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Section 7: UPS System Control

Chapter 1 - UPS System Control Principles


1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................. 7-1
Chapter 2 - High Voltage Interface Board
2.1 Chapter overview ..................................................................................... 7-5
2.2 General description ................................................................................... 7-5
2.3 Detailed description .................................................................................. 7-7
2.3.1 X1 Low voltage signals to/from the UPS Logic Board. .............. 7-7
2.3.2 X2 (Page 2) DC bus (battery) voltage sense ............................. 7-7
2.3.3 X3 (Page 2) Rectifier input voltage sense ................................. 7-7
2.3.4 X4 (Page 2) UPS output voltage sense ..................................... 7-7
2.3.5 X5 (Page 2) Inverter output voltage sense ................................ 7-7
2.3.6 X6 (Page 2) Bypass voltage sense ............................................ 7-8
2.3.7 X7 (Page 1) Power switch auxiliary contacts ........................... 7-8
2.3.8 X8 (Page 1) Interface to external connection block .................. 7-8
2.3.9 X9 (Page 2) Battery cabinet temperature .................................. 7-9
2.3.10 X10 (Page 2) Input air temperature sensor ............................. 7-9
2.3.11 X11 (Page 2) Inverter output air temperature sensor .............. 7-9
2.3.12 X12 (Page 2) Transformer cubicle air temperature sensor ..... 7-9
2.3.13 X13 (Page 1) Inverter assembly thermostats ........................ 7-10
2.3.14 X14 (Page 1) Not in use ........................................................ 7-10
2.3.15 X15 (Page 1) Battery fuse monitor ....................................... 7-10
2.3.16 X16 (Page 1) Not in use (linked out) .................................... 7-10
2.3.17 X17 (Page 1) Not in use (linked out) .................................... 7-10
2.3.18 X18 (Page 1) Rectifier current sensing ................................. 7-10
2.3.19 X19 (Page 1) Output current monitoring W-ph .................... 7-10
2.3.20 X20 (Page 1) Output current monitoring V-ph ..................... 7-10
2.3.21 X21 (Page 1) Output current monitoring U-ph ..................... 7-11
2.3.22 X22 (Page 1) Battery current monitoring ............................. 7-11
2.3.23 X23 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring U-ph ................... 7-11
2.3.24 X24 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring V-ph ................... 7-11
2.3.25 X25 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring W-ph .................. 7-11
2.3.26 X26 (Page 1) Not in use ........................................................ 7-11
2.3.27 X27 (Page 1) Not in use ........................................................ 7-11
2.4 Summary information ............................................................................. 7-12
Chapter 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)
3.1 Chapter overview ................................................................................... 7-13
3.2 General description ................................................................................. 7-13
3.2.1 Circuit board functions .............................................................. 7-13
3.2.2 Input/Output connections ........................................................... 7-14
3.2.3 Block Diagram ........................................................................... 7-20
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3.3 Detailed circuit description .................................................................... 7-23


3.3.1 Introduction ................................................................................ 7-23
3.3.2 Basic microcontroller system ..................................................... 7-24
3.3.3 Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers ........................... 7-26
3.3.4 Ni-Cad Battery back-up controller ............................................. 7-26
3.3.5 Reset generator ........................................................................... 7-27
3.3.6 System RAM and ROM memory addressing ............................ 7-28
3.3.7 Basic system control logic (D88) ............................................... 7-29
D88 Status signals to processor system ........................... 7-31
D88 Reset circuit [RES_EXT> ........................................ 7-32
Major control signal outputs ............................................ 7-32
Load transfer control ........................................................ 7-34
3.3.8 CAN bus communications drivers and control logic ................. 7-35
3.3.9 Real-time clock (RTC) ............................................................... 7-35
3.3.10 Data bus buffers chip select decoding ................................... 7-37
3.3.11 Data bus input buffers .............................................................. 7-38
3.3.12 Data bus output buffers ............................................................ 7-45
3.3.13 Frequency sensing and control signals .................................... 7-55
Frequency control principles ............................................ 7-55
Frequency sync control and operation ............................. 7-56
Non-Sync detection and alarm ......................................... 7-58
External sync inhibit ...................................................... 7-58
3.3.14 Analogue signal processing ..................................................... 7-59
Bypass voltage signal processing ..................................... 7-59
Inverter voltage sensing ................................................... 7-60
Battery (bus) voltage sensing ........................................... 7-61
Battery current sensing .................................................... 7-61
Output voltage sensing ..................................................... 7-62
Output current sensing ..................................................... 7-63
Analogue signal monitoring multiplexers 7-64
3.3.15 Power supplies ......................................................................... 7-65
3.3.16 External communications ......................................................... 7-67
3.3.17 On board 7-segment indications summary .............................. 7-68
3.4 Summary information ............................................................................. 7-72
Chapter 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)
4.1 Chapter overview ................................................................................... 7-75
4.2 General description ................................................................................. 7-75
4.2.1 Circuit board functions .............................................................. 7-75
4.2.2 Input/Output connections ........................................................... 7-76
4.2.3 Block Diagram ........................................................................... 7-81
4.3 Detailed circuit description .................................................................... 7-84
4.3.1 Introduction ................................................................................ 7-84
4.3.2 Basic microcontroller system ..................................................... 7-85
4.3.3 Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers ........................... 7-88
4.3.4 Ni-Cad Battery back-up controller ............................................. 7-88
4.3.5 Reset generator ........................................................................... 7-89
4.3.6 System RAM and ROM memory addressing ............................ 7-90

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control

4.3.7 Basic system control logic ......................................................... 7-92


D22 Functional description .............................................. 7-92
D23 Functional description .............................................. 7-94
4.3.8 CAN bus communications drivers and control logic ................. 7-96
4.3.9 Real-time clock (RTC) ............................................................... 7-96
4.3.10 Data bus buffers chip select decoding ................................... 7-98
4.3.11 Data bus input buffers .............................................................. 7-99
4.3.12 Data bus output buffers .......................................................... 7-105
4.3.13 Frequency sensing and control signals .................................. 7-113
Frequency control principles .......................................... 7-113
Frequency sync control and operation ........................... 7-114
Non-Sync detection and alarm ....................................... 7-116
External sync inhibit .................................................... 7-116
4.3.14 Analogue signal processing ................................................... 7-117
Bypass voltage signal processing ................................... 7-117
Inverter voltage sensing ................................................. 7-118
Battery (bus) voltage sensing ......................................... 7-119
Battery current sensing .................................................. 7-119
Output voltage sensing ................................................... 7-120
Output current sensing ................................................... 7-121
Analogue signal monitoring multiplexers ...................... 7-122
4.3.15 Power supplies ....................................................................... 7-123
4.3.16 External communications ....................................................... 7-125
4.3.17 On board 7-segment indications summary ............................ 7-126
4.4 Summary information ........................................................................... 7-130
Chapter 5 - Operator Logic Board
5.1 Chapter overview ................................................................................. 7-133
5.2 General description ............................................................................... 7-133
5.2.1 Circuit board functions ............................................................ 7-133
5.2.2 Input/Output connections ......................................................... 7-134
5.2.3 Block Diagram ......................................................................... 7-135
5.3 Detailed circuit description .................................................................. 7-137
5.3.1 Introduction .............................................................................. 7-137
5.3.2 Basic microcontroller system ................................................... 7-138
5.3.3 Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers ......................... 7-139
5.3.4 Reset generator ......................................................................... 7-140
5.3.5 Alarm buzzer ............................................................................ 7-140
5.3.6 Address decoding D10 .......................................................... 7-140
5.3.7 System RAM and ROM memory addressing .......................... 7-141
5.3.8 Interface to the Operator Control Panel ................................... 7-142
5.3.9 Interface to the CAN Bus ......................................................... 7-143
5.3.10 Serial (modem) Interface ....................................................... 7-144
5.3.11 RS232 & RS485 Interface ..................................................... 7-144
5.3.12 Power Supply ......................................................................... 7-145
5.4 Summary information ........................................................................... 7-146

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Chapter 6 - Operator Control Panel


6.1 Section overview .................................................................................. 7-149
6.2 General description ............................................................................... 7-149
6.2.1 Circuit board functions ............................................................ 7-149
6.2.2 Input/Output connections ......................................................... 7-149
6.3 Detailed circuit description .................................................................. 7-150
6.3.1 LED Display indication ........................................................... 7-150
6.3.2 Operator input switches ........................................................... 7-151
6.3.3 LCD Display Panel .................................................................. 7-151
Chapter 7 - System software
7.1 Introduction .......................................................................................... 7-153
7.2 Program structure and execution .......................................................... 7-153
7.2.1 Initialisation/Reset ................................................................... 7-156
7.2.2 Rectifier ON/OFF subroutine .................................................. 7-158
7.2.3 Inverter OFF/ON Sub-routine .................................................. 7-160
7.2.4 Frequency synchronisation control .......................................... 7-162
7.2.5 Battery circuit breaker control ................................................. 7-168
7.2.6 Low Battery Pre-alarm ............................................................. 7-172
7.2.7 Battery undervoltage trip threshold ......................................... 7-174
7.2.8 Battery Boost charge ................................................................ 7-176
7.2.9 Battery Test .............................................................................. 7-178
7.2.10 Load transfer control logic ..................................................... 7-180

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Section 7: UPS System Control

Chapter 1 - UPS System Control Principles

1.1

Introduction
Previous descriptions in this manual show that the UPS can broadly be divided
into three major areas, each of which is largely independently controlled i.e:
the rectifier (See section 4)
the inverter (See section 5)
the static switch (See section 6)
However, a study of these sections show that there is also a degree of commonality concerning certain of their control functions; for example, the way in which
their required analogue sense signals are processed and applied, and their operating parameters set from the Operator Control Panel.
The chapters in this section (7) describe those boards concerned with servicing the
control requirements of all three of the major power sections mentioned above,
and as such are the boards that bring together the control functions of the entire
UPS system hence the section title UPS System Control. A block diagram showing the relationship between the System Control boards and the other UPS control
areas is shown in Figure 7-1.
High Voltage Interface Board

Analogue signal processing. The High Voltage Interface Board is responsible


for processing the analogue sense signals obtained from various parts of the UPS
power sections as illustrated in Figure 7-1. It attenuates, and where necessary
isolates, the sensed signals to levels acceptable to the low voltage operating environment of the other control boards, and in certain instances also provides a
means of signal calibration. The boards output are then passed to the major control logic boards via the UPS Logic Board, which is at the heart of the System Control function.
Digital signal processing. This board also monitors various digital status signals and passes them once again to the UPS Logic Board, where they are used by
the decision-making processes in its microcontrollers software. For example,
Figure 7-1 shows inputs from the power switch auxiliaries; but not shown are various external inputs from circuits such as the Emergency Stop facility, battery
cabinet thermostats etc.
Operator Control Panel & Operator Logic Board

These two boards provide the digital interface between the Operator and the UPS
Logic Board and permit two-way data communication i.e. metering data generated on the UPS Logic Board are processed on the Operator Logic Board and then
presented to the Operator Control Panel; conversely, parameter settings and
manual control inputs entered at the Operator Control Panel are passed through
the Operator Logic Board processing circuits to the UPS Logic Board where they
impinge on the microcontrollers decision-making operation.

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7-1

Input voltage sense

Input
Choke

Operator Control
Panel

DC Bus voltage sense

Q1 Aux
Q2 Aux
Q3 Aux
Input voltage sense
Input current sense
DC Bus voltage sense
Battery current sense

Rectifier Logic
Board

Drive (Trigger)
Interface Bd.
Battery current sense

Bypass Mains

Input mains

Q3 Aux

Phase
Controlled
Rectifier

DC Busbar
filter
capacitors

CBbat Aux

Rectifier Control

High Voltage
Interface Board

UPS Logic Board

Inverter Logic
Board

Inverter Base
Drive Bds.

3 Phase
Power
Inverter

Inverter Control

Inverter current sense

Bypass
Isolator

Operator Logic Board

Input
Input
Isolator Fuses

Q1 Aux

Q2 Aux

Input current sense

CBbat Aux
Inverter current sense
Inverter voltage sense
Bypass voltage sense
Output voltage sense
Output current sense
Q4 Aux
Battery Breaker Trip

Output
Tfrmr

filter
capacitors

Bypass voltage sense


Inverter voltage sense

7-2
Output voltage sense

System Control

Parallel Control Bus

Parallel Logic
Board (1+1 only)

Alarm Interface Board


(I/O Option)

Static Switch
Driver Board

Drive (Trigger)
Interface Bd.

Inverter-side
Contactor

Static Switch
Control

Bypass-side
Static Switch

Output
Isolator

Output current sense

ON GENERATOR

Remote Alarms

Q4 Aux

Maintenance Bypass
Isolator

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 1 - UPS System Control Principles
7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Figure 7-1: UPS Control system block diagram

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Critical Load

Inverter voltage sense

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 1 - UPS System Control Principles

Alarm Interface Board

Several forms of Alarm Interface Board are available to allow remote indication
of the alarms generated on the UPS Logic Board (refer to the Options Section of
this manual). These boards also permit the connection of certain basic external
controls; such as on-generator, sync inhibit, second stage current limit etc.
UPS Logic Board

As is evident from reading the earlier part of this chapter, the UPS Logic Board
is central to the whole System Control function.
This board, which is micro-controller driven, accepts various analogue and digital
inputs from the High Voltage Interface Board, Operator Control Board and Alarm
Interface Board (optional) and provides the necessary control and alarms signals
used by the remainder of the UPS control areas. It also monitors various alarm and
status signals from the rectifier, inverter and static switch control sections and
produces appropriate alarms and control logic signals.
The board is software-driven and a description of the software functions and flowcharts are provided at the end of this section (see Chapter 7).
In a 1+1 configured system the UPS Logic Board is also fed with various control
and status signals from the Parallel Logic Board pertaining to the parallel-control
functions (See section 8).

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 1 - UPS System Control Principles

7-4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

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Section 7:

Chapter 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

2.1

Chapter overview
This chapter contains a circuit description of the High Voltage Interface Board
used across the whole model 7200 Series UPS range and should be read in conjunction with circuit diagram SE-4590054-O (2 pages).
Signal annotations shown on the circuit diagrams are shown in italics in the following text e.g. VINV_A.

2.2

General description
The purpose of this board is to provide an interface between the high voltage environments of the UPS power circuitry and the low voltage environment of the
system control boards. The high voltage sense signals taken from various parts of
the power circuitry are therefore attenuated on this board before being applied to
their appropriate control circuits.
In addition to providing signal attenuation the board also contains calibration facilitates for those signals which are power-related. This allows the board to be
used across the entire model range providing the calibration links are set appropriately.
All the low-voltage signals are connected to the UPS Logic Board via socket X1
and ribbon cable W8: the remaining IDC connectors (X2 to X27) carry the high
voltage signals.
Table 7-1on the following page provides an overview of each connectors function and this is followed by a more detailed circuit description.
Power supplies

The 12V control power rails required by the boards op-amps are obtained from
the UPS Logic Board and connected via X1 pins 1-12 as shown on the circuit diagram page 2.

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CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

.
Table 7-1: Connector summary

7-6

X1

Low voltage signals to/from the UPS Logic Board.

X2

DC bus (battery) voltage sense inputs.

X3

Rectifier input voltage sensing inputs

X4

UPS output voltage sensing inputs

X5

Inverter output voltage sensing inputs

X6

Bypass voltage sensing inputs

X7

Power switch auxiliary contacts

X8

Interface to customer connection block X8

X9

Battery cabinet temperature

X10

Input air temperature sensor inputs

X11

inverter output air temperature sensor inputs

X12

Transformer cabinet air temperature sensor inputs

X13

Inverter assembly thermostats (n/c)

X14

Not in use

X15

Battery fuse monitor

X16

Not in use (linked out) inverter fuse fail

X17

Not in use (linked out) rectifier fuse fail

X18

Rectifier input current monitor

X19

Output current monitoring W-ph

X20

Output current monitoring V-ph

X21

Output current monitoring U-ph

X22

Battery current monitoring

X23

Inverter current monitoring U-ph (12 pulse inverter only)

X24

Inverter current monitoring V-ph (6 pulse & 12 pulse inverter)

X25

Inverter current monitoring W-ph (6 pulse & 12 pulse inverter)

X26

Not in use 12 pulse rectifier DC current bridge

X27

Not in use 12 pulse rectifier DC current bridge

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CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

Detailed description
The remainder of this chapter contains a detailed description of the circuits associated with each of the above connectors.

2.3.1

X1 Low voltage signals to/from the UPS Logic Board.


X1 carries various signals between the High Voltage Interface Board and the UPS
Logic Board, each of which is described in detail below. It also carries 12V
power supplies from the UPS Logic Board to the High Voltage Interface Board to
provide it with general control power supply rails and also power the DCCT devices used to monitor the battery current and inverter output current.

2.3.2

X2 (Page 2) DC bus (battery) voltage sense


The DC Bus (battery) voltage is monitored at connector X2, attenuated by N4d
and connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1-27. The attenuation factor is approximately 136:1 i.e. V_B has a sensitivity of approximately 7.3mV per V(battery) and is therefore approximately 3.255Vdc. at a nominal float charge of 446V.

2.3.3

X3 (Page 2) Rectifier input voltage sense


The input mains line voltage is connected to connector X3, attenuated by three
sections of N4 and connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1 terminals 24,25,26.
Each section of N4 monitors the input voltage on a line-to-line basis; for example
N4a inputs are connected to the input U (Vrec-A) and V (Vrec-B) phases. The attenuation factor is approximately 75:1 i.e. VREC_AB has a sensitivity of approximately 13.3mV per Vl-l (input volts) and therefore equals 5.8Vrms (15Vp-p)
when the input mains voltage is at a nominal 400Vac.
Note: the input voltage is applied to X3 only when the input power switch Q1 is
closed and the main input power fuses are healthy.

2.3.4

X4 (Page 2) UPS output voltage sense


The UPS output voltage is connected to connector X4, attenuated by three sections of N3 and connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1 terminals 21,22,23.
Each section of N3 monitors the output voltage on a line-to-neutral basis; for example N3a inputs are connected to the output neutral (Vout-0) and U phase
(Vout-A). The attenuation factor is approximately 100:1 i.e. VO_A has a sensitivity of approximately 10mV per Vl-n (output) and therefore equals 2.2Vrms
(8Vp-p) when the UPS output voltage is at a nominal 220Vac.
Note: the output voltage is connected to X4 from the live side of the output
power switch Q4 and is present when the inverter output contactor is closed (load
on inverter) OR the bypass static switch is closed (load on bypass) but not when
the load is running on the maintenance bypass and the UPS is shut down.

2.3.5

X5 (Page 2) Inverter output voltage sense


The inverter output voltage is connected to connector X5, attenuated by three sections of N2 and connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1 terminals 18,19,20.
Each section of N2 monitors the inverter voltage on a line-to-neutral basis; for example N2a inputs are connected to the inverter neutral (Vinv-0) and U phase
(Vinv-A). The attenuation factor is approximately 100:1 i.e. VINV_A has a sensitivity of approximately 10mV per Vl-n (inverter) and therefore equals 2.2Vrms
(8Vp-p) when the inverter voltage is at a nominal 220Vac.

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Note: the inverter voltage is connected to X5 from the junction of the output transformer and inverter output contactor and is present only when the inverter is operating. When the inverter output contactor is closed (load on inverter) the voltage
applied to X5 is identical to the output voltage sense signals applied to X4 (see
above) these two signal groups can therefore be considered as monitoring either
side of the inverter output contactor.
2.3.6

X6 (Page 2) Bypass voltage sense


The UPS bypass voltage is connected to connector X6, attenuated by three sections of N1 and connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1 terminals 15,16,17.
Each section of N1 monitors the bypass voltage on a line-to-neutral basis; for example N1a inputs are connected to the bypass neutral (Vin-0) and U phase (Vin-A).
The attenuation factor is approximately 100:1 i.e. VI_A has a sensitivity of approximately 10mV per Vl-n (bypass) and therefore equals 2.2Vrms (8Vp-p) when
the UPS output voltage is at a nominal 220Vac.
Note: the bypass voltage is connected to X4 from the switched side of the bypass
power switch Q2 and is present when the switch is closed (normal).

