You are on page 1of 19

 

TATA Motors: Iconic 
International Drive

Disclaimer: This case was written by Uday Kamath, as a part of the individual 
Uday Kamath 
project for the subject  International Business ‐ I at a business school course,  eEPSM‐02‐052 
the case has been compiled through freely available print and online articles, 
which  are  duly  acknowledged  in  the  references,  the  interpretation  of  issues  3/11/2009 
faced by the Company are his own analysis with no direct domain knowledge   
and  is  intended  for  use  as  a  class  project  for  discussion,  rather  than  to 
illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a management situation. 
 
Index 
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 3 
Ford’s Premier Brands on Sale ........................................................................................................................ 3 
Tata one step at a time ................................................................................................................................... 3 
Jaguar Ok with Tata takeover .......................................................................................................................... 4 
Mr. Money comes up with Car Finance6 ......................................................................................................... 4 
Indian Mergers and Acquisitions: The changing face of Indian Business brand India! ..................................... 5 
Mergers and Acquisitions ............................................................................................................................... 7 
For Tata Motors ‐ How good a deal is it? ....................................................................................................... 7 
The Obvious Benefits ...................................................................................................................................... 7 
The Challenges8 .............................................................................................................................................. 7 
New Markets8 ................................................................................................................................................. 8 
Investors Disappointed8 ................................................................................................................................. 8 
The Road Ahead8 ............................................................................................................................................ 9 
Jaguar Land Rover launches in India ............................................................................................................. 9 
Land Rover badly hit, but Jaguar is a bigger problem9 .................................................................................. 10 
Generating Media Attention ......................................................................................................................... 10 
Smaller‐sized competitor .............................................................................................................................. 11 
Analysis ..................................................................................................................................................... 11 
Growth Strategy Risk .................................................................................................................................... 12 
Economic Risk ............................................................................................................................................... 12 
Macroeconomic risk ................................................................................................................................. 12 
Foreign exchange risk/ Financial management risk ................................................................................... 12 
Interest rate risk ....................................................................................................................................... 13 
Manufacturing, Technology and Integration ................................................................................................. 13 
Product Offering – portfolio management .................................................................................................... 13 
Operating Costs ............................................................................................................................................ 13 
Policy Risks ................................................................................................................................................... 14 
Technology Policy ..................................................................................................................................... 14 
Labour Policy ............................................................................................................................................ 14 
Culture Risk ................................................................................................................................................... 14 
References: ................................................................................................................................................ 14 
Annexure ................................................................................................................................................... 15 
Jaguar Land Rover11 ...................................................................................................................................... 15 
Financials 2008‐2009 .................................................................................................................................... 16 
Financials 2007‐2008 .................................................................................................................................... 16 
Graph‐1 ........................................................................................................................................................ 16 
Graph‐2 ........................................................................................................................................................ 16 
 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    2   
 
Introduction 
Ford’s Premier Brands on Sale 
 
June 2007  news  was  out1  that  Ford has appointed  Goldman  Sachs,  Morgan  Stanley and  HSBC  to  investigate 
selling  its  British  premium  brands  Jaguar  and  Land  Rover.  The  move  effectively  signals  the  end  of  the  Blue 
Oval's PAG division#. 
 
Officials have refused to confirm or deny the sale, but have outlined to British MPs the deal which will spin off 
Jaguar and Land Rover, but retain Volvo in the Ford family. Ford sold Aston Martin, PAG's# sports car brand, to 
a private equity partnership earlier in the year. No bidders for Jaguar/Land Rover were confirmed yet, but Fiat 
Auto denied it was in the frame, and Renault‐Nissan has also distanced itself from reports it was interested. 
Alchemy Partners, the venture capitalists who nearly bought MG Rover back in 2000 is also a contender.  
 
Former  Ford  of  Europe  boss  Martin  Leach  said  he  expected  private  equity  companies  as  the  most  likely 
bidders, which raises fears over the 15,000 employees in the UK. 'The two businesses have not been profitable 
for some time; the deal will most likely include some downsizing,' he told the BBC's Today programme. Ford is 
desperate to make progress in its recovery programme after losing $12.7 billion last year. The Aston Martin 
sale raised £479 million and a combined Jag/Aston sale could swell Ford's coffers further. Although Land Rover 
is in a healthier financial state than Jaguar, it is seen as almost impossible to separate the two brands, which is 
why  Ford  is  considering  bundling  them  together  in  a  joint  sale.  The  companies  share  many  back‐office 
functions, engineering units and even manufacturing at the joint Halewood plant in Merseyside. Although Ford 
doesn't break down the results of its individual brands, the Premier Automotive Group suffered a bigger pre‐
tax loss last year, losing $327m compared with $89m in 2005. Selling off Jaguar, Land Rover and Aston Martin 
would effectively trigger the end of PAG. 
 
After 6 months of negotiations2 the battle for Land Rover and Jaguar has been whittled down to three serious 
bidders. Tata, fellow Indian car group Mahindra, and American buyout group One Equity. Ford is likely to name 
Tata as its preferred bidder in the next couple of weeks. Tata will pay in the region of £1 billion for the British 
marquees although they will still have to negotiate a separate deal with Ford for the continued supply of their 
engines.  A  settlement  will  also  need  to be  negotiated  with  the  pension  trustees  and  with  Unite  the  JLR’s 
workers  union.  The  three  UK  factories  are  to  remain  safeguarding  15,000  UK  jobs,  although  most  felt  that 
production will be slowly shifted to India. 
 

Tata one step at a time 
 
By late January 20083, Indian automaker Tata Motors was one step closer to acquiring Jaguar and Land Rover 
from  Ford  after  winning  the  support  of  the  unions  utilized  by  the  British  brands.    A  non‐essential  but  still 
important victory for Tata, the unions' shop stewards  voted that if Ford were to sell the two manufacturers 
they feel Tata would be the best choice. The unions still seem to believe that Ford keeping Jaguar and Land 
Rover would be the best situation for the workforce. 
 
