

were too

polite, boys, to

swear at

in return, as I just leveled at

him as

he stood in the door, sending a bullet
close to his ear,

out of sight.

and making him dodge Then what time we made

!

But we didn't leave without a benediction. As we flew away Weatherbee
shouted,
"
'

How
I

do you

like
.''

our

style of fight-

ing,

Colonel

Mosby

went

in,

leaving his pistols in his holsters.

"

And
'

sent back this parting cry

:

" Come and see us, boys, How my heart fluttered when I saw that My horse stood close by Mosby's, and New York Twenty -first.'

we're of the leaving one

were almost within my reach. But there sat the Lieutenant with his revolver in his hand, ready to shoot me down at the first imprudent movement. Caution was necessary. So, leisurely getting down, I pretended to tie my As I fumbled about the bridle I horse. saw out of one eye that the Captain was moving off, to look, as he said, for an orderly to take the horses. Mosby's horse was between the Lieutenant and myself. Here was a chance if I could only get the pistols, I might fight my way out. Suddenly I put my foot into the stirrup of Mosby's saddle, and laid hold of one But the Lieuof the shooting-irons. tenant saw the movement and fired. Fortunately his aim was bad, and he missed me. In an instant I was in the saddle and aiming straight at the felhis pistols
:

" So, lads,

we got away,
Mosby's
'

vacancy among
carrying with
pistols,

officers,

and
find

us his

gray nag,' saddle,

and over-coat.
in the tent
is

You

will

them
horse

— he

all

there, except

the

out yonder in the woods

Union provender, on which, if was brought up. "One good thing came out of our Mosby, as we learned during capture.
eating

Mosby

told the truth, he

our

ride,

and from

his

talk

with the

farmers, intended to attack Captain Gere
at daylight,

hoping to surprise and cut

him

to pieces.
little

that nice

Of course we spoiled plan by getting back in

time to give the Captain notice of what was going on, and enable him to make preparations
for

defense.
it,

Mosby

evi-

dently thought better of

and didn't

;

come."

low's heart, shot

how
the
the

excited

I

him dead. Heavens But I wasn't out of was
!
!

A

country

girl,

coming from the

field,

told

by

woods
fired
;

yet.

The Captain hearing
round instantly wide of the

her poetic cousia that she looked as fresh as a
daisy kissed with dew, said, " Well,
it wasn't any was Steve Jones that him that every one in town it

discharges, turned

and

but he, too, shot
all

fellow by that name, but

mark.

Mosby,

the door, shouting.

excitement, rushed to kissed me. I told would find it out?"

'^^Z^jm'ARJiy'oF THE REPUBLIC AL MANAC^
PATI\TOTISM.
tiger cat

45

have been

cut, to call the tiger

A

2ist, Discourse delivered at Gettysburg, July Republic, the Grand Army of the 1S78, be/ore

by

Rkv.

J.

F.

Covering,

Chaplain-in-ckief,

G. A. K.

Mercy and forgiveness are a° kitten. forvirtues; but mercy and Christian compromise and giveness do not mean Between loyalty and disconcession. between heaven and hell, loyalty, as
is

forgotten, nor

be own manhood, we dishonor the graves to honor It is of our dead, when we forget held as of secondary importance. nation, when by a single our duty the cause of the our duty; our Christian duty apologize for rest the word or look we seem to those upon whom must as exulveneration the patriotism which once sung its

The

be there lesson of patriotism must not

a deep

gulf.

We

shame our

must we

suffer

it

to

;

responsibility

of inculcating

for

of the bugle, and righteousness, gratitude temus in the notes gleam of sabres, and guardianship of its wrath with the for the guidance and command from the throat of God, and obedience to those uttered its Almighty
justice

flashed

principles

underlying -our nationaUty, it is which are the products of His law ; the most enthusiour duty to encourage There is a mawkish astic patriotism. speak sentimentalism which hesitates to above a whisper. of loyalty and patriotism rebellion by praising bravery
It

cannon.

September, folwhich gave us lowing the days of July

During the month
battle-field,

of

this

a

very

striking

phe-

condones
"

It finds

Black's not so

about 3 Suddenly, in the afternoon, of light fleecy a vast number of the bravery of o'clock, I have no question thenrolled up from the South, in regiments clouds those who once mustered of tinged with delicate shades so stoutly^ edges and brigades and fought the emerald amethyst and of our noble pearl and ao-ainst the noble defenders of the When light green tint forming on some They did fight bravely. " flag. beautiful fringe. For the tug cfouds a singularly Greek meets Greek, then comes singly or in long column, they were nearly an hour, all that But for of war." through the these clouds swept rapidly as Gen. wrong. "We may not forget," phenomenon had hardly Day in his open sky. This Butle'r said last Decoration and one more '' we may not forget passed when another eloquent oration In the deep took its place. a bad startling soldiers that they were good below where the sky touched the

With

keen, discriminating sight, black— nor white so very white."

I nomenon was observed in Virginia. warm the air day had been exceedingly leaf was was drv and motionless, not a silence was broken only stirring, and the life. insect by the drowsy hum of
;

he

i
1

;

m

valley

cause."

out from the South to South at the horizon, And I deem it to be a sacred duty the North, silently as if We have on towards keep this disthiction in mind. were mustering on the paradewith conscience. We ghosts no right to shuffle vast numo-round of the heavens, came claws of a rii^ht, because the

have^no

46
bers of

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
soldierly forms.

a surge wave of the Atlantic, lifting itself up with a power that seems irresistible, ade after brigade, they advanced, passed is dashed into spray upon the rock cliff in review and disappeared. Only a little Do they forget the heroic sacrifice that imagination was needed to clothe these sanctified their loyalty and patriotism ? shadowy presences in a common uniform, Perhaps even as the Apostle was encoma simple blouse and hat, but armed with passed round about with an innumerable no weapon, neither sabre or gun. For multitude, so to-day upon the heights, an hour this grand review took place, within the valleys, here in our midst, may then the sky was again clear a cool be the forces of those who once wore the breeze sprung up the earth brightened blue ay, and the forms of those who under the setting sun. All was still, as wore the gray, and who passing through if the mysterious tread of ghostly feet the fiery furnace of battle have been had brought a solemn sense of peace. purged from every taint of disloyalty and
I'latoon after

platoon, battalion after

battalion,

brig-

.''

;

;

;

What was a vision may be actual fact. rebellion. Certainly this is true that Here and now may be gathering about with a lesser use of the imagination than us a silent and unarmed multitude. On that which shaped the shadowy clouds the plains of Marathon, so a patriotic into soldierly presences, we may say faith taught the Athenian, those who had there are those living who are with us
once saved the land
battles,

—gathered on
to

certain
their

to-day

— parents
who gave
their

who gave
brothers,

their

sons,

anniversary occasions,

review

wives

their husbands, sisters

and to quicken in the hearts of Greece a love for country. Here once another summer brightened. I)o any here remember that day that day twice repeated when the sky quivered with the conflict that shook the earth when with the flashing of keen sabres, squadron mingled with squadron, and the shriek of rider and horse rent the air together

who gave

friends

who

gave, with heart-breaking farewells, their
nearest and dearest.

those

who

live

of the sacrifice

There are with us and who suffer because they have made in the

;

love of their

departed.

They

are with

us

;

and

if

with us only in thought, they

;

bear testimony to the import and value of the sacrifice by which the highest
Christian patriotism
is

when

the

booming

of artillery, the crash

confirmed.
of such sacrifice
?

of shell, the whirl of bullets of shot

and plunge

Are instances needed

were answered back, each hillside to the other giving echo when over these hills and valleys hung the thick sulphurous clouds lighted up by the lurid wrath of war ? Do you think the dead remem;

Where can we
heroic death?

look without greeting the

scene of some heroic exploit or of some

Yonder sounded

the cry

once, "On, to the

Round Top," and

the

dashed forward. Among them ber—that they recall the terrific charge; were three, united by ties of soldierly that they see again the valiant masses love. Round Top is gained. The ranks mown like corn. hurl themselvesforward, only tobe broken of the rebels are and shattered and thrown back, as when Shrapnel and shell do their fearful duty.
troops

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Together our three friends
separated for a

47

had kept,

tion

can

duplicate

ours.

In character

agam. Yes, and one falls with a gurgling cheer upon his lips; he motions feebly "Come near;'' he whispers, "I must send one message home." One of the survivors springs forwards, bends over
!

moment only to meet and in membership it is unique. Round Top is gained Gained? rades of the (31d Guard, veterans

Comof the

G. A. R.,

let

us hold true to our record

and stand firm for any emergency. Let every fight, from Bull Run to Gettysburg, from Gettysburg to Appomattgx, speak in our ready and firm resolution. When

him, but, as he tries to catch the whisper the
of
his friend, the

zip of
air,

hisses through the

command comes not the command a Minnie ball of any mortal leader, but the command and, struck to the of God uttering itself in the supreme

crisis-hour, when such comcheek they lie, and their dying thoughts mand calls us to face the Nation's foe greet each other while there beside whether that foe dare utter rebellious them sat the third, one hand grasping his words or do rebellious deeds, whether it
to
;

heart, the brother-in-arms falls.

Cheek

need of some

;

rifle,

the other laid

upon
tears

his tent-mate's,

seeks to steal by policy what was lost by
battle, or to kill

while

unconscious
in

furrowed

his

by the stealthy stab of the

swarthy, battle-stained face.

assassin what could not be done by hand-

another portion of the field is to-hand fighting let us be ready and body of a Union soldier. The obedient. If in any need of any day God their rayless, stony stare speaks to us by any servant of His will, eyes are open is set upon an ambrotype, the likeness of "Up, Guards, and at them!" let the The dying soldier, bugle sound, "Forward, the whole line " three little children. in his last moments, turned to thoughts of land with irresistible and overwhelming home, and while looking into the pictured impetuosity let the charge be made,
the dead
;
|
|

Here

!

faces of the

little

ones,

breathing with

I

Do
God.

this,

but do this in the
this,

name

of

his last breath a prayer for their protecj

Do

but do this in the spirit

all its joys and of Christian fidelity to the great Captain and its flag. of our salvation. Do this, but do this in Comrades of the Grand Army of the recognition of the significance of all the Republic by the toil of the march, by memories and duties and hopes assothe exposure of the camp, by the fiery ciated with this battle-field of Gettvsburg. " Glorious things are spoken of thee, baptism of battle, you have won the honor which cannot be taken from you, O City of God." Yes, "glorious things of being the Nation's defenders, the are spoken of thee, O City of God " O

tion,

surrendered

life

with

|

dutie3, for our country

:


!

veteran

soldiery

that

forms the color- Gettysburg.
This was the Nation's battle-field
Over Over Over Over
it

guard of the Union. None but those who have served in the Army or Navy during the late war can recruit our ranks. Ours is the
aristocracy of patriotisim
!

it it it

gathered the angry cloud, thundered the canno.i loud, glared the lightning's pain,
hurtled the leaden rain.

No

organiza-

— —

;

48 Look round
!

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
there once the squadrons dashed,
Tl-^e

Late

Ger\.

Pi:\il

Kearney.

And

once the sabres flashed; Hark! hear the echo from days of dread! "Forward! forward " o'er living and dead.
there, there

Philip Kearney was born in New York City on 2d June, 1815. He was born a
soldier,

and

in spite of the

wishes of his

This was the Nation's battle-field

:

On On On

redden'ed a crimson sod, agony prayed to God. it, amid the deadly strife,
it

it

The wounded shrieked

for death

—not

him to study law, enlisted in the First United States Dra goons, when quite a boy. His uncle then commanded them, and through his infamily,

who

desired

life.

Look round

!

there once the squadrons dashed

And
"

there, there once the sabres flashed.
!

he succeeded in obtaining a commission as Second Lieutenant. He was shortly afterward sent to Europe by
fluence the

Hark

Forward

hear the echo from days of dread, forward !" o'er living and dead.
!

Government

to

report
;

upon

the

cavalry tactics of

the French

and, the
several

What

is

the Nation's battle-field

?

better to inform himself, he

joined the

Valleys slumber in peace to-day;

Chasseurs d' Afriqiie, and
;

made

Round Top

smiles 'neath the Summer's ray

In the camp of the di.ad each silent grave Like a holy altar enshrines our brave.

The robin sings from the shattered tree. In meadow flower hums the honey-bee Her fields, once wet with a crimson stain,
;

Give

fruitful

promise of golden grain.

Such
God

is

the Nation's battle-field.

of our comrades!

we

praise thy

name;

Each hero " Dead on
Living
!

of thine

is

the heir of fame.

the field of honor!"
1

we

cry:

Promoted
Nation

is

Heaven's reply.
!

