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M.B.

A PROGRAMME
WELFARE MEASURES

EMPLOYEE

INTRODUCTION
Employee welfare defines as “efforts to make life worth living for workmen”.
These efforts have their origin either in some statute formed by the state or in some local
custom or in collective agreement or in the employer’s own initiative.

To give expression to philanthropic and paternalistic feelings.

To win over employee’s loyalty and increase their morale.

To combat trade unionism and socialist ideas.

To build up stable labour force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism.

To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.

To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits.

To earn goodwill and enhance public image.

To reduce the threat of further government intervention.

To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

IMPORTANCE:
Industrial progress of a country depends on its committed work force and the
social and economic aspects of the life of a worker have a direct influence on the social and
economic development of a nation.
The scheme of employee welfare may be regarded as “a wise investment”
which should and usually does bring a profitable return in the form of greater efficiency.
In order to get the best out of a worker in the matter of production working
condition required to be improved to a large extend. The workers should at least have the
means and facilities to keep him self in a state of health and efficiency.

JOCIL Ltd.
N.I.T

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M.B.A PROGRAMME
WELFARE MEASURES

EMPLOYEE

Principles of Employee Welfare Service
Following are generally given as the principles to be followed in setting up a
employee welfare service:

The service should satisfy real needs of the workers. This means that the manager
must first determine what the employee’s real needs are with the active participation
of workers.

The service should such as can be handled by cafeteria approach. Due to the
difference in Sex, age, marital status, number of children, type of job and the income
level of employees there are large differences in their choice of a particular benefit.
This is known as the cafeteria approach. Such an approach individualises the benefit
system though it may be difficult to operate and administer.

The employer should not assume a benevolent posture.

The cost of the service should be calculate and its financing established on a sound
basis.

There should be periodical assessment or evaluation of the service and necessary
timely --on the basis of feedback.

JOCIL Ltd.
N.I.T

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M.B.A PROGRAMME
WELFARE MEASURES

EMPLOYEE

FEATURES:
 The basic purpose into improve the lot of the working class.
 Employee welfare is a dynamic concept.
 Employee welfare measures are also known as fringe benefits and
services.
 Welfare measures may be both voluntary and statutory

JOCIL Ltd.
N.I.T

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The statutory welfare schemes include the fallowing provisions. Spittoons (ware houses).A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE EMPLOYEE WELFARE SCHEMES: Organization provide welfare facilities to their employees to keep their motivation levels high. 9. Changing rooms. Statutory welfare schemes: These include provisions provided in the industrial acts like Factories Act 1948. Latrines and urinals. 6.B. 1. Washing places. 8. Lighting. JOCIL Ltd. 7. Facilities for sitting. Mines Act 1962. Dock workers Act 1986. Drinking water. N.I. The employee welfare schemes can be classified into two categories viz. 3.T 4 .M. 4. 2. Canteen facilities. Statutory and Non-Statutory schemes. 5. First aid appliances.

Medi-claim insurance scheme. Many Nonstatutory welfare schemes may include the fallowing schemes. Personal health care (regular medical checkups) 2. JOCIL Ltd. 1. N. Flexi time. Rest rooms.T 5 . 7. Employee assistance programs (external counseling service) 4. Non-Statutory schemes: The Non-Statutory schemes differ from the organization.B.I. Harassment policy. 6. Maternity and adoption leave.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 10. 3. 5. Employee referral scheme.M.

level of education.T 6 . degree of industrialization and general standard of the socio-economic development of the nation. THE POLICE THEORY: This is based on the contention that a minimum standard of welfare is necessary for labourers. Apparently this theory assumes that man is selfish and self centered and always tired to achieve his own ends. There are seven theories. RELIIGIOUS THEORY: This theory is based on the concept that man is essentially “a religious animal” even today many acts of man are related to religion sentiments and beliefs. Man is believed to have an instinctive urge by which he strives to remove the suffering of others and promote their well being. elastic and differs from time to time. industry to industry and country to country depending upon the value system. Here the assumption is that without policing compulsion employers do not provide even the minimum facilities for workers.M. N. JOCIL Ltd.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE THEORIES OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE: The form of Employee welfare activities is flexible. even at any cost of the welfare of others.B. PHILANTHROPIC THEORY: This theory is based on mans love for mankind. region to region.I. In fact the labour welfare movement began in early years of the industrial revolution with the support of philanthropists. social customs. Philanthropic means ‘loving mankind’.

Here.M. welfare work is used as a means to secure preserve and develop the efficiency and productivity of labour. work as a sort of an advertisement and help an organization to project its good image and build up and promote good and healthy public relations. N. According to this the employer should hold the industrial assets for himself for the benefit of his workers and also for society.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE TRUSTEESHIP THEORY: This is also called the paternalistic theory of labour welfare. PUBLIC RELATION THEORY.I.B. labour welfare programs under this theory. This theory provides the basis for an atmosphere of goodwill between labour and management and also between management and the public.T 7 . PLACATING THEORY: This theory is based on the fact that the labour groups are becoming demanding and militant and are more conscious of their rights and privileges then ever before. JOCIL Ltd. FUNCTIONAL THEORY: This is also called the efficiency theory.

But few sound and strong unions have been the pioneering in this respect. trade unions have done little for the welfare of workers. restrooms. 2. Other agencies JOCIL Ltd. N. Employers : Employers in India in general looked upon welfare work as fruitless and baren though some of them indeed had done pioneering. shelters etc.T : 8 .. These acts provide for canteens. Trade unions : In India. 3. 4.M.I. safety and welfare under Factories act 1948 and Mines act 1952.B. 5. crèches. State government : Government in different states and union territories provide welfare facilities to workers.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE AGENCIES OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE: 1. Central government: The central government has made elaborate provisions for the health.

Jocil limited is a management organization in that physical effort is more compared to the mental effort.T 9 . In this company the researcher is going to analyse welfare conditions and amenities for employees and how these facilities are satisfying the employees JOCIL Ltd..A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Some philanthropic. charitable social service organizations like. seva sadan society etc. Basic reason behind to select this topic is. N.M.I. LINK OF THE TOPIC TO THE COMPANY The researches had selected the topic employee welfare measures in Jocil limited.B.