2.3.7

X7 (Page 1) Power switch auxiliary contacts


Each of the UPS power switches has an auxiliary contact which signals the switch
status to the UPS Logic Board via the High Voltage Interface Board Q7. In each
case the auxiliary contact is open when the main switch is open, and one side is
connected to 0V which is available at X7-5. When the power switches are closed
they therefore pull their respective status signals at X1 terminals 43-46 to 0V
which is interpreted as logic low by the switch monitoring circuits on the UPS
Logic Board. Conversely, when the power switches are open the outputs to X1
terminals 43-46 are pulled up to +4.7V and interpreted as logic high.

2.3.8

X8 (Page 1) Interface to external connection block


X8 is connected to the customer terminal block (X3) by means of the wires identified in Figure 7-1 below:
Figure 7-2: Connection between X8 and customer T.B
X3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

X8
79
81
82
77
76

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

HVI Board

Customer T.B

Battery circuit breaker enable

A +5V battery circuit breaker enable signal is generated on the UPS Logic
Board and connected to the High Voltage Interface Board X1-54 from where it
passes directly through X8-2 to the customer T.B. X3-6. From here, the signal is
taken via external wiring to the trip circuit on the Battery Circuit Breaker Controller Board. The battery circuit breaker will trip if this enable supply is removed (note that X8-5 provides the enable signal 0V return path).

7-8

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

Battery circuit breaker auxiliary

Auxiliary contacts of the battery circuit breaker make the circuit between X8
terminals 4 and 5 (0V) when the breaker is closed. This is fed as a logic low circuit breaker closed status signal (SW_BAT) to the UPS Logic Board via X1-53.
When the circuit breaker is open SW_BAT is pulled up to 4.7V due to V11.
Emergency Stop

The emergency stop circuit is connected in a normally-closed fashion between


the customer T.B. terminals 10 and 11. This is connected via wires 76 and 77 to
X8 terminals 6 and 7 and then passed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-52 in the
form of a logic low ESD signal. When the emergency stop circuit is open, ESD is
pulled up to 4.7V due to V10.
If the emergency stop facility is not used then a link must be fitted between terminals 10 and 11 on the customer T.B. in order for the UPS to operate.
Note: when the emergency stop circuit is activated it shuts down the UPS power
sections and isolates the load but does not disconnect the UPS input power source
(unless an optional external mains circuit breaker is used) therefore the UPS control logic will maintain its operating control power from the input mains supply if
it is still available.
2.3.9

X9 (Page 2) Battery cabinet temperature


The battery cabinet temperature is monitored by an LM355A temperature sensor
which produces a temperature-proportional voltage of 10mV/C. This is buffered
on the High Voltage Interface Board and the resulting T4 signal is connected to
the UPS Logic Board via X1-60 and is ultimately used by the Rectifier Logic
Board to reduce the regulated battery float charge voltage by 1V per degree centigrade of increase in battery temperature.

2.3.10

X10 (Page 2) Input air temperature sensor


The input air temperature is monitored by an LM355A temperature sensor which
produces a temperature-proportional voltage of 10mV/C. This is buffered on the
High Voltage Interface Board and the resulting T3 signal is connected to the UPS
Logic Board via X1-59. The UPS Logic Board uses this signal to present the
actual input cooling air-flow temperature on the appropriate Operator Control
Panel metering display window.

2.3.11

X11 (Page 2) Inverter output air temperature sensor


The inverter output air temperature is monitored by an LM355A temperature
sensor which produces a temperature-proportional voltage of 10mV/C. This is
buffered on the High Voltage Interface Board and the resulting T2 signal is connected to the UPS Logic Board cooling air-flow temperature on the appropriate
Operator Control Panel metering display window.

2.3.12

X12 (Page 2) Transformer cubicle air temperature sensor


The transformer cubicle air temperature is monitored by an LM355A temperature
sensor which produces a temperature-proportional voltage of 10mV/C. This is
buffered on the High Voltage Interface Board and the resulting T1 signal is connected to the UPS Logic Board via X1-57. This signal is ultimately used by the
Rectifier Logic Board to reduce the regulated battery float charge voltage by 1V
per degree centigrade of increase in transformer temperature (between 25C and
35C).

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CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

2.3.13

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

X13 (Page 1) Inverter assembly thermostats (normally closed)


The thermostats fitted to the inverter heatsink provide a normally closed circuit
between X13 pins 1 and 2, and open only if the temperature rises above 90C. The
TH status signal to the UPS Logic Board via X1-51 is therefore normally low, and
rises to 4.7V (due to V9) following an inverter overtemperature event.
If an overtemperature condition occurs an inverter overtemperature alarm is
immediately activated (alarm #34) and the inverter is shut down after one minute
if the condition is still present overtemp shutdown (alarm #62) annunciated.
The shut-down condition is latched, and the reset button must be pressed to restart
the inverter and cancel the alarm.

2.3.14

X14 (Page 1) Not in use

2.3.15

X15 (Page 1) Battery fuse monitor


The battery fuse contains a micro-switch failure detection device which provides
a normally closed circuit between X15 pins 1 and 2. The FUS_BAT status signal
to the UPS Logic Board via X1-50 is therefore normally low, and rises to 4.7V
(due to V8) following a fuse failure. Alarm #54 annunciates a fuse failure event.

2.3.16

X16 (Page 1) Not in use (linked out)

2.3.17

X17 (Page 1) Not in use (linked out)

2.3.18

X18 (Page 1) Rectifier current sensing


Two CTs mounted on the U and V phases of the rectifier assembly provide input
current sense signals to X18 pins 1-3. These signals are rectified by V12-V17 and
the resulting dc voltage (IREC_I) is developed across a selectable burden resistor
and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-35. The appropriate resistance is selected
by a three-position jumper identified as X40 which should be set to position 0-3
in all cases of 30kVA, 40kVA and 60kVA models. This signal is used by the Rectifier Logic Board to limit the maximum input current allowed through the rectifier in order to protect the rectifier SCRs.

2.3.19

X19 (Page 1) Output current monitoring W-ph


A CT mounted on the UPS output W phase provides a current sense signal to X19
pins 1-3. The resulting voltage (IO_C) is developed across a selectable burden resistor and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-34. The appropriate resistance is
selected by a three-position jumper identified as X39 which should be set to position 0-3 in all cases of 30kVA, 40kVA and 60kVA models. This signal is used
by the UPS Logic Board to initiate an overload warning (alarm #66) and overload
latches (alarm #62), and also to initiate the overload timer.

2.3.20

X20 (Page 1) Output current monitoring V-ph


A CT mounted on the UPS output V phase provides a current sense signal to X20
pins 1-3. The resulting voltage (IO_B) is developed across a selectable burden resistor and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-33. The appropriate resistance is
selected by a three-position jumper identified as X38 which should be set to position 0-3 in all cases of 30kVA, 40kVA and 60kVA models. This signal is used
by the UPS Logic Board to initiate an overload warning (alarm #66) and overload
latches (alarm #62), and also to initiate the overload timer.

7-10

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

2.3.21

X21 (Page 1) Output current monitoring U-ph


A CT mounted on the UPS output U phase provides a current sense signal to X21
pins 1-3. The resulting voltage (IO_A) is developed across a selectable burden resistor and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-32. The appropriate resistance is
selected by a three-position jumper identified as X37 which should be set to position 0-3 in all cases of 30kVA, 40kVA and 60kVA models. This signal is used
by the UPS Logic Board to initiate an overload warning (alarm #66) and overload
latches (alarm #62), and also to initiate the overload timer.

2.3.22

X22 (Page 1) Battery current monitoring


A DCCT mounted in the battery positive line provides a current sense signal to
X22 pin 2 (pins 1 and 3 carry the 12V operating power supply to the DCCT device). The signal voltage (IO_A) is developed across a selectable burden resistor
and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-31. The appropriate resistance is selected
by a three-position jumper identified as X31 which should be set to position 0-2
in standard 30kVA, 40kVA and 60kVA models and 0-3 in a 60kVA model. The
sense signal is used by the Rectifier Logic Board to limit the maximum battery
charge current (to protect the battery), and also by the UPS Logic Board to calculate the percentage capacity and remaining autonomy time.

2.3.23

X23 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring U-ph


Not used the inverter U-phase current is not monitored in a standard 7200 Series
UPS model.

2.3.24

X24 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring V-ph


A DCCT mounted in the inverter output V-phase line provides a current sense
signal to X24 pin 2 (pins 1 and 3 carry the 12V operating power supply to the
DCCT device). The signal voltage (IINV_B) is developed across a selectable
burden resistor and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-29. The appropriate resistance is selected by a three-position jumper identified as X33 which should be set
to 0-2 in standard 40kVA models and 0-3 in a 30kVA and 60kVA models.
This signal is used by the Inverter Logic Board to:
regulate the PWM drives in order to sustain the inverter output during load
changes (i.e. act as a feed-forward control).
introduce a 150% inverter current limit (achieved by blocking the PWM
signal and reducing the inverter voltage) in order to limit the maximum
current drawn through the inverter and protect the inverter IGBT devices.

2.3.25

X25 (Page 1) Inverter current monitoring W-ph


A DCCT mounted in the inverter output W-phase line provides a current sense
signal to X25 pin 2 (pins 1 and 3 carry the 12V power supply to the DCCT device). The signal voltage (IINV_C) is developed across a selectable burden resistor
and fed to the UPS Logic Board via X1-30. The appropriate resistance is selected
by a three-position jumper identified as X34 which should be set to position 0-2
in standard 40kVA models and 0-3 in a 30kVA and 60kVA models.
This signal is used in the same way as the V-phase signal described above.

2.3.26

X26 (Page 1) Not in use

2.3.27

X27 (Page 1) Not in use

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 2 - High Voltage Interface Board

2.4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Summary information
Table 7-2: High Voltage Interface Board configuration links

7-12

Jumper

Link
Position

0-1

X31

0-2

X31 : X32 : X33 : X34 : X35 : X37 : X38


: X39 : X40

0-3

0-1

X31 : X32 : X33 : X34

0-2

X35 : X36 : X37 : X38 : X39 : X40

0-3

0-1

0-2

X31 :X32 : X33 : X34 : X35 : X36 : X37 :


X38 : X39 : X40

0-3

Function

30 kVA CT burden selection

40 kVA CT burden selection

60 kVA CT burden selection

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Section 7: UPS System Control

Chapter 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

3.1

Chapter overview
This chapter contains a circuit description of the current UPS Logic Board used
across the whole 7200 Series UPS model range, and should be read in conjunction
with circuit diagram SE-4550007-H (7 pages).
Part N SE-4550007-H is a direct replacement for Part N SE-4550004-E which
may be fitted to units manufactured prior to February 1997. Though their are only
minor differences in the two PCBs a full explanation of the UPS Logic Board Part
N SE-4550004-E can be found in Section 20 Chapter 4.
Signal annotations shown on the circuit diagrams are shown in italics in the following text e.g. [CLKOUT>.

3.2
3.2.1

General description
Circuit board functions
Figure 7-3: UPS Logic Board connections
Rectifier
Logic Board
X2

Inverter
Logic Board
X4

Static Switch
Driver Board
X13

X1

X3

X5
X7

UPS Logic Board


X2

X8

X1
High Voltage
I/face Board

X1
External
Alarm Options

X6

Parallel X2
Control
Logic
X3

X4

X2
X9
Operator
Logic Board

Operator
Control
Panel

The position of the UPS Logic Board with respect to the other control boards
places it at the heart of the UPS control operation and its functional responsibilities can be broadly summarised as follows:
Motherboard
One of the most basic functions provided by the UPS Logic Board is to act
as a motherboard for signals travelling directly between any of the other
circuit boards connected to it: e.g. the input voltage sense signals passes
directly from the High Voltage Interface Board to the Rectifier Logic

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Board.
System control
The UPS Logic Board contains a microprocessor-based control system
which reads various status signals derived on the other circuit boards and
produces several system control logic signals: e.g. stop/start signals to
the Rectifier/Inverter Logic Boards, and transfer command signals to the
Static Switch Interface Board.
Alarms control
The UPS Logic Board acts as an assembly point for alarm signals generated on the various other boards, together with those generated on the UPS
Logic Board itself, and controls their distribution to the Operator Control
Panel and External Alarms Options under microprocessor supervision.
Operator programming interface
The UPS Logic Board microprocessor enforces the programmable system
operating parameters selected by the operator, via the Operator Logic
Board, onto the system control logic
Static Switch transfer control
The UPS Logic Board contains decision-making logic which controls the
load transfer events between the inverter and static bypass supplies.
3.2.2

Input/Output connections
The UPS Logic Board has eight connectors (See Figure 7-3) whose connections
are summarised below.
X1 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Rectifier Board
4520074-A (See Table 7-3).
X2 System control and monitoring signals to/from the High Voltage
Interface Board 4590054-O (See Table 7-4).
X3 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Inverter Logic
Board 4530025-T (See Table 7-5).
X4 Power supply to Operator Logic Board 4550005-F (see circuit diagram sheet 7).
X5 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Static Switch
Driver Board 4542043-Z (See Table 7-6).
X6 Data/logic to/from Operator Logic Board 4550005-F (see circuit diagram sheet 7).
X7 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Parallel Logic
Board 4520075-B. (See Table 7-1)
X8 Alarm outputs to optional external (remote) alarm display boards
(see relevant external alarm interface board in the Options section of this
manual).

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Table 7-3: Connector X1 (To Rectifier Logic Board)


PIN

I/O

1-4

0V ground reference for digital electronics

5-8

+12V power supply derived from AC-DC Power Supply Board

9-12

-12V power supply derived from AC-DC Power Supply Board

13-14

I/O

Common ground reference for analogue sense signals

15

VREC_AC: Input mains voltage sense signal (phases U-W)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

16

VREC_BA: Input mains voltage sense signal (phases V-U)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

17

VREC_CB:Input mains voltage sense signal (phases W-V)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

18

IB: Battery current sense signal through connection from HVI


Board battery current limit control

19

Not used in standard modules

20

IREC: Rectifier input current sense signal through connection


from HVI Board input current limit control

21-23

Not used in standard modules

24

IREC_T: Used in parallel systems only (not available)

25

VB: DC Bus (battery) voltage feedback through connection from


HVI Board (-3.225Vdc @446V DC Bus)

26

T_BAT: Battery cabinet temperature sensor through connection


from HVI Board (2.98V @ 25C)

27

IDC_1: Not used in standard model (12 pulse rectifier only)

28

IDC_2: Not used in standard model (12 pulse rectifier only)

29

DB: Used in parallel systems only (input current sharing)

30

DB_0: Used in parallel systems only (input current sharing)

31

Not used in standard modules

32

OVLREC: Rectifier overload error status (Overload = 1)

33

BLKREC: Rectifier OFF/ON status (OFF = 1, ON = 0)

34

SEQREC: Input mains phase sequence error status (Error = 1)

35

IN_LOW: Low input volts 20% error status (Error = 1)

36

ON_REC: Rectifier Run(1)/Stop(0) command from UPSLB micro

37

XRADD_1: Reduced current limit from UPSLB micro (On Gen = 1)

38

REC_A: Charge mode selection from UPSLB micro

39

REC_B: Charge mode selection from UPSLB micro

40

Not used in standard modules

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Function

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Table 7-4: Connector X2 (To High Voltage Interface Board)

7-16

PIN

I/O

Function

1-4

0V ground reference for digital electronics

5-8

+12V supply to HVI Board

9-12

-12V supply to HVI Board

13-14

Common ground reference for analogue sense signals

15-17

VI-A, VI-B, VI-C: Bypass sense voltages for U-V-W phases


respectively. Approximately 1% of bypass L-N voltage

18-20

VINV-A, VINV-B, VINV-C: Inverter sense voltages for U-V-W


phases. Approximately 1% of inverter L-N voltage (8Vp-p)

21-23

VO-A, VO-B, VO-C: UPS output sense voltages for U-V-W phases
respectively. Approximately 1% of UPS output L-N voltage (8Vp-p)

24-26

VREC-AC, VREC-BA, VREC-CB: Input mains sense voltages.


Approximately 1.3% of input L-L voltage
e.g. approx. range 5V - 5.5V (15Vp-p) for 380-415V nominal input

27

V-B: DC Bus (Battery) volts sense signal. Approximately 0.7% of


the DC Bus voltage (+3.225Vdc @446V DC Bus)

28-30

IINV-A, IINV-A, IINV-C: Inverter current sense (150% phaseback)

31

I-B: Battery current sense signal (Batt I limit and current display)

32-34

IO-A, IO-B, IO-C: Output current O/load alarm/timer/display

35

IREC-1: Input current sense signal (dc)

36-42

Not used in standard modules

43

SW-REC: Rectifier Input Switch auxiliary contact status

44

SW-IN: Static Bypass Switch auxiliary contact status

45

SW-BYP: Maintenance Bypass Switch auxiliary contact status

46

SW-OUT: Output Switch auxiliary contact status

47

Not used in standard modules

48

FUSINV: Inverter fuse monitor (not used in standard module)

49

FUSREC: Rectifier fuse monitor (not used in standard module)

50

FUSBAT: Battery fuse monitor

51

TH: Inverter thermostat contact status

52

ESD: Emergency shutdown

53

SW-BAT: Battery isolator auxiliary contact status

54

BATTRP: Battery isolator trip signal

55-56

Not used in standard modules

57-60

T1, T2, T3, T4: Temperature sensing monitoring signals

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Table 7-5: Connector X3 (Inverter Logic Board)


PIN

I/O

1-4

0V power supply rail

5-8

+12V power supply derived from DC-DC Power Supply Board

9 - 12

-12V power supply derived from DC-DC Power Supply Board

13

Common

14

Common

15-17

[VI-A>, [VI-B>, [VI-C>: Bypass volts sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

18-20

[VIN-A>, [VIN-B>, [VIN-C>: Inverter volts sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

21-23

[IINV_A>, [IINV_B>, [IINV_C>: Inverter current sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

24

[XINVOI>: Mains error load transfer to inverter (H)

25

[DREF>: Output voltage adjustment - used in parallel modules

26

[DREF0>: Output voltage adjustment - used in parallel modules

27-30

[DV-A>, [DV-B>, [DV-C>, [DV-0>: Load sharing signals used for


parallel modules only

31

[INV-L>: Transfer load to inverter command from processor system

32

[OVL-INV>: Inverter overload status to processor system (OVL = L)

33

[BLK-INV>: Inverter On/Off status to processor system (Off = H)

34

[BACK>: Inv. frequency back to processor system from Inverter


Logic Board

35

[SYNC>: Produced by processor system to Inverter Logic Board

36

[ON-INV>: Inverter On/Off control from processor system (Off = L)

37

[INV-F>: from processor system (Inv Freq)

38-39

[INV_A>, [INV_B>: from processor system - used in output volts


selection

40

Inverter thermostat status signals (optional)

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Function

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Table 7-6: Connector X5 (Static Switch Driver Board)


PIN

I/O

Function

1-4

0V power supply rail

5-8

+12V power supply rail

9 - 12

-12V power supply rail

13

XSTAI1: Not used in standard module. Details required as to what


is connected to SSDB connector X7

14

XSTAI2: Output contactor (inverter output) auxiliary contact status


low = contactor closed

15-16

INV-L: Transfer load to inverter command from processor system

17-18

MNS-L: Transfer load to bypass command from processor system

19

XSTAD1: Not used in standard module.

20

XSTAD2: Not used in standard module.