God

of the

!

bless thou our land

Speak from our Gettysburg thy command That in the future, as in the past,

campaigns with them in Algeria, winning golden opinions from the. officers for his gallantry and military skill. When the war broke out with Mexico, Phil Kearney accompanied the army as a Captain of Dragoons, whose equipments and horses he provided at his private expense. In the march from Vera Cruz to Mexico he won high honor, and was shortly afterward brevetted Major for his gallantry. At the San Antonio Gate, City of Mexico, he was ordered to charge a battery. He gave the order to charge. A murderous volley checked his advance, and caused
his

troop

to

waver.

Alone,

with

his

The law

of the right shall be law to the last;

That the crime of rebellion shall triumph never. But the flag of the Union float forever.

Amen

!

" I say, Dick, don't you think that if the women had to do the fighting instead of the men they would make sad work of it?" "No; why do you ask.'"' "Because I think they would, they have

such an engaging way with them." '-That's very true but they have also such a captivating way
;

that there

would

be, doubtless,

more prisoners

than killed."

sword erect, Philip Kearney dashed upon the enemy, and his men, electrified bv his example, charged and took the battery. In this affair Major Kearney lost an arm. After the Mexican war Major Kearney was sent to California, and commanded an expedition against the Indians of the Columbia River. He displayed during this campaign, as the annals of the War Department will prove, such tact, cool-

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
ness,

49

and courage
from

as

won him

the praise
\^'hen re-

My
"Cindy!"

Boy Ben.

of our best miUtary judges,

turned
returning

this

expedition,

Kearney resigned his Europe to

Major The girl leaned from the window of the commission, and room she was dusting. Fair and bluedevoted se\eral eyed, somewhat pretty, there was yet a
lurking something in her face that told

years to military studies.

During the Itahan campaign of 1859, Major Kearney served as vokuiteer aid to General Morris, a distinguished officer in the French army. The American aid made good use of the facihties offered

you she belonged to the subject race. "Yes, Ben," looking up and down the fragrant garden paths for the owner of the voice, and finally right down beneath the window, where he stood with a prun-

him during the
conclusion.

series of brilhant victories ing-knife in his
to

hand and some clippings

which brought the contest

a speedy from the
observing, trimming.

tall

flowering shrub he had been

He was

ever

studying

witli

imflagging zeal and ardor blood

each movement of the army.
future
this

He was

unconsciously preparing himself for his
position. At the conclusion of campaign the French officers, who

had witnessed with
Philip

delight the evidences

Nothing in his face to tell what darkened in his veins, unless it might be the spark that smouldered, as it were, in his full dark eye. He was tall and lithely made, his features aristocratic enough in mould for the most exacting taste, and he carried himself

and enthusiasm of like a prince in disguise. " It's true, Cindy, what I told you. Kearney, called the Emperor Napoleon's attention to the American Master Perry is only home on furlough. officer. His Majesty immediately be- He's taken a commission in the Richstowed upon him the Cross of the Legion' mond army. I saw his uniform hid away in the oak wardrobe, not half an hour of honor. When the news of the breaking out of ago. And the family is going back with first reached him when he goes. hideous rebellion this So it's good-by to Europe, Major Philip Kearney was resid- our chance if we don't take it pretty ing in Paris. He lost not a moment. soon."
of the military ardor
" What shall we do, Ben !" Cindy said, and was shortly afterward clasping her hands. appointed a Brigadier-General of the Ben reached up and pulled her ear In the army of down to the level of his lips. forces of New Jersey. the Potomac no officer has won higher "Take our chance to-night, if we care praise than General Kearney. General enough for it," he whispered "the Union M'Clellan is said to have wept when he lines are only six miles off." heard of his death, and to have said "But master will go after us," she "Who can replace Phil Kearney?"' answered, in the same breathless voice. " I know and they'd give us up to him, because he pretends to be Union. The CowARr:)'s "Arms." — His les^s.

He

hurried back to offer his services to

his country,

;

;

"

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
I can't

girl,

prove that he ain't. But, my with a load of sweet-potatoes, the other Wonder if those Yankee soldiers as Cindy and Ben. day. You'll put on a suit of Master Walt's, will see any resemblance between Captain and I shall wear Master Perry's uniform?" Littlejohn and his boy Ben ?" Cindy watched her lover, speechless Cindy drew back from Ben's triumphant

And

we

won't go

look, fairly aghast with the daringness of

with

admiration

;

too

much

bewildered,

the proposition.

indeed, to detect the fine sarcasm that

"Don't you be scared, Cindy, it ain't bad as to stay. And remember what that would be. How did your old mother die } and where's Jube ? and what was Lizzy whipped for ? Will you go ? " Cindy was crying bitterly. " Yes, oh
half so

underlay his
"

light speech.
!

The
"
?

devil

ha,

ha
this

!

the mischief does
rascal

ho, ho What mean, Ben, you
:

yes

!

It was Captain Perry himself, who had been listening some time among the branches of the tree under which they
little

"Get away
to-night,
_

as early as you

can then, stood, waiting for the night to get a
of

Walt's.

can
It

;

I'll

Master darker. He swung himself down now, Look as much like him as you and laid his hand lightly on Ben's be waiting at the bottom of the shoulder, almost convulsed with laughter

and

wear

a

suit

garden."

at the idea of his servant in his uniform,

was near midnight when the two met and pretending to pass for himself! "It means that I'm going to try again at the foot of the garden- Cindy Master Perry," said Ben, looking as much like the spruce young freedom. " Come, Cindy." student. Master Walt, as his clothes could quietly. He sprang from under Littlejohn 's make her, but shaking with fear till her hand, and darted down the avenue. teeth chattered. Poor Cindy was too frightened to Ben she at first took for Master Perry himself, and was for running back to the move, and let Master Perry take her house when he stopped her. Ben's eyes back to the house without the faintest flashed like the buttons of his master's show of resistance. Master Perry was very angry by this uniform. " Do I look enough like him to pass time but he did not offer to pursue the for him, Cindy ? " he asked, drawing fugitive.
;

" The scoundrel " he muttered. " I'll Ben." go over to the Union camp after him " Then I am him, Captain Perry Little- to-morrow ; and 1 don't think he'll ever john, of the Confederate service re- try it again after I've given him a certain member, Cindy and you're my boy practical illustration of the consequences Jube, and I'm going to desert to the old of such impertinence. Won't the Yankees curse them when they flag I never wanted to fight against. stare, though That's about what I heard a deserter find that, instead of CajDtain Littlejohn,

himself up.

!

"You

look like his very

self,

tell

'em when

I

went

to the L^nion

camp

deserter, they've only got

my

slave-boy.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Ben
?

SI

They're just soft enough to swal- Colonel Manning, amused and perplexed
both, sent a
file

The uniform became him wonderfully, having already snuffed a few^ hours of however, it seemed that nothing could free air he carried himself several inches save him. taller than usual, and looked so handTrue to his word, Master Perry went some and dignified withal, that it was over to the Union camp in the morning much easier believing Littlejohn " my to claim his slave. He had rested very boy Ben," than Ben himself. " You certainly resemble each other," contentedly overnight, in the belief that he would experience no difficulty in said Colonel Manning; to the slave obtaining possession of him, and his claimant, " and really. Sir, where master meditations were chiefly of the punish- and slave so strongly resemble each ment necessary to prevent such imper- other, really
| 1

low that imposition." Cindy listened to him, shuddering. She had often heard Ben say he would never live to be whipped and some instinct of this in the family had hitherto spared him such ignominy. Now,
;

of

men

after the mysteri-

ous Captain.

Ben came
like

into the presence, looking

a Major-General, at the very least.

Ben was very spirited; He hesitated, still between amusement he knew that well enough but all the and real perplexity, while Littlejohn more reason why his spirit should be colored angrily.
tinence in future.
;
[

broken.

i

"Do
"

"A

fellow

representing
.-"

himself

as

feeling for his

Captain Littlejohn, deserted from the Confederate service " repeated the
officer

you mean to insult me, sword but Ben had By no means, Captain."
;

Sir.^*"
it.

to

whom
"Why,

Littlejohn
yes, I believe

presented the

Ben, at too great a distance to hear conversation, was regarding his
indescribable copied from the most apspecimens of Southern chivalry
air,

himself.

got such a
though,
gated.

man

till

Do

we have He's under guard, the matter can be investiyou know any thing about
here.

quondam master with an
ferocious

proved he had ever seen.
singular claim to

him

?

" Captain, this gentleman lays a very

Littlejohn laughed.

"I ought
is

to,

seeing I'm

Cap

ahem

The bogus Captain
sentence

interrupted

the

Littlejohn myself, and the fellow you hesitating

with

a

ferocious
:

Ben, done up in scowl, and then laughing lightly, said •'You are facetious, Colonel, hal ha! uniform the fellow got to call my boy Ben, this gentleman." hold of somewhere."

have got

my

— ahem —

only

my boy

in a

Here was a situation Which was somewhat "My boy Ben," or was either? The There were some Colonel began to look cloudy, vaguely more coherently. quicksands in the vicinity of that uniform, suspecting that he was being made the and victim of some family hoax. but he floundered through them

"What?"

!

Littlejohn repeated his story

:

:z-ii

"

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
other

"Gentlemen," he began, "I see no enough, for nothing more was heard of way but to place you both under him till the following day toward noon. arrest till this matter can be properly Meanwhile, next morning, a little
before
light,

investigated."

a

blue-eyed,
calling
into

fair-faced

"Come

to inform against

me

as a rebel,

young

woman
struggling

herself

Cindy,

eh? " said Ben, slave wit getting ahead of
the gentlemanly instinct on the other side. " began Littlejohn "You, rascal

came
and

the

Union camp,

fell

fainting with terror at the foot

;

of the compassionate picket

who

hailed

but Colonel Manning informed him that her. A slight examination showed that personal invective could not be indulged it was probably not altogether terror
there, the Captain

showed himself
no Captain;

quite

made

the girl faint.

Her
;

shoulders were

she had been an whipped for trying to run away. That outrage, Colonel Manning a deliberate was evident enough. outrage! We all know what Yankee soldiers are " Why, Ben, what game are you up to in such a case. One of those who stood now ? The cleverest joker you ever saw. there and heard poor Cindy's story had Colonel," the real Ben said, with an air dabbled in law before he became a solthat staggered Littlejohn himself. dier, and was consequently dubbed " the He managed Colonel Manning tried to smile, but it lawyer" by his co.nrades. was hard work, the whole affair was so somehow to get speech with Captain and the consebewildering. And he had grown more Littlejohn alias Ben and more suspicious that he was being quence was, that when Colonel Manning, hoaxed somehow. His sentiments con- having pondered the matter, had that
bruised

the most a gentleman of the two.

and lacerated

"Captain?

he's

this is

;

cerning the contrabands were peculiar, curious case of " My boy Ben " up again somebody might have hit upon this plan in the morning, Ben, looking as much
to test them.
like

He
rious

accordingly, as the simplest
pair

way Colonel

a Major-General as ever, told the with dignified courtesy that if he

out of the dilemma,

both

under

present.

ordered the myste- would permit him (Ben) to say a few arrest for the words and ask a few question, he would prove entirely to his satisfaction which of

Southern temper was scarcely able to the two was really Captain Littlejohn. itself then, and sputtered and Colonel Manning assented, and Ben fumed vehemently, but in vain. Ben proceeded " If even I were the slave of this man marched away with his chuckling guard like a conquering hero. calling himself Perry Littlejohn, has not A messenger was dispatched to the the United States Congress passed a law
contain
:

Littlejohn family mansion

when Master

Perry got cool enough to suggest such a " Then, sir, this matter is easy of setBut the messenger must have lost his way, though it was plain tlement. For the easier arrangement of
proceeding.

?" confiscating the slaves of all rebels has passed such a law." "Congress

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
it I

53

am

willing to

acknowledge that
Perry Littlejohn
confiscated

I
;

was
but
is

T]:\ar\ksgivir\g.

the

property of

"

What

have

soldiers

in

hospital,

having in
a rebel,

my
I

possession proof that he

writhing in pain, or tossing in fever, to

am now

to the

United States. This uniform, you will find, if you wish to test the matter, fits that gentleman better even than myself. I took it from his wardrobe the night I came here. In this pocket of it you will find his commission, under rebel signaEy ture, as an officer in the rebel army. sending to his father's house and examining his father's private papers you will find ample proof that he is also a rebel. Till you have ascertained these circumstances to be as I represent them. Colonel, I shall await with hope that judgment

be thankful for? The day is a humbug. Keep it.' No, I've not kept it." A strong man shorn of his strength spoke, but it was no Delilah answering. " Many a poor soldier wear}^ with pain and agony has found cause for thankfulness ; some trifling deed of pity or word of sympathy has stirred his heart to
gratefulness.