JOCIL Ltd.T 10 .B.  To offer findings and suggestions based on the study.LTD.  To know the impact of welfare facilities on the performance of the employees.  To observe the welfare activities in the company.  To know the satisfaction level towards the welfare services offered by the company.I. N.  To examine the employee welfare measures of the company.M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:  To present the theoretical frame work of employee welfare measures in JOCIL.

B. Data can be broadly classified as  Primary data. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically in it we study the various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying this research problem.  Researcher provide Questionnaire to employees.M. Primary data: This is original in character and are collected afresh.T 11 .  Researcher directly interact with existing employees.  Secondary data.I. JOCIL Ltd. N.  Researcher got feed back through the questionnaires and researcher understand the satisfaction levels of employee towards the organization.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY: Research methodology is way to systematically solve the research problem.

N.B. internet etc. SAMPLING METHODOLOGY: SAMPLE UNIT: The researcher had selected the workers as sample unit.. why because the study entirely deals with welfare measures. JOCIL Ltd. SAMPLE TYPE: The researcher had chosen the systematic random sampling SAMPLE SIZE: The universe of the study is 800 in that researcher had selected 10% as sample size that is 80.I.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Secondary data: Refers to the use of information already collected and published or unpublished the source are books..T 12 .M.

relating to welfare provisions were observed. The present study of welfare provisions includes intra mural activities i. The present study includes only formal and informal meeting with the employees..A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Scope of the study: HRD plays an important role Indian modern society..M. welfare provisions inside the organization and extra mural activities i. N.e.I. during my study all aspects i.T 13 .. Keeping this view in mind I made a study of welfare scheme in ACL..B..e.e. welfare provisions outside the organization at present provide the fallowing welfare facilities.. The organization provides a long list of welfare measures to its employees. As the organization resists to conduct a survey among the employees regarding their welfare provision. JOCIL Ltd.

The employee is a soldier safeguarding the social & economic factors of the organization and his/her actions and interactions with in the company work will have a great impact and influence on organizational development.M.I. Keeping in view the above importance of employee welfare an attempt is made to study the welfare provisions provided for the employees at JOCIL LIMITED.T 14 . N. JOCIL Ltd.B.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Need of the study: Company progress on its committed workforce and the social & economic aspects of an employee has an employee has a direct influence on development of a company.

B.I. Time was the major constraint as the mentioned period was not enough to collect the data in detailed.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY: As the mangers of the organization are busy with their work schedule it was difficult to collect detailed data. Survey was done with the sample size of 800 as the employees of the company work in shifts and as they are busy with their schedule. Some were unable to understand the language in the questionnaire so the felt it difficult to answer.T 15 . JOCIL Ltd. N.M.

T 16 . JOCIL Ltd.I.  The present study is useful to the academicians.B. N.  The present study is useful to the JOCIL LIMITED.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Significance of the study:  The present study on employee welfare measure is useful to the company in future to accelerate the welfare measures.M.

Presentation of the study: Chapter one deals with “Rationale of the study”.B.M.I.  Link of the topic to the company. JOCIL Ltd. Chapter four deals with “analysis of employee welfare measures in JOCIL LIMITED”.T 17 . Chapter two deals with “objectives and methodology of the study” Chapter three deals with “industry and company profile”.  The present study is also useful to the policy makers.  Introduction.  The present study is useful to the economists. N.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE  The present study is useful to the competitors.

Marseilles became noted as a soap making center. In the 1st cent.M. A soap factory and bars of scented soap were excavated at Pompeii. Ancient peoples are believed to have employed wood ashes and water for washing and to have relieved the resulting irritation with grease or oil.T 18 .D. INDUSTRY ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION Soap. N. Soap fell into disuse after the fall of Rome but was revived in Italy probably in the 8th cent.1200.B. and reached France c. a cleansing agent. and by absorbing dirt into the foam..A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Chapter five deals with “Findings and suggestions and conclusion”. Pliny described a soap of tallow and wood ashes used by Germanic tribes to brighten their hair. JOCIL Ltd. by emulsifying grease. A. It cleanses by lowering the surface tension of water.I.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Although soap was known in England in the 14th cent. which is now known as glycerin. Soap making was common in Italy and Spain during the 8th century. the first English patent to a soap maker was issued in the 17th cent. The purifying agents mentioned in the Old Testament were not true soaps but were a product of tree bark ashes alone. The 1stcentury Roman historian Pliny the Elder described various forms of hard and soft dyecontaining soaps known as rutilandis capelins. the manufacture of soap was revolutionized in 1791 by the French chemist Nicolas Leblanc. in 1823. about 1500. The French. The industry in England grew rapidly and in 1622 was granted special privileges by King James I. the sodium or potassium salt of a fatty acid.B. producing a sweet-tasting substance that he called Ölsüss. and many housewives made soap from waste fats and lye (obtained by leaching wood ashes) Origin of soap Soap is a cleansing agent or detergent that is made from animal and vegetable fats.T 19 . By the 13th century. Meanwhile. when he boiled olive oil with lead oxide. Records mentioning the use of numerous soapy materials and cleansing agents date from ancient times. most soap was produced from the tallow of goats. and greases..M. N. In 1783 the Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele accidentally simulated the reaction that occurs in the presentday boiling process of soap making. with beech ash furnishing the alkali.I. described below. Chervil eventually discovered. In the American colonies soap factories appeared at an early date. devised a method of making soap from olive oil instead of from animal fats and. introduced their discoveries into England. that simple fats do not combine with alkali to form soap but are first decomposed to form fatty acids and glycerol’s. This discovery by Scheele led the French chemist Michel Eugene Chervil to investigate the chemical nature of the fats and oils used in soap. after experimentation. when the soap industry was introduced from Italy into France. who invented a process for JOCIL Ltd. formed by the interaction of fats and oils with alkali. chemically. which had previously been used by women to cleanse and impart brilliant colors to the hair. oils. The industry was handicapped in England from 1712 to 1853 by a heavy tax on soap.