Union  leadership  also  met  with  rival  bidders,  One  Equity  Partners  ‐  a  division  of  J.P.  Morgan  Chase  ‐  and 
Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd., an Indian automaker.  Tata apparently won over the union by saying they had no 
intention of moving or outsourcing workers to India, and top executives at Jaguar and Land Rover would likely 
keep their positions. 
 
According  to  Automotive  News4,  quoting  Ford  of  Europe’s  Chairman  Lewis  Booth,  the  American  group  has 
entered  “focused  and  detailed  negotiations”  that  aim  to  see  Tata  finally  as  the  new  boss  in  Coventry  and 
Gaydon, England. Taking into account this statement, it is obvious the two companies are now just clarifying 
the  details  of  the  deal.  As  a  matter  of  fact  Booth’s  statement  is  the  first  time  Ford  names  with  certainty  a 
candidate for Jaguar and Land Rover. 
 
Of  course  it  is  too  early  to  consider  Tata  deal  as  a  bargain,  or  any  long‐term  negative  effects  on  the  British 
companies. However, Ford needs immediate cash to overcome losses, and Tata seeks to play the global game 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    3   
 
with Jaguar/Land Rover under its wings. For sure, Ford is losing two of the biggest brand names in auto history 
that ironically are now growing with fresh products such as the all new Jaguar XF, the XK, and the Land Rover 
Freelander II. 
 

Jaguar Ok with Tata takeover 

The management of luxury carmaker Jaguar is 'entirely relaxed'  5 about the prospects of Indian conglomerate 
Tata Group taking over the brand along with Land Rover.  

Earlier, in the month, Ford had named Tata Motors, which is part of the Tata Group, as the preferred bidder 
for its British marquees ‐ Jaguar and Land Rover, but a final decision for the sale is yet to be taken. "We have 
shown  Tata  our  new  model  lines  and  the  planned  product  cycle.  The  two  national  cultures  appear  to  fit 
together very well and Tata is being very respectful about what we are doing," Ian Callum, Director of design 
who  is  responsible  for  the  Jaguar's  new  XF  and  XK  model  ranges  told  Financial  Times.  However,  Callum 
stopped short of acknowledging Tata's purchase of Jaguar and Land Rover for an estimated $2Bn was a done 
deal between Tata and Ford, the report said. Jaguar’s management is entirely relaxed about the prospect of 
the  carmakers  takeover  by  Tata  group  and  believes  that  it  would  allow  Jaguar  and  Land  Rover  to  develop 
unfettered, the financial daily added.  

Many of the problems associated with Jaguar cars, which have persistently failed to attract enough buyers and 
its descent into losses that hit about 600 million dollars several years ago, lay within Jaguar itself, Callum was 
quoted as saying in the report. It had failed to move on and keep pace with its major rivals, he added.  

Mr. Money comes up with Car Finance6 

In the week of Mar 2008, the Jaguar and Land Rover marquees were rescued from cash‐poor Ford of America 
by cash‐rich Tata of India. Had that not happened, the pride of Coventry and Solihull's finest could have been 
snapped  up  by  asset‐strippers  or,  even  worse,  died  a  painful  MG  Rover‐style  death.  The  new  outfit  will 
officially be known as Jaguar Land Rover ‐ but it is already being referred to merely as JLR. 

 It's  not  known  exactly  where  JLR  will  locate  its  headquarters,  nor  how  it’s  new  company  logo  will  look  and 
whether its two famous badges will somehow be merged into one. 

About  13,500  workers  in  Britain  are  employed  directly  by  either  Jaguar  or  Land  Rover,  and  there  are  many 
more  UK  citizens  working  for  British  suppliers,  dealerships,  transport  companies  and  associated  businesses. 
Had  Ford  not  let  Tata  step  in,  thousands  of  Brits  might  have  been  joining  the  dole  queue.  The  situation  for 
Jaguar and, to a lesser extent, Land Rover is ‐ or was ‐ critical. In the past two decades, Jaguar has cost Ford 
billions of dollars. Although Land Rover is in better shape, the fact is that first BMW, and later Ford, were both 
keen to dump the 4x4 specialist because it cost a great deal to run but didn't make a great deal of profit. 

The big question is: what can Tata Motors do for Jaguar and Land Rover that Ford (and BMW) could not do? 
The  Indian  company  makes  buses and  Lorries and  has  also  churned out a few  down‐market  passenger  cars, 
some of which (the Safari 4x4, for example) rank among the worst motors on sale in Britain in recent times. So 
what, apart from cash,  can the Indians  bring to the party? With the best will in the  world, I can't  think of  a 
single thing. 

For  now,  the  16,00013  JLR  workers  and  most  of  the  suppliers  have  little  to  worry  about  because  Tata  has 
agreed to honor a five‐year plan that's already in  place. But that is only for the next five years. What about 
from year six? Britain has the fourth highest cost of living in the world and employers here face some of the 
highest  employment,  social  security  and  related  costs  ‐  around  £14  an  hour  for  a  production  worker.  By 
contrast,  India,  Tata's  home,  boasts  the  fourth  lowest  cost  of  living  and  the  equivalent  factory  worker  costs 
pennies,  not  pounds.  Surely,  it  will  have  occurred  to  Tata  that  it  can  save  colossal  amounts  by  shifting 
production to  its home soil? After all, Mercedes, Toyota  Honda, Hyundai, GM, Ford? Skoda and Fiat already 
make cars in India. 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    4   
 
The newly acquired  sites at  Coventry, Solihull, Castle  Bromwich, Halewood, Gaydon and elsewhere could be 
expertly valued by Tata. If some or all of these countless acres of prime English land get planning permission 
for residential, retail, airport or leisure development, Tata could see billions rolling in through property sales 
alone. 

Meanwhile, it's no surprise that Jaguar is desperate to sell cars at the moment. The official price list says that 
customers cannot buy an XK unless they spend more than £60,000. But at least one independent dealer has 
been offering this model, unused, at less than £50,000. Alternatively, another indie dealer has been slashing 
up to £6,321 off high‐spec X‐type Jags, which are now down to £18,999 unused. 

Could that be Tata Motor’s strategy? Hugely discounted cars built and sold in much greater numbers than ever 
before? Perhaps there's a need for busy factories in both the UK and India. 