Suffering generally

bles

men

to recognize

they disdain in
health."

humand accept what the pride and glory of
in

which makes
his slavey

me

either a free

"Yes, you women get us and then crow." man or " Victor, what malice !"

your power

" It is true ; then tell us to be thankful. Perry Littlejohn, Esq., had very little For what ? for mamied, crippled bodies, or rather he had much, but it for useless arms, for paralytic legs ?" to say was of little avail. The pale face grew paler, and a scornful His father, coming to claim Cindy, was smile gleamed out of restless, eager eyes. " Oh, Victor detained till a sort of investigating comthe battle is Victor mittee could be sent to his house. but half fought, the glory only half won

!

!

proved that Ben had told when you utter these thoughts. Colonel Manning being Victor partially raised himself, leaning very exact in such matters, the Littlejohn on one arm and speaking haughtily. " If you think I implied regret at gi slaves fulfilled the letter of the law, and became confiscated. my mite to this war you are wholly mis-

The

result
;

the truth

ancl

day,

They had a wedding in camp the next Ben and Cindy were married.
Margaret Fuller To make our women
While
or\

taken, ^vlargaret." " No, no I did not
!

mean

that, believe

Worqen.

me

;

but
I

it is

right for all to

be thankful,
of

and

meant you had not gained one

sea captains,
sea,

Miss Margaret Fuller wrestles, scripture sends them all to And calls them weaker vessels;
sure
it

the direct purposes of suffering."
*' Pray what is that?" Margaret's head drooped as she ans-

The matter

is

very plain,

No
And

evidence

lacks,

wered, " Gratitude for having shared in even
the least degree that which was endured for us all by our Master."

They

specially its clear to me, 're very fit for " smacks."

Cambridge.

54

GRAND ARMY OF HIE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Victor's voice

had lowered before he

The

fairest little being,

robed

in

pink

danced in and thrust her curly " I am no Carmelite, Margaret, nor pate clown on her brother's arm, chatterone of those who believe that mere bodi- ing all the while. " You have kept Madge ever so long ly pain can make us like the Divine One" But it can help it can indeed.'' isn't she a darling" " What is that she wears on her neckShe was so afraid to speak of these things that she dared not say all she was lace, Josey ?' thinking. She wanted to assure him that "A cross, a pearl cross; Madge, let a better appreciation of the great sacrifice him see it !" " Don't ask her, Josey. lay in his power than in hers, rejoicing She is angry but dif- with me. as she was, in health and vigor Is that the way you women ferent leaven had been working in his wear crosses made of pearls and hung on mind, for he suddenly resumed again in a golden chain How heavy they must
reiolied,

tarlatan,

;

;

.''

his cutting ironical tone

:

be!"
" Stop, Victor, stop,

" Ah,

it is

easy to preach of thankful-

ness in purple and fine linen to the ragged, beggarly horde
devoutly, and
oft"
!

Madge has

gone, and

you are outrageous. I shall go too

;

You have heard but
little

look at the buttons in
!

my

ears.''

the sermon to-day, you ha\e given thanks

that

I

farther —stand a you — you are going may look

" Petite sauvage

why make

holes in
?''

now

such

little

pink sea-shells of auriculas

at

" I don't

know what you mean.

I

to the

sumptuous dinner

;

but you do not army button ear-rings to match
bracelet,

this

wear army

and they are lovely. is to be cajoled. I wonder who will But, Vic, I wish yon had your dear old whisper the most tasteful, delicate flat- leg again so we could have a redowa teries who will offer the most poetic and how splendidly you used to lead the Oh, it is too bad draughts, spiced carefully for such dainty German I shall lips Let me see. The sheen of your just cry." " And make your eyes read. I silk dazzles must shade my weak Oh no, and the lace [osey come, dance off with yourself. vision it is Aery beautiful Who's to be there ?" at your throat, how soft and downy " Everybody." the rose, you call it a ruche, I believe "Tell me who Margaret dances with." too, in your hair is red, rosier than your " She won't dance in war times, she fair face, red as the blood \ have seen on " She came up Isn't she old fogy. says. battle-fields " Madge Madge where are you ? to me the other night and said the music Come out of tliis dungeon. We are ought to be funeral marches instead of waiting for you. What are you two giddy waltzes." "Was that after I came home.''" crooning over? Victor, you look as sour " No, before and you know how magLook at me am I not as green grapes. nificently she plays. Well, she would bewitching See, I am oi iTiilitairc.
care for the viands, your esthetic palate button

;

!

!

!

;

;

;

!

!

;

;

.-'

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
it She has tightened the rein adagio of one of Beethoven's symphonies, the bit cuts at every pull but I am or something else so sad that we could venging myself. I hurt her nicely
!

55
till

not touch the piano except to give us the found

;

reto-

hardly keep from tears
Vic.

;

but

I

must go,

night.

She's a good

little

Christian,

and

don't get blue here all does not like to be thought a Pharisee." suppose you would rather have A little table stood near with convena book than my delectable society?" ient trifles. A book of larger type caught " " Oh yes, chatter-box adieu his eye, Mrs. Browning's " Last Poems."
;

Good-bye
I

alone.

;

!

The
away
;

light steps

danced down the

hall

;

other steps and other voices echoed, died
the carriage wheels rolled
off,

and
print

silence reigned.

Victor took up his book

;

the

was too
linquish

fine
it,

;

so he was obliged to re-

wishing he had some one to

read aloud to him. Margaret had so often read to him that the words began
to

opened of itself, as if it knew the hand accustomed to hold it (not Victor's), at the hundred and seventy-eighth page. Down the tenth, ele\-enth, and twelfth verses was scored lightly a pencil mark. For one vivid moment he knew what one woman had suffered in all the dreary time of his silent imprisonment in Richmond, and like an avenging weapon
It

bear more clearness and power from those verses cut in deeply. He tried to any other, but he had shake it off he tried to think some other provoked her now. It was not a pleasant hand had opened these pages so often reverie in which he was indulging alone, that the leaves fell apart at this one place.
her voice than
;
;

he who had prided himself on his independence and manly strength. But he did not regret having spoken as he did to Margaret ; it rather satisfied him to resent kindness and patience with cool sarcasm it was his masculine protest against forbearance and gentleness. " Thankful, grateful I have no need, I wish to have no need for such words. Has she not left me all alone here to gnash my teeth at fate, to ponder over my uselessness and miserable good-for-nothingness, while she dances off to a dinner a Thanksgiving dinner And wliy should she not go What does
crippled, feverish, restless
;
;

He knew

better

;

and knowing

it,

self-

reproach added to his dreariness. His bell rang so furiotisly that the servant
feared some accident and rushed breathlessly in.

"

return,

Did the ladies say when they would Joanna ?" "No, sir; but not until late Yw\ sure,

sir."

" Ask them when they come no, you need not either. Bring me a glass of

water."
" Yes, sir."

"i

He

was very

restless

and

feverish,

and

.''

lay with closed eyes as quick steps indi-

me that she should deny herself cated Joanna's return. But the step was any plca.sure } Nothing. To be sure I lighter, and a cool hand laid softly on once told her I was fool enough then his brow made him start. that no other woman in the world had A quiet figure in gray merino, with so great a sway o\'er my actions con- only a blue bow knotted under the linen
she owe

;

S6
collar,

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
stood near him

She knew not what he meant and though she had determined not to be " I thought you had gone !" was the weak, tears would come just one pashalf-impatient exclamation. sionate outburst, which she quelled " I changed my mind at the last mo- proudly the moment they were shed. But he saw them, and drew her toward ment." "To heap coals of fire on my head, I his couch. " This is the way I have to sue for suppose." "Victor, drink this water; you have pardon, lying helpless, maimed for life, fever ; don't talk." I had rather you had killed me, Margaret, than force me so to love you that I "I must." "Not now; let me read." She had can not longer hide it. Oh, Margaret, opened a book, and crouched down on a Margaret, it was cruel I, who shall low ottoman, her face shaded by her never ask any woman to be my wife." hand, began to read. Margaret put out her hand very coolly. The voice was " Good-night, Victor." like a chime of low, sweet bells, but they " Must you go ? seemed to jangle in Victor's ears. He Then I am mistaken. tossed and turned, and finally put out his I hoped you cared for me, Margaret, in spite of my detestable behaviour." hand and grasped the book. " Pardon me, Margaret." "Yes, I must go, Victor." " It has been very tiresome for you "Shall I go away, Victor.'" here, Margaret, listening to my folly." "Yes." " No, I did not care to go out." There was not a tinge of sentiment or Her perfect indifference at last ensadness in her words, but they were very raged him, as she knew it would. calm and low. " You seem to be in no way moved at " I only came because I saw you were worse and needed recreation," rising as my misery. I did not know you were so cold and heartless." she spoke. " What would you have me say ?" " Do you call this recreation .'"
thick, drooping,
;

wavy

curls hid her eyes.

;

!

'

"No,
harm."
"

it

is

very evident I have done

''

Drop some
the

delicious grains of pity
pill

;

sweeten
phrases."
" I "

bitter

with

honeyed

He was

More than you can repair, Margaret." not now speaking satirically,

and she looked at him with amazement. " You have made me break a resolution so strong that it was nearly a vow." "I Victor?" "Yes, you, with your calmness and womanly gentleness, your terrible malignity."

very sorry this has happened." is a cant expression. You are generally original."

am

But that

She was silent again, and moved toward the door. He detained her, grasping her hand.
" Among all your thanks to-day can you spare a little forgiveness ?" " For what .?"

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

57

" For my rudeness and harshness." For a moment or two his pale face His voice was gentle again. worked. It was hard for him to make "There is more to forgive than that." the attempt he had almost sworn not to " I dare say bnt I am in earnest. do so hard, that for a moment he Don't go yet. Do you forgive me faltered. ''No!" firmly, softly, but emphatiBut the temptation was irresistable. cally. and he saw that nothing else would " And why not Is my sin so hein- compel Margaret to answer, so he spoke ous ?" " Margaret, will you be my wife " The man is not a brave one who tells " Yes, Victor," came the answer, a woman he loves her but will not ask clearly spoken. her to be his wife." " The wife of a cripple " Margaret!" She crushed the words with a kiss. She went on as indifferently and coolly For a long while there was stillness,
;

.''"

.-'

:

.''"

.-'"

as

if discussing some novel. " It is not brave, nor is it honest, for

Victor clasping tightly Margaret's hands
as
if

afraid she

he may have won
strange way."
"

her
let

love

in

some place

of the pain

But she should

on his him know," said pressive

would elude them, but in and feverish irritability features was a look of very excontent.

Victor, half amazed and half amused. " true woman's self-respect is a bar-

A

rier to

that."

Margaret's tears were so nearly falling that it was some time before she could ask Victor what he was thinking of, so

" Victor bit his lip. " cripple, doomed to drag a footless

A

unusual was his silence. " Keeping my Thanksgiving at
rej^ly.

last,"

him all his life, has no right was the to ask a young and beautiful, no, nor an old and ugly, woman to be his wife." stump
after

MY

BOY.

" "

Who

has laid down that law
is

?"

A

true man's self-respect

the bar-

ROSE TERRY.
being,
I

rier."

Margaret glanced up, a of a smile playing over her features. "It is a dead-lock, Victor." " It shall not be, Margaret, if you just stoop down here a moment."
"

Every human very sunbeam some trait, or
of their
will

believe,

has

expression,

or
is

power

peculiar to themselves, that

the seal

own

individuality.

I

begin with

in

such a "credo," because it is necessary order to explain the peculiar but

What

for ?"

faithfully true incident I

have

to narrate

specialty. Now I have both your hands ; tell I do not Everybody confides me, do you, dare you love me V There was no answer, and her curls mean that they trust, or love, or ask bnt something in my drooped over her face. He repeated the help from me mental or moral nature seems to lay a question, but she would not reply.

"

that

I

should confess

my own in me
!

;

"

:

58
spell,

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
even on strangers
;

have favored " (as we say in Connecticut), a most certain gravity and sadness on the long had personal histories of delicate nature, things I would scarcely uncomely feature, the prominent mouth tell my sister, poured into my ears by set firmly, the cool eyes looking straight persons I had not knowrx ten days. forward, the hands dropped, nothing This curious and often embarrassing gift more attractive in the visage than a of mine was never more strongly ex- steady expression one could scarce emplified than one day, about a month imagine that even a mother's eye could ago, when I was walking up the broad find it pleasant to look on. There bright streets of my native city. she I looked from the picture to her could have been nothing in my face to was a middle-aged, common-place lookattract confidence, for I was very tired, ing woman, well and neatly dressed in full of care and anxiety, and hastening deep mourning, evidently from the home without even a glance at the country her whole face stirred with people I met, when suddenly a woman suppressed feeling. I had to say somestepped before me and said, in a peculiar thing so I spoke

and

I

the

;

;

;

excited tone " Do you want to see
:

"

my boy
and
!