M. Fatty Alcohols Fatty alcohols are the most important basic oleo chemical used for the production of surfactants. about 70% of the fatty alcohols produced are used for the manufacture of non-ionic and anionic surfactants such as fatty ethoxylates and fatty ether sulphates. World Production of Basic Oleo chemicals Starting from the eighties. due to increase in the production of palm and palm kernel oils. there is a significant shift in the production of basic Oleo chemicals from the developed countries to the ASEAN region (Table 18). Fatty Acids In the early 1980s.T 20 . or soda. accounting for more than 90% of the world’s total production at those times. In 1995.I. in the ASEAN countries.2 million tones. From 1985 onwards. However. there was a marked shift from these developed countries to the ASEAN region. and the concern for the environment. but by 1700 many areas derived their main income from the export of ashes and fats used in soap making. soap was made from rendered animal fats and was processed mainly in the household. In the early American colonies. USA. N. Future production will depend on the pricing of palm oil/palm kernel oil versus ethylene. of which about 50% are from oils and fats (natural fatty alcohols) while the remaining 50% are from petrochemical sources (synthetic fatty alcohols). Europe and Japan were the major producers of fatty acids. World production of fatty alcohols in 1995 is about 1.B.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE obtaining sodium carbonate. it is forecast that Asia is to account for more than 50% of the world’s total production of fatty acids. In 1995. natural fatty alcohols would be favoured in the future. the coconut oil industry. Asia accounted for 30% of the world’s total production of fatty acids and by 2010. Fatty Amines JOCIL Ltd. and to some extent. from ordinary salt. This is mainly due to rapid development of the palm oil.

I.T 21 .M. JOCIL Ltd.B. QUATS are used in fabric softeners and hair conditioners.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Fatty amines are mostly produced for the production of quaternary ammonium compounds (QUATS) such as distearyldimethylammonium compounds. N. Their production is expected to increase substantially due to higher consumer demands in the future.

T 22 . Since water is essential for life.at least that it rinsed mud off their hands.M. JOCIL Ltd.I.B. N. the earliest people lived near water and knew something about its cleansing properties .A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES Basic Oleo chemicals EMPLOYEE 1995 2000e 2010f Europe 900 950 1050 15 America 650 700 850 30 Asia 900 1200 1750 95 Others 200 200 350 75 World 2650 3050 4000 50 Europe 250 250 275 10 America 100 110 130 30 Asia 225 275 365 60 Others 20 25 30 50 World 595 660 800 35 Europe 150 175 200 30 America 125 175 250 100 Asia 300 405 800 170 Others 25 25 50 100 World 600 780 1300 120 Europe 150 175 200 30 America 200 200 220 10 Asia 100 120 180 80 Others 75 75 100 30 World 515 570 700 35 Europe 200 210 230 15 America 150 170 210 40 Asia 200 270 450 125 Other 50 50 60 20 World 600 700 950 60 Basic Europe 1650 1760 1955 20 Olecochemiclas America 1225 1355 1660 35 Asia 1725 2270 3545 105 Others 370 375 590 60 World 4970 5760 7750 55 Fatty Acids Fatty Methyl Esters Fatty Alcohols – natural Fatty Amines Glycerol – natural % increase 1995 / 2010 HISTORY OF SOAP The origins of personal cleanliness date back to prehistoric times.

Soap got its name. according to an ancient Roman legend. a medical document from about 1500 B. from Mount Sapo.C. they cleaned their bodies with blocks of clay." Such materials were later used as hair styling aids. and wood ashes down into the clay soil along the Tiber River. Clothes were washed without soap in streams. Rain washed a mixture of melted animal fat. as well as for washing At about the same time. then anointed themselves with oil. and scraped off the oil and dirt with a metal instrument known as a strigil.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE A soap-like material found in clay cylinders during the excavation of ancient Babylon is evidence that soapmaking was known as early as 2800 B.C. or tallow. describes combining animal and vegetable oils with alkaline salts to form a soap-like material used for treating skin diseases.M. where animals were sacrificed. Women found that this clay mixture made their wash cleaner with much less effort. which is a method of making soap. pumice and ashes. N. The early Greeks bathed for aesthetic reasons and apparently did not use soap. that they used to tint their hair red. sand. made of tallow and ashes. Moses gave the Israelites detailed laws governing personal cleanliness. He also related cleanliness to health and religious purification.. Records show that ancient Egyptians bathed regularly. The Ebers Papyrus. but do not refer to the purpose of the "soap.I.T 23 .B. The ancient Germans and Gauls are also credited with discovering a substance called soap. They also used oil with ashes. Inscriptions on the cylinders say that fats were boiled with ashes. Biblical accounts suggest that the Israelites knew that mixing ashes and oil produced a kind of hair gel. JOCIL Ltd. Instead.

along with fragrance. The soap business was so good that in 1622.I. This lack of personal cleanliness and related unsanitary living conditions contributed heavily to the great plagues of the Middle Ages. recommended soap for both medicinal and cleansing purposes. Galen. Soap maker guilds guarded their trade secrets closely.D. and cleanliness Commercial soap making in the American colonies began in 1608 with the arrival of several soapmakers on the second ship from England to reach Jamestown. and especially to the Black Death of the 14th century. pools warmed with water from hot springs were popular gathering places on Saturday evenings. Well into the 19th century. By the second century A. When the high tax was removed. Still there were areas of the medieval world where personal cleanliness remained important. It wasn't until the 17th century that cleanliness and bathing started to come back into fashion in much of Europe. The baths were luxurious. VA.M. Gradually more varieties of soap became available for shaving and shampooing. was built about 312 B. so did bathing.C. due to their ready supply of raw materials such as oil from olive trees. However. Soap making was an established craft in Europe by the seventh century. soapmaking stayed JOCIL Ltd. After the fall of Rome in 467 A. N.B.000 a year. as well as bathing and laundering. the Greek physician.T 24 . much of Europe felt the impact of filth upon public health. Vegetable and animal oils were used with ashes of plants. Spain and France were early centers of soap manufacturing. for many years. Daily bathing was a common custom in Japan during the Middle Ages. soap became available to ordinary people. and the resulting decline in bathing habits.. King James I granted a monopoly to a soapmaker for $100. And in Iceland. soap was heavily taxed as a luxury item in several countries.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE As Roman civilization advanced. Italy. supplied with water from their aqueducts. The English began making soap during the 12th century. The first of the famous Roman baths. and bathing became very popular.D.