 
Indian Mergers and Acquisitions: The  changing face 
of Indian Business brand India!  
The giant7 positive strides that Brand India has taken in last few years are nothing less than astonishing. Indian 
Businessmen  and  Entrepreneurs  are  set  out  to  revamp  Indian  image  that  will  be  boasting  world’s  biggest 
corporation’s  in  near  future.  All  the  sectors,  be  it  Steel,  manufacturing,  Information  technology,  Auto  and 
FMCG are all buzzing with Mega Indian acquisitions. 

The latest and probably the most talked about after L.N. Mittal’s buy‐out of steel major Arcelor, is Jaguar‐ Land 
Rover bid by Tata group. 

To say that Jaguar and Land Rover are iconic brands in America and Europe is an under‐statement. If you see 
someone driving a Jaguar or Land Rover, the default thought that comes to your mind is “those guys must be 
filthy rich!” 

This Tata buy‐out of these two brands is much more than mere acquisition of a company. It is a message that 
Tata is sending across the globe about Indian companies and India itself! Not without a reason were the Jaguar 
dealers in Northern America making a big hoopla about this deal. Some dealers have gone so far as to suggest 
that consumers in the United States would not want to buy a premium brand such as Jaguar if it were owned 
by a company in India.  

From financial perspective though, people are not too sure how Tata plans to make a turn‐around of brands 
like Jaguar that have been on a losing streak since last 15 years making more than $billion losses year on year ! 

Until  up  to  a  couple  of  years  back,  the  news  that  Indian  companies  having  acquired  American‐European 
entities  was  very  rare.  However,  this  scenario  has  taken  a  sudden  U‐  turn.  Nowadays,  news  of  Indian 
Companies  acquiring  foreign  businesses  is  more  common  than  other  way  round.  Buoyant  Indian  Economy, 
extra cash with Indian corporate, Government policies and newly found dynamism in Indian businessmen have 
all contributed to this new acquisition trend. Indian companies are now aggressively looking at North American 
and European markets to spread their wings and become the global players. 

The Indian IT and ITES companies already have a strong presence in foreign markets; however, other sectors 
are also now growing rapidly. The increasing engagement of the Indian companies in the world markets, and 
particularly in the US, is not only an indication of the maturity reached by Indian Industry but also the extent of 
their participation in the overall globalization process. 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    5   
 
Here are the top 10 acquisitions made by Indian companies worldwide: 

Country  Deal value ($ 
Acquirer  Target Company  Industry 
targeted  ml) 
Tata Steel  Corus Group plc  UK 12,000 Steel
Hindalco  Novelis  Canada 5,982 Steel
Daewoo  Electronics 
Videocon  Korea  729  Electronics 
Corp. 
Dr. Reddy’s Labs  Betapharm  Germany 597 Pharmaceutical 
Suzlon Energy  Hansen Group  Belgium 565 Energy
Kenya  Petroleum 
HPCL  Kenya  500  Oil and Gas 
Refinery Ltd. 
Ranbaxy Labs  Terapia SA  Romania 324 Pharmaceutical 
Tata Steel  Natsteel  Singapore 293 Steel
Videocon  Thomson SA  France 290 Electronics 
VSNL  Teleglobe  Canada 239 Telecom

If you calculate top 10 deals it account for nearly US $ 21,500 million. This is more than double the amount 
involved in US companies’ acquisition of Indian counterparts. 

Graphical representation of Indian outbound deals since 2000. 

 (Source: http://ibef.org) 

Indian outbound deals, which were valued at US$ 0.7 billion in 2000‐01, increased to US$ 4.3 billion in 2005, 
and further crossed US$ 15 billion‐mark in 2006. In fact, 2006 will be remembered in India’s corporate history 
as  a  year  when  Indian  companies  covered  a  lot  of  new  ground.  They  went  shopping  across  the  globe  and 
acquired a number of strategically significant companies. This comprised 60 per cent of the total mergers and 
acquisitions  (M&A)  activity  in  India  in  2006.  And  almost  99  per  cent  of  acquisitions  were  made  with  cash 
payments.  

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    6   
 
Mergers and Acquisitions  

The total M&A deals for the year during January‐May 2007 have been 287 with a value of US$ 47.37 billion. Of 
these,  the  total  outbound  cross  border  deals  have  been  102  with  a  value  of  US$  28.19  billion,  representing 
59.5 per cent of the total M&A activity in India. 

The total M&A deals for the period January‐February 2007 have been 102 with a value of US$ 36.8 billion. Of 
these, the total outbound cross border deals have been 40 with a value of US$ 21 billion. 

There were 111 M&A deals with a total value of about US$ 6.12 billion in March and April 2007. Of these, the 
number of outbound cross border deals was 32 with a value of US$ 3.41 billion. 

There were 74 M&A deals with a total value of about US$ 4.37 billion in May 2007. Of these, the number of 
outbound cross border deals was 30 with a value of US$ 3.79 billion. 

The  sectors  attracting  investments  by  Corporate  India  include  metals,  pharmaceuticals,  industrial  goods, 
automotive  components,  beverages,  cosmetics  and  energy  in  manufacturing;  and  mobile  communications, 
software  and  financial  services  in  services,  with  pharmaceuticals,  IT  and  energy  being  the  prominent  ones 
among these. 

For Tata Motors ‐ How good a deal is it? 
Soon after the announcement by Tata Motors of its takeover of the British auto icons Jaguar and Land Rover 
from Ford Motor Company much of the auto world and the media8 were agog with excitement but for Mr. Ravi 
Kant, Managing Director of Tata Motors, it was business as usual. Asked by the media how he was planning to 
run the acquisition, he replied, without any fuss, that Tata Motors would leave the day‐to‐day running of JLR to 
its existing management. 

This short reply was largely ignored by the mainstream Indian media, but it answered the question that had 
consumed analysts and editorial writers worldwide since Ford chose Tata Motors as the “preferred bidder” in 
January 2008. In the retrospect it was really no fuss at all, this has been the approach by Tata Group with all its 
big ticket acquisitions in the recent past, all of which was overseas – from Tetley to Corus to Daewoo heavy 
commercial units. 

