You are on page 1of 9

2008 2014

6 YEARS HAVE PASSED since Hurricane Dolly hit the Texas Gulf Coast,
making landfall and causing $1.35 Billion USD in damage. As one of
the poorest areas in the United States, the Rio Grande Valley was
already an at risk population economically and environmentally. The
storm took these low income residents bad dreams and turned
them into nightmares.

These nightmares continued as mis-management of government contracts and an under prepared disaster recovery management
system that left many families still struggling to this day. The Lower Rio Grande Rapid Re-Housing Program (RAPIDO) attacks this
problem at a number of scales, creating a bottom up, community based approach that is centered on the families it intends to
support. The design process examines not only architectural issues but every level of the process, specifically the social, economic
and political contexts that make up a disaster scenario. RAPIDO is understanding, and re-designing the entire process with the
people that are impacted most.

Lower Rio Grande Rapid Re-Housing Program

RAPIDO

EXISTING MODEL
TIME

RAPIDO MODEL
AID

$
$

AID

$ SPENT ON SHELTER

Through the RAPIDO model any


contractor with a truck and trailer
will be able supply temporary
housing, supporting local jobs
and making housing more accessible. Families can work with
local CDCs and builders to add to
their homes.

$ SPENT ON MGNT

Money spent on administration,


staffing, and federal plans can be
better spent on more locally appropriate plans that put not only
support relief and reconstruction
but all puts money back in families
pockets.

RESPONSE TIME

Local governments equipped with


the tools they need can respond in
days rather than months (or years),
putting people back in their
homes without disrupting social
ties and keeping the fabric of their
communities in tact.

TIME

FEEDBACK

The RAPIDO program is designed


to test and re-test local disaster
response mechanisms and
re-shape the policies that shape
them. This feedback is intended to
shape legislation to better
respond to disasters in the future

$
$

the idea

AID

Regional Flooding Context

+710

FLOOD ZONES
FEMA Flood Zone A
FEMA Flood Zone ANI
FEMA Flood Zone X
FEMA Flood Zone X500

HIDALGO COUNTY
POPULATION AREA
MEDIAN INCOME
< $10,000
$10,000 - $19,999
$20,000 - $29,999
$30,000 - $39,999
$40,000 - $49,999
$50,000 - $59,999
$60,000 - $69,999
$70,000 - $79,999

Sta
r
Hid r Coun
algo
ty
Cou
nty

Hidalgo County
Kenedy County

WILLACY COUNTY

Willacy C
ounty
Hidalgo
County

DENSITY
(PERSONS PER SQUARE MILE)
< 60
60 - 249
250 - 999
1000 - 4999
> 5000

Willacy C
ounty
Cameron
County

25km

deral Emergency
Zones Designations.
ational Elevation

REGIONAL
URBAN STRUCTURE
Urban Areas
Colonias

Brownsville

GV STORMWATER

CAMERON COUNTY

COLONIAS

The Rio Grande Valley is


comprised of the highest
concentration of poverty in the
United States and contains a
substantial number of
substandard developments
known as colonias. These
developments are socially strong,
but highly economically and
envionmentally vulnerable.

AREA MEDIAN INCOME


$20,000 - $29,999

the Region's Stormwater Challenges and Infrastructure

OP

DENSITY
60 - 249
PERSONS / SQ MILE
FLOOD ZONE
A

SOCIAL VULNERABILITY
Social vulnerability and adaptive
capacity is central to estimating
disaster impacts. Though
communities may experience
similar storm events, the local
social, political, and physical
environment can make for very
different disaster experiences.

Variables that influence the social


vulnerability of a community
include: personal wealth, age,
development density, sector
economic dependence, housing
stock, race and ethnicity,
occupation, and infrastructure
dependence.

the place

1. PROGRAM DESIGN & DELIVERABLES

2. PROCESSES

3. INTEGRATION

4. IMPLEMENTATION

documented guidelines are developed based on research,


outreach and engagement

recommended processes for systemic


disaster preparedness

adoption of processes and


recommendations as statewide policy

occurs on state, county, and local levels and can be replicated nationwide

BUILDING & DELIVERY


METHODS
Utilize local contractors trained
in this disaster recovery model
to repair or recover damaged
homes. Use the CORE temporary
to permanent structure to more
efficiently move residents from
temporary housing to home.