which also used common table salt.I. made soapmaking one of America's fastest-growing industries by 1850. together with the development of power to operate factories. when the first synthetic detergent was developed in Germany in response to a World War I-related shortage of fats for making soap. unlike soap. With this widespread use came the development of milder soaps for bathing and soaps for use in the washing machines that were available to consumers by the turn of the century. but did not really take off until after World War II. The Leblanc process yielded quantities of good quality. its broad availability changed soap from a luxury item to an everyday necessity. or sodium chloride. in exchange for some soap. Household detergent production in the United States began in the early 1930s. professional soapmakers began regularly collecting waste fats from households. Nicholas Leblanc.M. The science of modern soapmaking was bom some 20 years later with the discovery by Michel Eugene Chevreul. Soda ash is the alkali obtained from ashes that combines with fat to form soap.B. N. His studies established the basis for both fat and soap chemistry. Solvay's process further reduced the cost of obtaining this alkali.T 25 . or sodium carbonate. would not combine with the mineral salts in water to form an insoluble substance known as soap curd. The discovery of detergents was also driven by the need for a cleaning agent that. synthetic detergents are non-soap washing and cleaning products that are "synthesized" or put together chemically from a variety of raw materials. Ernest Solvay. another French chemist. A major step toward large-scale commercial soapmaking occurred in 1791 when a French chemist. Eventually. of the chemical nature and relationship of fats. of the ammonia process. inexpensive soda ash. from common salt. patented a process for making soda ash. glycerine and fatty acids.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE essentially a household chore. At the same time. The war-time JOCIL Ltd. Also important to the advancement of soap technology was the mid-1800s invention by the Belgian chemist.The chemistry of soap manufacturing stayed essentially the same until 1916. These scientific discoveries. and increased both the quality and quantity of the soda ash available for manufacturing soap. to make soda ash. Known today simply as detergents.

Phosphate compounds used as builders in these detergents vastly improved performance. hand dishwashing and all-purpose cleaninproducts Fabric softeners (rinse-cycle added) Detergent with oxygen bleach 1960s Prewash soil and stain removers Laundry powders with enzymes Enzyme presoaks JOCIL Ltd. The breakthrough in the development of detergents for all-purpose laundry uses came in 1946. N.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE interruption of fat and oil supplies as well as the military's need for a cleaning agent that would work in mineral-rich sea water and in cold water had further stimulated research on detergents.S. Since those early achievements in detergent and builder chemistry. dishwashing and household cleaning. The first detergents were used chiefly for hand dishwashing and fine fabric laundering. as well as safe for consumers and for the environment. while the builder helps the surfactant to work more efficiently. when the first "built" detergent (containing a surfactant/builder combination) was introduced in the U.M. new product activity has continued to focus on developing cleaning products that are efficient and easy to use.B.I. making them suitable for cleaning heavily soiled laundry. Here's a summary of some of those innovations: 1950s Automatic dishwasher powders Liquid laundry.T 26 . The surfactant is a detergent product's basic cleaning ingredient. Detergents (alone or in combination with soap) are also found in many of the bars and liquids used for personal cleansing. By 1953. sales of detergents in this country had surpassed those of soap. Now detergents have all but replaced soap-based products for laundering.

. detergent with fabric softener) 1980s Detergents for cooler water washing Automatic dishwasher liquids Concentrated laundry powders 1990s Ultra (superconcentrated) powder and liquid detergents Ultra fabric softeners Automatic dishwasher gels Laundry and cleaning product refills ABOUT PERSONAL WASH (SOAPS) JOCIL Ltd.M.T 27 .g.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 1970s Liquid hand soaps Fabric softeners (sheets and wash-cycle added) Multifunctional products (e. N.B.I.

growth in rural demand is expected to increase because consumers are moving up towards premium products. The major players in personal wash (Soap) market are Hindustan uni Lever Ltd. The brand names of HLL are Liril. Ayush.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE The personal wash can be segregated into: * Premium.M.75 million retail stores are in the rural areas. Different brands are popular in different regions. Rexona. HLL gives its products in several brand names. in the recent past there has not been much change in the volume of premium soaps in proportion to economy soaps. soaps are available in five million retail stores. Denim. Growth With increase in disposable incomes. As a result of sharp fall in farm disposable incomes. out of which. availability of these products is not an issue. N. while in Brazil it is at 1. Dove.B. (HUL) Hindustan Lever Ltd. hence around 50% of the soaps are sold in the rural markets. Cinthol The price of the premium segment products is twice that of economy segment products.Lux. Lifebuoy. Lux. The penetration level of toilet soaps is 88. Breeze. 70% of India's population resides in the rural areas. Dove * Economy.Nirma Bath.Nirma. In India HLL has gained 60% of share in the total toilet soap market. Lifebuoy * Popular. Therefore. Pears.6%.I. Consumers through upgraded offerings and better quality soaps.100 gms per annum. However. Hamam. In India. The economy and popular segments are 4/5ths of the entire soaps market. the consumers persuaded low-income households to JOCIL Ltd. has become a major player in the Indian personal wash market. HLL have brought a few benefits to the consumer as a marketer of toilet soap have tried to woo.. 3. the per capita consumption of soap in India is at 460 gms per annum. because increase in prices has led some consumers to look for cheaper substitutes. However.T 28 . Fair & Lovely.

HLL has increased Lifebuoy’s market share by introducing. Godrej consumer care has introduced.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE downtrade.I. a fairness soap. Breeze 2-in-1 actually offers a cost-effective replacement to consumers who we hair wash products and soap. Wipro have come out with new mixes and are confident of delivering value. Lifebuoy Active. spawning a competitive response from HLL in the form of Fair & Lovely soap. Now-a-days HLL has become a dominant player in the Indian personal wash market. Wipro Baby Soap. Godrej. Lifebuoy Gold.Pradesh with 18 percent market share. that is. In spite of competition Wipro has generated consumer satisfaction. N. as against this.B. The company faces several competitions from HLL. switch from high-to-low –priced brands. has been a success too. HLL offering to combine two benefits in a single tablet. The company introduced Chandrika as a Ayurvedic and herbal product as against Medimix. In India Wipro has gained 50% of share in toilet soap market.M.T 29 . The major competitors of HLL are Nirma. Godrej consumer care and WIPRO. WIPRO : WIPRO has become a major player in the Indian personal wash market. The biggest brand of Wipro is Santoor was launched in the late 80’s. HLL claims Breeze is the largest brand in the discount segment. Henko. Nirma : JOCIL Ltd.6 million outlets across the country for its distribution. Nirma. The companies’ further interests in naturals/ ayurvedic segment of the toiletries market. HLL has gained major share in discount segment. too appears to endorse the phenomenon of downtrading. It covers 1. Wipro through Santoor is the leading Soap marketer in Andhra . fairglow which claims to enhance a fairness. Wipro gives its products in brand names of Santoor. HLL. Lifebuoy Plus. Wipro baby soft diapers gained almost 65 percent of the business from Northern Markets. 50 percent of Wipro consumer care business comes from the toilet soap category. Chadrika.