Table 7-1: Connector X7 (See Table 8-2)


PIN

I/O

1-4

0V ground reference for digital electronics

5-8

+12V supply to HVI Board

9-10

-12V supply to HVI Board

11-13

VO-A, VO-B, VO-C: UPS output sense voltages for U-V-W phases
respectively. Approximately 1% of UPS output L-N voltage (8Vp-p)

14

Common ground reference for analogue sense signals


VI-A, VI-B, VI-C: Bypass sense voltages for U-V-W phases
respectively. Approximately 1% of bypass L-N voltage

15-17

IO-A, IO-B, IO-C: Output current O/load alarm/timer/display

18

I_B_P:

19
20-22

COMM_P:
DV-A, DV-B, DV-C:

23

DV-0:

24

IREC-T:

25

DB:

26

DB-0:

27-28

0V ground reference

29-30

+5V Supply to

31

7-18

Function

PAOU10:

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Table 7-1: Connector X7 (See Table 8-2)


PIN

I/O

Function

32

INV_DIS:

33

SW-OUT:

34

SWBYP:

35

I_BST_BAT:

36

I_TST_BAT:

37

MNS_DIS:

38

BLK_SEL:

39

OFF_INV:

40

C_L_INV:

41

RES_EXT:

42

V-AUX:

43

O_BLK_SW:

44

O_MNS_L_SS:

45

O_MNS_D_SS:

46

TST_BAT:

47

BST_BAT:

48

MNS_SYN_KO:

49

O_MNS_DIS:

50

SYN_INV_OK:

51

PAR_REC:

52

INV-L:

53

FRQ_SYN:

54

FRQ_PAR:

55

FRQ_MNS:

56

BACK:

57

INV_OK:

58

CON_SEL:

59

I_SW_BYP:

60

XSTAIZ:

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7-19

7-20

Output
Display

CAN
Interface

Da
ta

P2

P3

A/D
Converters

P5

P1

P4

P0

20MHz
Clock

Analogue Signal

RAM

MUX
D43
D48
D49

EPROM

Data X

Address X

Reset
Bypass On/Off
Inverter On/Off
Rectifier On/Off

Input
Buffer

CS

S1
S2
S3

S5

On Inverter
Inverter contactor
control

Output
Buffer

OFF

OFF

Analogue
Buffering

D22

ON

D23

X8

X7

X5

X3

X2

X1

ON

ON

Alarm
Board

Parallel
Logic

SBS Board

Inverter
Logic Bd

H.V.I Board

Rectifier
Logic Bd

OFF

Rectifier Run

Inverter Run

OFF

3.2.3

l
ro
nt
Co

Reset
Power
X28

On Bypass
Bypass SCR control

ON

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)
7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Block Diagram
Figure 7-4: UPS Logic Board basic block diagram

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

3.2.3.1

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

System overview
Processor system

The UPS Logic Board control system is based on a type 80C166 microcontroller,
as shown in Figure 7-4. This device contains six ports through which it communicates with peripheral circuits/devices, together with several system control
lines. It also contains an internal A/D converter, four programmable timers and
internal ROM & RAM.
The ports are configured by an initialisation routine performed by the system software on power-up and can be summarised as follows.
Port 0
This port is configured as a 16-bit bi-directional data bus <D0...D15>
Port 1
This port is configured as the first 16-bits of an 18-bit address bus
<A0...A15> the other two address lines are provided by port 4.
Port 2
The lower half of this port <P2-0...P2-7> carries various synchronising/timing signals and the upper half <P2-8...P2-15> comprises the CAN data bus,
which carries the data to/from the Operator Logic Board
Port 3
This 16-bit port is configured as a mixture of inputs and outputs generally
concerned with controlling the CAN Bus data exchange.
Port 4
The lower two lines only are utilised on port 4. These form the upper two
address lines <A16...A17> the lower address lines <A0...A15> are provided
by port 1.
Port 5
The lower ten lines of this port <P5-0...P5-9> are configured to act as inputs
to the internal A/D converter.
System control lines
In addition to the I/O ports the microcontroller also has the general control
I/O lines normally associated with a microprocessor-based system; such
as a system clock, reset, and Read/Write control.
Memory

The microcontroller uses both internal and external memory. 2 X 126k of batterybacked RAM and 2 X 516k of EPROM are fitted to the board as standard which
holds the system operating software. Facilities are included on the board to allow
alternative memory configurations to be used as described later.
Data buffers

The 16-bit data bus is connected to various control circuit boards via input and
output data buffers, as shown in Figure 7-4, which are controlled by individual
chip select enable lines to direct the data flow to/from the appropriate source, as
required by the system control software.
Analogue signal processing

The microcontroller monitors various analogue signals which are connected to


the UPS Logic Board from the peripheral boards. These signals are processed by
suitable analogue circuitry, buffered where necessary, and applied to the microcontrollers A/D inputs via a series of multiplexer devices.

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Primary output control signals

Although the micro-controller produces numerous control logic signals, its primary outputs can be considered to be:
Inverter Start/Stop
Signal to the Inverter Logic Board which determines whether or not the
inverter section is enabled or inhibited.
Rectifier Start/Stop
Signal to the Rectifier Logic Board which determines whether or not the
rectifier section is enabled or inhibited.
Load on inverter
Signal which controls the inverter-side contactor (K1) and connects the
inverter output to the load.
Load on bypass
Signal which controls the static switch and connects the load to the static
bypass supply.
Note: the load on inverter and load on bypass signals are interlocked
such that they cannot be activated simultaneously.
As shown on the block diagram, these signals are produced by a dedicated logic
block which is controlled by the data bus together with individual switches which
allow each of the above functions to be manually overridden.
Operator Interface

The microcontroller is connected to the Operator Logic Board via the CAN Bus,
which is a bi-directional serial communications link that enables the operator to
program several operational parameters into the micro-controller and also enables
various alarms and indications to be displayed on the Operator Control Panel.

7-22

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

3.3
3.3.1

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Detailed circuit description


Introduction
The UPS Logic Board circuit diagram (SE-4540007-H) comprises 7 sheets. With
reference to the block diagram description (See Figure 7-4), the drawings can
broadly be described as follows:
Sheet 1 contains a signal map identifying the functions covered on the
remaining pages. It also contains a summary chart detailing the various
configuration jumpers.
Sheet 2 contains the
basic microcontroller system
data bus, address bus and control line buffers
Ni-Cad battery back-up controller
reset generator
Sheet 3 contains the
system RAM and ROM memory and its associated configuration links
Inverter/Rectifier Start/Stop control logic
load transfer control logic
CAN bus communications drivers and control logic
Real-time clock (RTC)
Sheet 4 contains the
data bus input buffers
data bus output buffers
on-board 7-segment indication circuit
Sheet 5 contains analogue signal processing circuits for the
input voltage sense signals
inverter voltage sense signals
DC (battery) bus voltage sense signal
Battery current sense signal
it also contains reference voltage generators; power supply monitors; and
inverter overvoltage and input overvoltage fault detection circuits.
Sheet 6 contains analogue signal processing circuits for the
output voltage sense signals
output current sense signals
it also contains the analogue signal multiplexers (for the A/D inputs), output overvoltage and overcurrent fault detection circuits.
Sheet 7 contains the
input/output signal identifications details
serial communications (RS485) driver and port
Note: On the diagrams, a negative symbol at the end of a signals annotation indicates that the signal is active low e.g. [RD> = [RD->.
As with all micro-based system, the microcontrollers operation is determined by
the program held in the systems memory: and as this is hidden to the service engineer there is very little that can be done to ascertain that the board is working
correctly apart from checking the validity of its input and output signals, and other
signals generated on the board which are required by the central processor system.
The following description deals with the board on this basis, and should provide
sufficient information to determine whether or not the board is functioning correctly when it comes to troubleshooting. A full software description is beyond the
scope of this manual.

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

3.3.2

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Basic microcontroller system


(circuit diagram sheet 2)
Figure 7-5: Micro system control signals
Power Supply

Clock

27

Power
Fail

29

Vref (+5V)

54

XTAL1

READY

96

Ready

CLKOUT

97

Clock out

ALE

25

Address latch enable

BHE

92

Bus high enable

RSTOUT

96

Reset out

RD

26

Read

WR

95

Write

RSTIN
NMI
VAREF

Control Bus

Reset

20

D42

Caution

When monitoring the signals described in this section it is best done with control
power only i.e. with the UPS power sections shut down and the circuit boards
live via the control power supply. The signals entering the left of the above diagram are constant and can be monitored with a meter/oscilloscope; those shown
on the right of the diagram are not constant and best monitored with a logic probe.
The logic sequence/timing of these signals depend upon various circuit conditions
and cannot therefore be accurately defined; however, for field test purposes, the
presence of a variable switching logic signal at these points would generally indicate that the basic processor control bus is serviceable and the system software
is running.
Power supply

The microcontroller is powered from the general +5V rail which is provided by a
three-terminal 5V regulator (N1) shown on diagram sheet 7.
System clock (XTAL1)

A dedicated crystal-controlled clock generator (E2) provides a system clock


signal which is connected to the microcontroller (D12) pin 20. This signal is a
20MHz squarewave switching between +5V and 0V.
System reset (RSTIN)

On power-up, a 1 second logic low reset pulse, [RSTIN->, is applied to D42 pin 27
from the reset generator circuit. This can also be manually applied for troubleshooting purposes by temporarily bridging jumper X28 (See paragraph 3.3.5).
The [RSTIN-> pulse forces the processor to restart its operation from the beginning
of its operating program which forces it to run through its initialisation routine.
Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI)

When the input to D42 pin 29 (NMI) goes low it instructs the system software to
interrupt its present operation and execute a power-down routine to save critical
data.
The source of this input is determined by X17 which is normally made 2-3 and
selects the power failure detection circuit output [PFO> as the controlling signal
this circuit is shown on diagram sheet 5 (See paragraph 3.3.15.4).

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Reference voltage (VAREF)

The input to D42 pin 54 (VAREF) is a +5V reference voltage used by the internal
A/D converters to compute the digital values for all analogue signals e.g volts/
current/VA etc. An adjustable reference voltage generator (N45 pin 8) (See paragraph 3.3.15.2), shown on diagram sheet 5, provides this input ([VREF>) via X20
which is normally made 1-2.
Clock out (CLKOUT)

This output is a 20MHz squarewave synchronised to the processor clock input and
is used by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding logic D33 (See paragraph
3.3.6) shown on the diagram sheet 3. This is to ensure that when the processor
wishes to read from/write to memory the memory access is synchronised to the
internal microprocessor action i.e. it ensures that the accessed memory address
is relevant to the current processors requirements.
Address latch enable (ALE)

This output goes high to enable the address bus to be latched into the RAM/ROM
memory address decoding logic D33 shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 3.3.6).
Bus high enable (BHE)

The logic state of this output indicates whether the processor is internally enabling
its high or low byte data bus i.e. it indicates if the micro wishes to read from
(or write to) the lower byte (D0....D7) or the higher byte (D8....D15). [BHE-> is
low when the high byte is being accessed, and vice versa, and is used by the RAM/
ROM memory address decoding logic shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 3.3.6).
Reset out (RSTOUT)

is controlled by the reset input signal, [RSTIN->, and goes high while the
input rest signal is applied. This signal is synchronised to the system clock and
returns high an integral number of clock pulses after the input reset signal is removed. The [RSTO-> signal is used by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding
logic shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 3.3.6); and a buffered version,
[RSTOX->, is connected to the data bus output buffers as shown on diagram sheet
4 via jumper X25 (2-3) (See paragraph 3.3.12).
[RSTO->

Ready (Ready)

This input, when low, inserts wait states in the processors operation; thus slowing
it down. It is driven by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding logic shown on
the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 3.3.6) and holds off the processors operation until the appropriate address latching has taken place, thus effectively extending the read/write times when slower memory elements are being used.
Read (RD)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to read the data from the device
or memory location currently addressed by the address bus.
Write (WR)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to write data to the device or
memory location currently addressed by the address bus.

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3.3.3

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers


(circuit diagram sheet 2).
Data bus buffer

Two type ACT245 octal bus transceivers (D32 & D36) are employed as bi-directional protection buffers between the microcontroller (D0....D15) and the data bus
(DX0....DX15). D32 buffers the low byte (D0....D7) and D36 the high byte;
however both are controlled by a common data direction signal i.e. the microcontrollers [RD-> output therefore the data direction of all 16 data bus lines are
controlled by a single signal.
These devices are described in appendix A (See paragraph A.1).
When the microcontroller drives its [RD-> output low it sets the data direction
through the buffers from B-to-A, which allows the data bus contents through to
the microcontrollers data inputs. At other times, when [RD-> is high, data flows
through the buffers from A-to-B, allowing the micro to place data onto the data
bus, which can then be written to a peripheral circuit as required.
Address bus buffer

The address bus is also buffered by two ACT245 devices (D38 & D41) but, unlike
the data bus described above, in this case the data direction is fixed by connecting
pin 1 of each device to a permanent +5V supply. Thus the address bus data always
flows through the devices in the A-to-B direction and used to select a memory location the buffered address bus is annotated (AX0....AX17).
Note: AX16 & AX17 are buffered by the control bus buffer described below.
Control bus buffer

The control bus signals [RD->, [WR->, [BHE->, [RSTO-> are all buffered by D47.
This device is configured with fixed data direction A-to-B, in the same manner as
the address bus buffer described above, by the application of a fixed +5V supply
at D47 pin 1. The buffered control signals [RDX->, [WRX->, [BHEX->, [RSTOX-> are
used by various circuits distributed throughout the circuit diagrams.
In all cases the above mentioned buffers have pull-up resistors connected to their
input and output pins e.g. resistor packs R307, R309 etc.
3.3.4

Ni-Cad Battery back-up controller


(circuit diagram sheet 2).
A 3.6V 280mAh Ni-Cad battery is fitted to the UPS Logic Board to back-up the
RAM contents and maintain the RTC time-keeping operation when the UPS is
turned OFF; when fully charged the battery offers a back-up period of up to 4 to
5 months.
The charger circuit is activated by the [OUTBAT> signal which is produced by the
processor via D25 pin 19 (diagram sheet 4). When [OUTBAT> goes high it turns
on V152 which then turns on V151 to supply the battery charge current via led
H8, R32 and V73. The charge voltage is limited to 4.7V by zener V14.
Note: the battery can be disabled for shipping/storage by opening jumper X31.
The battery is connected to the RAM memory devices and Real Time Clock
device shown on diagram sheet 3 via V32 and the battery supply annotated
[VRAM>. Thus, if the boards power supply is turned off (i.e. UPS fully powered
down) the programmable parameters held in RAM (e.g. kVA, working voltage

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and frequency, battery charging parameters and display language) are maintained; and the real-time clock keeps running. It is not therefore necessary to reprogram these parameters following every start-up.
Note: Jumper X31 must be made in order to enable this function.
The [VBATT> output is not connected to other parts of the circuit, but it is monitored by the microcontrollers analogue input [AN9> via D44, which is a quad analogue switch. [VBATT> is switched through D44 pin 2, by [FL-12> when it goes
high; this is controlled by a 12V supply rail monitor circuit (diagram sheet 5)
which inhibits the [VBATT> sense signal if the 12V power rails are invalid, thus
preventing an erroneous battery voltage fault being detected by the micro under
these conditions.
Note: the other three gates within D44 are not used and their inputs are tied to 0V.
[OUTBAT> signal details

The micro-controller monitors the NiCad battery voltage (3.6V nom) via AN9
and its internal A/D converter (as described above) and turns on the Ni-Cad
charger, by driving the [OUTBAT> signal high, if the Ni-Cad voltage falls below
2.8V. When the charger is active, the [INTERNAL BATTERY LOW] message is
displayed on the Operator Control Panel (alarm #76) and led H8 illuminates.
Once the battery is recharged to 3.6V the charger is turned off by the [OUTBAT>
signal returning low and the alarm message is cancelled. Thus the Ni-Cad battery
is charged only when necessary and is not permanently trickle-charged.
Note: the NiCad charger may be active for several hours when the UPS is first
commissioned (depending on the initial battery charge state) jumper X31 must
be fitted to enable the battery back-up facility.
3.3.5

Reset generator
(circuit diagram sheet 2).
A purpose-designed Supply Voltage Supervisor (N24) provides the micro with a
1 second sec logic low [RSTIN-> reset signal on power-up. This signal, which is
applied to the micro pin 27, can also be initiated manually by temporarily making
jumper X28 (1-2). The [RSTIN> signal also resets the RAM chip select signals produced by D19a/d (shown on circuit diagram sheet 3) and points the micro to its
initialisation routines.

Caution

Using X28 to activate the reset circuit during normal UPS operation will crash the
unit, because the run signals to the rectifier, inverter and static switch will be disabled for the 1 second reset period.

On power-up (reset) the micro-controller receives initialisation data from D20


which is an EEPROM used to store the Emerson/Liebert/SICE software passport
identification. Amongst other things this configures the micros programmable
ports P0-P5 to the parameters required to operate in this application. Without this
security interlock the micro-controller will be inactive. An inverse output, [VAUX>, goes high on reset and is connected to D22 and D23 in the Inverter/Rectifier Start/Stop control logic and Load transfer control logic (circuit diagram
sheet 3). This resets the logic latches (Emergency Stop, DC Overvolts, etc.) and
re-applies the run signals to the rectifier, inverter and static switch.
Note: the reset time is determined by R157/C97, and begins when the +5V supply
rail reaches 3.6V on initial power-up.

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3.3.6

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

System RAM and ROM memory addressing


(circuit diagram sheet 3).
The system memory comprises 2 x 512k EPROMs (D35 & D46) and 2 x 128k
RAM chips (D28 & D40). All these devices have an 8-bit data bus output; however, the EPROMs have a 16-bit address input while the RAM chips have a 17bit address facility.
Random Access memory (RAM)

This is the read/write memory store; sometimes referred to as the temporary


store. Any data fed in from the peripheral devices or produced during the execution of the main program will be temporarily held in RAM e.g. UPS setup parameters such as kVA, nominal voltages/frequency, serial number, passwords,
etc. This is a volatile location, meaning that when power is lost to the component
all data is also lost; thus the need for the on-board back-up Ni-Cad battery.
Read Only Memory (ROM)

This memory contains the operating system program, or firmware, which is basically a sequence of instructions to be carried out by the micro-controller in order
to make it perform the actions required of it. Upon power-up the micro is pointed
to the first instruction as part of its reset initialisation, and from then on it steps
through the programmed instructions in a sequence dictated by various events and
monitored conditions.
ROM is non-volatile, which means that it does not lose its memory contents in
the event of a loss of power.
Address decoding D33 / D19

The output enable pins of all four memory devices are controlled by the control
bus [RD-> line, therefore when this line goes low the processor can read the data
held at the current address from any of the devices. The purpose of the address
decoding circuit is to enable the microcontroller to select which of the EPROM
or RAM devices it wishes to communicate with at any given time. The memory
devices chip select inputs are controlled by a circuit comprising an ASIC i.c.
(D33) and two gates of D19.
D33s inputs are connected to A0, A14....A17, and several control bus signals
as described in paragraph 3.3.2. which are all controlled by the microcontroller.
The output signals, [CSEP1L->, [CSEP1H->, [CSRA1L->, and [CSRA1H->, adopt logic
states determined directly by these processor-controlled inputs and are synchronised to the processor operation by the 20MHz [CLKOUT> signal.
When low, [CSEP1L-> and [CSEP1H-> enable the EPROM devices via their chip
enable inputs (pin 20), while [CSRA1L-> and [CSRA1H-> perform a similar function on the RAM chips.
The [READY> output from D33 is fed back to the micro to inform it that the appropriate addresses have been loaded into D33s internal latches (See paragraph
3.3.2).
As D19 provides the chip select inputs to the RAM devices it is powered from
the battery-backed RAM supply to prevent RAM data corruption on UPS power
down.
Note: jumper X14 provides a test facility for bench testing only and all links
should be open during normal operation.

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AX15 & AX16 configuration links

The UPS Logic Board has been designed to facilitate future software upgrades by
including configuration links to permit the addressing of alternative memory devices. These links affect the routing of the AX15 and AX16 address lines, and the
standard configuration is shown below in Figure 7-6.
In the standard configuration the signals annotated [PIN29EP> and [PIN3EP> are
connected to the EPROMs A14 and A15 inputs and are therefore driven by the
AX15 and AX16 address lines respectively. The [PIN31RAM> signal (AX16) is
connected to the A15 input of both RAM devices and the [PIN3RAM> signal
(AX15) is connected to the RAM write enable inputs.
Figure 7-6: AX15 & AX16 decoding configuration links
X19

X13

[AX16>

X22

[PIN3EP>

X21

X23

[AX15>
[PIN29EP>
[WRX>

3.3.7

[PIN31RAM>

[PIN3RAM>

X24

[PIN29RAM>

Basic system control logic (D88)


The term Basic System Control Logic is used here to described the signals generated by the UPS Logic Board which control the rectifier and inverter start/stop
commands; battery circuit breaker trip, and the load transfer control between
inverter and static bypass.
These functions are controlled by a single ASIC device annotated D88 which is
shown on sheet 3 of the diagram and also in greater detail in Figure 7-7. D88 also
provides the processor system with various status signals, as illustrated in the
block diagram.
The following description begins by identifying D88s input logic signals, and
continues by explaining their influences on the individual output control signals.