Infact in a press statement the Tata Group Chairman Ratan Tata had said “We have enormous respect for the 
two brands and will endeavor to preserve and build on their heritage and competitiveness, keeping their British 
identities intact” 
 
The Obvious Benefits 

The  JLR  deal  will  give  Tata  Motors  a  critical  footprint  in  Europe,  which  accounts  for  over  three‐fifth  of  JLR’s 
total  sales  volumes.  Then,  Jaguar  and  Land  Rover  will  also  expand  the  company’s  product  portfolio,  which 
comprises  of  the  Indica,  Indigo,  Sumo,  Safari  and  the  new  baby  Nano.  Ford  will  continue  to  provide 
engineering  and  back  office  support  for  an  unspecified  period.  And  the  US  company’s  finance  arm  will  also 
finance  JLR’s  dealers  and  customers  for  one  year.  These  could  prove  invaluable  for  Tata  during  the  initial 
months of its stewardship. 

The Challenges8 
 

But the big question is can Tata Motors succeed where Ford Motors failed?   Despite their iconic brand image, 
Jaguar and Land Rover face formidable challenges. Jaguar, which sold 130,000 cars in 2002, closed year 2007 
with sales of less than half that number. BMW, which targets the same customers, produces 20 times as many 
cars. Then, over the last three decades, it has been plagued by quality and reliability issues. This, experts say, 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    7   
 
had a lot to do with Ford’s management mantra. In order to cut costs, it built the Jaguar X‐type on the Ford 
Mondeo platform. This diluted Jaguar’s premium brand image and ensured a lukewarm response from buyers. 
But a slew of new launches and platforms—among them the new XF model, and also the XK and XJ— could 
reverse this trend and take volumes past the 100,000‐mark this year. “We will allow the JLR management to 
strengthen the company’s brand personality. The new Jaguar XK has proved to be a successful model. The new 
XF sedan has received great reviews at auto shows and 15,000 bookings have already been received. I believe 
the new product line is very good,” Ravi Kant MD Tata Motors said in a recent interview. The company expects 
to sell up to 50,000 units of this model this year. 
 
Land Rover’s problems are very different from Jaguar’s. It produced a little more than 225,000 SUVs last year 
and  is profitable.  But,  in  a  world  turning  ‘greener’  by  the  day,  Land Rover  still,  produces  sturdy  gas‐guzzlers 
that are fast going out of fashion. But here, too, the Tata’s may be stepping in at the cusp of good times. The 
new Land Rover LRX concept car, which was unveiled at the Detroit Auto Show in January 2008, is fuel‐efficient 
and has carbon dioxide emissions of about 120 g/km, well within EU norms.  
Like  the  XF,  this  smart  hybrid,  which  will  be  positioned  as  a  small  SUV  for  urban  consumers,  is  expected  to 
restore Land Rover’s old glory. 
 
Despite Tata Motors having no obvious synergies with JLR, and despite having no presence or expertise in its 
market segment, it may just be getting in at a time when the tide is turning. Jagdish Khattar, former MD of 
Maruti  Udyog  (now  Maruti‐Suzuki  India)  says  “The  challenge  will  lie  in  selling  cars  in  competitive  markets, 
which are not growing.” This is where the Tata Group’s unique management philosophy can help it come up 
trumps.  
 
The Telegraph, London, quoted Peter Cooke, KPMG Professor of Automotive Management at the University of 
Buckingham,  one  of  the  world’s  foremost  authorities  on  auto  companies,  as  saying  “Tata  has  perfected  the 
delicate  art  of  arms‐length  management.”  Tata  Motors  is  expected  to  follow  the  Corus  model  at  JLR.  That 
means, it will probably form an integration committee comprising senior executives from Tata Motors and JLR, 
set  milestone  and  long‐term  goals  and,  as  Kant  has  said,  let  the  local  management  run  the  company.  
 

New Markets8 
 
If there’s one fly in the ointment, it is that Europe and the US, JLR’s main markets, are slowing down. This may 
delay its recovery. The Tata’s are expected to counter this by exploring new markets in Russia, China, India and 
other parts of Asia. But will it also move production to a low‐cost location like India? The UK, after all, has one 
of  the  highest  wage  rates  in  the  world,  and  one  way  of  cutting  costs  will  be  to  move  at  least  a  part  of  the 
manufacturing somewhere cheaper.  
 
Tata  Motors  has  signed  an  agreement  with  Unite,  JLR’s  labour  union,  to  safeguard  jobs  for  three  years  (till 
2011). Roger Maddison, National Officer for the Automobile Industry at Unite, says the deal augurs well for the 
UK automotive industry and for the people working for JLR. “Unite has secured written guarantees for all the 
plants on staffing levels, employee terms and conditions, including pensions, and sourcing agreements.  

Tata  Motors has  not  responded on  this  sensitive  subject,  but  the Telegraph  has  said  that  JLR’s  three  plants, 
which  produce a little  over  a  quarter million  cars and  SUVs,  “may  be two  plants  too many”,  and  speculated 
that “Land Rover would be pushing an open door if it closed its Solihull plant, as the land is sought after for 
housing  and  an  extension  to  Birmingham  airport”.  If  such  speculation  does  turn  to  fact,  then  there  is  a 
possibility of the Tata Motors moving at least some production lines to India after the three‐year no layoffs 
agreement runs its course. 

 
Investors Disappointed8 
 
The Indian press greeted the Tata‐JLR deal with lots of cheer, but investors gave it thumbs down. Since January 
3, 2008 when Ford announced Tata Motors as the “preferred bidder”, the Tata Motors stock has moved down 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    8   
 
from Rs 794.25 to Rs 679.4, when the deal was announced. In the two days since then, it  has lost a further 
4.92% to Rs 645.95.  