"
?

is in the army?" "He's dead!" I

He

My wits
thought, "
don't

are rather quick, thanks to long
at
it

despair of giving these two words in
;

training in emergencies,

once

I

A

crazy person

take

coolly,
I said

with

show her you know it." entire composure and
yes,

So
a

certain

degree of suavity, quite unsurprised.

"Oh

where
is,

is

he?"

"There he
out of
door.
I

said she, indicating with

the tip of her parasol one daguerreotype

some hundred, that filled a large showcase leaning against the side of a
looked, expecting to
see some fat and bare armed, with a

I did not know that one phrase be so overburdened with expression. I felt at once that there was only one fact in the world to her, only one possessing and transfusing agony idea that could not recognise any thing in life but itself that even knew not in its blind rage, whether she spoke or thought; intent to careless of forms or persons speak as a severed artery is to bleed, The yet simply instinctive in doing so. very dynamic force of her anguish made

print

could

;

;

urchin, ruffled

it

utter itself in words.

I was like one I was struck dumb. whip or an apple, looking crosser than for I blundering into a foreign tongue, what life and more stolid than nature had jumped to the feminine conclusion could I say ? I stammered out a blunt
;

that this strange appeal

maternal pride in

was a burst of inquiry " Was he shot ? some simple soul, " Shot at Bull Run and they brought altogether carried away by the depicted beauties of her baby but I saw instead him home." "You had him with you then? " a young man's figure, dressed in uniform;
:

:

a thoroughly

New England

face,

" hard-

"

Oh

yes

!

He was

just

through

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
College.

59

going to be a died, he was so good; he was all the Why son I'd got, and I thought he'd grow up the President said at his funeral it was a to be a comfort to me, and everybody mysterious Providence." spoke well of him? he'd have done a "P)ut it was splendid to have him die great deal more good if he'd lived I
!

The

best boy

minister

;

so good and so smart.

for his country," said

I.

I had said it I could have know God always does right, tongue for offering to this if it does seem hard now," said I, in broken heart such oratorical stuff as despair of making my way gradually to that. She took no notice of it. these heights, that are the very citadel of

As soon

as

can't see it " But you

— and he's dead!"

;

bitten

my

"He was so good knew so much if the soul, and which one instinctively he had lived he would have done so shrinks from entering without cautious much more all his life, and he's approach. She turned round upon me dead." with a mingled look of weariness and She faced round upon me with these anger. " Did you ever lose a son in the war .?" last words till I felt imbecile again. " Was he sorry he went " said I. said she, almost fiercely. " No he thought he ought to. I asked That appeal cowed me at once, for I him when he was a-d3ang, if he could felt all it implied ; my tongue faltered Why, and my heart slunk away before hers, as forgive the man that shot him. mother says he, I haven't anything I said faintly. against him, he didn't mean to shoot me "No."
: :

!

'

!

'

*

specially

to fire his

ought to

"Then you don't know anything about suppose he thought he ought gun as much as I thought I it ; it's no use for you to talk. I can't I could shake hands have it so fire mine. I tell you he's dead !
;

I

!

with him now."

she caught the eye of a friend, and turned to speak to her. hero for your son," I could not have I "He's dead," was all she said, with made my escape. dreadful iteration; the tears running over borne another minute the sight of her I have never seen her since her eyelids, without her consciousness grief. apparently, and her whole face as still though I found out her name and her with intensity as the band of a wheel dwelling-place, and if ever I go through that moves so fast it seems to stand that pretty river town I will ask about still. her, most surely, for I never can forget
Just

here

"You had

a real

blessed

I, "you are a her or her son. Yet strange to say as have made such a I walked away from that interview, sacrifice to your country ; I wish day stunned and dumb, only these words and night I had a man to send to the kept reiterating themselves in my mind " " For God so loved the world, He war, and I haven't one This was equally unheeded she went gave his only-begotten Son." on "I can't see why he should have

"But

after

all,"

said

woman

to

:

!

;

6o
Pl:\il.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
S}\eridan Riding to the Front
victory

the

cavalry, he rode to the front, took

hat and waved it, while a cheer went up from the ranks not less hearty 1864, at Cedar Creek, surpassed in and enthusiastic than that which greeted interest the victory gained precisely one him after the battle of Winchester. Genmonth earlier at Winchester. It was a erals rode out to meet him, officers waved victory following upon the heels of their swords, men threw up their hats in apparent reverse, and therefore reflect- an extremity of glee. General Custer, ing peculiar credit on the brave com- discovering Sheridan at the moment he mander to whose timely arrival upon the arrived, rode up to him, threw his arms field the final success of the day must be around his neck, and kissed him on the cheek. Waiting for no other parley attributed. The (leneral was at Winchester in the than simply to exchange greeting, and early morning when the enemy attacked to say, 'This retreat must be stopped!' fifteen milts distant from the field Sheridan broke loose and began galof operations. General Wright was in lopping down the lines, along the whole command. The enemy had approached front of the army. Everywhere the under cover of a heavy fog, and flanking enthusiasm caused by his appearance the extreme right of the Federal line, was the same." held by Crook's Corps, and attacking The line was speedily re-formed in the centre, had thrown the entire line provost-marshals brought in stragglers into confusion, and driven it several by the scores ; the retreating army miles. The stragglers to the rear were turned its face to the foe. An attack fearfully numerous, and the enemy was just about to be made was repulsed, pushing on, turning against the Federals and the tide of battle turned. Then a score of guns already captured from Sheridan's time was come. Cavalry them. charge was ordered against right and This was the situation a little before left flank of the enemy, and then a noon when Sheridan came on the grand advance of the three infantry field, riding, says one of his staff, so corps from left to right on the enemy's that the devil himself could not have centre. "On through Middletown," says kept up. A staff-officer meeting him the correspondent above quoted, " and pronounced the situation of the army beyond, the enemy hurried, and the Army to be " awful." of the Shenandoah pursued. The roar " Pshaw," said Sheridan, "it's nothing of musketry now had a gleeful, dancing It's all right, or we'll fix it sound. of the sort. The guns fired shotted salutes !" right of victory. Custer and Merritt, Sheridan hastened to his cavalry on charging in on right and left, doubled " Galloping past the up the flanks of the foe, taking prisoners, the extreme left.
off his

The

gained,

on October

19,

;

batteries," says the W^^/-/^/ correspondent,

slashing,

killing,

driving as

they went.

" to the extreme

left of

the line held

by The march

of

the

infantry was

more

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
more terrible. The lines swayed and broke before it every where. Beyond Middletown, on the battle-field fought over in the morning their columns were completely overthrown and disorganized. They fled along the pike and over the fields like sheep." Thus on through Strasburgh with two brigades of cavalry at their heels. Two thousand prisoners were gathered together, though there was not a sufficient guard to send them all to the The guns lost in the morning rear. were recaptured, and as many more taken, making fifty in all, and, according to Sheridan's veport, the enemy reached Mont Jackson without an ormajestic and
of the foe

6i

A

I\ecollectior\ of Gettysburg.]

A
inns,

few days after the dreadful battle

of Gettysburg,

when more than twenty

thousand badly wounded
the

men

filled the

churches, the

private

homes,
sheds,

the farm-houses, the barns, the

the extemporized canvaS-hospitals, which

made

that

fair

region
I

boundless misery,
field-hospitals

went

a spectacle of out to the
corps,

of the

third

four

miles

ganized regiment. The scene at Sheridan's headquarters
at night, after the battle, was wildly ex" General Custer arrived about citing.

The first thing he did was to o'clock. hug General Sheridan with all his might, lifting him in the air, whirling him around " By guish. and around, with the shout One woman, young and fair, but grave we've cleaned them out and got the Catching sight of General and earnest, clothed in purity and mercy, gims!" the only woman in the whole vast Torbert, Custer went through the same moved in and out of the hospital proceeding with him, until Torbert was camp Inhere, there, old tents, speaking some tender word, giving forced to cry out " some cordial, holding the hand of a dying fellow don't capture me Sheridan's ride to the front, October boy, or receiving the last words of a I can 10, 18G4, will go down in histor)' as one husband for his widowed wife; of the most important and exciting never forget how, amid scenes which,
:

from town, where twenty-four hundred wounded men lay in their tents, a vast camp of mutilated humanity. Who can ever describe, or would wish to describe if he could, the various and horrible forms of injury represented in victims of that the persons of the But amid glorious and decisive fight all their sufferings, an air of triumph animated the pale faces of those ranks No of heroes, even on their dying beds. murmurs mingled with the sighs of their exhaustion or the groans of tb'^'.ir an!

,

'

:

!

;

'

events which have ever given interest to under ordinary circumstances, no woman a battle-scene and to this event will be could have appeared in without gross
;

Says indecorum, the holy pity and purity of attributed the victory of the day. General Grant, " Turning what bid fair this angel of mercy made her presence
to

be a disaster into a glorious victory seem as fit as though she had indeed stamps Sheridan what I always thought dropped out of heaven. The men themof him, one of the ablest of Generals." selves, sick or well, all seemed awed and

62
purified

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
had at length got to work among them, and limbs just cut off, (one I recollect, with the heavy shoe and stocking still upon it,) lay in dreadful carelessness, in
fullview, about the place.

by such a resident among them. Separated from the main camp by a shallow stream, running through a deep ravine, was a hospital where, with perhaps fifty of our own men, more than two

Having exhausted the little store of wounded rebels had been placed. Under sudden and violent comforts we had brought with us, one of rains, this shallow stream had "in a few the sufferers said to Miss G., " Ma'am,
hundred
hours
several
less

swollen

to

such a torrent as ac- can't you sing a
I'll

little

hymn 1"

"

O

yes,

tually to

sweep away, beyond recovery,

sing you a song that will do for either
in the

of

wounded men who lay, thought- side;" and there, any new peril, sleeping on its band of neglected
earnestness, her

midst of that
pity
to
is

sufferers, she stood,

banks.

For three days the flood kept at an unfordable height, and the wretched hospital of the rebels was cut off from medicine and supplies by the impossibility of reaching it. A brave young
repeatedly

and with a look of heavenly
eyes
raised

and God,

sung,

— " When

this cruel

war

over,"

in a clear, pleading voice, that

made me

lieutenant

swam

the torrent

with a bag of medicines and small comforts in his

tion that

mouth, the only communicawas had meanwhile. Accompanied by the young woman above named, I found my way, at the

earliest

moment

possible, to the unwill-

ingly neglected scene.

The place was

a

barn and stable. Every foot of it was occupied by a wretched sufferer, clad usually in the ragged gray of the rebel uniform. Those above in the barn might almost be said to be in heaven, as compared with those below it the stable, who might with equal truth be For upon heaps of said to be in hell. dung, reeking with rain, and tormented
with vermin, their

remove my hat, and long to cast myself Sighs and groans upon my knees ceased and while the song went on pain seemed charmed away. The moment it stopped, one poor fellow, who had lost his right am, raised his left and said, " O, ma'am, I wish I had my other arm back, if it was only to clap you." In that barn a noble matron from Philadelphia was doing her utmost for those two hundred wounded prisoners. She had been with them all the time, using such scanty means as she could
!

;

master to alleviate their misery. I reto Gettysburg and sent out a heavy wagon load of supplies, food, medicines, and clothing, to those poor
turned
wretches
that
night.

What was my

wounds

still

undressed, surprise, only last week, on visiting our

and many longing for amputation, as the rooms at Washington, to find this noble happy long for food or drink, lay fair lady there, with a face fuller of anguish and noble youth, with evidences of than any of those she had ministered to She had at gentle breeding in their fine-cut features, in that place of torment. and hunger, despair, and death in their her home in Philadelphia, yesterday, The surgeon received from her son, in the army of bright and hollow eyes.

GRAND ARMY oF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
the Potomac, a telegraphic despatch, " " Mother, I am to be shot on Wednes- "

63

day next, under a charge of desertion."

What sort of a wife The laist ye say av' Cap'tn twan't much
;

did

you
's

get ?"

her
of

the best,
I
if

a courtin'

Knowing
and

the

groundlessness
haste

of

the had," he continued.