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Figure 7-7: Basic system control logic (internal detail)

ESD_I

X2-52

09

D88
29

R97

SCR_OPN

N15-8
N15-14

M_ESD
D26-5

28

R86
32 M_SCR_OP

Z39
0V

BAT_MA

D34-12

D26-4

08
20 M_BAT_MA
R113

R111

R112

D26-6

26 BAT_MA_D
27 SCR_OP_D
24 ESD_D

ALM_RES

16

39

0V
RES_EXT

SEQ_MNS

D26-7

13

BLK_BYP_M
D55-9

D21-16

D21-5
X7-39
X7-40
D21-9
X7-32
D54-6
D1-4
D21-12

25

MNS_KO

11

IBOPEN

12

BLK_INV_M

02

INV_ON
OFF_INV

17

06
14

INV_DIS

07

SYN_KO

18

B-INV
L_MAINS

31
41

BLK_REC_M

04

REC_ON

40

Q3
R320
Q2

34 BAT_TRP

33 ON_INV

S1

+5V

7-30

X2-54

X3-36

36

INV_L

38 MNS_L

ON_REC

D51-8

D51-6

X1-36

Block
Rectifier
Block
Inverter

R320

Block
Bypass

R320

Manual
RESET

Q1

D26-3

05

C_L_INV
L_INV

R320

BLK_MNS

X7=41

01

37

D21-15

C64

44

D21-2

652

V-AUX

C63

43

MRESET
N24-6

0V

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3.3.7.1

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

D88 Status signals to processor system


Emergency shutdown [M_ESD>

The emergency shutdown signal [ESD_I> to D88-9 is driven by external circuitry


and connected via X2-52 (sheet 7) as a logic high when the emergency shutdown
is applied.
This drives pin 29 ([M_ESD>) high which is connected to the processor system via
D26-5 where it initiates alarm #63 [CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY] (See paragraph
3.3.11.4) and also provides a latching input back to D88 pin 24 ([ESD_D>) which
holds pin 29 in its high state until the reset circuit is activated the latching signal
is debounced by R112/C63.
The high [ESD_D> input to D88 pin 24:

turns off the bypass enable signal ([BLK_MNS> = 0) D88 pin 25.
trips the battery circuit breaker ([BAT_TRP> = 0) D88-34
turns OFF (stops) the rectifier ([ON_INV> = 0) D88-33
turns OFF (stops) the inverter ([ON_REC> = 0) D88-37

Static switch SCR open [M_SCR_OP>

The static switch SCR open signal [SCR_OPN> to D88-28 is produced by N158 or N5-14 (sheet 6) as a logic high when the detection circuits sees a voltage
drop across one of the static bypass SCRs.
This drives pin 32 ([M_SCR_OP>) high (provided the load on mains ([MNS_L>)
output to D88-38 is also high) which is connected to the processor system via
D26-4 where it annunciates alarm #15 [BYP: SCR FAILURE] (See paragraph
3.3.11.4) and also provides a latching input back to D88 pin 27 ([SCR_OP_D>)
which holds pin 32 in its high state until the reset circuit is activated the latching
signal is debounced by R111/C62.
In addition to latching the output on pin 32, the logic high [SCR_OP_D> input also
blocks the static switch by forcing high the [BLK_MNS> output at D88-25 (see details of [BLK_MNS> below).
DC Overvoltage fast

The DC Fast Overvoltage signal ([BAT_MA>) to D88-8 is produced by N13-8


(sheet 5) and is logic high when a DC busbar (battery) overvoltage condition
(>620V) is present.
This drives pin 20 ([M_BAT_MA>) high which is connected to the processor system
via U26-6 where it initiates alarm #58 [DC BUS: FAST OVERVOL.] (See paragraph 3.3.11.4) and also provides a latching input back to D88 pin 26
([BAT_MA_D>) which holds pin 20 in its high state until the reset circuit is activated the latching signal is debounced by R113/C64.
The logic high latching signal to pin 20 ([M_BAT_MA>) also:
trips the battery circuit breaker ([BAT_TRP> = 0) D88-34
turns OFF (stops) the rectifier ([ON_INV> = 0) D88-33
turns OFF (stops) the inverter ([ON_REC> = 0) D88-37

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3.3.7.2

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

D88 Reset circuit [RES_EXT>

There are three sources of reset signal applied to D88:


D88-16 receives a logic high reset signal from the microcontroller via the
data bus output buffer D21-2 (See paragraph 3.3.12.5). This is a software
reset programmable via the Operator Control Board
D88-44 receives a logic high reset pulse when the board is powered up
(See paragraph 3.3.5)
D88-43 is driven high when the manual reset button (S1) is pressed
Common functions

In each case, a logic high activation on any of the above inputs:


resets the Emergency shutdown, Bypass SCR open and DC overvoltage latches described above.
provides a [RES_EXT> reset signal at D88-39 which is applied via X7-41
to the Parallel Logic Board in a 1+1 configured system.
[V_AUX> signal functions

In addition to the common functions described above the [V_AUX> signal also:

applies a reset signal directly to the Parallel Logic Board via X7-42.
resets (turns off) the static bypass ([BLK_MNS> = 1) D88-25.
resets (opens) the battery circuit breaker ([BAT_TRP> = 0) D88-34.
resets (turns off) the inverter ([ON_INV> = 0) D88-33.
resets (turns off) the rectifier ([ON_REC> = 0) D88-37.

The [V_AUX> power-up reset signal to D88-44 also resets the [BLK_MNS> output
from D88-25, described immediately above.
3.3.7.3

Major control signal outputs


Static bypass inhibit [BLK_MNS>

The [BLK_MNS> output from D88 pin 25 goes high when D88 detects any condition which requires the load to be prevented from being connected to the static
bypass supply. This output is fed to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer
U26-3 where it initiates alarm #16 [BYP:HARDWARE BLOCK.] (See paragraph
3.3.11.4) and is also connected to the load-on-bypass control logic within D88
where it inhibits the load-on-bypass command [MNS_L> output from D88 pin 38.
The [BLK_MNS> signal can be driven high, disabling the static bypass, by any one
of the following conditions:
Emergency shutdown latch set ([ESD_D> = 1) D88-24 (see above).
Bypass SCR open latch set ([M_SCR_OP> = 1) D88-27 (see above).
1 second Power-up reset pulse ([V_AUX> =1) D88-44 (see above).
Static bypass mains phase sequence error ([SEQ_MNS> = 1) D88-13. This
is derived from D27a on diagram sheet 5 (see paragraph 3.3.13.2 on page
7-56).
Manual block applied from switch Q1 ([BLK_MNS_M>) = 1) D88-1.
Mains error signal ([MNS_KO>) = 1) D88-11. This is produced by the
processor system under software control and applied via data bus buffer
D55 (see paragraph 3.3.12.7 on page 7-50).

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Battery circuit breaker trip [BAT_TRP>

A logic low [BAT_TRP> output from D88-34 trips the battery circuit breaker via
X2-54 (sheet 7), which is connected to the High Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.8).
The [BAT_TRP> signal can be driven low by any one of the following inputs:

DC Fast Overvoltage latch set ([BAT_MA_D> = 1) D88-26 (see above).


Emergency shutdown latch set ([ESD_D> = 1) D88-24 (see above).
1 second Power-up reset pulse ([V_AUX> =1) D88-44 (see above).
Software trip ([IBOPEN> = 1) D88-12. This is produced by the processor
system under software control and applied via data bus buffer D21-16
(See paragraph 3.3.12.5).
Note: This signal trips the battery breaker on low DC voltage as follows:
UPS on greater than 15% load = 330V
UPS on less than 15% load = 360V
The low voltage trip level is programmable via the Operator Control Panel
SET-UP screen, and is adjustable between 1.6V/cell and 1.69V/cell; however the 30V window between the <>15% levels is not adjustable.

Inverter Start/Stop (On/Off)

The [ON-INV> output from D88-33 is connected to the Inverter Logic Board via
X3-36 (sheet 7) where it controls the inverter Start/Stop status (see paragraph
2.3.8 on page 5-51). A logic low [ON-INV> signal commands the inverter to
STOP and can be effected by any one of the following D88 inputs (conversely,
all the following inputs must be in their healthy low state in order for the inverter
to run):
DC Fast Overvoltage latch set ([BAT_MA_D> = 1) D88-26 (see above).
Emergency shutdown latch set ([ESD_D> = 1) D88-24 (see above).
1 second Power-up reset pulse ([V_AUX> =1) D88-44 (see above).
Software control ([INV-ON> = 0) D88-17. This is produced by the processor system under software control and applied via data bus buffer D21-6
(See paragraph 3.3.12.5). This signal is low to inhibit the inverter and
high to enable it. When this signal is actively blocking the inverter (i.e.
low) it initiates alarm #30 [INV:SOFTWARE BLOCK.].
Manual inverter block ([BLK_INV_M> = 1) D88-2 logic high from the
manual inverter inhibit switch Q2.
If the [ON-INV> signal at D88 pin 33 is active (low), blocking the inverter,
alarm #32 [INV: HARDWARE BLOCK] will be active. Note that alarm #32
will be disabled if alarm #31 is active. Alarm #31 can be interpreted that
the inverter has been selected off, while alarm #32 suggests that the
inverter has been turned off for some other reason.
Parallel Logic Inverter OFF request ([OFF_INV> = 1) D88-5. This input
allows the Parallel Logic Board to enable/inhibit the inverter in a 1+1
configured system (see paragraph 2.3.1 on page 8-12). [OFF_INV> is high
to inhibit the inverter and vice-versa.

Rectifier Start/Stop (ON/OFF) [ON_REC>

The [ON_REC> output from D88-37 is connected to the Rectifier Logic Board via
X1-36 (sheet 7) where it controls the rectifier Start/Stop status (see paragraph
2.3.6 on page 4-35). A logic low [ON_REC> signal turns OFF the rectifier and can
be effected by any one of the following D88 inputs:
DC Fast Overvoltage latch set ([BAT_MA_D> = 1) D88-26 (see above).

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Emergency shutdown latch set ([ESD_D> = 1) D88-24 (see above).


1 second Power-up reset pulse ([V_AUX> =1) D88-44 (see above).
Software control ([REC-ON> = 0) D88-40 [REC-ON>. This is produced
by the processor system under software control and applied via the data
bus output buffer D21-15 (See paragraph 3.3.12.5). [REC-ON> is low to
inhibit the rectifier and high to enable it. When this signal is actively
blocking the rectifier (i.e. low) it initiates alarm #20 [RECT:SOFTWARE
BLOCK].
Manual rectifier block ([BLK_REC_M> = 1) D88-4. This input is
obtained from the manual rectifier inhibit switch Q3.
If the [ON-REC> signal at D88 pin 37 is active (low), blocking the rectifier,
alarm #22 [RECT:HARDWARE BLOCK] will be active. Note that this will
be disabled if alarm #21 is active. Alarm #21 can be interpreted that the
rectifier has been selected off via the Operator Control Panel, while alarm
#22 suggests that the rectifier has been turned off for some other reason
3.3.7.4

Load transfer control

The transfer control logic within D88 is interlocked such that the load on inverter [INV_L> and load-on-bypass [MNS_L> commands are mutually exclusive.
Load on inverter command [INV_L>:

The Load on inverter command ([INV_L>) output from D88-36 goes high to transfer the load to the inverter; and is connected to the Static Switch Driver Board via
X5-15 (sheet 7), where it turns OFF the static switch (disconnecting the load from
the bypass supply) and energises the inverter-side contactor (K1) driver circuit.
It is also connected to the Inverter Logic Board, via X3-31, where it triggers the
latches within D11 which makes the inverter voltage track the bypass supply voltage for 100ms (See section 5 paragraph 2.3.3). This is done to provide a smooth
transfer from bypass to inverter and reduce the wear on the inverter-side contactor (K1).
In order for D88 pin 36 ([INV_L>) to go high, all of the following conditions must
be satisfied:
Inverter Logic Board OK ([B-INV> = 0) D88-31. This input is driven by
the fault detection circuit on the Inverter Logic Board and applies a 1 second logic high hold-off command to X3-33 ([BLKINV> diagram sheet 7)
when any of its internal faults are active (e.g. Vsat) (see paragraph 2.3.7
on page 5-50). This is connected to D88-31 in the form of [B-INV>, and
must therefore be logic low, indicating no fault in order to permit the
load to be connected to the inverter.
Software request ([L_INV> = 1) D88-14. This is produced by the processor system and applied via the data bus output buffer D21-9 when all its
software-monitored parameters have been verified (e.g. Inverter voltage
OK, Sync OK etc.)(See paragraph 3.3.12.5).
Parallel Logic Inverter on inverter request ([C_L_INV> =0) D88-6. This
input is generated by the Parallel Logic Board in a 1+1 configured system and goes low when the parallel system control conditions request connecting the load on inverter. In a single-module application this input,
which is applied via X7-40, is tied to logic low and has no affect.
Load on bypass command [MNS_L>:

The load on bypass command output from D88-38 goes high to transfer the load
to the bypass; and is connected to the Static Switch Driver Board via X5-17 (sheet

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7), where it turns on the static switch driver circuit, connecting the load to the
bypass supply. It is also connected internally (within D88) to disable the bypass
SCR open annunciation circuit when load on bypass is not being commanded
i.e. the Open Circuit SCR fault is discounted while the load is on-inverter.
In order for D88 pin 38 ([MNS_L>) to go high, all of the following conditions must
be satisfied:
1. The static bypass must be enabled i.e. the [BLK_MNS> output on D88 pin
25 must be low (see above).
2. Parallel Logic Inverter on bypass request ([INV-DIS> =0) D88-6. This input
is generated by the Parallel Logic Board in a 1+1 configured system and
goes low when the parallel system control conditions request connecting the
load on bypass. In a single-module application this input, which is applied via
X7-32, is tied to logic low and has no affect.
Note: on the Parallel Logic Board the signal at X1-32 is identified as
[I_BUS_INV_L>.
3. In addition to conditions (1) and (2) above, one of the following conditions
must also be valid:
a) Software request ([L_MNS> = 1) D88-41. This is produced by the processor system when all software-monitored parameters are correct (e.g.
Critical bus volts not OK, overload, bypass volts OK etc.) and applied via
the data bus output buffer D21-12 (See paragraph 3.3.12.5).
b) No Load-on-inverter is being requested i.e. D88-6 [C_L_INV> AND
D88-14 [L_INV> are both logic high (see above). This means that neither
the Parallel Logic Board nor the microprocessor system are calling for the
load to be connected to the inverter
c) Inverter is blocked, but still in-sync i.e. D88-31 [BLK_INV> is high (see
above) AND the [SYN_KO> input to D88-18 is low. Note that [SYN_KO> is
derived via the processor system and D54, and is logic high when the
inverter and bypass are not in sync (see paragraph 3.3.12.8 on page 7-52).
3.3.8

CAN bus communications drivers and control logic


(circuit diagram sheet 3).
The CAN bus communications system is described in paragraph 5.3.9. (Operator
Logic Board).

3.3.9

Real-time clock (RTC)


(circuit diagram sheet 3)
The MC68698 (D18) is a peripheral device which contains a real-time clock/calendar, a 32 x 8 bit static RAM, and a synchronous, serial, three-wire interface for
communicating with the micro-controller. As its title suggests, the real time
clock accurately counts seconds, minutes, hours (AM/PM), Day-of-the week,
date, month and year (including auto-incrementing leap-year). In the UPS Logic
Board application it provides date stamping for the Operator Control Panel messages and service data entered via the Maintenance Menu Screen (see paragraph 2.4.6.3 on page 2-40). The device operates from the Ni-Cad back-up
battery to maintain its time-keeping function and prevent data loss when the general +5V control power is turned off. It also contains many other circuit functions,

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

such as an alarm facility, watchdog timer etc. which are not used in this application but may be mentioned briefly in the following description.
Power supply details

D18 is powered from the +5 volt power supply, which is connected to pin 16
(Vcc) and available at all times provided the unit is powered up.
When jumper X33 is made 1-2 the battery-backed RAM supply [VRAM] (See paragraph 3.3.4) is connected to pin 13 [Vbatt> and also, via an R-C delay circuit
(R108/C54), to pin 10 [POR>.
The delayed input to pin 10 is seen as a Power On Reset [POR> and resets the
device by briefly holding pin 10 low while the device is powered-up. However,
as the battery-backed supply is present at all times, this is effectively a onceonly reset that takes place when X33 is initially made 1-2 (i.e. battery connected)
and is not affected by subsequent application/removal of the UPS Logic Boards
+5V control power supply.
The boards +5V supply rail is monitored at D18 pin 12; and when the voltage at
this pin is less than 0.7V above the Ni-Cad voltage (pin 13) the device switches
to a low-power stand-by mode whereby it maintains its time-keeping function but
internally inhibits serial communication facilities with the micro-controller. This
prevents the passage of invalid or spurious data while the micro-controller is powering-down and so prevents RTC data corruption.
Clock control

The RTCs internal timer operation can be controlled from one of two sources;
either from an external crystal-controlled clock reference or a 50/60Hz mains-derived sinusoidal signal. In this particular application an external crystal is used
and the 50/60Hz input to pin 11 (LINE) is grounded via R107.
For crystal operation pins 14 and 15 are connected to a 32.768kHz, 1.048576kHz,
2.097152kHz or 4.194304kHz crystal, as shown on the circuit diagram. A programmable internal divider circuit enables the particular external clock frequency
to be scaled down to that used by the internal logic. The internal clock signal is
made available at pin 1 (CLKO) but in this particular application is not used, and
remains unterminated.
Serial communications interface

Four lines, connected to pins 4 to 7, implement a bi-directional communications


interface with the micro-controller, and allow the micro to write configuration and
control data to the RTC and read the time and register data. As described above,
such communication is inhibited if the UPS Logic Boards +5V power rail is unavailable.
The [ORCS> input to pin 7 (SS) is seen as a chip select input in this application
and must be held high while either a read or write event is taking place. Data is
input (written) to the RTC by [ORDI> to pin 5; and output (read) from the device
by [ORDO> from pin 7. In each case the data takes the form of a serial data stream
clocked in/out by the serial clock signal [ORSK> applied to pin 4. Note that all
four of these signals are under direct control of the micro-controller and applied
to the data bus via the buffers shown on diagram sheet 4.
Other connections

The functions connected to pin 2, pin 3 and pin 9 are not used in this particular
application and these pins are tied to their default logic levels as shown.

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Section 7:

3.3.10

Data bus buffers chip select decoding


The data bus communicates with the peripheral circuits and devices via 16 octal
buffers which are selected in pairs to provide a 16 bit data bus transfer. The
micro-controller selects a particular buffer-pair by appropriately addressing the
chip select decoding circuit (D52) which then enables the required buffers.
Details of the digital signals handled by each buffer are provided in the following
paragraphs.
Figure 7-8: Data bus buffer control (block diagram)
D8
[CSIN1->

D17
CP

OE

D2

D25
CP

OE

D1
[CSIN2->

D9

OE

CP

D26

CP

D51

D50
CP

OE

D60

CP

D7

D54
CP

CP

D10
CP

<CSOU3-]

D55

OE

[CSDIS->

<CSOU2-]

D21

OE

[CSIN3->

<CSOU1-]

<CSOU4-]

D56
CP

DATA
BUS

Control Bus
Microcontroller
Address Bus
AX11
AX12
AX13
AX14
AX15
AX16
AX17
[RDX->
[WRX->

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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

D52

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

[CSDIS->
[CSIN1->
[CSIN2->
[CSIN3->
[CSOU1->
[CSOU2->
[CSOU3->
[CSOU4->

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3.3.11

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Data bus input buffers


(diagram sheet 4).
Digital signals which are read by the microcontroller as part of its control function
are connected to the data bus via six type HCT 245 octal bus transceivers (See Appendix A.1) which are accessed in pairs to provide a 16-bit data transfer (See
Figure 7-8). The buffers data direction pins are held permanently high, therefore
the data flow is fixed from A-to-B in each device. Chip select signals from
D52 are connected to the buffers output enable pins which provides the means
for the micro to select each pair of devices as required.
The remainder of this sub-section lists the digital signals connected to the data bus
through the bus input buffers, and provides signal details where appropriate.
Note: The alarms shown are for version 4 software. These may vary from earlier
software versions, which will have different screen descriptions, the alarm
number and definition however remains the same.