A  part  of  this  is  undoubtedly  due  to  the  overall  crash  in  the  stock  market,  but  it  is  a  fact  that  investors  are 
nervous  about  the  impact  of  the  $3‐billion  (Rs  12,000‐crore)  debt  that  Tata  Motors  is  taking  on  its  balance 
sheet to finance this deal. Says Tata Motors’ CFO C. Ramakrishnan “This is a bridge loan facility extended by a 
syndicate  of  banks  and  will  be  replaced  by  a  combination  of  a  long‐term  debt  and  equity  at  an  appropriate 
time.” A report by global investment bank UBS says: “This (the debt) could increase Tata Motors’ interest costs 
by Rs 650‐700 crore per annum and reduce the earnings per share for 2008‐09 by Rs 12‐13, or 19‐20 per cent.” 
Investors  are  particularly  worried  because  this  comes  at  a  time  when  the  company  is  in  the  midst  of  an  Rs 
12,000‐crore expansion programme. In January this year, global rating agency Standard & Poor’s placed Tata 
Motors under credit watch.  

The Road Ahead8 
 
Autocar India Editor Hormazd Sorabjee says the short term will be all about new models like the XF saloon. “I 
do  not  think  there  is  a  problem  as  far  as  the  brand  positioning  is  concerned.  These  are  top  end  models  and 
there  is  no  overlap  with  Tata  Motors’  existing  lineup.”  Agrees  Harish  Bijoor,  CEO,  Harish  Bijoor  Consults,  a 
brand consultancy, who thinks it is possible for a company to have a plethora of brands. “Having a car priced 
at Rs 1 lakh and another at Rs 1 crore is hardly an issue,” he says. This means, effectively, that Tata Motors will 
be competing at the top‐end and the bottom of the market, where competition is the least intense, and not in 
the cutthroat middle segment where the main global competition lies. 
 
 

Jaguar Land Rover launches in India 
Tata Motors officially launched the Jaguar and Land Rover in the Indian market on 28 June, 2009. Ratan Tata, 
Chairman, Tata Sons and Tata Motors said when launching the brands in Mumbai “We are extremely pleased 
and proud to introduce the Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) brands in the Indian market and give the discerning Indian 
customer direct access to these prestigious brands, accompanied by a parts and service network. We hope that 
they will delight customers in India, just as they have done in markets the world over”. 
With prices ranging from Rs. 63Lakhs to Rs. 1.0Crores, the five premium models from the JLR range – the XF 
(competes  with  Mercedes  E‐Class)  and  the  XK  sports  coupe  and  convertible,  plus  the  Discovery,  the  Range 
Rover Sport and the flagship Range Rover. 
 
Jaguar’s current model range consists of 4 cars – the slow selling older X‐type, XF which was launched in 2008 
and the one model which is holding out for Jaguar, the XY sports and convertible that is selling decently and 
the flagship XJ. Land Rover consists of 4 models too – the Freelander, the Defender, the Range Rover Sport and 
the flagship Range Rover  
 
In India all this – will at best sell only in hundreds. But the numbers will be significant for Tata Motors as it is hit 
hard by the economic meltdown, suffering a net loss of Rs. 2,505 Crores ($521.5Million) in 2008‐2009, mainly 
on account of JLR acquisition in March 2008. JLR made an after‐tax‐loss of £306 Million ($501.5 Million) in the 
ten months to end of March 2008. Sales of Land Rover crashed 40% to 120,000 cars during June’08 to 
March’09, while Jaguar sales declined by 4% to 47,000 cars. In the first half JLR’s European sales were down 
39% to 41,907 cars according to the European Automobiles Manufactures Association, ACEA. 

Declining sales have forced Tata Motors to cut 2,000 JLR jobs. In beginning of August 2009 Tata announced 300 
more posts would be cut along with the production of X‐type at the JLR’s Halewood facility in north England. 
The automaker also asked for an UK government guarantee for a £340 Million ($561.9Million) loan sanctioned 
by the European Investment Bank for JLR. As the scenario for global automobile demand remains weak it looks 
like JLR may axe more jobs. Shedding jobs and shutting plants are short‐term answers to stem the bleeding of 
the two brands that pushed Tata Motors to its first loss in 8 years. The crash of the commercial vehicle market 
in India also contributed to the woes. But what is required is a strategy that integrates JLR into Tata Motors 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    9   
 
more effectively, taking advantage of the cost benefits that Tata could bring to the manufacturing process. At 
the same time there is a lot that Tata Motors can learn from JLR. 

 Land Rover badly hit, but Jaguar is a bigger problem9 
 
Land  Rover  which  has  been  doing  well  till  the  mid‐2008  has  been  badly  hit  like  all  the  SUV’s,  the  Defender 
which is the oldest model in the range has been hit the most. Infact technologically the Defender is very much 
like the Tata Safari. A chassis‐on‐frame design the dimensions are similar, the weigh is very much the same just 
that the 2.2‐litre Tata diesel engine develops more torque (140bhp and 320Nm) than the Defender’s 2.5‐litre 
units  (122bhp  and  300Nm).  The  Defender  is  much  more  capable  off‐road,  but  then  it  does  not  have  air‐
conditioning, central locking and few extras that some versions of Safari has. The Safari sells for between Rs. 
8.0Lakhs  and  Rs.  13.0Lakhs  in  India  while  the  smaller,  short  wheelbase,  3‐door  Defender  starts  at  £23,680 
(Rs.18.7Lakhs) in the UK. This is 43% to 133% more than the Safari. 

The  Defender  is  overpriced,  which  probably  explains  why  just  23,154  units  (a  little  over  10%  of  total  Land 
Rover sales) were sold in 2007. But, if it is possible to bring down the costs and improve quality, the potential 
for this go‐anywhere vehicle in markets across Africa, Asia and Latin America which is outside of its traditional 
markets UK and Europe could be huge. As it is possible to share the chassis and other underpinnings, a simple 
robust 4x4 that could both be the next‐gen Land Rover and Tata Safari could add up to hundreds of thousands 
of units. The Defender has been assembled under license in several locations worldwide, including Brazil and 
Turkey and if the last generation was made in Spain then India is the next logical step and in future models like 
the Freelander and the LRX (project 1.513 planned for 2011 roll‐out) could also be made in India for the Asian 
and the African markets. The LRX or a new name proposed will be the significant new model in the new Tata 
ownership of Land Rover stage. This model has the potential for seeing major success in Europe and the USA. 
The essential ‘Britishness’ of a Defender or a Freelander or an LRX will probably be less of an issue compared 
to the Range Rover, Range Rover Sport and the Discovery. For these models to keep on succeeding, it would be 
essential to carry out with production (or final assembly) at UK. With a cost competitive Defender, Freelander 
and LRX apart from the civilian markets there are markets with police and armed forces too. Were Tata Motors 
to  push  lower‐cost  robust  vehicles,  there  could  be  large,  institutional  markets  in  Africa,  the  former  CIS  and 
Latin America. Infact, the potential volume of Land Rover worldwide could easily double to around 400,000 a 
year.   