HOUSING MODEL

PROGRAM
COMPARISON
REPORT

ENGAGED DESIGN &


OUTREACH PROCESS
Employ, train, and engage local
organizations in the outreach
process. Understand home
design preferences and patterns
of use to ensure long-term
function of home designs.

POLICY
RECOMMENDATIONS

STATEWIDE NATURAL
DISASTER PLAN

To be reviewed in the 2015 Texas


State Legislative cycle.
Regional Implementation
Outreach and organizational
collaboration increases
preparedness on a regional scale,
and allows for efficiencies in
access to information and
allocation of resources.

ORGANIZATIONAL
COLLABORATION
Ensure municipal, local, and
regional stakeholders are able
to provide a comprehensive and
speedy deployment of housing
repair and recovery system that
fall within existing emergency
response frameworks.

TECHNICAL GUIDE

PRE-DISASTER
PLANNING
Identify proceses and needs
prior to disaster - procurement,
training local laborers, outreach
center locations, and local
organizations conducting
outreach after a disaster - to
increase the number of people
who qualify and receive aid.

Local Implementation
Locally driven recovery reduces
the timeline of receiving aid, and
emphasizes a grassroots guided
approach. This is proven to
increase satisfaction and
efficiency within the recovery
process.

policy design and implementation

OFF-SITE CONSTRUCTION
begins prior to construction and continues after storm

1. PRE-DEVELOPMENT / PRE-DESIGN

2. OUTREACH AND CASE MANAGEMENT

3. SITE ASSESSMENT AND

4. DELIVER AND ASSEMBLE

5. EXPANSION

community engagement and research

assessment of damaged and intake of families

assessment of sites and preparation for construction

occurs locally / assembled in one week

dependent upon residents


choice and resources

Engaged - Addition Design Process

NA
TU

RA

LD

ISA
ST
ER

OC
CU
RS

Off
ou -si

Ou

On

t
thr t of fl e C
o
ou oo
gh d z nst
ou on
t re e, s ruc
gio cat tio
ter
n
n
ed

Sit
eC
on

str
uc

Construction Prep
Core panels are constructed in
local lumber yards, warehouses, etc
prior to storm event
Construction Response
Core units continue to be
constructed after storm event o
meet local need.
Transport
standard truck with
flatbed trailer hitch

tio

Assess Conditions
Region is surveyed and damaged
is assessed.

Loc tre
a
lies al tea ch
thr ms Tea
ou
a
gh re d ms
i
ou
t th spatc Disp
e a hed
atc
pp
t
lica o w he
d
tio ork
np
w
roc ith f
ess am
i.

Debris Clean-Up
site /portion of site is cleared

Site Evaluation
sites are evaluated with families
to determine home layout.

Outreach Teams Meet w/ Families


Teams of outreach experts and local
community organizers work with families to
become eligible for disaster relief housing

Core Placed
The core is assembled on site. Family
moves in

Case Managers w/with Families


families work with case managers
throughout application process.
Community Engaged - Core Design Process

Designers Work w/ families


families go through custom
design process to add to core
once post disaster conditions
have stabilized.

making process

Addition
Design teams pair with builders and families to add to home once region is stabilized and construction can begin at full
scale

TEMPORARY ROOF
A durable/temporary roof is
designed to last if families are
forced to rely on the CORE for an
extended period of time. The area
can double as storage space, and
the material can be reused
post-storm to clad the home or
an additional shed.

WET WALL
Plumbing and a majority of
electrical components are
located in the wet wall. Cabinets
are installed last to allow for final
connections to be made.

ELECTRICAL
Electrical chases are built into the
wall panels to ensure flexibility of
the CORE design. Families and
contractors are able to modify
these connections at any point in
the construction of additional
space.

SAFE HOUSE
The CORE is built as a safe house
with extra rigid shear walls and
connections, should aftershock
disaster occur while families are
particularly vulnerable.