3.3.11.1

Buffer D8 activated by CSIN1


XRADT1

Source: Sheet 7 X1-31


Description: From the Power Rectifier overtemperature sensing device this
input is not normally used and is held permanently low by jumper X10 (1-2) on
the Rectifier Logic Board. If used, in an overtemperature situation this input initiates alarm #24 [RECT: OVERTEMPERAT.] and the rectifier and inverter are
shut-down 1 minute later accompanied by alarm #62 [CUT-OFF: OVERTEMPER]. This alarm must be reset by pressing the manual reset push-button.
OVLREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-32


Description: Rectifier Overload this input goes high when the rectifier is operating in input current limit mode (H6 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board)
(See section 4 paragraph 2.3.4.2).
This initiates alarm #23 [RECTIFIER: I/P LIMIT].
BLKREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-33


Description: Rectifier Blocked this input goes high when the Rectifier Logic
board is in its stop mode (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6). This can be due to the
Rectifier Logic Board detecting an internal fault or a stop (block) command
issued by the UPS Logic Board (See paragraph 3.3.7).
The internal fault channel is triggered by either: incorrect phase rotation; Rectifier Logic Board power supply failure; or low input voltage (-20%). The external
fault channel initiated by the UPS Logic Board will be accompanied by alarm #21
[RECT: OFF VIA DISPL.] or alarm #22 [RECT: HARDWARE BLOCK] (See paragraph 3.3.7).

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SEQREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-34


Description: Rectifier input phase sequence error this input goes high when
the Rectifier Logic board phase sequence monitor detects an error on the incoming 3 phase mains supply (H8 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board) (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.1).
IN-LOW

Source: Sheet 7 X1-35


Description: Rectifier input undervoltage this input goes high when the Rectifier Logic board input voltage monitor detects a -20% undervoltage condition on
the incoming 3 phase mains supply (H9 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board)
(See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.2).
XATI1 / XATI2 / XATI3

Source: Sheet 7 X2-40 / 41 / 42


Description: Not used no connection on High Voltage Interface Board.
3.3.11.2

Buffer D2 activated by CSIN1


SW-REC

Source: Sheet 7 X2-43


Description: Rectifier input switch monitor this input goes low when the rectifier input mains power switch is closed. This signal passes through the High
Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the input switch
is open, this signal initiates alarm #04 [RECTIF. SWITCHOPEN].
SW-IN

Source: Sheet 7 X2-44


Description: Static Bypass switch monitor this input goes low when the Static
Bypass mains power switch is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the bypass switch is
open, this signal initiates alarm #02 [BYPASS SWITCH OPEN].
SW-BYP

Source: Sheet 7 X2-45


Description: Maintenance Bypass switch monitor this input goes low when
the Maintenance Bypass switch is closed. This signal passes through the High
Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the maintenance
bypass switch is closed, this signal initiates alarm #06 [MANUAL BYPASS
CLOSED].

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SW-OUT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-46


Description: Output switch monitor this input goes low when the Output
switch is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage Interface Board
(See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the output switch is open, this signal initiates alarm #03 [OUTPUT SWITCH OPEN].
FUSINV

Source: Sheet 7 X2-48


Description: Not used - held permanently low due to link fitted to connector
X16 on the High Voltage Interface Board (see main equipment wiring diagrams).
If used, this input monitors the inverter fuse and on fuse failure initiates alarm #38
[INV: FUSE FAIL].
FUSREC

Source: Sheet 7 X2-49


Description: Not used - held permanently low due to link fitted to connector
X17 on the High Voltage Interface Board (see main equipment wiring diagrams).
If used, this input monitors the rectifier (input) fuses and on fuse failure initiates
alarm #25 [RECT: FUSE FAIL].
FUSBAT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-50


Description: Battery fuse monitor this input goes high if the battery fuse ruptures (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.15).
The fuse is detected by a micro-switch located on the fuse which, when activated,
initiates alarm #57 [BATTERY: FUSE FAIL].
TH

Source: Sheet 7 X2-51


Description: Inverter thermostat monitor this input goes high if an inverter
thermostat opens (overtemperature > 90C) (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.13). In
the event of an overtemperature situation occurring, this input initiates alarm #34
[INV: OVERTEMPERATURE.] and the rectifier and inverter are shut-down 1
minute later accompanied by alarm #62 [CUT-OFF: OVERTEMPER.]. This alarm
must be reset by pressing the manual reset push-button (S1).
3.3.11.3

Buffer D1 activated by CSIN2


SW-BAT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-53


Description: Battery circuit breaker monitor this input goes low when the Battery switch (or contactor) is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage
Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the battery switch is open,
this signal initiates alarm #05 [BATTERY SWITCH OPEN].

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OVLINV

Source: Sheet 7 X3-32


Description: Inverter Overload this input goes high when the inverter is operating in current limit mode (H14 illuminated on the Inverter Logic Board) (See
section 5 paragraph 2.3.7). In an Overload condition, this signal initiates alarm
#33 [INV: CURRENT LIMIT].
BLKINV

Source: Sheet 7 X3-33


Description: Inverter Blocked this input goes high when the Inverter Logic
Board is in its stop mode (See section 5 paragraph 2.3.8). This can be due to the
Inverter Logic Board detecting an internal fault or a stop (block) command
issued by the UPS Logic Board (See paragraph 3.3.7). The internal fault channel
is triggered by either: IGBT desaturation, ribbon cable disconnected, Inverter
Logic Board power failure. The external fault channel initiated by the UPS Logic
Board will be accompanied by alarm [#30], [#31] or [#32].
XINVI1

Source: Sheet 7 X3-40


Description: Not used held permanently low due to X13 (2-3) on the Inverter
Logic Board which disables this alternative temperature sensor route. The active
thermostat route is via [TH> described earlier.
XSTAI1

Source: Sheet 7 X5-13


Description: Not used held permanently low due to X11 (1-2) on the Static
Switch Driver Board. No thermostat is fitted on the heatsink.
XSTAT2

Source: Sheet 7 X5-14


Description: Inverter output contactor monitor goes low when the inverter
output contactor is closed (load on inverter) and is used by the transfer control
logic software routine.
LINK X12

Source: On-board jumper X12


Description: The normal position is open link is closed to disable Initialisation
3.3.11.4

Buffer D26 activated by CSIN2


MRESET

Source: Sheet 3 switch S1


Description: RESET switch goes high when the on-board manual reset switch
(S1) is pressed and is used by the micro to unlatch block commands issued by
some of its software routines.

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BLK-MNS

Source: Sheet 3 D88 pin 25


Description: Static Switch blocked monitor this input goes high to inform
the micro that the static switch control logic (on this Board) is inhibiting the static
switch (alarm #16 [BYP: HARDWARE BLOCK). This can be invoked by any of
the following signals applied to D88 (See paragraph 3.3.7.1).
static switch manual inhibit switch (Q1) closed
bypass phase sequence error detected
emergency shutdown operated (latched)
open circuit SCR (latched)
UPS Logic Board power supply failure
M-SCR-OP

Source: Sheet 3 D88 pin 32


Description: Static Switch SCR open circuit monitor this input goes high to
inform the micro that an open circuit static switch SCR has been detected (on this
Board) (alarm #15 BYP: SCR FAILURE]). This signal is latched within D88 and
must be reset using S1 to return to normal conditions.
M-ESD

Source: Sheet 3 D88 pin 29


Description: Emergency shutdown monitor this input goes high to inform
the micro that an emergency shutdown (Emergency Stop) has been applied (See
paragraph 3.3.7.1) (alarm [#63] [CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY]). This signal is
latched within D88 and must be reset using S1 to return to normal conditions.
M-BAT-MA

Source: Sheet 3 D88 pin 20


Description: DC Overvoltage this input goes high to inform the micro that a
DC Overvoltage has been detected (See paragraph 3.3.7) (alarm [#58]
[DC BUS: FAST OVERVOL.]). This signal is latched within D88 and must be
reset by S1 to return to normal conditions.
SEQMNS

Source: Sheet 5 D34 pin 10


Description: Bypass phase sequence error this input goes high to inform the
micro that a Bypass phase sequence error has been detected (See paragraph
3.3.14.1). Note that the Rectifier Logic Board detects a phase sequence error on
the UPS (rectifier) input mains supply (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.1). A phase
sequence error initiates alarm [#14] [BYP: PHASE ROT.ERROR] and also enables alarm [#16] [BYP: HARDWARE BLOCK] via the micro.
EEDO

Source: Sheet 2 D20 pin 4


Description: Output from the security EPROM to initiate the micro-controller.

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DRDO

Source: Sheet 3 D18 pin 6


Description: Real Time Clock output (See paragraph 3.3.9).
3.3.11.5

Buffer D51 activated by CSIN3


I-BST-BAT

Source: Sheet 7 X7-35


Description: The signal to this input is generated on the Parallel Logic Board
when the modules in a 1+1-configured system are connected in common battery
mode; and is logic high when battery boost is requested by either module (see
paragraph 2.6.2 on page 8-37). This informs the processor system to command
the Rectifier Logic Board to enter Boost Mode (see D17 [REC_A> [REC_B> outputs).
I-TST-BAT

Source: Sheet 7 X7-36


Description: The signal to this input is generated on the Parallel Logic Board
when the modules in a 1+1-configured system are connected in common battery
mode; and is logic high when battery test is selected in either module (see paragraph 2.6.3 on page 8-37). This informs the processor system to command the
Rectifier Logic Board to enter Battery Test Mode (see D17 [REC_A> [REC_B> outputs).
MNS-DIS

Source: Sheet 7 X7-37


Description: The signal to this input is generated on the Parallel Logic Board,
and is applicable only in a 1+1-configured system. It is logic high if the
from D50-16 (via X1-49) is driven high in either module.

[D_MNS_DIS> output

BLK-SEL

Source: Sheet 7 X7-38


Description: The signal to this input is generated on the Parallel Logic Board
when the modules in a 1+1-configured system; and is logic high if the Parallel
Logic Boards selective shutdown circuit is active (LED H1 illuminated on Parallel Logic Board) (see paragraph 2.3.1.1 on page 8-13).
MNS-L

Source: Sheet 3 D88-38


Description: This input goes high when the control logic requests load-on-bypass. This signal is also fed to the Static Switch Driver Board (X5-17)
I-SW-BYP

Source: Sheet 7 X7-59


Description: The signal to this input is generated on the Parallel Logic Board
and is logic low when the Maintenance Bypass Switch is closed is either module
connected to a 1+1-configured system.

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INV-L

Source: Sheet 3 D88-36


Description: This input goes high when the control logic requests load-on-inverter. This signal is fed to the Static Switch Driver Board X5-15 where it initiates the output contactor closure; and it is also connected to the Parallel Logic
Board where it enables the current sharing function in a 1+1-configured system
(see paragraph 2.5 on page 8-31).
INV-DIS

Source: Sheet 7 X7-32


Description: This input signal is produced by the Parallel Logic Board in a 1+1configured system and is logic when the Parallel Logic Board requests load-onbypass (see paragraph 2.3.2 on page 8-15). The signal is also applied to the
transfer control logic within D88 (See paragraph 3.3.7.4).
3.3.11.6

Buffer D60 activated by CSIN3


BLK-EXT

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 11


Description: From external alarms (AS400 interface board). This input provides a means of allowing the inverter to be turned OFF/ON from an external
signal via the Remote Alarms Board. The Block (OFF) signal is applied as a
closed contact across the Remote Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 1-2.
Note: Jumper X6 on the Remote Alarms Board must be selected 2-3 in order to
enable this function.
BLK-SYN

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 12


Description: Sync disable this is an input from the optional remote alarms
board (AS400 interface board) which goes high (+5V) when the UPS is ON and is normally used to prevent the inverter synchronising to a
frequency-wild standby generator. The On Generator status signal is applied as a
closed contact across the Remote Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 3-4.
GENERATOR

Note: The response to the ON-GENERATOR event is programmable via the Operator Control Panel FUNCTION software screen which allows three separate
functions to enabled/disabled:
Synchro Block is concerned with the [BLK-SYN> signal mentioned here
and, when enabled, prevents the inverter from tracking the bypass frequency when it is being provided by the standby generator.
Charge Inhibit is concerned with the battery recharge current limit
function which, when enabled, reduces the RECTIFIER current limit by
15%.
Current Limit is concerned with the rectifier input current limit
[XRADD1> function which, when enabled, reduces the input current limit
by 35%.
The reduced current limit functions are employed to lower the potential
maximum current demand if the standby generator is undersized.

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BLK-01

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 9


Description: From external alarms (AS400 interface board) Not used.
BLK-CHG

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 10


Description: Rectifier Disable This input provides a means of allowing the
rectifier to be turned OFF/ON from an external signal via the Remote Alarms
Board. The Block (OFF) signal is applied as a closed contact across the Remote
Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 1-2.
Note: Jumper X6 on the Remote Alarms Board must be selected 1-2 in order to
enable this function.
Links X26

Source: Sheet 4 jumper X26


Description: The four sections of jumper X26 are detailed in a Table on the circuit diagram sheet 1 and summarized below:
Table 7-7: X26 Jumper details

Open
(Standard)

Auto-transfer mode enabled (on-line operation).


Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter when the
inverter is available i.e. the inverter is the preferred supply source

Closed

Manual-transfer mode enabled (off-line operation).


Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter only when
the bypass is unavailable i.e. the bypass is the preferred
supply source. Note: there will be a 3-cycle break on transfer to inverter,

LINK 1-2

Open
LINK 3-4

Closed
(Standard)

Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor enabled. i.e. The


inverter is given 5 seconds to reach nominal voltage otherwise it is latched OFF.

Open
(Standard)

Enables the Event History monitor to store up to a maximum of 10 alarms.

LINK 5-6
Closed

LINK 7-8

3.3.12

Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor disabled

Resets the Event History monitor. Note: After the 10th


event, the monitor buffer is full an cannot store any further
events. The buffer should be reset to 0 after each maintenance or commissioning to enable new events to be captured.

Open
(Standard)

Password protection enabled.

Closed

Password protection disabled

Data bus output buffers


(circuit diagram sheet 4).
Digital signals generated by the microcontroller as part of its control function are
fed to the peripheral circuits via 10 type-74C273 octal latches (See Appendix A.2)
which are accessed in pairs to provide a 16-bit data transfer (See Figure 7-8). The

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chip select signals from D52 provide the latch clock signals and data is therefore
transferred through the latches when the appropriate chip select signal switches
from low to high. A logic low [RSTDX-> reset signal is connected to all the data
bus output buffers via jumper X25 (3-2) and drives all their outputs low when applied. [RSTDX-> is produced by the microcontroller (See paragraph 3.3.3) and
shown on the circuit diagram sheet 2.
The remainder of this sub-section lists the digital signals connected through the
latches, and provides signal details where appropriate.
3.3.12.1

Buffers D7 and D10 activated by CSDIS

These two devices connect the data bus output to the two on-board 7-segment diagnostic displays (H11 & H12). For a detailed description of the displayed parameters (see paragraph 3.3.17 on page 7-68).
3.3.12.2

Buffer D17 activated by CSOUT1


XRADD1

Destination: Sheet 7 X1 pin 37


Description: Reduced current limit when this output goes high it reduces the
Rectifier Logic Boards input current limit threshold by 35% (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.4.2).

Conditions: This software-selectable output is activated when the UPS is running on standby generator as described on page 7-44 ([BLK_SYN>).
REC-B & REC-A

Destination: Sheet 7 X1 pin 38 / 39


Description: Charge mode selection these two outputs are connected to a decoder on the Rectifier Logic Board where they invoke one of four permissible
charge modes (see section 4 table 4-3).

Conditions: These outputs select Test, Boost, Float and Manual charge modes
in response to selections made on the Operator Control Panel. The automatic
Boost mode parameters, i.e. duration and threshold, are also operator-defined
(see paragraph 2.5.6 on page 2-53). LEDs on the Rectifier Logic Board illuminate to indicate the active charge mode.
XAT01 & XATO2

Destination: Sheet 7 X2 pin 55 / 56


Description: Not used
INV-F

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 37


Description: Base frequency selection informs the Inverter Logic Boards
staircase pattern generator of the UPS systems base frequency (i.e. 50/60Hz).
(See section 5 paragraph 2.3.2).

Conditions: This output is high for 50Hz and low for 60Hz as selected on the
Operator Control Panel see Selecting the UPS SETUP parameters in the commissioning procedure (see paragraph 2.4.5.3 on page 2-35).

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

INV-B & INV-A

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 38 / 39


Description: Inverter working voltage selection these two outputs are connected to a decoder on the Inverter Logic Board where they select one of four permissible charge modes (see section 5 table 5-3).

Conditions: The logic states of these outputs are determined by the working
voltage selected by the operator see commissioning procedure (see paragraph
2.4.5.2 on page 2-34). LEDs on the Inverter Logic Board illuminate to indicate
the active selection.
3.3.12.3

Buffer D25 activated by CSOUT1


XSTAO1 & XSTAO2

Destination: Sheet 7 X5 pin 19 / 20


Description: Not used
RE485-

Destination: Sheet 7 D58 pin 2


Description: This output selects the Read Enable pin of D58, which is an
RS485 communications driver connected to the parallel interface connector X7
pins 59/60 not used.
OE485

Destination: Sheet 7 D58 pin 3


Description: This output selects the Output Enable pin of D58, which is an
RS485 communications driver connected to the parallel interface connector X7
pins 59/60 not used.
TP5

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 5


Description: Not used (test point for system software).
OUTBAT

Destination: Sheet 2 V152


Description: This output, when high, enables the on-board Ni-Cad battery
charger.

Conditions: This output enables the Ni Cad battery charger if its voltage falls
to 2.8Vdc and disables it again once the battery voltage rises to 3.6V.
Note: when the charger is enabled the [INTERNAL BATTERY LOW] warning is
annunciated (alarm [#76] active).
3.3.12.4

Buffer D9 activated by CSOUT2


EECS / EESK / EEDI

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 7


Description: These outputs control the data acquisition of EEPROM D20

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ORCS

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 7


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) chip select (See paragraph 3.3.9).
ORSK

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 4


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) serial communications clock input (See
paragraph 3.3.9).
ORDI

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 5


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) serial data input (See paragraph 3.3.9).
SELANA / SELANB

Destination: Sheet 6
Description: These two outputs are connected to the address inputs of three 2pole multiplexers which select the analogue signals for the microcontrollers A/D
inputs e.g. selecting the analogue signals for display purposes (kVA values are
calculated in software using V x I).
3.3.12.5

Buffer D21 activated by CSOUT2


ALMRES

Destination: Sheet 3 D22 pin 1


Description: Software controlled RESET This output, when high, resets the
Emergency Shutdown, DC Overvoltage and Open SCR fault latches within D22.

Conditions: This facility is not programmed into the current software and it is
therefore not used.
INV-ON

Destination: Sheet 3 D88 pin 17


Description: Inverter ON request This output, when high, requests D88 to
issue an [ON_INV> command signal which is connected to the Inverter Logic
Board and turns ON the inverter provided other D88 inputs are correct (See paragraph 3.3.7).

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.3 on page 7-160)


L-INV

Destination: Sheet 3 D88 pin 14


Description: Load-on-inverter request This output is connected to the load
transfer control logic within D88 where it is interlocked with the [BLK_INV> and
signals within D88 (See paragraph 3.3.7.4). This signal is high when
the processor system requests load-on-inverter.

[C_L_INV>

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.10 on page 7-180)

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L_MAINS

Destination: Sheet 3 D88 pin 41


Description: Load-on-bypass (mains) request This output is connected to
the load transfer control logic within D88 where it is interlocked with several
other signals within D88 (See paragraph 3.3.7.4). This signal goes high when the
processor system requests load-on-bypass.

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.10 on page 7-180)


REC-ON

Destination: Sheet 3 D88 pin 40


Description: Rectifier ON request This output, when high, requests D88 to
issue an [ON_REC> command signal, which is connected to the Rectifier Logic
Board and turns ON the rectifier (provided other D88 inputs are correct (See paragraph 3.3.7)).