Other than the Defender, Land Rover’s product planning is clear: the LRX for 2011, an all new Range Rover in 
2013 (Project L405) and an all new Range Rover Sport (Project L494) for 2014. And there can be considerable 
synergy for the next Defender (projected for a 2014 roll‐out). Land Rover could then, in the long term, be a real 
winner for Tata Motors. 
 
Clearly, the bigger problem is Jaguar: sales are down despite the success of the new XF and it’s the one losing 
money more than the others. In the short term, its product planning is quite clear, but there are concerns in 
the longer term. And is there any potential synergy for Tata which they could leverage? 
 

Generating Media Attention 
 
On the product front, the XF has been doing well, as is the XK, both of which have been launched in India. Their 
high  performance  siblings,  the  XFR  and  the  XKR,  have  been  garnering  much  media  attention  and  some 
(profitable) numbers. These two are also on offer in India. And by 2014, the next generation XF (Project X260) 
will roll out. That’s the good news. 
 
The bad news is the slow selling XJ and older X‐type. But the XJ will shortly be replaced by the new XJ, which 
was  unveiled  in  July  2009,  and  will  go  on  sale  in  early  2010.  As  Ravi  Kant  now  elevated  to  the  post  of  Vice 
Chairman  of  Tata  Motors  (Mr.  P.M  Telang  is  the  Managing  Director  of  India  Operations)  points  out,  the  XJ 
“goes on sale in early 2010, when it will be available in India as well. Specifications and prices will be shared in 
due course of time.”  The styling of the new car, which has been inspired by the XF, is a modern repackaging of 
the current car, and that should make a good car that’s much more appealing than the older XJ whose styling – 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    10   
 
unfortunately‐ harked back to the original XJ6 from 1968. Initial reaction from the specialized press have been 
promising, but only by 2010 will we know how customers take to it. 
 
2010  will  also  see  the  phasing  out  of  the  X‐type.  And  there  are  no  plans  to  replace  it.  Instead,  Jaguar  is 
planning on two more niche products: The F‐Type and the XF Coupe. Jaguar has always wanted to do a ‘small’ 
sports  car  to  rival  Mercedes’  SLK  and  in  2000,  showed  the  F‐Type  concept.  Apparently,  Ratan  Tata  likes  the 
idea and is all for a $ 50,000 (Rs 20 lakh) roadster (the base new XK retails for £98,000, that’s Rs 73Lakhs plus). 
If given the go ahead (to Project X700), an inexpensive two‐seater convertible could be on sale by 2012. The 
other idea, a Coupe derived from the XF (Project X252), is an obvious range extension and is expected to roll 
out by 2013. 
 
Both the F‐Type and the XF Coupe will be good for Jaguar’s image and have the potential to be profitable. But 
in the numbers game, they will be marginal at best. For instance, The SLK and the CL‐Class do less than 5% and 
1% of Mercedes’ worldwide sale of 1.26 million cars sold in 2008. But the issue is will all these initiatives get 
Jaguar to 200,000‐plus cars every year, the volume that is required to make JLR profitable, assuming that Land 
Rover gets to at least 300,000? Which are not a lot, given that Audi sold over a million cars in 2008 and BMW 
did 1.4 million cars (including the Mini) in the same period. 
 

Smaller­sized competitor 
 
Longer term what Jaguar really needs is to make a smaller sized, larger volume car – a car that can be a worthy 
competitor to the smaller Audis, Mercedes and BMWs. The slow‐selling X‐Type has convinced many industry 
pundits that Jaguar’s image cannot work with a small car. But Jaguar really ought to develop a replacement for 
the X‐Type, and make a Y‐Type and Z‐Type. The numbers are there: Audi’s smaller A4 and A3 make up more 
than three‐fifths of Audi’s global sales; for BMW, the 1 and 3 Series represent some 71% of all BMW’s sold; 
and for Mercedes the –Class and the A/B‐Classes add up to more than half of Daimler’s worldwide sales. 
 
For inspiration, they have a concept already: The Jaguar R‐D6 from 2001. What’s more, this car – that could 
perhaps straddle the two segments in being a hatchback and a saloon – could share a lot with a bigger Tata 
flagship  car.  And  that  car  could  very  well  be  the  Tata  Prima,  a  concept  of  which  was  unveiled  at  the  last 
Geneva Motor Show. The Pininfarina‐designed Prima, incidentally, has strikingly similar dimensions to the X‐
Type. 
 
And though Tata may be ‘bringing’ the Prima to Jaguar, it may be better sense to get Jaguar to actually design 
and develop the platform. To allow Jaguar to do what Ford didn’t do, that is, design a Jaguar (and not a Ford 
Mondeo  ‐  derivative,  which  the  X‐Type  actually  is)  that  alone  could  share  ‐  for  cost  benefits‐  its 
platform/underpinnings with the Prima, yet retain its quintessential ‘Britishness’. Making the aggregates and 
platform in India can bring costs down, and at the same time Tata could gain from the technology that Jaguar 
(and Land Rover) could bring to the table. 
 
So, can the takeover yield dividends for Tata Motors? It won’t be easy, and Ratan Tata and his team will have 
to overcome several hurdles before they can turn JLR around. But as it did with Daewoo Heavy Vehicles, Tetley 
and, to a lesser extent, Corus, Team Tata may yet surprise the doomsayers. 
 