"Belike 'twas as

I wint to-night to a wake ye know I thought so an' toand awful what that be military discipline, it morrow night I'd be in front of a Praste, necessities of seemed only too probable that her boy, the Lord help me." " How did you like " How for some venial ^ffence, was really, in your wife .?" said the captain.

charge, in any intent of her faithful son,
yet, the

dreadful

.''


"^

— —

a

few

hours, to lose his

precious

life

did

I

like

her

As

a well

man

likes

by a disgraceful death!
the mother's spirit
in the son's guilt.

We

had known

medicine.

Be-gorra, the

way she

liked

too well

interposition

with

to believe me was to get three hundert an' sivintyDirect and earnest five dollars av' me bounty, and that's the the President was last I see av' her, an' be the same takin

made from our
•ment
of

office

for

a

postpone-

it 's a-ll

I

want

to."

"

I

shall take

warn-

the

sentence and a
that

new

trial.

ing from what you say, Paddy, and be

to get married," said Dr. H. doubtless unjust sentence, for his moth- " Och, Docther, that 's not the way ; er's sake, and because she had loved 'twould be like stoppin' up all the little

The boy was saved

sudden and careful not

much

her son was forgiven.

springs becase one

man dhrounded
's

him-

H. W.
Jottir\gs

B.

self in the say.

There
;

betther luck for
av' them good wife

the likes av' yese

I

wouldn't be demanall

from

tl^e

Battle Field

ing meself spaking agin'
the


is

wimmen,

I

mean."

A

\From Chaplain Lovering's Note Bouk.\

a

blessing,

an'

the worst gets one, av'

from Massachusetts, for they look out." " I'm afraid after what He feels bound, you've said that I've not the courage to therefore, whenever opportunity presents try." Och, Docther, don't be downitself, to stand up for the Old Bay State. hearted 'twas the bewilderment of the One night Capt. Perry, in order to start whiskey that make the thruble wid me " Well, Paddy, what about an' there's no danger av' that wid you. him, said " Be-gorry, Shure an't you a temperance man tell Massachusetts these days .'" " Yqx all that, I might an' she's all right," was his hearty reply. me that now ? "Let me see," continued the Captain, in n>ake a mistake, so I'll be contented as I "You enlisted am." Paddy's face fell. He was silent a hesitating manner: "Thrue for you that for a while, watching the Doctor out of there, didn't you.?" "And you were married there, the corner of his eye. At last he heaved I did." "Thrue for you agin," a profound sigh, and looking at me, wern't you.'"' " Chaplain, is the Doctor in arnest, " an' that same said said Paddy, with a sigh " He soems to be," I said. wer' the worst job I iver had in Massa- d'ye think ?" doubtfully, chusetts, an' that wer' me own fault." "Well, thin," said Paddy,
hails

Patrick

'twas there he " 'listed."

;

;

:

;

:

!

64
there
's

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
one

woman

to
(jr

be pitied in the stand Yankee preaching, that was wosse'n
j

State of Maine,

elsewhere."

bullets."

was brought into the Hospital. The Dr. had been fatally wounded. soldier who had fallen out of the column met him. "Well, Dr." said' the man, on the line of march, and is making all " We are giving it to them they are on the speed he can to get into camp with the run. Johnny Reb will get heavy his fellows, comes up to a place where " How !" Bully ^for

A MAN

A

POOR,

tired,

dirty,

forlorn-looking

He

;

rations
is it

there

is

a

number

of surgeons with
" Hello,

some
?"

to-day. us with you ?" questioned Dr.

Hersom

;

hospital
"

attendants.

thar," he

"

Where

are you

wounded

?"

"

Me

!

I'm

Who'll trade hit here," was the reply, as the man put Trade what ?" answers a round apple- his hand on his bowels. " A bad wound," " My gun for a shirtface drummer. "Yes," was the response; said the Dr. soldier as he plods on, " collar," says but never I'm done for, I suppose Just as he gets by, a mind that, the Johnnies are running with a chuckle. Surgeon comes up followed by his man The flag is all right tugging away at an old pack-horse,
shouts as he passes,
;
!

"

scarcely able to stumble along.
calls

Soldier

out with
:

an

oath which will not
a

bear repeating

" You're

mean

Hark Singing Where By whom On the operating table by a man who
!
!

?

?

cuss,

dreams
cuts
eats
its

of

home

while the

sharp knife
the

you are
it

;

let that

old horse go and beat

the

quivering flesh, and
swift

saw

through the bone. "Kiss me again, Mother," he says. How Dear old Uncle John Vassar who clear and full his voice. Alas one short so quaint, so brave, hour, and then the life which had boundwill ever forget him the One day I said to him ed with love of home and country, so helpful. " Uncle John, if you wear that grey suit life that had been so full of endurance
! !

honorably."

way

;

:

you'll

get into trouble

;

somebody

will

and courage, goes

out.

another shadow run against you as a suspicious charac- darkens another home, " I'm not afraid," he replied, " our adds to the gloom of war. ter." boys won't shoot me, they know Uncle * Noble "Wonierv of tl:\e War. John too well, and if the Rebs catch me Mrs. Eliza Potter was the daughter of they won't keep me long. They got me

Another shadow

once
"

How

and held me only two did you get away .?"
either got to let

hours."
" I
told

Scottish

parents

of

intelligence, piety,

them they'd
else

me

and worth, but was herself born in the go or North of Ireland. She emigrated to

have camp meetings all the way to this country when thirteen years of age, Richmond." " So they let you go. Uncle and after acquiring a good education John?" "Yes," he replied, with a cheer*
From
'•

Women's Work

in the Civil

War."

T5y L.

ful

laugh.

"They

said

they

couldn't

P.

Brockett. Published

1867.

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
was
'Mr.

(>5

married while yet very young to for them. To do this was a matter of She was in delicate Lorenzo T. Potter, a native of great difficulty. Providence, R. I., but then, as now, a health, and the few quasi Union women who still maintained their intimacy with merchant of Charleston, S. C. When the leaders of the rebellion, of her protested strongly against her underwhich Charleston was the birth-place, taking such a work in her condition ; the began to talk of Secession, Mr. Potter military authorities had issued orders

was

further attentions should be silent, but when his opinion was that no demanded avowed himself heartily and bestowed upon them than such as were

devoted to the National cause and necessary to prevent a pestilence, and flag. the surgeon in charge was a rabid SeThe Late in the autumn of 18G1, a few cessionist, brutal and profane. Union prisoners, some of them wounded, place assigned as a hospital for them were brought to Charleston, and Mrs. was an old negro-pen and mart, long Potter, true to her principles, at once used for the confinement and sale of set about supplying them with needed slaves, with its kitchen and other outShe buildings. There was no floor but earth, comforts and ministering to them. had the gratification of knowing that, and it was a filthy and miserable den, owing in a good degree to her care, into which any man of common humanity they were nearly all restored to their would have shrunk from thrusting a sick ranks in health and condition to do or wounded beast. Mrs. Potter comprehended the situafurther service to their country. She saw that her only In June, 1862, occurred the disastrous tion at once. battle of James Island, in which the chance for accomplishing her purpose
fully

the National

Union forces lost some four hundred or of ministering to those wounded soldiers more prisoners, most of them wounded. must be through this rebel surgeon, and
These were brought into Charleston, and with skillful diplomacy she began to nothing could exceed the fury and hatred study the best method of influencing Pie had a mother in Charleston manifested toward them by nearly all him. classes of the white population of the city. with whom she had had a slight acnever hitherto a Fair and delicately-nurtured women, who quaintance, though boasted of their superior refinement and willing one. Now, however, she visited culture, were ready to propose their her with some presents of articles not murder in cold blood, and to express readily procurable, and talked with her She soon found that he the hope that they would die of their about her son. All pity, all sympathy, all was ambitious of promotion, and was wounds. womanly tenderness seemed to have looking forward with some anxious longNo ings to an appointment as grand surgeon fled from the hearts of these furies. sooner did Mrs. Potter learn of the to the large hospitals at Richmond. arrival of those poor wounded prisoners Here was something to work upon. than she determined to nurse and care Having ascertained at what time he

66

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

would be at home, she returned and their superiors in station, they cursed met him in the evening, and after listen- the poor wounded men, jeered at and ing to his ribald denunciation of the reviled them, and when compelled to Vandals, asked to be allowed to visit furnish them with water or focd, they
the
hospital

He
the

objected very strongly
fit

not a

a matter of curiosity. took care that both should be as unpalatsaid it was able as possible, and administered in ; place for a lady to go to, " that such a way as to increase their sufferas
rascals djdn't deserve
;

or attention

any pity ings. he was rid of Sending her son before her to lay them, and he would be soon \ he'd wing gently on each mangled and suffering them." By dint of urgency and more body a part of a sheet or other covering
he wished
potent appliances, however, she obtained for its nakedness, Mrs. Potter advanced permission to visit the hospital the next into the room and administered, so far morning. She had been forewarned that as possible, cordials, soft custard, and

many
their
said,
fact,

of the men had been deprived of other nourishment to the men, clothing, " removed," the surgeon washed and cleansed their wounds. " to get at their wounds," but, in these ministrations of mercy she
;

and
In

was

her- constantly insulted and taunted by the some vile wretches who were acting as prohospital clothing, as well as cordials and fessed attendants, and was told that such simple nourishment as could be " her white neck would get stretched most readily administered to them. A if she went to do for them Vandals." servant brought these to the* foul den In the negro kitchen adjoining the main which the rebels had taken for an building she found a soldier from one of hospital, and Mrs. Potter and her son, the Connecticut regiments, wounded in a noble, brave boy of fifteen, received the head and shoulder, who had been them and entered the place. What an thrown down with his head and neck Almost resting in the ash-pit or fire-place of the appalling sight met their eyes four hundred men suffering from wounds kitchen the oozing blood and the lukeof every description, and, with hardly an warm water which had been thrown exception, entirely nude, lay scattered upon his wounds had made a lye with earth-floor, filthy without the ashes, which had eaten through a over the

stolen

and she had provided

self

with

portions of sheets and

.

!

;

blanket, mattrass, pillow, sheet, or even

large portion of the skin of

tie

neck

straw

to

rest

upon

;

their
flies

dressed, covered with

wounds un- and back of the head. She relieved him and maggots, as far as possible, and having accomplished
all

and tortured with
tendants

The only atwere the lowest dregs of the white population of the city, thieves and prostitutes taken from the slums or from the jails to wait on these poor fellows
thirst.
;

she could that day, she set
the

out for home, after arranging for another
interview

with

surgeon.

She

re-

monstrated with him in regard to the wretched conition of the wounded prisand actuated by the same feelings as oners, but he declared that it was good

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
Vandals it enough for them, the was better than they deserved. "That may be," said Mrs. Potter, "but you cannot afford to have them left in that condition you are looking for promotion to a Richmond hospital, and you can only obtain it by proving that you know how to manage a hospital well. If with all the difficulties in your way, you can make this a model hospital, you will have earned and will doubtless receive promoHe saw the reasonableness of tion."
;
\

67

pital

clothing, as well as the

food and

She endeavored to needed. persuade the other nurses and attendants
delicacies
to

wash the soiled clothing

of the

men,

but they refused, and, whenever it was removed, destroyed it; and she was compelled to hire, at her own expense,
the washing for
hospital.
all

the patients in the

She

expended

over

eleven

this,

but

said

that

the

Confederate

authorities

would not furnish him with

the necessary hospital supplies to make " I can help you in it a good hospital.
that

point

"Apand I will furnish you the necessary b^ds and bedding for the men, and such other in Charleston. The surgeon took comforts and special articles of diet as all the glory to himself. "This is the they may need, and will perform a way / keep my hospital," he would say and very soon you to the rebel officers who visited him, nurse's duty beside can demonstrate your claim to a better and several times he was censured by
matter,"
said

Mrs. Potter.

me

a nurse in your hospital,

hundred dollars in this work alone. She dressed the wounds of the men herself, and with the aid of her son kept them cleanly and comfortable. This involved, in such a miserable and filthy place, a vast amount of labor much of it of the most unpleasant character but she never shrank from it; and in a short time that hospital was superior in neatness and comfort to any

;

objected to the rebel authorities for suffering the Poor not to be brought " Vandals" to be so comfortable. such wretches as fellows very little of their comfort was contact with into were then the nurses in the hospital. due to any kind offices of his. At times She replied that if she chose to take the old ferocity of his nature would
position."