WALL ASSEMBILIES
Simple, repetitive assemblies use
stick framing methods able to be
constructed by local builders.
Panels can be removed to
accommodate a wide variety of
home designs.

GATHERING PLACE
Gathering places are integral to
the CORE design. The porch
components are able to be
reused or relocated for future
additions to the home.

ELEVATED
CONSTRUCTION

the CORE

Elevated construction allows for


flexibility if flood plain elevations
are revised post-disaster. This
reduces environmental risks for
families.

STORAGE/SHADE

Double roof acts as a badly


needed storages space as well as
shading the structure.

CUSTOM DESIGN FOR


FAMILIES

Once conditions have stabilized


families can work with local
CDCs and designers to add to
their homes.

GATHERING SPACE

DURABLE/FLEXIBLE

Rubberized zip-wall panels keep


the house dry without the need
for siding, leaving the family the
like later on.

the house

The number one priority is to get


people back in their homes. But
with limited interior space,
families need a place to gather.

COMMUNITIES KEPT
INTACT

With families back in their


neighborhoods quickly, familial
and social ties are kept intact.

EXISTING CORE

The core is designed to facilitate


expansion.

ECONOMIESARE
AREREINFORCED
REINFORCED
3.3.ECONOMIES
2. FAMILIES
MAKE
2. FAMILIES
MAKE CHOICES
CHOICES
MAKE
CHOICES
Fromfamilies
the get-go,
get-go,
families are
areable
ableto
to
From the get-go,
are able families
to make choices
to affect
their to
make
choices
to affect
affect their
theirsituations.
situations.
situations. Designers and
Designers and
and
contractors work with
contractors work with them
to contractors work with
to ensure
ensure
that when
when cores
coresare
are
ensure thatthem
when cores
are placedthat
on site, it is placed
done so with
site, itit is
is done
done so
sowith
withfuture
future
onfuture
site,
rebuilding in mind. Once
3. ECONOMIES
mind. Once
Once
conditionsARE REINFORCED
rebuilding
in mind.
conditions
conditions are
stabilized families
The RAPIDO
program is designed to not only
begin planning
their new families
families begin
begin
planning
are for
stabilized
planning
help families but build the economies that
homes.
homes. support these families. The construction system
2. FAMILIES MAKE CHOICESfor their new homes.
From the get-go, families are able to
make choices to affect their situations.
Designers and contractors work with
them to ensure that when cores are
placed
on site, it is MAKE
done soCHOICES
with future
2. FAMILIES
rebuilding in mind. Once conditions
From the get-go, families are able to
are make
stabilized
families begin planning
choices to affect their situations.
for their
newand
homes.
Designers
contractors work with

TheRAPIDO
RAPIDOprogram
programisisdesigned
designedtotonot
not
only
The
only
helpfamilies
familiesbut
butbuild
buildthe
theeconomies
economies
that
help
that
3. ECONOMIESsupport
ARE these
support
thesefamilies.
families.The
Theconstruction
construction
system
system
REINFORCED
builttotogive
givelocal
localcontractors
contractorsthe
theability
ability
use
isisbuilt
toto
use
The RAPIDO program is designed
theirskills
skillstotosupport
supporttheir
theirfamilies
familiesand
and
local
their
local
to not only help families but build
the economies that support these
economies.
economies.
families. The construction system
is built to give local contractors
the ability to use their skills to
support their families and local
economies.

is built to give local contractors the ability to use


their skills to support their families and local
3. ECONOMIES ARE REINFORCED economies.

The RAPIDO program is designed to not only


help families but build the economies that
support these families. The construction system
is built to give local contractors the ability to use
their skills to support their families and local
economies.

them to ensure that when cores are


placed on site, it is done so with future
rebuilding in mind. Once conditions
are stabilized families begin planning
for their new homes.