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.2 on page 7-158).


IBOPEN

Destination: Sheet 3 D88 pin 12


Description: Trip battery circuit breaker This output, when high, requests D88
to issue a [BAT_TRP> command signal which is connected to the High Voltage Interface Board and turns OFF the battery circuit breaker driver transistor.

Conditions: This signal is software driven via a programmable parameter setting entered from the Operator Control Panel to trip the battery circuit breaker
when the battery is fully discharged (see page 2-37). The Emergency Shutdown
and DC Overvoltage inputs to D88 pins 9 and 8 also trigger the battery trip signal
when active (See paragraph 3.3.7).
TP6

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 6


Description: Not used (test point for system software).
3.3.12.6

Buffer D50 activated by CSOUT3


O_BLK_SW

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-43


Description: This output is used in a multi-module system only and has no
affect in a single-module or 1+1 system. In a multi-module system the output is
connected to the Parallel Logic Board where, when high, it turns off the inverters
in all the modules connected to the system.
O_MNS_L_SS

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-44


Description: This output is used in a multi-module system only and has no
affect in a single-module or 1+1 system. In a multi-module system the output is
connected to the Parallel Logic Board where, when high, it opens the output contactor in every module when a transfer to bypass is commanded.

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O_MNS_D_SS

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-45


Description: This output goes high when the bypass supply parameters are
deemed valid by the processor system. This is connected to the bypass frequency
validation circuit on the Parallel Logic Board where it determines if the GVCO is
allowed to synchronise to the bypass (see paragraph 2.4.4.1 on page 8-27).
TST_BAT

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-46


Description: This output goes high when the processor system requests a battery test function and is connected to the Parallel Logic Board. If the UPS is configured as a 1+1 system with common battery, the Parallel Logic Board passes
this signal along the parallel control bus where it switches both modules to the
battery test mode i.e. ensures both modules operate at the same charge voltage
(see paragraph 2.6.3 on page 8-37).
BST_BAT

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-47


Description: This output goes high when the processor system requests a battery boost function and is connected to the Parallel Logic Board. If the UPS is
configured as a 1+1 system with common battery, the Parallel Logic Board passes
this signal along the parallel control bus where it switches both modules to the
battery boost mode i.e. ensures both modules operate at the same charge voltage
(see paragraph 2.6.2 on page 8-37).
MNS_SYN_KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-48


Description: This output goes high when the processor system senses that the
Inverter Logic Board has achieved internal synchronism and is connected to the
Parallel Logic Board. If the UPS is configured as a 1+1 system this is used by the
GVCO synchronisation control system as part of its inter-module synchronisation
function (see paragraph 2.4 on page 8-19).
O_MNS_DIS

Destination: Sheet 7 X1-49


Description: This high signal is connected to the Parallel Logic Board via X149 which, via the parallel control bus, immediately returns a logic low [MNS_DIS>
signal back to X1-37 in both modules of a 1+1 configured system. This is input
to the processor system via D51-4.
3.3.12.7

Buffer D55 activated by CSOUT3


PAR_REC

Destination: Sheet 7 X7-51


Description: This signal is driven high by the processor system when it requests
parallel rectifier operation. It is connected to the Parallel Logic Board where it
energises relay K5, whose contacts complete the rectifier current sharing control
circuit.

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OUT-03

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 31


Description: Output to Parallel Logic Board
Conditions: Not used in a 1+1-configured system.
OUT-03

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 25


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc.).
Conditions: Not used
MNS-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 26


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc.).
Conditions: Logic high if mains (bypass) supply error i.e. overvoltage [#11],
undervoltage [#12], absent [#10] or bypass blocked [#17].
BATED

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 27


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if the battery voltage falls to its end-of-discharge level
[#56] as set by operator through Operator Control Panel (see page 2-37). It is
also active if the battery breaker is open [#05] or the battery fuse is open [#57].
CHG-INH

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 28


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if the battery charger is inhibited (driven by the
[BLK-CHG> signal described on page 7-45). Jumper X4 pins 1-2 must be linked on

the Alarm Board.


SWBYP

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 29


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if maintenance bypass isolator is closed accompanied
by alarm #06 [MANUAL BYPASS CLOSED].
OUT-01

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 23


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Not used in the present software implementation

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3.3.12.8

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Buffer D54 activated by CSOUT4


OUT-02

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 24


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Not used in the present software implementation
OVT-BAT

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 18


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface, Remote
Alarms Monitor etc).

Conditions: Logic high in the event of battery overtemperature Not used in


the present software implementation.
SYN-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 16


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface, Remote
Alarms Monitor etc).

Conditions: Logic high if the inverter is unsynchronised to the bypass supply


i.e. if the phase displacement is more than 9. This condition will initiate alarm
#35 [INV: UNSYNCHRONISED].
ALL-GEN

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 17


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: This is the Common Alarm output to the Alarm Board and is
active if any of the following alarms are present: [#05], [#06], [#10], [#11], [#12],
[#16], [#17], [#24], [#33], [#34], [#52], [#56], [#57], [#66].
A400ON

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 31


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: This alarm is active when the load is on the UPS (inverter or bypass) and is interlocked with the Maintenance Bypass being closed.
A400UF

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 32


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Condition: Mains Failure alarm; enabled by alarm [#01] and active when [#22]
is energised.
A400BL

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 33


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).

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Conditions: Low Battery warning; enabled by alarm [#01] and active when
[#56] is energised.
A400BY

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 34


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Load on Bypass; active when alarm [#18] is energised.
3.3.12.9

Buffer D56 activated by CSOUT4


MNSREC

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 20


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Rectifier input voltage failure active when H9 is illuminated on
the Rectifier Logic Board.
CS-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 19


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Bypass-side Static Switch blocked goes high if a fault is detected
on the static switch (alarm [#16] present).
BAT-DSC

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 13


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Battery discharging active when alarm [#22] is present.
OVL

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 14


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Overload active when alarm [#33] or [#66] is present.
OVT-DIS

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 15


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Overtemperature active when alarm [#24] or [#34] is present.
OVT-AMB

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 30


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Output Air overtemperature not used.
XINV01

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 24


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Description: Mains error inhibit to Inverter Logic Board transfer control.


Conditions: On the Inverter Logic Board a circuit within D11 provides a control signal [RIF> which briefly transfers the voltage reference signal to the bypass
supply just before the inverter-side contactor is closed; (see paragraph 2.3.3 on
page 5-45). This signal, [XIN01>, goes high to inform the Inverter Logic Board of
a mains (bypass) voltage error and prevents the switch-over to the bypass supply
reference from taking place; and so prevents the inverter locking to an out-of-spec
voltage.
TP7

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 7


Description: Not used (test point for system software).

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)
Section 7:

3.3.13

Frequency sensing and control signals


Figure 7-9: Frequency synchronisation control

Parallel logic

54

X7
2

D53

X2
5

VI-A

8Vp-p

F-IN

X4

X3

X18-3
63
16
BACKM

[O_BACK>

34

BACK

D17
MICROCONTROLLER

Bypass supply R-phase


voltage sensing

15

DATA
BUS
D54

34

INV-F

15 INV-F
50 /60 Hz
selection

37

D1

37
Clock
signals
to tri-wave
generator

SYNC-KO

44

Frequency
Divider

Sync error
detection

D60

Sync Inhibit
(M:S variations

64

SYNCM

UPS Logic Board

Important Note:

2
3
Master Freq
reference for
Inverter Osc
(correction)

15

4
9

X34:2-3 = Single
1-2 = Parallel
14
1
D59
SYNC

50/60Hz signal
synchronised to
bypass (when present)

R247
phase
align

43

BLK-SYN

5V

27

35

35

Phase
Locked
D1 Loop
20
21 14
SYNC

50/60Hz

X18-2
62
15
F-INM

CLK
288kHz

D42

VCO
13

Phase
Comparator

D6 3

Inverter Logic Board

This section describes the frequency control operation for a single-module installation i.e. where the module is operating as a single, stand-alone UPS system.
Where the module is part of a 1+1 System, the control operation is very similar
except that the bypass R_phase supply signal to which the unit attempts to synchronise is obtained from the Parallel Logic Board, and is subject to a complex
inter-module synchronisation regime.
To understand to synchronisation principles of a 1+1 system, you are advised to
read section 8 paragraph 2.4 prior to this section.

3.3.13.1

Frequency control principles

The inverter frequency is determined by the VCO section of a phase locked loop
i.c. (D6) on the Inverter Logic Board which provides a 288kHz (nominal) clock
signal to a frequency-divider (within D1) which then clocks the multiplexers in
the reference voltage generator circuit section 5 paragraph 2.3.2.

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Base frequency selection

The inverter base frequency is selected via the Operator Control Panel during
commissioning and is read by the microcontroller through the CAN bus. The
micro responds by appropriately setting the [INV-F> output from D17-15 Low =
50Hz and High = 60Hz. This is connected to the frequency divider on the Inverter Logic Board where it determines the division factor i.e. when [INV-F> is low
the 288kHz VCO output is divided by 5760 to produce a 50Hz output at D1-27;
when [INV-F> is high the division is 4800 and produces a 60Hz output.
Frequency synchronisation

It is desirable that the inverter output is synchronised to the bypass supply under
normal operating conditions as this enables a closed load transfer to be carried
out in the event of a UPS fault where-by the static switch SCRs are turned on at
the same time as the inverter contactor is opened, and the load does not experience
a supply break.
If the inverter is not synchronised to the bypass supply there could be a large voltage difference across the static switch SCRs while the load is on-inverter (i.e.
SCRs OFF) which might damage the UPS/load equipment during a subsequent
closed transfer: in such circumstances an open transfer takes place if the UPS
develops a fault, where-by the inverter contactor is opened prior to turning ON
the static switch SCRs. This causes a load supply break of up to 1 second, which
is an inbuilt feature designed to avoid load damage.
The frequency synchronisation control mechanism is quite complex and effectively based on two nested phase locked loops. The inner loop comprises D6 on
the Inverter Logic Board and the outer loop is functionally provided by the microcontroller, under software control.
3.3.13.2

Frequency sync control and operation


Inverter Logic Board phase-locked-loop (assuming 50Hz operation.)

The phase comparator section of D6 compares the 50Hz output from D1-27,
connected to D6-3, with a frequency reference signal annotated [SYNC> which is
produced by the microcontroller and connected to D6-14 (available at test point
X18-4). If the phase comparator detects any phase difference between these two
signals its output at D6-13 will modify the VCOs frequency in such a way as to
make the frequency divider output at D1-27 match the [SYNC> signal frequency
i.e. the VCO frequency will be modified until the phase comparator within D6
sees no error between these signals, whereupon the circuit can be considered to
be phase-locked. Thus the inverter frequency tracks the [SYNC> signal reference
frequency.
[SYNC> signal generation (assuming 50Hz)

The microcomputer monitors the bypass supply R-phase waveform [VI-A> via a
comparator which extracts its frequency information, [F-INM>. This signal can be
seen at X18-2 as a squarewave coinciding with the bypass supply R-phase zerocrossing points. The Inverter Logic Board frequency dividers 50Hz output (D127) is also monitored and is available at X18-3, annotated [BACKM>.
Under software control, the micro operates on these two signals in the same way
as described above for the Inverter Logic Boards phase-locked-loop. That is, it
performs the phase comparator and VCO functions described above and produces a 50Hz output, [SYNC>, whose absolute frequency is controlled by the de-

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tected phase difference between [F-INM> and [BACKM> i.e. the width of the pulse
is directly proportional to the amount of phase difference.
Example of sync control

The overall operation of the synchronisation control circuits can best be explained
by example. Consider the case where the bypass frequency suddenly jumps from
50Hz to 50.5Hz:
1. The micro will sense the jump in bypass frequency through a rise in [F-INM>
to 50.5Hz.
2. The micro will sense a phase error between [F-INM> and [BACKM> due to their
frequency difference and will ramp-up the [SYNC> signal frequency because
it senses that the bypass frequency is higher than that of the inverter.
Note: ramp-up speed is controlled under a slew rate software program factory
set at 0.1Hz /Second.
3. The phase comparator in the Inverter Logic Boards phase-locked-loop will
see the ramping [SYNC> frequency and detect that it is now higher than the
frequency dividers 50Hz output.
4. The phase comparator error output (pin 13) will call for an increase in VCO
frequency, which will thus increase the frequency divider clock rate and
thereby demand an increased inverter frequency.
5. The 50Hz outputs from the frequency divider also ramp-up in line with the
inverter frequency and have two affects:
a) The increasing output at D1-27 is fed back to the phase-locked-loop
(D6-3) where it maintains phase-lock i.e. it ties the clock frequency to
the [SYNC> signal and maintains close tracking of this signal.
b) The same increasing output from D1-27 is fed back to the microcontroller
via R247 where it allows the phase error function to maintain a close
check on the bypass/inverter frequency and phase relationship.
6. When the inverter frequency has risen to match the 50.5Hz bypass frequency,
and the [F-INM> and [BACKM> signals are in phase:
a) The [SYNC> frequency will stop ramping up and remain at 50.5Hz, synchronised to the bypass supply due to the action of the micro.
b) The VCO clock frequency will remain constant i.e. 290.88kHz
(5760 x 50.5 as 5760 is the divider factor for 50Hz systems).
c) The output from D1 pin 27 will be steady at 50.5Hz and synchronised to
the [SYNC> signal.
7. If [SYNC> is synchronised to the bypass supply (6a) and the frequency divider
outputs/inverter are synchronised to the [SYNC> signal (6c) then this results in
the inverter being effectively synchronised to the bypass supply, are required.

Important notes: The above description requires qualification by the following notes.
a) The internal mechanism of the frequency divider chip ties its 50Hz outputs to the zero-crossing points of the R-phase inverter voltage. Thus, as
the micro uses the bypass R-phase supply as its frequency sensing source,
this effectively ensures that the inverter and bypass supplies are synchronised correctly from a phase alignment viewpoint.

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b) To aid description the above example assumed that the bypass frequency
underwent a stepped change; however, in practice any change in bypass
frequency is likely to occur gradually: in which case the circuit dynamics
are usually able to maintain a phase-locked condition during the period of
change, resulting in the inverter frequency tracking the bypass frequency
at all times without incurring a detectable phase error.
c) The synchronising window and slew-rate are adjustable and selected
from the Operator Control Panel setup menus. The window defines the
limits to which the inverter is allowed to track the bypass frequency and
normally set to 2%; while the slew-rate defines the maximum permitted rate-of-change of inverter frequency and is usually set to 0.1Hz/s. i.e.
this determines the fastest rate of change of bypass frequency tolerated by
the synchronisation circuit whilst maintaining sync.
If the bypass frequency goes outside the permitted window for longer than
1 minute, the inverter frequency will return to its base frequency and await
the mains return within the sync window, where-upon it will re-synchronise. An [INV:UNSYNCHRONIZED] (alarm #35) warning will be displayed while this situation is in effect.
d) In the event of a bypass supply failure the microcontroller will drive its
[SYNC> output to the centre frequency i.e. 50Hz.
Sync phase adjustment

R247 is connected to a phase-shift circuit on the Inverter Logic Board and provides the means for trimming any error in the phase relationship between the inverter [BACKM> and bypass [F-INM> sense signals once the sync control circuit is
phase-locked due mainly to component tolerances. Therefore, once the inverter
is synchronised this resistor can be adjusted to reduce the residual phase difference between the inverter R-phase output and the bypass R-phase supply.
3.3.13.3

Non-Sync detection and alarm

An alarm condition [SYN-KO> is flagged by the microcontroller when it detects


that the [BACKM> and [F-INM> signals are more than 11 out-of-phase. This is communicated to the Operator Logic Board via the CAN bus and also, via D54-6, to
the I/O interface connector X8-16 where it can be used to provide a remote alarms
indication (sheet 7). [SYN-KO> is high when a non-sync condition is present.
3.3.13.4

External sync inhibit

In certain circumstances it may be necessary to inhibit the synchronisation loop


for example when supplying the UPS from a stand-by generator whose frequency
regulation is poor. This can be achieved by an external input via the I/O connector
X8-11 [BLK-SYN> which is connected to the microcontroller via D60-2. This input
must be taken high to inhibit the synchronisation function (See paragraph
3.3.11.6).
Note: The control can be activated only after being enabled in the Function parameter software setup screen (see paragraph 2.4.7.3 on page 2-43).

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3.3.14

3.3.14.1

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Analogue signal processing


The UPS Logic Board monitors the UPS input voltage, output voltage, inverter
voltage, battery voltage, output current and battery current. These inputs are processed by analogue circuits (sheets 6 & 7) which provide appropriate signals for
the microcomputers A/D input port. In some cases the inputs are also converted
to digital alarm/status signals which are connected to the micro via the data bus.
Bypass voltage signal processing

Figure 7-10: Bypass voltage sensing block diagram


Line-Neut

Line-Line

N6
Buffer

N29
Sum-Amp

3-Phase
Bypass
Volts
Sense

+5V
+2.5V
0V

VIABM
To A/D
Multiplexers
(Display uses)

VIBCM
VICAM
REF-2 (2.5V)

8Vp-p

N29d
Rectifier

[SVI>

To SCR OPEN det.

[SVIM> To A/D Multiplexers


(Bypass volts monitor)

A-Ph

B-Ph

N14
Filter

N14
Filter

[F-IN> To Micro
(sync control - bypass R-ph)

D27
Ph-Seq

[SEQMNS>
To Micro
(Phase Sequence
error detector)

Voltage sensing

The bypass voltage sense signals ([VI-A> - [VI-C>) are developed on the High Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.6) and connected via X2 pins 15, 16, 17
to N6b/c/d which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 5). The signals at N6 outputs therefore equate to approximately 1% of the bypass supply line-neutral voltage (e.g.
2.4Vrms at 240V working) and are connected to several blocks as shown in
Figure 7-10.
Voltage monitoring

N29a-c take the line-to-neutral sense voltages produced by N6 and converts them
into line-to-line sense voltages suitable for connecting to the microcontroller A/D
inputs. Taking N29a as an example; this amplifier differentially sums the [VI-A>
and [VI-B> signals from N6 and produces the [VIABM> L-L signal. However the
amplifier attenuates the resultant signal to about 30% (e.g. 1.38V for 240V working) due to its feedback resistance ratios: also, the non-inverting input is connected to VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage) rather than to the 0V rail, which therefore
applies a 2.5V offset to [VIABM>. Thus in a 240V system working at nominal voltage [VIABM> is approximately 3.9Vp-p centred on a 2.5V reference. This signal
sits well within the microcontrollers A/D 0-5V input level, and is shown connected to the A/D multiplexer circuit (sheet 6).
Note: if the bypass voltage is missing [VIABM> will be 2.5Vdc due to the absence
of any ac signal.