the company has managed robust sales. Godrej. 12 + (for 75 gms) Premium JOCIL Ltd. which claims to enhance fairness. the fairness soap from Godrej Consumer Care. Nirma has gained major market share just a couple of years after its entry. Godrej Consumer Care: With at least three entirely new launches under its belt. Launches such as Nirma have paid off because consumers have seen the brand as offering good value for money.B. Fair Glow. The Nirma was succeeded within a short period due to its aggressive pricing strategy.I. offer which the consumer products business was diverted from the Godrej industries and vested with Godrej consumer care. As a relatively small player in the business. The company has managed healthy top line growth in the market. has been a success too. The company’s recent restructuring exercise. has also helped pep up profitability performance. Godrej consumer care has improved its market share in the personal wash market. It tries to made brands such as Nirma available at least 10 percent lower than its nearest competitors. The company offers its brands Nirma Lime. N. Wipro. Nirma.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Nirma has quickly become a significant player in the domestic toilet soap market. Nirma premier. 6 – 8 (for 75 gms) Sub-Popular Rs.M. The company’s aggressive pricing strategy has been the key behind its performance. 8 – 12 (for 75 gms) Popular Rs.T 30 . Segmentation of the total toilet soaps: Price Range Soap Segment Rs. The company faces competition from HLL.

tooth brush (12 per cent). fairness cream. washing powder. cleaners and repellents. tooth brush. deodorants.T 31 . washing powder (13 per cent) detergent cakes (11 per cent). shampoos. laundry soaps. N. dish wash. April-June 2008. branded coconut oil (18 per cent). The products. toilet soap (10 per cent). tooth paste. which are projected to achieve excellent growth of 20 per cent and above during the first quarter of the financial year 2008-09. shampoos. liquid detergent (13 per cent). shaving cream.soap and toiletries (14 per cent). The products that are expected to growth between 10-20 per cent are . The range of products covered by the FICCI survey amounted to about 28 items. hair dyes. skin care and cosmetics (19 per cent).M.e. deodorant (40 per cent). 5 per cent). The survey projects higher growth across sectors in the FMCG segment in view of the growing economic fundamentals. i. fairness products and men’s products. anti-dandruff shampoos (22 per cent). cleaners/repellents (24. oral care (17 per cent). laundry soaps/ bars (11 per cent). It included soap and toiletries.. deodorant. are shaving cream (22 per cent). tooth powder. anti-aging solutions. hair care (16 per cent) coconut oil (12 per cent). toilet soap. etc.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES Segment EMPLOYEE Market Share Growth Rate (%) Premium 24 (%) 3 Popular 45 1 Sub-Popular 31 15 Present scenario in india Consumers’ preference for FMCGs is shifting towards higher lifestyle categories like skin care. tooth paste (16 per cent). detergent cakes. fabric wash (12 per cent). personal wash (14 per cent). coconut oil. skin/ fairness cream (21 per cent). hair dyes (30 per cent). increased literacy . rapid urbanisation. dish wash (20 per cent) . feminine hygiene.I. feminine hygiene (13 per cent). personal health care (16 per cent). rising aspiration JOCIL Ltd. tooth powder (21 per cent).B.

000 per tone in 2008.000 per tone in 2007 to Rs 20. Problems of soap industry in India Following the hike in petro-product prices. but if we raise our price. JOCIL Ltd. growing consumer demand and increased affordability of the consumers.” he said. N.000 crores.I. At present. the big increase in the price of oil in recent months has hit them hard. “The impact is likely to trickle down to the common man. Sulphuric acid rates have risen from Rs 4.” said Manchanda. as the leading soap industrialists are contemplating an increase in prices. it will be curtains for us. This comes after the drastic increase in the raw material cost over last one year. 15 out of 35 soap-manufacturing units in Kanpur are on the verge of closure.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE levels. the worst affected are the small manufacturing units. These changes are due to various incentives proposed in the Union Budget 2008-09. The manufacturers pointed out that the price of acid slurry has increased from Rs 81 per kg to Rs 110 per kg in the last 10 days. local soap products. including a few that are nationally acclaimed. “The rates of petroleumbased chemicals have gone up by leaps and bounds. Micky Manchanda. hold a 25 to 30 per cent share in the market. Since the industry's raw materials are petroleum products. The rate of soda has also gone up from Rs 12 per kg to Rs 25 per kg in the last one-year. According to the president of the UP Small Scale Soap Industries.T 32 .B. including the major farm loan waiver scheme worth Rs 60.M.

up to about 25% will be used in the production of oleo chemicals and their derivatives. a significant amount.M. cannot just compete with the renewable oleo chemicals in term of dependability of supply of raw materials. This makes it very attractive to use oleo chemicals in many applications from the economic point of view.B. Being derived from natural sources. coconut oil. very often. This is clearly reflected in the changing pattern in the types of surfactants used in washing and cleaning agents in Western Europe during the period 1991 – 98 as shown in the following Table 19.65% per annum up to the year 2020 (Table 12). Products derived from oleo chemicals exhibit many distinct advantages over those from petrochemicals. products derived from oleochemicals are more readily biodegraded and this works very much in favour of oleochemicals. This factor is especially significant in the developed world. at least in the next two decades.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Future Prospect Raw Material Supply The world’s oleo chemical industry is set for rapid growth. The current world scenario is the abundance of raw materials in the form of palm and palm kernel oils.I. Economic Factor The cost factor is also working in favor of oleo chemicals made from natural oils? Current petrol prices being at all time high. While the major portions of these two oils will be used in food applications. where consumer preference for environmentally friendly products. The ASEAN Market JOCIL Ltd. Furthermore. petroleum. and to a lesser extent. Environmental Consideration Another major factor in favour of oleo chemicals is the issue of the environment. Palm and palm kernel oils are expected to grow at about 3. N. it will be more expensive to make the same products for petroleum. at more than USD 30 per barrel of crude oil in June 2000. determines the types of products that will appear on the shelves of supermarkets. being a depleting resource.T 33 .