The

surgeon

this,

that she ought

!

that risk he need not be anxious about

gleam
Mrs.

out,

and finally succeeded in obtaining from him the appointment, he drawing her pay and rations. She entered upon her duties at once.
it,

Potter.

even in his intercourse with One day, a soldier who

had received some terrible wounds in the head, one of which had laid bare a portion of the brain, attracted her atten;

the maggots, by hundreds, were near tion were a crawling over his wounds, and l.e seemed She carefully large number of mattrasses which had to be suffering intensely. been used by his hands. These she had removed the loathsome creatures, washed brought to the hospital, furnished with his wounds tenderly, and laid cool, wet He had not for some suitable bedding, and she drew upon cloths upon them. her home stores for the necessary hos- time previously shown any consciousness,

In a factory
Charleston,

of

her

husband's,
there

then closed,

68

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

groped

but wlien she had completed her task he prisoners, though conducted quietly and for her hands, and seizing them, as secretely as possible, drew down upon
cried out, "

Mother mother " She v/as her the scorn and spite of the rebels, in by this and as he still every form which their malignity could held her hands with his firm grasp, devise. The fences and walls of her though seemingly dying or dead, she dwelling were constantly covered with was compelled to wait a little before abusive and obscene inscriptions, atshe could remove them. tacking alike her character and her
! !

affected to tears

;

The next day,
Mrs. Potter,
to
I

as she

came

into the

hospital, the surgeon said to her,

" Oh,

show you. followed him

have something I Come this way." She as he went to the deadhouse, one of the miserable appendages of the hospital. Calling her attention to a rough box, he slipped ofif the cover and exposed the body of the poor sufferer, covered completely with maggots, (its

One of her servants found almost constant employment in effacing want these evidences of petty spite. As she
motives.

passed along the streets to and from the hospital, women of high social position, who a short time before had been proud
of invitation to visit her,
skirts as they

drew away

their

passed her, lest they should be polluted by contact with a Union woman ; and with nose uplifted and only covering), and said with a sneering contemptuous shrugs, indicated their tone, " There's your pet " contempt for one who dared be a helper Symptoms of scurvy began to make of wounded Union soldiers. The lower their appearance among the men, and classes manifested their hate by the
!

it impossible to obtain a suffici- foulest and most abusive language. ency of oranges, lemons, and limes in the Twice she was summoned to headCharleston market, Mrs. Potter sent to quarters to answer to the serious charge Nassau, N. P., for them, and ran the of giving aid and comfort to the enemy," blockade repeatedly with her small and of "shedding tears over the Vandal ventures of tropical fruits. She made foe." Her husband was repeatedly it a rule to refuse nothing to a wounded questioned by the military authorities soldier which it was in her power to as to his wife's giving so much help to

finding

let the cost be what it might the "Vandals;" but he replied always and more than once, when tropical fruits that his wife was a British subject, and were scarcest, and the Confederate cur- therefore not responsible to them for rency seriously depreciated, she paid ten what she did for these wounded men, dollars each for oranges for her patients. and that she had resources of her own, Occasionally she brought them flowers, which she expended without rendering but the surgeon, partly, perhaps, at the him an account of them. He, meantime, prompting of other rebels, prohibited in every way in his power, aided our this, because it was giving aid and com- soldiers who were in Southern prisons. fort to the eneni}'. His money bribed Confederate provost Mrs. Potter's labors for the Union marshals to allow the transmission of

obtain,

;

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
supplies to Andersonville prisoners,

69

when morning

of their departure, intending to

those supplies alone preserved them from distribute them to them the ambulances a general starvation his money and sup- entered
;

before
;

they
their

but

plies

reached the prisoners at Columbia departure was hastened by the military and Florence, and mitigated, though it authorities, and when she arrived they Into each could not wholly prevent the suffering were all in the ambulances. The officers imprisoned under of those she threw a bundle of bandages, there. supplied with but while doing so was arrested by the fire at Charleston were all necessary household utensils and guard, who charged her with giving the She and those who prisoners the means of escape. food from his table escaped from the rebel prison found in explained ; but they would listen to no him a protector, and were sheltered by explanation, and surrounded her with one of them their bayonets, threatening her with his care for long periods instant death or with long imprisonment till there was for twenty-two months feasible chance of escape. A truer- for what she had done while outside, a the howling mob were shouting, " Kill hearted patriot never lived than he. Hang her She is a Shoot her The soldiers who had been wounded her
;

— —

;

!

!

!

at

James Island

either died or recovered

so far as to be deemed capable of removal to Columbia, Florence, or Salisbury but others, captured in the siege of Fort Wagner, or on the ruins of Fort Sumter, or elsewhere on the
;

through Mrs. Potter did not lose her self-possession, though she was aware of the danger she was in, but demanded to be taken to the headquarters. At this
"S'ankee
!

Run

her

"

!

&c., ^Q..

coast,

moment the surgeon, who was to take were sent to take their places, charge of the prisoners en route to and Mrs. Potter found constant employ- Columbia, rode up, and ascertaining ment for her active charities. One in- the state of the case, ordered them to

cident in connection with the removal of "disperse, and leave that woman alone." the convalescent prisoners to Columbia, The guard and the mob at their back,
is

worthy of record. Knowing that at did not like to lose their victim so Columbia they would not in all probabil- easily, and refused to release her until ity find Union women to nurse them as he should prove that he is really the When he had protenderly as she had done, she devoted surgeon in charge. several days before their departure to duced his commission, and the sergeant instructing those who were most nearly of the guard had made out the signature recovered, to care for the weaker and of the chief of staff, they sullenly drew feebler prisoners, to dress their wounds, back and allowed her to escape. We have already spoken of their eldest She had and give them nourishment. provided bundles of bandages and rags son, the companion of his mother in all for dressings, and packages of crackers her charitable labors, and her comforter He was a noble, and bread for their journey. These she in all her sorrows. brought down to the hospital on the manly, Christian boy, gentle and tender

70

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

in his feelings, yet firm and brave in the assed by the rebels. The young ruffians, maintenance of right. At the beginning when they found their victim determined of the war he had received from some not to yield, threatened to finish him next

friend the present of a

prized

it

Union Flag. He time. Mrs. Potter did not believe they highly for the giver's sake, but would carry out their threat, but she took
what precautions she could to prevent her son from being exposed to their
malignity.
It

covered his consciousness for a little trample on it and destroy it. He refused time, conversed freely with his mother, of They threatened him his hopes of heaven, his trust in Jesus, to surrender it. with a whipping, but he was firm. Soon and his faith in the final triumph of the after he told his mother of their threats, national cause. He acknowledged that
flag.

more highly as the emblem of the Union, and requested his mother to put it away for him till the time should come when it might again wave over a loyal city. He was a pupil in the Charleston High School, and was expecting to graduate there, and enter college in the autumn. It had, somehow, come to the knowledge of some of the pupils of the high school, sons of some of the rebel aristocracy, that young Potter had this flag, and they demanded it of him, that they might

was, however,

all

in

vain.

He was

to

go

to tlie high school to receive

his diploma, before entering college,

and
his

when he came, these young
in wait for him,

villains laid

and while one called

attention in another direction, the others

upon him, beat him on the head, and few minutes he was borne to his home, bleeding and insensible. He reset
in a

up the She approved his resolution, and told him that he would not be the first who had suffered for the flag of the nation. A few days later he came home and sent
his determination not to give
to his mother, to ask her to

and

come

to his

been most cruelly beaten, and his back was covered with gory stripes, but he made no complaint, except to say, " I can bear this, mother, but I cannot bear to have them abuse you as they do." " Their abuse does not injure me, my son," was her reply ; " our Master was reviled and evil-treated, and why should not His servants suffer what He suffered .''" The knowledge of this cruel outrage was kept from his father, who was at the time very anxious in regard to the condition of some of the Union soldiers, and who was also greatly harroom.

He had

he knew those who had assaulted him, but refused to give their names, and Delirium prayed for their forgiveness. soon supervened, and after some months of severe suffering, typhoid fever set in, and death came to relieve his poor bruised and mangled body from further distress. The mother, though at first almost overwhelmed at this terrible affliction, bore up under it with the patience Rising and fortitude of a Christian. from her sick bed, while this sorrow was yet fresh, she sought to relieve her overburdened heart by ministering to those who were suffering in the hospital. Never had her ministrations there been so gentle and tender, or her sympathies so hearty for those who had been wounded in defending the flag. Large numbers of those in the hospital at this time were

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
very severely wounded, and sank under your tears, lady;
their
let

71
it

me keep

on

my

wounds.

To

those

she devoted heart

till

I die."

There was, naturally enough, among men an apprehension that their serstances she was permitted to rejoice that vices and sacrifices for their country they manifested evidence of having given would be forgotten, and that when the their hearts to the Saviour before they struggle was over and peace had returned, departed. none would remember even the names of The soldiers thus tenderly cared for, those who had laid down their lives to almost worshipped her. We have seen secure the blessings of freedom. This letters from several of those who sur- fear Mrs. Potter earnestly combated. vived and returned to the army or to "If I live," she said, "to see the retu-n their homes, so touching and earnest in of peace, your deeds shall be recorded their gratitude that their perusal would for your honor and the everlasting rememTheir friends brance of the nation affect any reader to tears. if I die, I will and families of the soldiers, at home, to bequeath it as a sacred trust to my whom, as often as opportunity could be children, to see that this work shall not found, she transmitted the dying messages be neglected." and keepsakes entrusted to her charge, Peace came, but the war had swept recognized with the deepest thankful- away Mrs. Potter's large estate, except ness their indebtedness to her faithful twenty thousand dollars which she had care for these mementos of the heroic expended for the wounded and imprisoned soldiers, and about twice that sum dead. The cruelties inflicted on the wounded which her husband had given for the men by the rebel surgeons and attendants same purpose. That, as given for a holy affected her deeply. On one occasion cause, they reckoned saved. But not for she had been moved to tears by some of a moment did Mrs. Potter hesitate to their barbarities, and though, from fear fulfill her pledge to those dear soldiers A lot was secured in of depressing the spirits of the men, she of the Republic. generally abstained from weeping in their Magnolia Cemetery near Charleston ; the presence, at this time she could not re- Government has undertaken to fence strain herself, and shed tears as she per- it ; the bodies of three hundred and formed her usual round of duties for the thirty Union soldiers, who died in the men. One poor fellow, severely wounded, prison hospitals of Charleston and were was near death, and from him she buried in the potter's field of that city, received dymg messages and endeavored are, this autumn, to be removed to their to prepare him for his coming dissolution. new resting-place ; and partly from the As she left him, she dropped her hand- wreck of her own fortune, and partly by kerchief, and presently returned for it, personal effort among her friends, this when the dying soldier, looking up in her heroic woman has procured the means face, said beseechingly, '' It was wet with for the completion of a shaft of everherself especially, pointing
to the

them

great Sacrifice for sin, and in

many

in-

the

:


;

72

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
eigiiteen
feet

on which is inscribed the legend, Immortality TO HUNDREDS OF THE DEFENDERS OF American Liberty against the Great Rebellion, and with it the names of a hundred and seventy-one of these dead heroes, and a commemorative tribute to the unlcnown dead soldiers of the Union whose names it was not possible to ascerThe record of these dead soldiers, tain. imperfect as it is, is due entirely to Mrs.
during granite,
high,

which he dwelt, and by which his worth was most thoroughly known. Three days after Major Anderson had lowered his flag in Charleston Harbor, the Sixth Massachusetts Militia started Their passage through for Washington.
Baltimore, on the 19th of April, 186 1,
is

a remarkable point in our national hisThe next day about thirty of the tory.
sick

Potter's solicitous

care.

The name

of

every soldier

who entered

the hospital,

and wounded were placed in the Washington Infirmary, where the Judiciary Hospital now stands. Miss Barton proceeded promptly Jo the spot to ascer-

could be ascertained, was care- tain their cqnditioniand afford such volfully entered by her, and copied by her untary relief as might be in her power. Hence, if she was not the first person in daughter. The nation's gratitude is due to those the country in this noble work, no one who for the love of their country " jeop- could have been more than a few hours

where

it

arded their

lives,

even unto the death,
foul,

in

before her.

The regiment was quartered

and as those early volundank and teers will remember, troops on their first loathsome, battled with starvation and arrival were often very poorly provided The 21st of April happened to be is for. fever, and often sank in the contest No omnibuses ran that day, it not also due, and even in larger meas- Sunday. so she ure, to those, who, surrendered by rebels and street cars as yet were not and exposed to all their malignity, suf- hired five colored persons, loaded them martyrdom, while with baskets of ready prepared food, and fured a perpetual
the high places of the field;"
to those
at the Capitol,

who

in

rebel

prisons,

;

;

ministering to

our sick and wounded men, and with no hope of reward, save in an approving conscience and the smile of God, gave their time, their substance, and their lives to the nation's
deliverance
?

proceeded to the Capitol. The freight they bore served as countersign and pass she entered the Senate Chamber, and
distributed her

welcome

store.