Social
Networks
Social
Networks

Social Networks

Social Networks

1. COMMUNTIES
ARE TORN APART

When a storm hits families are


displaced and the ties that hold
communities
together
are broken.
MMUNITIES
ARE TORN
APART
1. COMMUNITIES
ARE TORN
APART
If
people
are
displaced
to
long,
storm
families
are displaced
and and
the
tiesties
that
hold
Whenhits
a storm
hits families
are displaced
the
that
hold
this
ties
become
impossible
to
nities
togethertogether
are broken.
If people
are displaced
toto
communities
are broken.
If people
are displaced
thisrepair.
ties become
impossible
to repair
is long,
ties become
impossible
to repair

1.COMMUNITIES
COMMUNITIES ARE
ARE TORN
TORN APART
APART
1.

When a storm hits families are displaced and the ties that hold
When a storm hits families are displaced and the ties that hold
communities together are broken. If people are displaced to
communities together are broken. If people are displaced to
long, this ties become impossible to repair
long, this ties become impossible to repair

THE NEIGHBORHOOD

the neighborhood

E NEIGHBORHOOD

4. COMMUNITIES ARE STRENGTHENED

An open-sourced and grassroots approach not


4.
COMMUNITIES ARE STRENGTHENED
only gives communities access to shelter and
An open-sourced
andbygrassroots
resources
but builds strength
allowing approach not
only
givestocommunities
access to shelter and
people
their own outcomes.

resources but builds strength by allowing


people to their own outcomes.

4. COMMUNTIES ARE
STRENGTHENED

An open-sourced and grassroots


approach not only gives
communities access to shelter
and resources but builds strength
by allowing people to control
their own outcomes.

BUILDING & DELIVERY


METHODS
Utilize local contractors trained
in this disaster recovery model
to repair or recover damaged
homes. Use the CORE temporary
to permanent structure to more
efficiently move residents from
temporary housing to home.

HOUSING MODEL

TIME

AID
EXISTING MODEL

PROGRAM
COMPARISON
REPORT

ENGAGED DESIGN &


OUTREACH PROCESS
Employ, train, and engage local
organizations in the outreach
process. Understand home
design preferences and patterns
of use to ensure long-term
function of home designs.

POLICY
RECOMMENDATIONS

STATEWIDE NATURAL
DISASTER PLAN

To be reviewed in the 2015 Texas


State Legislative cycle.

ORGANIZATIONAL
COLLABORATION

Regional Implementation
Outreach and organizational
collaboration increases
preparedness on a regional scale,
and allows for efficiencies in
access to information and
allocation of resources.

Ensure municipal, local, and


regional stakeholders are able
to provide a comprehensive and
speedy deployment of housing
repair and recovery system that
fall within existing emergency
response frameworks.

TECHNICAL GUIDE

POLICY AND
IMPLEMENTATION

PRE-DISASTER
PLANNING
Identify proceses and needs
prior to disaster - procurement,
training local laborers, outreach
center locations, and local
organizations conducting
outreach after a disaster - to
increase the number of people
who qualify and receive aid.

RAPIDO creates an efficient


system of disaster reponse,
starting from and grassroots level
to determine policy appropriate
to its local context. The system
shifts control of the recovery
process to local organizations and
individuals, ensuring more
efficient use of federal and state
resources.

Local Implementation
Locally driven recovery reduces
the timeline of receiving aid, and
emphasizes a grassroots guided
approach. This is proven to
increase satisfaction and
efficiency within the recovery
process.

POLICY PROCESS

DESIGN AND BUILDING


PROCESS

The CORE modular home


provides a foundation for a
resident-controlled design
process, allowing choice in the
design and construction of their
home. The system reduces the
amount of time that residents are
displaced, keeping social
networks intact and reducing the
negative economic impacts of
disasters on the affected
households.

MAKING PROCESS

BUILDING RESILIENT
COMMUNITIES
RAPIDO addresses the disaster
recovery process on multiple
scales. The housing design and
construction process must
navigate the complex system of
policy, economics, local culture,
and ecology in order to ensure
equitable and effective delivery of
assistance to communities that
are the most vulnerable to natural
disasters. This holistic approach
sets the foundation for resilient
neighborhoods in the face of
future events.
NEIGHBORHOOD

the RAPIDO model