M.B.A PROGRAMME
WELFARE MEASURES

EMPLOYEE

The ASEAN countries, are poised to play a greater role in the world’s oleochemical
industry. ASEAN is already a major player in the production and export of oleochemicals,
accounting for 36% in the world production of oleochemicals in 2000 (Table 20). By the year
2010, ASEAN is expected to supply up to 50% of the world’s oleochemicals, with the bulk,
about 30%, coming from Malaysia.

The Developed World
While market expansion in the developed world such as North America and Europe is set to
increase at a marginal rate, the possibilities of new products and formulations are very large.
There is great concern on the environment in the developed countries and hence oleochemical
products are in a more favourable position to cater for consumer needs in these developed
countries.

JOCIL Ltd.
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EMPLOYEE

COMPANY ANALYSIS
INTRODUCTION ABOUT COMPANY
Jocil limited was incorporated on 20 feb 1978 with the name “Andra Pradesh
oil and chemical industries limited” as per the certificate of incorporation No 2260 granted
by the registrar of companies , A.P Hyderabad .
This was a joint venture with Andra Pradesh industrial development corporation
(APIDC)and jaya lakshmi cotton and oil products private ltd (JCOP) perecharla guntur dist,:
a company belongs to jaya lakshmi grouop . on 6 may 1982 the name of andra pradesh oil
and chemical industries limited was changed into jaya lakshmi oil and chemical industries
limited . the company’ s name has been changed from jaya lakshmi oil and chemical
industries limited to jocil limited with effect from 17 september , 1992 , jocil limited is a
subsidiary of the andra sugars limited.
INCEPTION
Jocil limited was incorporated on 20 feb 1978 with the name
“Andra Pradesh oil and chemical industries limited” as per the certificate of incorporation No
2260 granted by the registrar of companies , A.P Hyderabad .

Vision
The main vision of the company is to manufacture fatty acids and Toilet soaps. The
company received letter of intent from department of industrial development, Ministry of
industries, Govt. of India, Delhi. Enhancing the annual licensed capacity of fatty acids,
Glycerin and toilet soap. The company has implemented this letter by increasing installation
capacity of fatty acids plant from 6,205 M.T. per annum to 15,510 M.T. with effect from
JOCIL Ltd.
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M.B.A PROGRAMME
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EMPLOYEE

February, 1991, this enhanced capacity came into operation. Later the company enhanced the
capacity to 37500 M.T. p.a.w.e.f. March’ 1995.

Mission.
Jocil Mission is to move up the levels of uncompromised customer care and to
be a valued supplier of high quality products and services.

JOCIL LIMITED POLICIES:
Supply quality goods and services to customer’s delight.

Use resources efficiently; reduce wastage and prevent pollution. Encourage
development and involvement of employees.

Provide work environment that makes the employees committed and motivated
for maximizing productivity

Establish systems for maintaining transparency, fairness and equality in dealing
the employees

Empower employees for enhancing commitment, responsibility and accountability

Encourage teamwork, creativity, innovativeness and high achievement orientation

Provide growth and opportunities for developing skill and knowledge

Ensure functioning of effective communication channels with employees

Identify development needs of the employees on a regular basis, provide the
necessary training and continually evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of the
training so that the quality of the training also gets upgraded

JOCIL Ltd.
N.I.T

36

Jocil supplies different grades of Stearic acid and other fatty acids to other manufacturing companies of pharmaceuticals. 1982the name of Andhra Pradesh oil and chemical industries limited was changed into Jayalakshmi oil and chemical industries Ltd. Oleic acid etc.M.B. 2.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE HISTORY OF JOCIL LIMTED: Jocil limited was incorporated on 20 th February’ 1978 with the name Andhra Pradesh Oil and chemical industries Limited. plastics etc. 1992. INITIAL INVESTMENT: The company has set up Rs. Bombay with technology and equipment of C.3 crores fatty acid and soap project on turnkey basis through M/s. Henko spic etc.3. and also supply soap noodles to the above customers.T 37 . This was a joint Venture with Andhra Pradesh Industrial Development Corporation (APIDU) and was promoted by Jayalakshmi Group of Companies. 4. It also manufactures soaps. Jocil supplies fatty acids to meet their specific requirements of Stearic acid.M. N.Ballestra(India)limited . JOCIL Ltd. Jocil limited is a subsidiary of The Andhra Sugars Ltd. Johnson & Johnson.I. Jocil is a leading manufacture of kinds of fatty acids.B. On 6th may.. PERFORMANCE & ACHIEVEMENTS OF JOCIL: 1. 3. chemicals. Italy. Jocil manufactures soaps on contract basis to HLL. The company’s name has been changed from Jayalakshmi oil and chemical industries limited to Jocil limited with effect from 17th Semptember.

B.T 38 . JOCIL Ltd. cotton seed acid oils etc. N. d) Maintenance of quality control by experienced and committed operating personnel.M. b) The processing and purification of fatty acids is done by using latest technology. c) The technology and requirement of Jocil has been imported from CMB Italy. f) It uses high quality chemicals for the purification and processing of the fatty acids. coconut oils. g) It maintains international standards in manufacturing its products so as to suit different kinds of I n industrial users.I. e) Toilet soaps and Glycerrine are manufactured as per BISC (ISI) standards.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Jocil’s production of quality goods is due to the following factors: a) Usage of good quality raw materials like rice bran oils.

B. Mullapudi Harischandra Prasad Managing Director J. Murali Mohan Directors P.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 3. Gopala Krishna JOCIL Ltd. Narayana Chowdary V.I.M.T 39 . Narendranath Chowdary Mullapudi Thimmaraja Y. Srinivasa Rao M. Raju K. N. Organizational chart Chairman Dr. S.

B.T 40 . Kesavulu Reddy Board Of Directors Roles And Responsibilities  Chairman Chairman is to lead and overseeing of the Board of Directors.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE Subbarao V.I.M. N.  Managing Director Who manages a division within organization  Directors Overseeing the conduct of the companies Business JOCIL Ltd. Tipirneni President & Secretary P .