Many

of

the soldiers were from her

own

neighbor-

hood, and as they thronged around her, she stood upon the steps to the Vice
President's chair and read to

them from
written
their journ-

Clara Harlowe Barton.

a paper she had brought, the
history of their departure

first

and

Miss Barton was born in North Oxford, ney. These two days were the first small Worcester County, Massachusetts. Her beginnings of her military experience, father, Stephen Barton, Sr., was a man steps which naturally led to much else. highly esteemed in the community in Men wrote home their own impressions

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
of

73

what they saw

;

and her

acts

found confiscated

ready reporters.

she had taught or as boys a few Governments confiscate. Soldiers when years before, called to see her on their they take such things, steal. I am afraid, way to the front. Troops were gather- my men, you will have to take it back to
rapidl}', and hospitals the inevitawere springing shadows of armies up and getting filled. Daily she visited them, bringing to the sick news, and delicacies and comforts of her own procuring, and writing letters for those who Mothers could not write themselves. and sisters heard of her, and begged her to visit this one and that, committing to her care letters, socks, jellies and the like. Her work and its fame grew week by week, and soon her room, for she generally had but one, became sadly encumbered with boxes, and barrels and baskThrough ets, of the most varied contents.

Young known

soldiers

whom no

!

it," said the soldiers. "No! " said the lady " that will never do. ;

ing
ble

the house from which

you took

it.

I

can't receive a stolen carpet."

The men
back.

looked sheepish enough, but they shouldered the carpet and carried
the wearisome
it

In

weeks that followed the Fredericksburg disaster, when there was not the excitement of a coming battle, and the wounded whether detained in the hosjDitals around Falmouth or forwarded through the deep mud to the hospital transports on the Potomac, still with saddened countenances and depressed
looked forward to a dreary future, Miss Barton toiled on, infusing hope and cheerfulness into sad hearts, and bringing
spirits

the

summer

of IS62, the constant stock the consolations of

she had on hand
tons.

averaged about

five

religion to her aid, pointed them to the only true source of

The goods were mainly

the con- hope

and comfort.

In the early days of April, 1863, Miss and sewing-circles to whom she was per- Barton went to the South with the expecBut, although articles of tation of being present at the combined sonally known. clothing, lint, bandages, cordials, pre- land and naval attack on Charleston.
tributions of liberal individuals, churches

served

fruits, liquors,

be

sent,

there

and the like might She reached the wharf at Hilton Head was always much ^\hich on the afternoon of the 7th, in time to
hear the crack of Sumter's guns as they
fleet.

she had to buy herself.

While she was
the corps
city,

in

Fredericksburg, after opened in broadside on Dupont's

the battle of the 13th,

some

soldiers of

That memorable
it

assault

accomplished
to ascertain

who had been roving about
a large and " What

the nothing unless

might be

came

to her quarters bringing with

that Charleston could not

be taken by

great dithculty

very costly water. The expedition returned to Hilthis for .?" ton Head, and a period of inactivity asked Miss Barton. "It is for you, followed, enlivened only by unimportant ma'am," said one of the soldiers; "you raids, newspaper correspondence, and have been so good to us, that we wanted the small quarrels that naturally arise in

and elegant carpet.

is

to bring

you something."
she asked.

"Where
!

did

an unemployed army.

you get

it.?"

"O

ma'am, we

Through

all

the Ions:

bombardment

that

74

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.

followed, until

Sumter was reduced, and the meantime freely, as she had done all Warner and Gregg was ours, amid the along, of her own private means for the scorching sun and the prevalence of succor of the poor wounded soldiers. prostrating diseases, though herself more Moving on to Port Royal, and thence to than once struck down with illness, she the James River, she presently became remained at her post, a most fearless and attached to the Army of the James, where
co-worker with the fndefatigable General Butler, at the instance of his Chief Medical Director, Surgeon McCorM. M. Marsh in saving the lives and mick, acknowledging her past services, promoting the health of the soldiers of and appreciating her abilities, gave her
efficient

agent of the Sanitary Commission, Dr.

the

Union army.

'
'

How could

you," said a
to that

recognized

position,

a friend to her subsequently,

"how could enhanced her
bute as
of the

usefulness,

which greatly and enabled

you expose your

life

and health

her, with her energetic nature, to contri-

deadly heat.-'" "Why," she answered, evidently without a thought of the heroism of the answer, " the other ladies thought they could not endure the climate, and as
I

much

to the welfare

and comfort

army

in that year, as

able to do in all

she had been her previous connection

it. In January, I865, she returned Washington, where she was detained from the front for nearly two months by take care of the soldiers, I went." In January, 1864, Miss Barton returned the illness and death of a brother and to the North, and after spending four or nephew, and did not again join the army five weeks in visiting her friends and in the field. recruiting her wasted strength, again took By this time, of course, she was very up her position at Washington, and com- generally known, and the circle of her menced making preparations for the correspondence was wide. Her influence comingcampaign which fro m observation, in high official quarters was supposed to she was convinced would be the fiercest be considerable, and she was in the daily and most destructive of human life of any receipt of inquiries and applications of The first week of the cam- various kinds, in particular in regard to of the war. paign found her at the secondary base of the fate of men believed to have been The great the army at Belle Plain, and thence with confined in Southern Prisons,

with

knew somebody must

to

wounded she moved number of letters received of this class, Extensive as had led her to decide to spend some months been her preparations, and wide as were at Annapolis, among the camps and the circle of friends who had entrusted to records of paroled and exchanged prisher the means of solace and healing, the oners, for the purpose of answering the Her plan of operaslaughter had been so terrific that she inquiries of friends. found her supplies nearly exhausted, and tion was approved by President Lincoln, 1S65, and notice of her for the first time during the war was March 11,
the great
to

army

of the

Fredericksburg.

compelled to appeal for further supplies appointment as "General Correspondent to her friends at the North, expending in for the friends of Paroled Prisoners,"

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
was published
sively,

75

in the newspapers exten- incorrect, as to be Poor worthless. bringing in a torrent of inquiries wretches in the rebel pens seemed even

and

letters

from wives, parents. State

to forget the

officials,

agencies, the Sanitary

Commis- them.

names their mother called The Annapolis scheme was there-

On fore abandoned, with mortification that encountered thousands of letters hnd lain so long obstacles that were vexatious, time-wast- unanswered, that thousands of anxious ing, and in fact, insupportable. Without friends were daily waiting for tidings of
sion and the Christian Commission.

reaching

Annapolis,

she

rank, rights or authority credited by law, their loved and

lost.

The pathos and
letters

the officials there were at a loss
receive her.

how

to

simplicity

of

these

was

often

The town was

so crowded touching.

An

old

man

writes

that

he

no private lodgings, has two sons and three grandsons in the and had to force herself as a scarce army, and of two of the five he could get welcome guest upon some one for a few no tidings. Another says she knew her days, while her baggage stood out in the son was brave, and if he died, he died snow. Nearly two months were con- honorably. He was all she had and she sumed in negotiations before an order gave him freely to the country. If lie be was obtained from the War Department really lost she will not repine but she to the effect that the military authorities feels she has a right to be told what Many of the writers at Annapolis might allow her the use of became of him. a tent, and its furniture, and a moderate seemed to have a very primitive idea of supply of postage stamps. This was not the way information was to be picked up. mandatory, but permissive ; and negotia- They imagined that Miss Barton was to tions could now be opened with the walk through all hospitals, camps, armies gentlemen at Annapolis. In the mean- and prisons, and narrowly scrutinizing time the President had been assassinated, every face, would be able to identify the Richmond taken, and Lee's army sur- lost boy by the descriptions given her. rendered. The rebellion was breaking Hence the fond mother minutely desaway. All prisoners were to be released cribed her boy as he remained graven on from parole, and sent home, and nothing her memory on the day of his departure. would remain at Annapolis but the The result of these delays was the organrecords. Unfortunately these proved to ization, by Miss Barton, at her own cost, but a small per of a Bureau of Records of Missing Men be of very little service centage of those inquired for, were found of the Armies of the United States, at on the rolls, and obviously these, for the Washington. Here she collected all rolls most part, were not men who had been of prisoners, hospital records, and records She was of burials in the rebel prisons and elselost, but who had returned. also informed, on good authority, that a where, and at short intervals published large number of prisoners had been Rolls of Missing Men, which, by the exchanged without roll or record, and franks of some of her friends among the that some rolls were so fraudulent and Members of Congress, were sent to all
that she could find
;

; ;

76

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC ALMANAC.
In
Tl:\e

parts of the United States, and posted in

Prisor\ Cell.

prominent places, and

in

many

instances
In the prison
cell
I sit,

copied into local papers.

thinking mother dear of

you,

"When Johnny Comes
When Johnny comes
!

Marcl:\ir\g

Home. And
And
Tho'

our bright and happy homes so far away the tears they fill my eyes spite of all that

I

can do,
I

marching home again, Hurrah Hurrah We'll give him a hearty welcome then, Hurrah Hurrah I
!
!

try to cheer

my comrades and

feel gay.

The men will cheer, The ladies they will

the boys will shout.
all

turn out,

Tramp, tramp, tramp the boys are marching, Cheer up comrades they will come
;

And

we'll

all

gay when marching home.
feel

Johnny comes

And beneath

the starry flag
air

we

shall breathe the

again

Of the freeland

in

our

own beloved home.

The

old church bell will peal with joy,

Hurrah

1

Hurrah

!

To welcome home
!

our darling boy.
!

Hurrah Hurrah The village lads and lasses say With roses they will strew the way, back dismayed, And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes And we heard the cry of vic'cry
marching home.

we stood when their fiercest charge they made, And they swept us off a hundred men or more But before we reached their lines they were beaten
In the battle front
o'er

and

o'er.

Get ready for the

jubilee,

Hurrah

!

Hurrah

So within
I

the prison cell

we

are waiting for the

That shall come to open wide the iron door; Hurrah Hurrah And the hollow eye grow bright, and the poor The laurel wreath is ready now heart almost gav. To place upon his loyal brow, we think of seeing home and friends once And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes As more. marching home.
!

We'll give the hero three times three,
!

day.

Let love and friendship on that day,

Hurrah! Hurrah

1

Their choicest treasures then display,

The Songa pulilished in the Almanac are can be procured at any Musie Store,

all set tj

music; and

Hurrah

!

Hurrah

!

And let each one perform some part, To fill with joy the warrior's heart.

TI\e

A

1

n:\ar\ac.

And

we'll

all

gay when Johnny marching home.
feel

comes

We
year.

purpose publishing the

Almanac

next

You

can aid us in making our next more

A Dutchman
said
:

being called upon to give, a toast,

interesting,

by

contributing

personal
etc.

reminis-

"

Here

ish to de heroes

what

fit,

pled and
I

cences of the war, anecdotes,

Anything you

died at the battle of Bull
one."

Run

— of

which

am may

send

will

be thankfully received and duly

acknowledged.

AD VERTISEMENTS.

77

E. B.
STAiiES,

Stillings & Co.
I

mm
Army

HUM mi

mmmw
Orders

15 Spring Lane, Boston, Mass.
Comrades
of

the Grand

are invited to give us a trial.

ty mail

promptly

filled.

BOSTON.

Got.

13,

1378.

"COMRADE E. B. STILLINGS HAS FURNISHED THE PRINTING FOR THIS DEPARTMENT FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS AND HAS GIVEN ENTIRE SATISFACTION, AND I CORDIALLY RECOMMEND HIM TO ANY COMRADE WISHING ANYTHING DONE IN HIS LINE."
J. F. MEECH, Asst. Adjutant- General Dept. of Mass., G. A.

R

INSURE WITH

THE "OLD" WORCESTER
Mutual Fire Insurance
377

Co.

MAIN STREET,
L05S
OI^

opp.

ELM, WORCESTER. MASS.

Insvives tlxe Safest class of JE*roi>ei'ty only, against

DAMAGE BY FIRE OR LIGHTNING.
E. r.

I»ays Sixty Per Cent. I>iyi<iencls.
CEAS. M. MILES, Se:7.

UPHAM,

Ass-t. Secy.

THE PARKER GUN,
SIMPLE
IN

CONSTRUCTION.

DURABLE

AND EFFECTIVE

IN

ACTION

FIKST PREMIUM

AND GOLD MEDAL AT CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION.
NEW ENGLAND AGENTS

Endorsed bv Dr. C AR^KK, the Champion Shot of the World, and by the Leading Sportsmen as being the American Gun for American Sportsmen. Send stamp for catalogue, edition 1878.

JOHN
tx'jr

P.