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Bypass frequency and phase sequence monitors

The bypass R-phase signal [VI-A> from N6-14 is connected to a zero-crossing circuit comprising N14a/d which produces a squarewave output [F-IN> at D34-6
which coincides with the R-phase zero-crossing points. This signal is used by the
microcontroller in its frequency synchronisation control (See paragraph
3.3.13.1).
A similar squarewave coinciding with the S-phase is obtained via N14b/c and
buffered by D34-8. These two squarewave signals are connected to a D-type flipflop (D27) which detects their phase relationship. Under normal circumstances
the R-phase signal should lead that of the S-phase; therefore when the rising-edge
R-phase signal clocks D27, its data (D) input should be low, producing a permanent high on its Q output which inverted to a low [SEQMNS> signal at D34-10.
In the event of a phase sequence error, D27 will have a permanent low clocked
through to its Q output and produce a high [SEQMNS> signal.
is connected to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer D28-7
where it flags a phase rotation error [BYP: PHASE ROT.ERROR] alarm #14
(See paragraph 3.3.11.4).
[SEQMNS>

3-phase voltage monitor

A full-wave, three-phase diode bridge comprising V34-V36 & V40-V42, produces a dc voltage proportional to the full three-phase supply which is fed to N29d.
This amplifier attenuates the signal by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the output at N2-14 is approximately 2.5Vdc at nominal working
voltage. Note that this is a ripple voltage since there is very little capacitance
around the amplifier. Thus if any bypass phase voltage goes out of tolerance (e.g.
10% window) the detector will sense the error. It does not require all three
phases to go outside the error window.
N2-14 provides signals to two other areas: [SVIM> is connected to the microcontroller A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 and used by the
micro to monitor the bypass voltage for a each individual phase (e.g. 10% voltage error); and [SVI> is connected to the circuit (also on sheet 6) which detects an
open circuit static switch SCR.
3.3.14.2

Inverter voltage sensing

Figure 7-11: Inverter voltage sensing block diagram


error detected on individual phase

8Vp-p

2.2Vdc

Line-Neut
3-Phase
Inverter
Volts
Sense

N3a-c
Buffer

N3d
Rectifier

[SVINVM>
To A/D Multiplexers

Voltage sensing

The inverter voltage sense signals ([VINV-A> - [VINV-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.5) and connected via X2 pins 18, 19,
20 to N3a-c which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 5). The signals at N3 outputs
therefore equate to approximately 1% of the inverter line-neutral voltage. A fullwave, three-phase diode bridge produces a dc voltage proportional to the full
three-phase output which is then fed to N3d. This amplifier attenuates the signal

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the output at N3-14
is approximately 2.5Vdc at nominal voltage, and connected to the microcontroller
A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6. This is a ripple voltage as
described previously, and is monitored by the inverter voltage error software
function (i.e. 10%).
3.3.14.3

Battery (bus) voltage sensing

Figure 7-12: Battery voltage sensing block diagram


[VBM>
3.25Vdc
@ 446V(bat)

To A/D Multiplexers

N13a
Buffer

[V-B>

N13c
Comparator

[BAT-MA>
DC Overvoltage (Fast)
(set to 620V(bat))

Battery volts monitor

The DC busbar (battery) voltage sense signal [V-B> is developed on the High Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.3) and connected via X2 pin 27 to N13a
which is a unity-gain buffer (sheet 5). The signal sensitivity is set on the High
Voltage Interface Board to approximately 7.3mV per Volt(bat) therefore [VBM> is
about 3.255V at nominal 446V float charge voltage. This signal is connected to
the microcontroller A/D input, via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6, where
it is used by several software functions, such as: display metering; slow DC overvoltage (max 2.4V/cell window); Low Battery warning (1.82V/cell window); End
of Discharge (1.67V/cell window); and % Charge/autonomy Time algorithms.
DC Overvolts detection (Fast)

is also monitored by N13c, which is configured as a comparator and used


to detect a DC Bus overvoltage condition. N13c has a fixed threshold which operates ([BAT-MA> goes high) when [VBM> reaches approximately 4.45V, which
equates to a DC Bus voltage of around 620Vdc.

[VBM>

[BAT-MA> is connected to the Basic System Control Logic where it trips the bat-

tery circuit breaker, turns off the rectifier and inverter, and trips a latch (See paragraph 3.3.7.1). In an overvoltage situation [DC BUS: FAST OVERVOL.] alarm
#58 the Basic System Control Logic responds by issuing a high [MBATMA>
signal which flags the micro-controller via data bus buffer D26 (See paragraph
3.3.11.4).
3.3.14.4

Battery current sensing

Figure 7-13: Battery current sensing block diagram


REF-2 (2.5V)

[I_B>
[I_B_P>

N13b
Buffer

[IBM>
To A/D Multiplexers

X36: 1-2 = Separate battery


2-3 = Common battery

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Battery current monitor

The battery current sense signal [I_B> is developed on the High Voltage Interface
Board (See paragraph 2.3.22) and connected via X2 pin 31 to N13b which has a
gain of approximately1.5 (sheet 5). The signal sensitivity is set on the High Voltage Interface Board by jumper X38 and the output [IBM> is connected to the
micro-controller A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 where it
is used for display purposes, and % Charge and Autonomy Time algorithms.
I_B_P is used in a 1+1 installation when the rectifier is paralleled in order to share
current in a common battery system (see paragraph 2.6.1 on page 8-36)

3.3.14.5

Output voltage sensing

Figure 7-14: Output voltage sensing block diagram


+5V
+2.5V
0V

Line-Line
3-Phase
Output
Volts
Sense

N5
Buffer

N31
Sum-Amp

VOABM
VOBCM
VOCAM
REF-2 (2.5V)

8Vp-p

N15a
Rectifier

[SVI>

To A/D
Multiplexers
(Monitoring &
display)

[SVOM> To A/D Multiplexers


(Critical bus monitor)

N15b-d
Comparator

[SCROPN>
To Micro
(SCR open cct.)

Line-Neut
N30
Buffer

VOAM
VOBM
VOCM

To A/D
Multiplexers
(monitoring & display)

REF-2 (2.5V)

Voltage sensing

The bypass voltage sense signals ([VO-A> - [VO-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.6) and connected via X2 pins 21, 22,
23 to N5a-c which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 6). The signals at N5 outputs
therefore equate to approximately 1% of the output line-neutral voltage (e.g. 2.4V
(8Vp-p) at 240V) and connected to several blocks as shown in Figure 7-14.
Voltage monitoring

The signals from N5a-c are connected to two sets of buffers which provide lineto-neutral and line-to-line monitoring voltages which are connected to the microcontroller A/D inputs via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 and used for
metering & display purposes.

L-N voltage monitoring. is provided by N38a-c which attenuate the voltage


sense signals by approximately 55% and also applies a 2.5Vdc offset due to the
non-inverting connection being terminated at VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage). At
240V nominal voltage the monitor output signals [VOAM>, [VOBM>, VOCM> are
therefore 1Vrms (2.8Vp-p) centred about a +2.5V reference which sits well within
the microcontrollers A/D 0-5V input level.

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Note: if the output voltage is missing [VOAM> etc. will be 2.5Vdc due to the absence of any ac signal.

L-L voltage monitoring. is provided by N31a-c. Taking N31a as an example;


this amplifier differentially sums the A and B phase signals from N5 and produces
the [VOABM> L-L signal. However, the amplifier attenuates the resultant signal by
about 70% (e.g. 1.38V for 240V working) due to its feedback resistance ratios:
also, as with the L-N circuit described above, the non-inverting input is connected
to VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage) rather than to the 0V rail, which applies a 2.5V
offset to [VOABM>. Thus in a 240V system working at nominal voltage [VOABM>
is approximately 3.9Vp-p centred on a 2.5V reference.
3-phase voltage monitor

A full-wave, three-phase diode bridge comprising V29-V31 etc, produces a dc


voltage proportional to the full output three-phase supply which is fed to N15a.
This amplifier attenuates the signal by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the [SVOM> output at N15-1 will be approximately 2.5Vdc at
nominal working voltage. Note that this is a ripple voltage since there is very little
capacitance around the amplifier. [SVOM> is connected to the microcontroller Ato-D inputs via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6. This is used by the
micro-controller as a critical bus voltage error monitor (factory set to 10%) for
transfer functions.
Open Circuit Static Switch SCR detection

As shown in Figure 7-14, the output voltage (3-phase) sense signal [SVOM> and
bypass voltage (3-phase) sense signal [SVI> are both connected to the Static
Switch SCR open circuit detector.
3.3.14.6

Output current sensing

Figure 7-15: Output sensing block diagram


REF-2 (2.5V)

3-Phase
Output
Current
Sense

N4a-c
Buffer

N4d
Sum-amp

[IOAM>
[IOBM>
[IOCM>

[IONM>
To A/D Multiplexers
(Overload & Timers)

(Display Metering)

Output current monitor

The UPS output current sense signals ([IO-A> - [IO-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.19) and connected via X2 pins 32,
33, 34 to N4a-c which attenuate the sense signals by approximately 75% and also
applies a 2.5Vdc offset due to the non-inverting connection being terminated at
VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage). The output signals [IOAM> etc. are connected to
the microcontroller A/D inputs via the multiplexer circuit, and the 2.5V offset is
sufficient to make the a.c. current signal sit within the 0-5V A/D input voltage
range. These signals are by the micros overload algorithm (i.e. 150% for 1

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minute, 125% for 10 minutes, 110% for 1 hour, 101% for 9 hours). They also represent the values shown on the Operator Control Panel Measurements display
screen.
N4d calculates the neutral current by differentially summing the three line currents in a balanced three phase system the algebraic sum of the currents should
equal zero, thus if the system is unbalanced then the amount of imbalance represent the current flowing in the neutral path. The neutral current signal [IONM> is
also subject to the 2.5V offset and applied to the microcontroller A/D inputs via
the multiplexers in the same way as the line current signals.
3.3.14.7

Analogue signal monitoring multiplexers

The microcontroller has ten A/D inputs ([AN0> to [AN9>).


[AN6> to [AN9> are fed by

fixed inputs signal sources; however, [AN0> to [AN5>


are fed via a series of multiplexers which allow the micro to select from various
signal sources. Three type 4052 multiplexers are used for this purpose, each addressed by two signals ([SELANA> and [SELANB>) produced by the microcontroller via data bus buffer D9 (See paragraph 3.3.12.4). Sheet 6 contains the
multiplexer circuit and illustrates the various monitored signals connected to their
data pins (See Appendix A.3). The multiplexers are inhibited if the -12V power
supply monitor detects an undervoltage by applying a logic high [FL-12-> to the
multiplexer inhibit inputs (pin 6) (See paragraph 3.3.15.3).
Note: the inputs annotated [T1> - [T4> are temperature sensing inputs refer to the
High Voltage Interface Board description (See paragraph 2.3.12).
Note: the micro can access the A/D signals in parallel and where necessary can
calculate values for the display e.g. kW = V x I.

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Section 7:

3.3.15
3.3.15.1

Power supplies
General description and voltage regulators

The UPS Logic Board 12V power supply rails are provided from two parallel
sources and will be available if either source is live. The first source is from the
Rectifier Logic Board, which is itself powered from the AC-DC Power Supply
and available whenever the UPS input (rectifier) supply is live (see paragraph 2.1
on page 3-5); the second if from the Inverter Logic Board, which is powered from
the DC-DC Power Supply and is available whenever the rectifier is working or
the batteries are connected to the DC Busbar (see paragraph 3.1 on page 3-7).
From the UPS Logic Board the 12V supplies are passed directly to all the remaining circuit boards and the communications port etc.
3.3.15.2

Reference voltage generators

Several devices require a stable +5V power supply which is provided by a simple
3-terminal +5V regulator (N1), shown on sheet 7.
In addition to the +5V power supply rail, there are also two reference voltage generators on the circuit board. One generates a regulated +5V, [VREF>, from the
+12V line and the other generates a regulated 2.5V output, [VREF-2>, from the
+5V supply rail. These reference voltages are used in conjunction with the microcontrollers A/D analogue inputs and are shown on sheet 5 of the circuit diagram.
+5V reference voltage [VREF>

This provides a stable power supply for the A/D converters within the micro
which is necessary for them to maintain their conversion accuracy.
2.5V reference voltage [VREF-2>

The micro-controllers internal A/D converters operate on stable 0V and +5V


power rails, as described above. Therefore if an AC signal is to be monitored (e.g.
bypass voltage), or a positive-and-negative going DC signal (e.g. battery current),
then a 2.5V offset is required shift the 0V point of the monitored signal into the
centre of the A/D converters input working range. This enables the A/D circuit
to convert both halves of an AC waveform and both positive and negative transitions of a dc signal voltage.
3.3.15.3

-12V undervoltage detector

Comparator N45a (sheet 5) serves as a -12V supply rail monitor and detects when
the -12V is less than approximately -9.8V. The operating threshold for this circuit
is set by V70 which applies a zener referenced voltage across R242/243 from the
+12V rail and under normal conditions sets N45-3 at about 1.86V. The -12V rail
is monitored via a resistor divider (R240/241) which is fixed at +3V at one end by
V70.
Due to the chosen resistor ratios, the voltage at N45-2 rises above 1.86V when the
-12V rail is less than -9.8V, at which point N45-1 switches low and produces a
logic high [FL-12-> signal and low [FL-12>.
When [FL-12> goes low it inhibits the back-up battery voltage sense signal to the
microcontroller via D44, as shown on diagram sheet 2 (See paragraph 3.3.4).
When [FL-12-> goes high is disables the microcontrollers A/D input multiplexers,
as shown on sheet 6 (See paragraph 3.3.14.7).

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3.3.15.4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

+12V undervoltage detector

Comparator N45b (sheet 5) serves as a +12V supply monitor. The operating


threshold for this circuit is set by [VREF-2> which applies a stabilised +2.5V to
N45-6, at about 1.86V. The +12V rail is monitored via a resistor divider (R246/
245/R244) which pulls the input to N45-5 below the 2.5V threshold when the
+12V rail fall below the 9.8V level. When this occurs the output at N45-7 switches from high to low which is reflected at D57-8 and the resulting low [PFO> flag
resets the microcontroller via its non-maskable interrupt (NMI) (See paragraph
3.3.2). The micro jumps to a save data subroutine as the supply rails are crashing.

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

External communications
RS232 communications

In addition to the bi-directional communication facility with the Operator Logic


Board via the CAN Bus, the microcontroller can also be accessed externally via
a standard RS232 communications connection (X9). This is designed to be used
with a portable computer for diagnostic, calibration and configuration purposes.
Communication takes place through D16 which is a standard RS232 line driver/
receiver connected to the micro via [TXO0> and [RXO0>, as shown on sheet 7 (See
Appendix A.6).
RS-485 Parallel control communications

An RS485 communications facility is also shown on sheet 7, based around D58


(See Appendix A.5). The differential I/O bus of this device (pins 6 & 7) is connected to the Parallel Logic Board via X7 ([TXRX+>, [TXRX->).

Transmit mode. the transmit mode is enabled when [DE485> is high, whereupon the [TXDI> data from the microcontroller, applied to D58 pin 4, passes through
the device and drives its differential outputs as described in appendix A.5. Note
that X32 should be made in order to connect the bus termination resistor (R250)
across the transmission line to present the correct impedance to the differential
outputs.

Receive mode. the receive mode is enabled when [RE485-> is taken low, whereupon the data on the differential I/O bus is converted into a data-stream and connected to the microcontroller via [RXDI>.

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3.3.17

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

On board 7-segment indications summary


The following table provides a summary of the alarm codes indicated on the two
7-segment LEDs together with their alarm interpretations and associated Operator
Panel audible and visible alarm annunciations. Note that there is no on-screen
alarm history facility, but where two (or more) alarms are active simultaneously
the associated codes will be displayed in a cyclic fashion at 1 second intervals
Note: Where the fault LED state is annotated (*) this indicates that the alarm is
latched and must be reset using S1 on the UPS Logic Board
Note: The following table has been updated for version 4.0 software alarm descriptions. Earlier software versions may differ slightly though the alarm function
remains the same.

CODE

Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

01

[ NORMAL OPERATION ]

OFF

OFF

02

[ BYPASS SWITCH OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

03

[ OUTPUT SWITCH OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

04

[ RECTIF. SWITCH OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

05

[ BATTERY SWITCH OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

06

[ MANUAL BYPASS CLOSED]


Manual bypass breaker closed

Pulsed

Flashing

10

[BYP: ABSENT ]
Bypass supply absent i.e. <50V

Intermittent

Flashing

11

[ BYP: OVERVOLTAGE ]
Bypass supply over voltage
upper limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

12

[ BYP: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Bypass supply under voltage
lower limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

13

[ BYP: FREQUENCY ERROR]


Bypass supply over/under freq
window limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

14

[ BYP: PHASE ROT. ERROR ]


Bypass phase rotation error

Continuous

ON

15

[ BYP: SCR FAILURE ]


Bypass SCR open circuit

Continuous

ON *

16

[ BYP:HARDWARE BLOCK ]
Bypass supply blocked
hardware block on UPS Logic Board

Pulsed

Flashing

17

[ BYP: OFF VIA DISPLAY]


Bypass blocked via operator menu

Pulsed

Flashing

18

[ LOAD ON BYPASS ]

Intermittent

Flashing

19

[ BYP: OVERTEMPERATURE ]
Static bypass overtemperature
warning

Continuous

ON

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Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

20

[ RECT:SOFTWARE BLOCK]
Software block via micro

Intermittent

Flashing

21

[ RECT: OFF VIA DISPL. ]


Rectifier blocked via operator menu

Pulsed

Flashing

22

[ RECT: HARDWARE BLOCK ]


Hardware block via UPS Logic Board

Continuous

ON

23

[ RECT: CURRENT LIMIT ]


Rectifier input current limit

Intermittent

Flashing

24

[ RECT: OVERTEMPERAT. ]
Rectifier overtemperature

Continuous

ON

25

[ RECT: FUSE FAIL ]


Input fuse failure (F10,F11,F12)

Continuous

ON

30

[ INV: SOFTWARE BLOCK ]


Software block via micro

Intermittent

Flashing

31

[ INV: OFF VIA DISPLAY ]


Inverter blocked via operator menu

Intermittent

Flashing

32

[ INV: HARDWARE BLOCK ]


Hardware block via UPS Logic Board

Continuous

ON

33

[ INV: CURRENT LIMIT ]


Inverter 150% current limit active

Continuous

ON

34

[ INV: OVERTEMPERATURE ]
Inverter overtemperature

Continuous

ON

35

[ INV: UNSYNCHRONIZED ]
Inverter unsynchronised to bypass
warning

Intermittent

Flashing

36

[ INV: OVERVOLTAGE ]
Inverter overvolts warning

Continuous

ON

37

[ INV: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Inverter undervolts warning

Continuous

ON

38

[ INV: FUSE FAIL ]


Inverter fuse failure

Continuous

ON

39

[ OUTPUT: OVERVOLTAGE ]
Inverter overvoltage trip
critical bus overvoltage trip to bypass

Continuous

ON

40

[ OUTPUT: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Critical bus undervoltage trip to
bypass level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

41

[ OUTPUT: NO VOLTAGE ]
UPS in off-line mode

Continuous

ON

42

[ OUTPUT: WAVEFORM ERR. ]


Critical bus peak voltage error

Continuous

ON

CODE

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Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

43

[ INV: FREQUENCY ERROR ]


lnverter frequency error
inverter frequency window is twice
the bypass window

Continuous

ON

44

[ INV: PARALLEL ERROR ]


Paralleling current error

Continuous

ON *

45

[ CONTACTOR FAILURE ]

50

[ BATTERY: UNDER TEST ]


Battery test in operation

Pulsed

OFF

51

[ BATTERY: TEST FAILED ]


Battery test has failed

Intermittent

Flashing *

52

[ BATTERY: DISCHARGING ]
Battery is discharging

Intermittent

Flashing

53

[ BATTERY: E.O.D. ]
Battery end_of_discharge trip
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

54

[ BOOST: TIME EXPIRED]


Boost charge period expired

Pulsed

Flashing

55

[ DC BUS: SLOW OVERVOL. ]


DC slow overvolts warning
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON *

56

[ DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Low battery warning
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

57

[ BATTERY: FUSE FAIL ]


Battery fuse (F13) failure

Continuous

ON

58

[ DC BUS: FAST OVERVOL. ]


Fast dc overvoltage
fixed at 620V

Continuous

ON *

60

[ BYP: XFER COUNT BLOCK ]


Transfer counter exceeded
i.e. >8 transfers in 1 minute

Continuous

ON *

61

[ CUT-OFF: OVERLOAD ]
Overload timer expired

Continuous

ON *

62

[ CUT-OFF: OVERTEMPER. ]
Overtemperature timer expired

Continuous

ON *

63

[ CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY ]
Emergency power-off activated

Continuous

ON *

66

[ OVERLOAD PRESENT ]
Overload present (warning)

Continuous

ON

67

[ CUT-OFF: OVERLOAD ]
Overload timer expired

Continuous

ON *

CODE

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Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

70

[ BAD EEPROM PROGRAM. ]


Start-up error use mimic reset

Pulsed

ON

71

[ ERR. LRC PAR. PAG 1 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

72

[ ERR. LRC PAR. PAG 2 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

73

[ ERR. LRC PAR. PAG 3 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

74

[ ERR LRC ALARM HIS. ]


Alarm History buffer error

Pulsed

ON

75

[ ERR LRC EVENT HIS. ]


Alarm History buffer error

Pulsed

ON

76

[ INTERNAL BATTERY LOW ]


Internal PCB ni-cad battery Low

Pulsed

ON

80

[ ERROR LRC TABLE ]

81

[ ERROR LRC PANEL ]

82

[ MODEM WRONG CONFIG. ]

83

[ ERROR LRC ALARM MEM. ]

84

[ MODEM NO RESPONSE ]
Modem incorrectly connected

85

[ MODEM FALSE COMMAND ]


Modem incorrectly configured

86

[ MODEM TIMEOUT TRASM. ]


Modem baud-rate error

87

[ CAN BUS NO RESPONSE ]


UPS-to-display not connected

88

[ AUTONOMY XXXX min ]


Battery autonomy time

CODE

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CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

3.4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Summary information
Table 7-8: UPS Logic Board configuration jumpers
Jumper

Link
Position
OPEN

X12

Function
(standard)

1-2

Not Required

3-4

Not Required

1-2

EPROM Enable

2-3

RAM Enable (standard)

1-2

Not Required

3-4

Not Required

5-6

Not Required

7-8

Not Required

1-2

PLL option with CAP IN

2-3

PLL option with FIN AUX

X13

Testing only
normally
open

X14

X15

OPEN

(standard)

CAN Bus to display disabled

X16
1-2

CAN Bus to display enabled (standard)

1-2

ALE enable data save

2-3

Power supply fail enable data save (standard)

1-2

EPROM II enable (not required)

2-3

RAM II enable (not required)

1-2

+5V PCB enables microprocessor ref. For VA calculations


(standard)

2-3

V ref. enables microprocessor ref. For VA calculations

1-2

Not Required

2-3

RAM enable (standard)

1-2

EPROM enable (standard)

2-3

Not Required

1-2

Not Required

2-3

EPROM enable (standard)

3-4

Not Required

4-5

Not Required

1-2

RAM enable (standard)

2-3

EPROM enable (not required)

3-4

RAM enable (standard)

4-5

EPROM enable (not required)

X17

X19

X20

X21

X22

X23

X24

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Jumper

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 3 - UPS Logic Board (4550007 H)

Link
Position

Function

1-2

Manual reset of output buffers

2-3

Microprocessor reset of output buffers (standard)

1-2

Open (Standard)
Auto-transfer mode enabled (on-line operation).
Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter when the
inverter is available i.e. the inverter is the preferred supply
source.
Closed
Manual-transfer mode enabled (off-line operation).
Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter only when
the bypass is unavailable i.e. the bypass is the preferred
supply source. Note: there will be a 3-cycle break on transfer to inverter.