B.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE  President and secretary Keep records and carries out general office work. N.5% are satisfied and 10 % are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with working environment. OF % OF HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 26 RESPONDENTS 32.M.5% SATISFIED 46 57.T 41 .5 % of the workers are highly satisfied with working environment and 57. HOW IS YOUR WORK ENVIRONMENT? DESCRIPTION NO.I. 1.5% NETURAL 8 10% DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY DISSATISFIED 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 32. JOCIL Ltd.

B. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with there is accumulation of dirt and refuse is removing daily. JOCIL Ltd.I.T 42 .A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES 2. N. EMPLOYEE IS ACCUMULATON OF DIRT AND REFUSE SHALL BE REMOVED DAILY? DESCRIPTION NO.M.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 3.B. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with there is accumulation of dirt and refuse is removing daily. Is any precautions taken by the workers for the dust of fume? DESCRIPTION NO.T 43 .M. N. JOCIL Ltd.I.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 4.B.M. JOCIL Ltd.T 44 . IS THE COMPANY PROVIDE THE SUFFICIENT LIGHTING IN THE WORKING ROOM? DESCRIPTION NO. OF RESPONDENTS % OF YES 80 RESPONDENTS 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with there is sufficient lighting in the working room. N.I.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 5.T 45 .M. N.I. OF % OF RESPONDENTS HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 76 95% SATISFIED 4 5% NETURAL 0 0 DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH DRINKING FACILITES? DESCRIPTION NO.B.

N. 6. OF RESPONDENTS % OF RESPONDENTS YES 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed in providing cool drinking water.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be understood that 95 % of the workers are highly satisfied with drinking facilities and 5% are satisfied and no one are neutral and no one are dissatisfied with drinking facilities .I.T 46 .M. JOCIL Ltd.B. IS THE COMPANY PROVIDING CHILLED DRINKING WATER? DESCRIPTION NO.

T 47 . OF % OF RESPONDENTS HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 80 100% SATISFIED 0 0 NETURAL 0 0 DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY DISSATISFIED 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed JOCIL Ltd. DO YOU HAVE SUFFICIENT TOILET FACILITIES FOR BOTH MALE AND FEMALE SEPARETELY? DESCRIPTION NO.B.I.M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE 7. N.

M.T 48 .5% SATISFIED 36 45% NETURAL 34 42. OF % OF RESPONDENTS HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 10 12.5% DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY DISSATISFIED 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE and highly satisfied with having sufficient toilet facilities for both male and female.I. N. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH CANTEEN FACILITIES IN JOCIL LIMITED? DESCRIPTION NO.B. 8.

OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 78 97. N.T 49 . IS THE COMPANY PROVIDING ANY SUBSIDARIES RATES FOR THE FOOD ITEMS? DESCRIPTION NO.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be understood that 12.I. 9.5% TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.5% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with canteen facilities.M.5% NO 2 2.B.5% of the workers are highly satisfied with canteen facilities and 45% are satisfied and 42.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be observe that 97.M.I.B.5% of the workers are Said that the company providing subsidiary rates for the food items and 2% of the workers are said that no subsidiary rates for the food items. OF % OF RESPONDENTS HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 8 10% SATISFIED 36 45% NETURAL 36 45% DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED JOCIL Ltd.T 50 . ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH MEDICAL FACILITIES AND DEPENDENCE? DESCRIPTION NO. 10. N.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES TOTAL EMPLOYEE 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 10 % of the workers are highly satisfied with medical facilities and 45% are satisfied and 45% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with medical facilities.T 51 .I. N. ARE YOU HAVE THE WAITING ROOMS AND REST ROOMS? DESCRIPTION NO.25% NO 27 33. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 53 66. 11.75% TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.B.M.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be observe that 66.B. OF % OF RESPONDENTS HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 28 35% SATISFIED 38 47.5% NETURAL 14 17. 12.25% are agreed in having waiting rooms and 33.M. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH WASHING AND DRYING FACILITIES? DESCRIPTION NO.5% DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED JOCIL Ltd.T 52 . N.I.75% are not agreed in having waiting rooms and rest rooms.

B.5% are satisfied and 17. IS THEIR ANY SAFETY MEASURES? DESCRIPTION NO.T 53 .I. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.5% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with washing and drying facilities. N. 13.M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES TOTAL EMPLOYEE 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 35 % of the workers are highly satisfied with washing and drying facilities and 47.

B.I. IF THE MACHINERY IS IN THE WORKING POSITION. IS THERE ANY SECURELY FENCED BY SAFEGUARDS? DESCRIPTION NO.T 54 .M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be understood that the company is providing safety measures to the employees. 14. N. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.

5% 25% 57.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be observe that all the respondents agreed with the machinery is securely fenced by safeguards. HOW MANY TIMES THE MACHINE WILL BE CHECK BY THE MECHANICS IN A MONTH? DESCRIPTION ONE TIME TWO TIMES THREE TIMES FOUR TIMES MORE TOTAL JOCIL Ltd.I.M.T NO OF RESPONDENTS 0 8 6 20 46 80 % OF RESPONDENTS 0% 10% 7. N.B.5% 100% 55 . 15.

16.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 10% of the respondents are agreed wityh one time checking of the machines in a month and 7. IS THEIR ANY SPECIAL UNIFORM FOR WORKERS AND MACHINERY OPERATIONS? DESCRIPTION NO.I.5% of the respondents are agreed with more times checking of the machines in a month .5% of the respondents are agreed with three times and 25% of respondents are agreed with four times and 57.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 56 .M. N.B. YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% JOCIL Ltd.

B.I. 17.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 57 . YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% JOCIL Ltd. IS THEIR ANY SAFETY COMMITTEE APPOINTED IN THE COMPANY? DESCRIPTION NO.M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with there is special uniform for workers for the machinery operations. N.

T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 58 .I. 18.M. N.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents are agreed there is safety committee appointed in the company.B. IS THE SAFETY KIT’S AVALIABLE DURING ALL WORKING HOUR’S? DESCRIPTION NO. YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% JOCIL Ltd.

I. N.M. ARE YOU HAVING THE HOUSING FACILITY? ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH ACCOMODATION? DESCRIPTION NO.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with safety kits are available during all working hours.5% JOCIL Ltd.5% NETURAL 18 22. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 24 30% SATISFIED 38 47.B.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 59 . 19.