LOVELL & SONS, 147 UASeilVGTON
IIT

ST.,

BOSTON.
GU.N'S,

3IASS.

MANUFACTUEZES AND lEALSES

GUNS, EIFLES, EEVOLVEES, AIE PISTOLS, AIE

ETC.

Seud slump lor Illustrated Catalogue of above goods, or for

lllustr.ited Catalogue for Shooting Gallery Targets.

AD VERTISEMENTS. JOHN KENDALL, JEWELS, EMBLEMS, ETC.,
78

MADE

TO

ORDER

GREENE &SON,
SiS Main
Sty-eel,

SILK AND STIFF HATS

MADE TO ORDER.

HEAD-QUARTERS FOB
6.

n.

I^.

P^T^ ^ND UNIFORMS,
Tlii.s

Di;|iartment

is in c-h.-irge

of

Comrade
Ty-QMeMet,

JdaU.

A

full

Stock

The only Manufacturing Jeweler receiving

DAVID BOYDEN. of FUR GOODS in Season.
-

MEDAL
156 Main
Street,

at K. E. FAIR, 1878.

315

MAIN ST.,
Wo
Iiave a large

WORCESTER.
ul

HENRY

W. MILLER,
Worcester, Mass,
Bsalor in

fiCTUKt} frames;!
assortment
choicu

uew

styles of

Mouldings
Nails, Glass and Building Materials generally Carpenters' and Mechanics' Tools, etc. brick set and portable. Stoves, Ranges and Furnaces Chilson's Arlington Portable Range, a very snperior article, together with a large variety ol other makes of

in

Gnid Leaf and Fancy
OAK.
facilities

Gilt,

WALNUT AND
Which with our
at Retail, at

we

are able to

make

uj)

Manufacturers' Wholesale Prices.

tiful

Ranges and Stoves. LittUfield's new Morning Glory Base Burn r, togetlier with the Laurel, a new and beauBase Burner, Parlor Stove and I'arlor Cook Stove. Copper, Tin an^l Sheet Iron Stove Work done in all its variety. Plumbing and Plumbing Materials.

WORCESTER MOULDING WORKS,
E. S.

KENNEY,

Proprietor,

21 Cypress

Street, fVorcester,

Mass.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT BONDS.
Tile best ami safest securities for invest»ie7it, at present, are those of the United States. K^e ad^n'se the purchase cf Registered on account of their absolute safty. full description of all issues of Governmetit Securities may be obtained at our office- iVe buy and sell on cotnmisiion, all kinds of Stocks and Bonds, deal in Foreign anci Domestixchant^c, are agents for European and Cali-

A

Bonds

^
The undersigned

»

»

will devote his attention to

E

fornia Steamship Lines, secure
Credit for Travellers,
dT'c.

Passports, Letters of

A

complete

list

</

*'

Called Botlds

"

may

Prosecuting Claims for Pensions, BOUNTIES, ARREARAGE OF PAY, AND OTHER CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT.

be found at

our counter.

CHARLES
Ofi&ce,

B.

WHITING &
-

CO.,

GEO.
M.No. 5 Maple

H.

ESTABROOK,
-

415 Main

St.,

-

"Worcester, Mass.

No. 6 Brinley Hall,

-

Worcester, Mass.

J".

"W. JO:EtlDJ^lS^
DEALER
IN

OBIHSOH
St.,

Stows,

\wmi
ST.,
-

aiiil

\mm
&c.

GOLD AND SILVER PLATER,
"Worcester, Mass.
Knives, Fork-s Spoons, Table Ware, Watches, .Tewelry, etc.. Plated and Re plated in a superior manner.

MANTLES, GF^ATES,
609 & 611 MAIN
Agent
for

Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fistures.

Manufacturer of and Dealer
K. of
P.,
I.

in

G. A. R., Masonic,
F.

Worcester, Mass.
and
all

0. O.

Brown's Steam Furnaces and Radiators.

U^^

Lodge Supplies. Orders from the country, by mail or express,
other Society Rcg;ilia and

pronijitly attended to.

AD VERTISEMENTS.
J, i,

79

Wifbjf

41®^

Wm. H.

Jourdan,

I>ealer in

ANTllRACUTE, BITUMINOUS AND GAS
387

MAIN

STI^EET,

•^^O^AE
RULING AND BINDING
IN

ALL ITS BRANCHES.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
OFFICE NO.
2

^§M|§i|^ga| ^tn
HENRY
Work,
for Building

W^tfesj.

LINCOLN BLOCK, MAIN

ST,

F.

EDWARDS,

Manufacturer of Constructive and Ornamental Metal

WORCESTER, MASS.

and Engineering purposes,

from Cast, Wrought and Sheet Metal.

Jerome Marble
Sole Proprietors and

&

Co.
the

Copper and Galvanized Iron Cornices, Oriel Windows, and other finish, AVealher Vanes, Stable Fittings, Vaults, Shutters, Sidewall'.-liijhts, and all styles of heavy or
light

Ma nifacturers of PATENT INDIGO BLUE DYE And dealers in

Columns, Girders, Bolts,

etc.,

furnished to order.

IRON FENCE FOR SOLDIERS'
A SPECIALTY.

MONUMENTS OILS, (bfRUGS,
when
desired.

CHEMICALS,
Mass.
M'.M. II.

DYE SUTFFS, PAINTS, GLASS, &C., FINE VARNISHES.

Estimates given from architects drawings
0!llre

440 Main

Street,

WORCESTER,

and Works, 22 & 24 Cypress St., Worcester, Mass.

JEROME MARBLE.

DRURY.

Hiram H. Ames
Dealers in

&

Co.

A. M. Evans,
Dealer
in

and Manufactnrer of allkiiul.^ of

FURNITURE,
BEDDING, CARPETS, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, ETC.

©raiiitelMcirbto Work.
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN POLISHED GRANITE

MONUMENTS A SPECIALTY.
for the sale of Celebrated see Granite Yard and

.Sole

Agent

Come and

Columbian Marble. Marble M'urks.

225 & 227 Main

St.,

Worcester, Mass.

Brackett Court, off 54 Shrewsbury Street, Near East end of Union Depot, WORCESTER, MASS.

H. Hammond, PRACTICAL AND JOBBER, REPAIRERLEAD AND IRON PIPES, OF PUMPS,
E.
Btove-Pipe Work,
N.

Dr. E.

W.

Sweet,

Hanging and B.-A COPPER a:ways

Bell Fitting, Lock Repairing. Wringer Repa ring, made a Specialty.

Key

BONE SETTER,
Office. 302

HOT

MAIN ST, WORCESTER, Mass.
:

and

READY FOR USE.
Oflice

Rooms 419
j6®~ Also,

Mair) St., over Friendly's,
for Laey's

Hours

From

9 to 12

A.M. and

1

to 5 i-.m.

WORCESTER, MASS.
Agent

Gas

Stoves.

Residence, 200 Main Street.

8o

AD VERTISEMENTS.

TOYS,
Restores Worn and Broken

&c.

F^epairs Urr\brellas, Car\es, Locks, Etc.

TAKES ORDERS FOR DYEING.
Articles to

Usefulness.

226 MAIN STREET,
Nearly

WORCESTER,
Bank.

Mass.

opposite Qiii)isiganiond

p.

J.

JENNINGS,
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BROWN AND BRYANT,
Manufacturers of

MOR TISING CHISELS
^le
13
AND BRYANT'S PATENT MORTISING MACHINE TABLES.
311

MECHANIC STBEET,
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02 1.

WORCESTER,
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Mass.

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Mass.

C.

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0. F.

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Market

CD'S

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STAND,
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No.

TWENTY-EIGHT.
35

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for either

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and

MEOHANIO

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SMOKING OR CHEWING.
CAN BE FOUND AT 391 Main Street.

All orders promptly attended to by beiiis left at James H. Frost's, 399 Main St., cor. Mechanic.
Hacks furaishod
for Fucerals

atd Parties at short notice.
P. O.

G.

A. R. Work a

Specialty.

Box

199.

Hotel & Restaurant,
The

Bay State House,
WOECESTEE, MASS.
only First-Class Hotel in the City, with Elevator and

modern improvements.

No. 301 Main Street,
Corner
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POPULAR PRICES.
PROPRIETORS.

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A. P.

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Late of the Delevan Ilouse,

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VV. L. SHEPARP, Late of the Massasoit House, Springfield.
Ilorse Cars pass the

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Coach at Depot

fbr all trains,

door tu and from depot.

i^l

f E STUDIES OF

THE GREAT ARMY
ART.

AN HISTORICAL WORK OF

Ccntainirg Sixty-Five Etchings (forty plates,) Illustrating the Life of the Union Armies during the late Civil War.

By

BDVSriJSr
of the

FORBES,
member of the French Etching Club; London Etching Club.

Special Artist with the Armies of the United States, and

Hon. Foreign Member

In introducing these sketches to the American public, the publishers would call attention to their manifold claims to the favorable consideration of all patrons of art, since they posHCSs more than the ordinary interest attached to the products of an artist's skill, as multiplied by the press, being entirely the work of the designer, whose inspirations snftVr no modification from the tools of the eniiraver. No etcher, "however fiiniou'', has ever applied his genius to the illustration of any great event in history, or even to the originator of a series of views, so large and numerous as those of Mr. Forkes, now oftVred, at unprecedentedly low rates, to the American people. As a true work of art, they take precedence of all engrav'ngs, lithographs, chromoa, and other printed pictures, however beautiful, the Importance of the subject clainiiJ a greater and more absorbing interest, for these sketches are the work of an eyewitness of, and participant in the long and deadly struggle which terminated twelve years ago, and depict scenes of familiar and engrosMna; interest to the veterans who still live to see thus vividly presented scenes which live in memory rather as strynge dreams than the past realities of a checkered life. These etchings received the award at the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia, and the unanimous and enthusiastic praise of the press, military chiefs of ihe highest rank, and artists high in estimation.

COPY OF CENTENNIAL A'WARD.
The under.signed having examined the product herein described " Life Studies of the Great Army," respectfully recommended the same to the United States Centennial Commission for award for the following reasons, viz: For excellent Studies from Nature and Life, Firmness in Tone, and Spirited Execution. C. W. COPE, Sig. of Judge.

EMINENT MEN. LETTERS FROM E.XECUTivE Mansion, Washington, July

28, 1876.

The President directs me to acknowledge the receipt of an India-proof set of engravings entitled "Life Studies of the Great Army," which you so'kindly forwarded hira, and to convej' to you his sinceie ihanks. lie wishes me to assure you of his appreciation of this valuable work of art, and of the kind sentiments expressed U. 8. GRANT, Very respectfully yours, in your note presenting it. Per Secretary. To Mr. EdM'IN Forbes, Artist.
HEADdUARTERS ARMY OP THE UNrfED STATES, WaSHINGTOM, D. C, July
24, 1875,

Artist. Dear Sir; I beg to aclinowledge receipt of the Portfolio containing your series of copper-plate etchings, entitled •' Life Sketches of the Great Army," and to thank you for the favor. 1 considered them most valuable so much so. that I had already instructed my A. D. C, Colonel Audenried, to purchase the set of first proofs now on Exhibition at the Centennial in Pliiladelphia which set I design for the decoration of my new office in the war department, when finished. I am sure that these pictures will'recall to the survivors the memory of manv scenes which are fading in the past. General. Truly your friend, W. T.

Edwin Forbes,

My

:

SHERMAN,

Div. of the Missouri, Chicago, Sept. 26, 1878. Messrs. Estes k Lauriat: 1 have at my headiinarters here, all of the " Life Sketches of the Great Army," by Mr. Forbes. They are framed and hung up around the rooms, forming a capital reminder of the days when we were on the field against the enemies of the repuplic. I take great pleasure in testifying to their artistic excellence and accuracy. Very Truly yours, P. H. SHERIDAN, Lieut. Gen'l.

Headquarters Military

Boston, January

19,

1877.

The Army

recall the old scenes.

Sketches, by Mr. Edwin Forbes, are very lifelike and interesting. They vividly and in a most spirited manner For the halls of Grand Army Posts, I can conceive of no more deliuhtful decor 'tion. BINNEY SARGENT, Commander of the Department of Mass.

HORACE

T^RMS OF PUBLICATION.— The series will be completed in 10 parts, each containing 4 Payment should be made plates (13x19, on paper 19x24) issued monthly, at $2,50 each Part, the carrier not being allowed to receive money in advance or to give credit. only on delivery The work will only be supplied to subscribers who agree to take the whole series. Subscribers will receive a Portfolio gratis with delivery of first parts,
;

ESTES k LAURIAT,

Publishers,

Boston.

Hoi

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