Analysis 
Tata  Motors  brilliant  and  bold  international  foray  has  come  after  years  of  market  periphery  entry  in  many 
countries  through  the  Tata  Motors  exports  division  of  their  own  cars  and  commercial  vehicles.  They  had 
gained sufficient experience and now wanted to fuel the main market entry for benefiting from a long‐term 
potential of the Global market. They knew that they needed something major in terms of offering and quality 
products  for  this  international  markets  entry.  They  acted  fast  and  confidently  to  grab  the  iconic  brands  in 
Jaguar and Land Rover. The two enterprises were formally transferred on June 2, 2008 at a signing ceremony 
at the Jaguar and Land Rover head quarters in West Midlands, when history was made and these two globally‐
renowned brands became Indian‐owned 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    11   
 
 
What are the international business risks and how are they planning to tackle or how they should address the 
risks. 

Growth Strategy Risk   
 
Tata Motors under the astute leadership team led by Mr. Ratan Tata has taken a very big step in the Global 
Automobile market.  With, the purchase of JLR, Tata Motors almost tripled in size, with the group’s turnover 
going up to Rs 70,938.85 crore. Things have not gone too well, but if the new car Nano gets going, Tata Motors 
could me a volume seller with more than a million vehicles by 2010. That’s would take them to the big league: 
No. 16th in the world. And that shouldn’t be difficult.  
 
Jaguar has been a prestigious maker of high performance passenger cars with a racing history, and Land Rover 
has always been the ‘Gold Standard’ for off road vehicles. 
 
Jaguar and Land Rover (JLR) are in the business of development, manufacture and sale of high end luxury cars 
and SUVs respectively. JLR has 3 manufacturing plants, 1 component manufacturing facility and 2 state of the 
art design and engineering centers in the UK, with 16,000 employees across the world, sales in more than 100 
countries and have over 2,200 dealers. Their combined volume for the calendar year 2007 was around 288,000 
vehicles. 
 
The Deal will give Tata Motors a critical presence in the European market and combined with its presence in 
markets like Korea and Spain it will increase their Global footprint, the risk is that these entry have come at a 
stiff price tag 12. 
 
The  passenger  car  and  utility  vehicle  segments  have  been  particularly  hard  hit  and  almost  all  automobile 
companies have been facing operating losses. The most visible disruption in the industry was, without doubt, 
the  collapse  of  two  of  the  three  major  U.S.  car  makers  that  filed  for  bankruptcy  and  have  emerged  as  new 
companies with sizeable Federal funds and with substantial equity held either by the U.S. government or the 
unions.  Worldwide  car  sales  are  down  5%  as  compared  to  the  previous  year.  The  automobile  industry  the 
world  over  is  rationalizing  production  facilities,  reducing  costs  wherever  possible,  consolidating  brands  and 
dropping model lines and deferring R&D projects to conserve funds. The crisis goes beyond the car makers in 
both  directions ‐  upstream, it affects steel  producers and downstream,  it affects thousands of suppliers and 
small technology companies. Countless jobs will have been lost this year and major projects will probably be 
put  on  hold,  awaiting  better  times.  The  worst‐hit  are  automobile  companies  in  the  U.S,  Europe  and  Japan, 
where  sales  of  new  cars  have  declined  by  16%  in  the  second  half  of  the  year  and  where  stimulus  packages 
designed  to  rekindle  demand  have only  been  partially  successful.  Russia  has  also  seen  major  declines  in the 
demand for cars. Thus, one of the major foundations of these nations' industrial base has been de‐established.  
 
  

Economic Risk 
.  

Macroeconomic risk 
 
The  Tata  Motors  entry  comes  at  a  time  when  the  economic  fundamentals  in  Europe  and  USA  are 
10
weak. These 2 markets account for over 88%   of the JLR’s sales.  
Credit  unavailability‐  further  tightening  of  liquidity  position  and  reduction  in  exposure  to  vehicle 
financing by banks/NBFCs would have an adverse impact on the automotive industry, it would be a 
challenge for the Company to fully offset the decrease in credit availability from outside sources. 
 

Foreign exchange risk/ Financial management risk 
 
Tata  Motors  has  issued  a  Corporate  Guarantee  in  favour  of  its  said  UK  SPV  for  this  purpose.    The 
repayment  of  the  said  facility  is  proposed  to  be  undertaken  through  a  long  term  funding  plan 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    12   
 
involving, amongst others, a right issue of equity/equity related instrument to its shareholders, and 
issue of securities in the international market these needs to be managed well for the overall financial 
health of the company. 
The  Company  has  large  foreign  currency  borrowings  in  the  form  of  foreign  currency  convertible 
securities.  Movements  in  exchange  rates  and  volatility  in  the  foreign  exchange  markets  could 
significantly impact profits. 
 

Interest rate risk 
 
The stiff price tag12 will increase the interest burden on the Tata Motors’ balance sheet. 
Post the JLR announcement and subsequently, the Company’s rating for foreign currency borrowings 
was revised by Standard & Poor from BB +/Stable to BB/Negative and by Moodys’ from Ba1 to Ba2. 
For borrowing in local currency the rating was revised from AA+/Stable to AA Negative/Stable by Crisil 
and from LAA+/Stable to LAA/Negative by ICRA.   
 
Interest rates hardening and other inflationary trends ‐ further hardening of consumer interest rates 
could  have  an  adverse  impact  on  the  automotive  industry.  Increase  in  inflation  could  also  have  a 
negative impact on automobile sales in the domestic market. 
 

Manufacturing, Technology and Integration 
 
In  these  brands,  Tata  Motors  has  acquired  impressive  engineering  capabilities,  substantial  manufacturing 
facilities, (which reflect the major investments by both Ford and BMW in past years), and enormous goodwill 
amongst  the  dealer  network  and  the  Jaguar  owners’  community.  There  is  a  need  to  introduce  a  greater 
number of attractive products for both brands, and to re‐kindle Jaguar’s past image connected with its sports 
car heritage. Both brands have tremendous unfulfilled market potential and a significant global presence 
 
The access to the manufacturing plants in the UK and the engineering expertise of Jaguar and Land Rover will 
be a big plus if the technology is well assimilated and will also benefit the domestic operations. 
 