OF RESPONDENTS % OF YES 64 RESPONDENTS 80% NO 16 20% JOCIL Ltd. N.M. IS THERE SCHOOL FACILITY FOR WORKERS CHILDREN’S? DESCRIPTION NO.5% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with accommodation .A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 30% of the workers are highly satisfied with accommodation and 47.B.I.T 60 .5% are satisfied and 22. 20.

I.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES TOTAL EMPLOYEE 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that 80% of the workers are agreed in providing school facility for workers children and 20% are not agreed in providing school facility for workers children. 21.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 5% 61 .B.M. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 4 JOCIL Ltd. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH LEAVE FACILITIES? DESCRIPTION NO. N.

M.5% DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 5 % of the workers are highly satisfied with leave facilities and 47. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH RECREATION FACILITIES? DESCRIPTION NO. N.5% are satisfied and 47. 22.5% JOCIL Ltd.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 62 .A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE SATISFIED 38 47.B. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 0 0 SATISFIED 58 72.5% NETURAL 38 47.I.5% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with leave facilities.

A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE NETURAL 20 25% DISSATISFIED 2 2.5% HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 0% of the workers are highly satisfied with recreation facilities and 72. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 12 15% SATISFIED 50 62. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH TRANSPORT FACILITIES WHICH INCLUDE TRAVEL TO OTHER PLACES? DESCRIPTION NO. N.5% are satisfied and 25% are stands at neutral and 2.5% JOCIL Ltd.B.I.5% are dissatisfied and one are highly dissatisfied with recreation facilities.M. 23.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 63 .

5% HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 15 % of the workers are highly satisfied with transport facilities and 62.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 64 .M.5% are satisfied and 20% are stands at neutral and 2. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 40 50% SATISFIED 34 42.FACILITIES? DESCRIPTION NO.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE NETURAL 16 20% DISSATISFIED 2 2.F.5% are stands at dissatisfied and no one highly dissatisfied with transport facilities.I. N.B. 24.5% JOCIL Ltd. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH P.5% NETURAL 6 7.

f facilities.M. N.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 50% of the workers are highly satisfied with p. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 0 0 SATISFIED 36 45% NETURAL 40 50% DISSATISFIED 4 5% JOCIL Ltd.5% are satisfied and 7. 25.B.5% are stands at neutral and no one dissatisfied with p. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH PRESENT SALARY AND WAGE STRUCTURE? DESCRIPTION NO.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 65 .I.f facilities and 42.

M.I.B.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood 0 % of the workers are highly satisfied with present salary and wage structure and 45% are satisfied and 50% are stands at neutral and 5% are dissatisfied and no one highly dissatisfied with present salary and wage structure. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH PAYMENT OF BONUS BY THE COMPANY? DESCRIPTION NO. 26.5% NETURAL 0 0 DISSATISFIED 0 0 JOCIL Ltd. N. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 78 97.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 66 .5% SATISFIED 2 2.

IS THERE ANY INSURANCE FACILITY FOR WORKERS? DESCRIPTION NO.5% are satisfied and no one is neutral and dissatisfied with payment of bonus by the company. OF % OF RESPONDENTS YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: JOCIL Ltd.M.5 % of the workers are highly satisfied with payment of bonus by the company and 2. N. 27.I.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 97.T 67 .B.

N.I.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with providing insurance facility for workers.B.M. 28.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 68 . IS THERE ANY ENQUIRY COMMITTEE APPOINTED SAKE OF HAZARD INCIDENT? DESCRIPTION NO. YES RESPONDENTS 80 100% NO 0 0 JOCIL Ltd.

ARE YOU COMFORTABLE WITH NUMBER OF WORKING HOURS OF YOUR COMPANY? DESCRIPTION NO.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 5% 69 . 29.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES TOTAL EMPLOYEE 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be observe that all respondents agreed with there is enquiry committee appointed sake of hazard incident.I.M. N. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 6 JOCIL Ltd.B.

I. N. ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH ON THE JOB TRAINING METHOD TO IMPROVE SKILLS IN JOCIL LIMITED? DESCRIPTION NO.5% JOCIL Ltd. HIGHLY SATISFIED RESPONDNETS 58 72.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE SATISFIED 74 95% NETURAL 0 0 DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 5 % of the workers are highly satisfied with working hours of company and 95% are satisfied and no one neutral.B.M. dissatisfied with working hours of company.5% SATISFIED 22 27.T OF % OF RESPONDENTS 70 . 30.

M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE NETURAL 0 0 DISSATISFIED 0 0 HIGHLY 0 0 DISSATISFIED TOTAL 80 100% INTERPRETATION: From the above table it can be understood that 72.  From this study it is found that organization is not maintaining transparency with employees JOCIL Ltd. N. dissatisfied with job training method. FINDINGS:  From this study researcher find that most of the employees are not satisfied with wages and salaries.I.5% are satisfied and no one neutral.T 71 .5 % of the workers are highly satisfied with job training method and 27.B.

 From this study it is found that the JOCIL LIMITED is providing partial transport facilities to the employees.B. JOCIL Ltd.  From this study the researcher find that the organization is providing rest rooms and waiting rooms but most of the employees doesn’t aware of that.  From this study it is found that recreational facilities of JOCIL LIMITED are not up to the employee satisfaction.M. Suggestions:  The researcher suggested that the organization should maintain fair wage system.  The organization should maintain transparency and openness to all employees who are working in the organization.I.T 72 . N.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE because the employees are very nervous and unsatisfactory to give their response.

Conclusion:  In JOCIL LIMITED all employee welfare facilities.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES EMPLOYEE  The organization is suggested to increase recreational facilities to the organization.  The organization need to provide full transport facilities who are coming from all directions near by areas.T 73 .I.B.M. N. It is providing all statutory provisions and non-statutory provisions. JOCIL Ltd.

B. And also allocating the financial resources and other supportive measures to workers like educational facilities.  From the inception of the company till new it runs successfully by improving the productivity through introducing many verities into the market is possible due to providing all welfare measures to the employee and employee cooperation to the management.T 74 .with contribution of management. JOCIL Ltd.M.A PROGRAMME WELFARE MEASURES  EMPLOYEE The company plays vital role to provide welfare facilities with the consultation of both employees and employers. N.I.. medical facilities and funds etc.