Uncertainty with respect to supply of engines and components by Ford Motors will be a issue as the current 
contract is for an 1‐year period. 
 
What would be more difficult is to make money, and to do that, apart from learning from JLR, it is essential 
that there is more synergy in using India as a production and sourcing base, along with better product planning 
and sharing of technologies. 
 
The  Company  manufactures  its  products  at  multiple  locations  and  its  operations  could  be  affected  by 
disruption in its supply chain due to any natural calamities and work stoppages at its suppliers’ end due to load 
shedding, labour problems, etc.  
 

Product Offering – portfolio management 
 
At one end of the spectrum is the Nano which is priced at Rs. 1.0Lakh and the other end is the niche brand 
Jaguar priced at Rs. 1.0Crore managing the portfolio range in terms of production, marketing efforts will be an 
issue. 
 

Operating Costs 
 
Prices  of  commodity  items  like  steel,  non‐ferrous  and  precious  metals  and  rubber  is  witnessing  an  upward 
movement,  which  can  be  partially  offset  by  the  Company’s  cost  reduction  initiatives.  The  price  of  steel,  in 
particular, has increased by 30% – 35% in the last 24 months and is expected to further increase significantly in 
the  coming  year,  increase  in  price  of  input  materials  could  have  a  negative  impact  on  the  demand  in  the 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    13   
 
domestic market and/or could severely impact the Company’s profitability to the extent that the same are not 
absorbed by the market through price realization. 
 

Policy Risks 
 

Technology Policy 
 
Stringent emission norms and safety regulations could bring new complexities and cost increases for 
automotive  industry,  impacting  the  Company’s  business.  WTO,  Free  Trade  Agreements  and  other 
similar policies could make the market more competitive for local manufacturers. 
 
In the overseas markets, many of which have stricter norms of vehicle regulations related to emission, 
safety, noise, technology, etc., the Company competes with international players which have global 
brand image, larger financial capability and multiple product platforms. These factors may impact the 
demand of the Company’s products in overseas markets. 
 

Labour Policy 
 
Unite  the  JLR  union  has  secured  written  guarantees  for  all  the  plants  on  staffing  levels,  employee 
terms and conditions, including pensions, and sourcing agreements which have the UK law support so 
any  further  downturn  will  be  a  potential  risk  if  there  is  new  retrenchment  or  closure  of  plants 
involved. 
 

Culture Risk 

In  the case  we saw that  the  Jaguar  dealers in  Northern America  making a big  hoopla  about this  deal.  Some 
dealers had gone so far as to suggest that consumers in the United States would not want to buy a premium 
brand such as Jaguar if it were owned by a company in India possible backlash. 

References: 
 
1) Jaguar/Land Rover sell‐off latest ‐ By Tim Pollard, Automotive News ‐ June 2007. 
2) Times Online‐ By Clinton Deacon ‐ Dec 17, 2007. 
3) Automotive News – By Zack Newmark ‐ Nov 23, 2007. 
4) Focused  negotiations  with  the  Indian  Company  ‐  By  Atanas  Markov,  Automotive  News  ‐  Jan  3, 
2008. 
5) Jaguar Ok with Tata Takeover: A report in Financial Express Jan 28, 2008. 
6) Car finance with Mr. Money ‐ By Mike Rutherford, Telegraph UK ‐ Mar 28, 2008. 
7) Indian  Mergers  and  Acquisitions:  The  changing  face  of  Indian  Business  ‐By  Arun  Prabhudesai, 
Trak.in India Business Blog 
8) In the Driver’s Seat – By Krishna Gopalan in Business Today – Apr 20, 2008. 
9) What Tata Can Do –  By Gautam Sen, Business India – Aug 23, 2009 
10) Graph 1 ‐ JLR Graphs in the Annexure ‐ Morgan Stanley Research  
11) Tata Motors website  ‐ www.tatamotors.com 
12) Graph 2 ‐ The Deal in Numbers – see annexure Swiss Bank – UBS 
13) Tata Motors Balance Sheet – Annexure Financials for 2007‐2008 & 2008‐2009 
 
#Ford  calls  Premier  Auto  Group  (PAG)  a  bold  new  program  for  future  market  position  success.  Ford  deems 
Blue  Oval  an  innovative  plan  for  dealership  success.  It  requires  dealers  to  meet  stringent  standards  for 
customer satisfaction, sales and service 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    14   
 
Annexure 
 

Jaguar Land Rover11 
 
Fact Sheet 

Jaguar  Land  Rover  is  a  business  built  around  two  great  British  car  brands  with  exceptional  design  and 
engineering capabilities. Jaguar Land Rover’s manufacturing facilities are in the UK. 

Areas of business 

Jaguar Cars, founded in 1922, is one of the world’s premier manufacturers of luxury saloons and sports cars. 
Land  Rover  has  been  manufacturing  4x4s  since  1948. Its  products  have  defined  the  segments  in  which  they 
operate. 

Jaguar  Land  Rover’s  manufacturing  facilities  are  in  the  UK.  The  Jaguar  Land  Rover  business  employs  over 
16,000 people, predominantly in the UK, including some 3,500 engineers at two product development centres, 
in Whitley in Coventry and Gaydon in Warwickshire. 

The Jaguar XF, XJ and  XK models are manufactured at the company's Castle Bromwich plant in Birmingham, 
UK,  while  the  Jaguar  X‐TYPE  is  produced  alongside  the  Land  Rover  Freelander  2  at  the  Halewood  plant  in 
Liverpool, UK. Land Rover's Defender, Discovery 3, Range Rover Sport and Range Rover models are all built at 
Solihull, UK. 

The  business  is  a  major  wealth  generator  for  the  UK,  with  78  per  cent  of  Land  Rovers  exported  to  169 
countries and  70 per cent of Jaguars exported to 63 countries. Sales to customers are conducted principally 
through franchised dealers and importers. 

Location 

Jaguar Land Rover is based in the UK. 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    15   
 
Financials 2008­2009 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    16   
 
Financials 2007­2008 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    17   
 
Graph­1 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    18   
 
Graph­2 
 
 
 

 International Business – I   …a Project Report    19