3-4

Open
Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor disabled.
Closed (Standard)
Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor enabled. i.e. The
inverter is given 5 seconds to reach nominal voltage otherwise it is latched OFF.

5-6

Open (Standard)
Enables the Event History monitor to store up to a maximum of 10 alarms.
Closed
Resets the Event History monitor. Note: After the 10th
event, the monitor buffer is full an cannot store any further
events. The buffer should be reset to 0 after each maintenance or commissioning to enable new events to be captured.

7-8

Open (Standard)
Password protection enabled
Closed
Password protection disabled

X25

X26

OPEN

Power up reset enabled (standard)

X28
CLOSED
OPEN

Power up reset disabled


2.5V power supply monitor enabled (standard)

X29
1-2
OPEN

2.5V power supply monitor disabled


Internal battery disabled

X31
1-2
OPEN

Internal battery installed and charger enabled (standard)


RS485 port disabled

X32
1-2

RS485 port enabled (standard)

1-2

Calendar IC supply from VRAM (Standard)

2-3

Calendar IC supply from internal battery

1-2

G.V.C.O. to inverter logic = parallel module

2-3

Micro V.C.O. to inverter logic = single module

X33

X34

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Link
Position

Jumper

Function

1-2

Separate battery per module (parallel system)

2-3

Common battery (parallel system)

1-2

Separate battery per module (parallel system)

2-3

Common battery (parallel system)

X35

X36

Table 7-9: UPS Logic Board potentiometer adjustment


Potentiometer

Function

R209

5 volt reference adjustment. Check at X20 pin 1

R212

2.5 volt reference adjustment. Check at anode of V45

Table 7-10: UPS Logic Board LED indication

7-74

LED

Colour

H1

Red

Function
Internal battery charger operating

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Section 20: UPS System Control

Chapter 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

4.1

Chapter overview
This chapter contains a circuit description of the UPS Logic Board used across the
whole 7200 Series UPS model range, and should be read in conjunction with circuit diagram SE-4550004-E (7 pages).
Signal annotations shown on the circuit diagrams are shown in italics in the following text e.g. [CLKOUT>.

4.2
4.2.1

General description
Circuit board functions
Figure 20-16: UPS Logic Board connections
Rectifier
Logic Board
X2

Inverter
Logic Board
X4

Static Switch
Driver Board
X13

X1

X3

X5
X7

UPS Logic Board


X2

X8

X1
High Voltage
I/face Board

X1
External
Alarm Options

X6

Parallel
Control
Logic

X4

X2
X9
Operator
Logic Board

Operator
Control
Panel

The position of the UPS Logic Board with respect to the other control boards
places it at the heart of the UPS control operation and its functional responsibilities can be broadly summarised as follows:
Motherboard
One of the most basic functions provided by the UPS Logic Board is to act
as a motherboard for signals travelling directly between any of the other
circuit boards connected to it: e.g. the input voltage sense signals passes
directly from the High Voltage Interface Board to the Rectifier Logic
Board.
System control
The UPS Logic Board contains a microprocessor-based control system
which reads various status signals derived on the other circuit boards and

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

produces several system control logic signals: e.g. stop/start signals to


the Rectifier/Inverter Logic Boards, and transfer command signals to the
Static Switch Interface Board.
Alarms control
The UPS Logic Board acts as an assembly point for alarm signals generated on the various other boards, together with those generated on the UPS
Logic Board itself, and controls their distribution to the Operator Control
Panel and External Alarms Options under microprocessor supervision.
Operator programming interface
The UPS Logic Board microprocessor enforces the programmable system
operating parameters selected by the operator, via the Operator Logic
Board, onto the system control logic
Static Switch transfer control
The UPS Logic Board contains decision-making logic which controls the
load transfer events between the inverter and static bypass supplies.
4.2.2

Input/Output connections
The UPS Logic Board has eight connectors (See Figure 20-16) whose connections are summarised below.
X1 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Rectifier Board
4520074-A (See Table 20-11).
X2 System control and monitoring signals to/from the High Voltage
Interface Board 4590054-O (See Table 20-12).
X3 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Inverter Logic
Board 4530024-S (See Table 20-13).
X4 Power supply to Operator Logic Board 4550005-F (see circuit diagram sheet 7).
X5 System control and monitoring signals to/from the Static Switch
Driver Board 4542041-X (See Table 20-14).
X6 Data/logic to/from Operator Logic Board 4550005-F (see circuit diagram sheet 7).
X7 Used in multi-module parallel operating systems only.
X8 Alarm outputs to optional external (remote) alarm display boards
(see relevant external alarm interface board in the Options section of this
manual).

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Table 20-11: Connector X1 (To Rectifier Logic Board)


PIN

I/O

1-4

0V ground reference for digital electronics

5-8

+12V power supply derived from AC-DC Power Supply Board

9-12

-12V power supply derived from AC-DC Power Supply Board

13-14

I/O

Common ground reference for analogue sense signals

15

VREC_AC: Input mains voltage sense signal (phases U-W)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

16

VREC_BA: Input mains voltage sense signal (phases V-U)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

17

VREC_CB:Input mains voltage sense signal (phases W-V)


through connection from HVI Board (15Vp-p)

18

IB: Battery current sense signal through connection from HVI


Board battery current limit control

19

Not used in standard modules

20

IREC: Rectifier input current sense signal through connection


from HVI Board input current limit control

21-23

Not used in standard modules

24

IREC_T: Used in parallel systems only (not available)

25

VB: DC Bus (battery) voltage feedback through connection from


HVI Board (-3.225Vdc @446V DC Bus)

26

T_BAT: Battery cabinet temperature sensor through connection


from HVI Board (2.98V @ 25C)

27

IDC_1: Not used in standard model (12 pulse rectifier only)

28

IDC_2: Not used in standard model (12 pulse rectifier only)

29

DB: Used in parallel systems only (input current sharing)

30

DB_0: Used in parallel systems only (input current sharing)

31

Not used in standard modules

32

OVLREC: Rectifier overload error status (Overload = 1)

33

BLKREC: Rectifier OFF/ON status (OFF = 1, ON = 0)

34

SEQREC: Input mains phase sequence error status (Error = 1)

35

IN_LOW: Low input volts 20% error status (Error = 1)

36

ON_REC: Rectifier Run(1)/Stop(0) command from UPSLB micro

37

XRADD_1: Reduced current limit from UPSLB micro (On Gen = 1)

38

REC_A: Charge mode selection from UPSLB micro

39

REC_B: Charge mode selection from UPSLB micro

40

Not used in standard modules

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Function

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Table 20-12: Connector X2 (To High Voltage Interface Board)

20-374

PIN

I/O

Function

1-4

0V ground reference for digital electronics

5-8

+12V supply to HVI Board

9-12

-12V supply to HVI Board

13-14

Common ground reference for analogue sense signals

15-17

VI-A, VI-B, VI-C: Bypass sense voltages for U-V-W phases


respectively. Approximately 1% of bypass L-N voltage

18-20

VINV-A, VINV-B, VINV-C: Inverter sense voltages for U-V-W


phases. Approximately 1% of inverter L-N voltage (8Vp-p)

21-23

VO-A, VO-B, VO-C: UPS output sense voltages for U-V-W phases
respectively. Approximately 1% of UPS output L-N voltage (8Vp-p)

24-26

VREC-AC, VREC-BA, VREC-CB: Input mains sense voltages.


Approximately 1.3% of input L-L voltage
e.g. approx. range 5V - 5.5V (15Vp-p) for 380-415V nominal input

27

V-B: DC Bus (Battery) volts sense signal. Approximately 0.7% of


the DC Bus voltage (+3.225Vdc @446V DC Bus)

28-30

IINV-A, IINV-A, IINV-C: Inverter current sense (150% phaseback)

31

I-B: Battery current sense signal (Batt I limit and current display)

32-34

IO-A, IO-B, IO-C: Output current O/load alarm/timer/display

35

IREC-1: Input current sense signal (dc)

36-42

Not used in standard modules

43

SW-REC: Rectifier Input Switch auxiliary contact status

44

SW-IN: Static Bypass Switch auxiliary contact status

45

SW-BYP: Maintenance Bypass Switch auxiliary contact status

46

SW-OUT: Output Switch auxiliary contact status

47

Not used in standard modules

48

FUSINV: Inverter fuse monitor (not used in standard module)

49

FUSREC: Rectifier fuse monitor (not used in standard module)

50

FUSBAT: Battery fuse monitor

51

TH: Inverter thermostat contact status

52

ESD: Emergency shutdown

53

SW-BAT: Battery isolator auxiliary contact status

54

BATTRP: Battery isolator trip signal

55-56

Not used in standard modules

57-60

T1, T2, T3, T4: Temperature sensing monitoring signals

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Table 20-13: Connector X3 (Inverter Logic Board)


PIN

I/O

Function

1-4

0V power supply rail

5-8

+12V power supply derived from DC-DC Power Supply Board

9 - 12

-12V power supply derived from DC-DC Power Supply Board

13

Common

14

Common

15-17

[VI-A>, [VI-B>, [VI-C>: Bypass volts sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

18-20

[VIN-A>, [VIN-B>, [VIN-C>: Inverter volts sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

21-23

[IINV_A>, [IINV_B>, [IINV_C>: Inverter current sense signals


through connection from HVI Board

24

[XINVOI>: Mains error load transfer to inverter (H)

25

[DREF>: Output voltage adjustment - used in parallel modules

26

[DREF0>: Output voltage adjustment - used in parallel modules

27-30

[DV-A>, [DV-B>, [DV-C>, [DV-0>: Load sharing signals used for


parallel modules only

31

[INV-L>: Transfer load to inverter command from processor system

32

[OVL-INV>: Inverter overload status to processor system (OVL = L)

33

[BLK-INV>: Inverter On/Off status to processor system (Off = H)

34

[BACK>: Sync signal back to processor system (Sync pulse train)

35

[SYNC>: Produced by processor system (Sync pulse train)

36

[ON-INV>: Inverter On/Off control from processor system (Off = L)

37

[INV-F>: from processor system (Inv Freq)

38-39

[INV_A>, [INV_B>: from processor system - used in output volts


selection

40

Inverter thermostat status signals (optional)

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Table 20-14: Connector X5 (Static Switch Driver Board)

20-376

PIN

I/O

Function

1-4

0V power supply rail

5-8

+12V power supply rail

9 - 12

-12V power supply rail

13

XSTAI1: Not used in standard module. Details required as to what


is connected to SSDB connector X7

14

XSTAI2: Output contactor (inverter output) auxiliary contact status


low = contactor closed

15-16

INV-L: Transfer load to inverter command from processor system

17-18

MNS-L: Transfer load to bypass command from processor system

19

XSTAD1: Not used in standard module.

20

XSTAD2: Not used in standard module.

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Output
Display

CAN
Interface

Da
ta

Co

P2

P3

P5

A/D
Converters

P1

P4

P0

20MHz
Clock

Analogue Signal

RAM

MUX
D43
D48
D49

EPROM

Data X

Address X

Reset
Bypass On/Off
Inverter On/Off
Rectifier On/Off

Input
Buffer

CS

S1
S2
S3

S5

On Inverter
Inverter contactor
control

Output
Buffer

OFF

OFF

Analogue
Buffering

D22

ON

D23

X8

X7

X5

X3

X2

X1

ON

ON

Alarm
Board

Parallel
Logic

SBS Board

Inverter
Logic Bd

H.V.I Board

Rectifier
Logic Bd

OFF

Rectifier Run

Inverter Run

OFF

4.2.3

ro
nt

Reset
Power
X28

On Bypass
Bypass SCR control

ON

7200 Series UPS Service Manual


SECTION 7 - UPS System Control
CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Block Diagram
Figure 20-17: UPS Logic Board basic block diagram

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)
4.2.3.1

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

System overview
Processor system

The UPS Logic Board control system is based on a type 80C166 microcontroller,
as shown in Figure 20-17. This device contains six ports through which it communicates with peripheral circuits/devices, together with several system control
lines. It also contains an internal A/D converter, four programmable timers and
internal ROM & RAM.
The ports are configured by an initialisation routine performed by the system software on power-up and can be summarised as follows.
Port 0
This port is configured as a 16-bit bi-directional data bus <D0...D15>
Port 1
This port is configured as the first 16-bits of an 18-bit address bus
<A0...A15> the other two address lines are provided by port 4.
Port 2
The lower half of this port <P2-0...P2-7> carries various synchronising/timing signals and the upper half <P2-8...P2-15> comprises the CAN data bus,
which carries the data to/from the Operator Logic Board
Port 3
This 16-bit port is configured as a mixture of inputs and outputs generally
concerned with controlling the CAN Bus data exchange.
Port 4
The lower two lines only are utilised on port 4. These form the upper two
address lines <A16...A17> the lower address lines <A0...A15> are provided
by port 1.
Port 5
The lower ten lines of this port <P5-0...P5-9> are configured to act as inputs
to the internal A/D converter.
System control lines
In addition to the I/O ports the microcontroller also has the general control
I/O lines normally associated with a microprocessor-based system; such
as a system clock, reset, and Read/Write control.
Memory

The microcontroller uses both internal and external memory. 2 X 126k of batterybacked RAM and 2 X 516k of EPROM are fitted to the board as standard which
holds the system operating software. Facilities are included on the board to allow
alternative memory configurations to be used as described later.
Data buffers

The 16-bit data bus is connected to various control circuit boards via input and
output data buffers, as shown in Figure 20-17, which are controlled by individual
chip select enable lines to direct the data flow to/from the appropriate source, as
required by the system control software.
Analogue signal processing

The microcontroller monitors various analogue signals which are connected to


the UPS Logic Board from the peripheral boards. These signals are processed by
suitable analogue circuitry, buffered where necessary, and applied to the microcontrollers A/D inputs via a series of multiplexer devices.

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Primary output control signals

Although the micro-controller produces numerous control logic signals, its primary outputs can be considered to be:
Inverter Start/Stop
Signal to the Inverter Logic Board which determines whether or not the
inverter section is enabled or inhibited.
Rectifier Start/Stop
Signal to the Rectifier Logic Board which determines whether or not the
rectifier section is enabled or inhibited.
Load on inverter
Signal which controls the inverter-side contactor (K1) and connects the
inverter output to the load.
Load on bypass
Signal which controls the static switch and connects the load to the static
bypass supply.
Note: the load on inverter and load on bypass signals are interlocked
such that they cannot be activated simultaneously.
As shown on the block diagram, these signals are produced by a dedicated logic
block which is controlled by the data bus together with individual switches which
allow each of the above functions to be manually overridden.
Operator Interface

The microcontroller is connected to the Operator Logic Board via the CAN Bus,
which is a bi-directional serial communications link that enables the operator to
program several operational parameters into the micro-controller and also enables
various alarms and indications to be displayed on the Operator Control Panel.

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4.3
4.3.1

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Detailed circuit description


Introduction
The UPS Logic Board circuit diagram (SE-4540004-E) comprises 7 sheets. With
reference to the block diagram description (See Figure 20-17), the drawings can
broadly be described as follows:
Sheet 1 contains a signal map identifying the functions covered on the
remaining pages. It also contains a summary chart detailing the various
configuration jumpers.
Sheet 2 contains the
basic microcontroller system
data bus, address bus and control line buffers
Ni-Cad battery back-up controller
reset generator
Sheet 3 contains the
system RAM and ROM memory and its associated configuration links
Inverter/Rectifier Start/Stop control logic
load transfer control logic
CAN bus communications drivers and control logic
Real-time clock (RTC)
Sheet 4 contains the
data bus input buffers
data bus output buffers
on-board 7-segment indication circuit
Sheet 5 contains analogue signal processing circuits for the
input voltage sense signals
inverter voltage sense signals
DC (battery) bus voltage sense signal
Battery current sense signal
it also contains reference voltage generators; power supply monitors; and
inverter overvoltage and input overvoltage fault detection circuits.
Sheet 6 contains analogue signal processing circuits for the
output voltage sense signals
output current sense signals
it also contains the analogue signal multiplexers (for the A/D inputs), output overvoltage and overcurrent fault detection circuits.
Sheet 7 contains the
input/output signal identifications details
serial communications (RS485) driver and port
Note: On the diagrams, a negative symbol at the end of a signals annotation indicates that the signal is active low e.g. [RD> = [RD->.
As with all micro-based system, the microcontrollers operation is determined by
the program held in the systems memory: and as this is hidden to the service engineer there is very little that can be done to ascertain that the board is working
correctly apart from checking the validity of its input and output signals, and other
signals generated on the board which are required by the central processor system.
The following description deals with the board on this basis, and should provide
sufficient information to determine whether or not the board is functioning correctly when it comes to troubleshooting. A full software description is beyond the
scope of this manual.

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4.3.2

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Basic microcontroller system


(circuit diagram sheet 2)
Figure 20-18: Micro system control signals
Power Supply

Clock

27

Power
Fail

29

Vref (+5V)

54

XTAL1

READY

96

Ready

CLKOUT

97

Clock out

ALE

25

Address latch enable

BHE

92

Bus high enable

RSTOUT

96

Reset out

RD

26

Read

WR

95

Write

RSTIN
NMI
VAREF

Control Bus

Reset

20

D42

Caution

When monitoring the signals described in this section it is best done with control
power only i.e. with the UPS power sections shut down and the circuit boards
live via the control power supply. The signals entering the left of the above diagram are constant and can be monitored with a meter/oscilloscope; those shown
on the right of the diagram are not constant and best monitored with a logic probe.
The logic sequence/timing of these signals depend upon various circuit conditions
and cannot therefore be accurately defined; however, for field test purposes, the
presence of a variable switching logic signal at these points would generally indicate that the basic processor control bus is serviceable and the system software
is running.
Power supply

The microcontroller is powered from the general +5V rail which is provided by a
three-terminal 5V regulator (N1) shown on diagram sheet 7.
System clock (XTAL1)

A dedicated crystal-controlled clock generator (E2) provides a system clock


signal which is connected to the microcontroller (D12) pin 20. This signal is a
20MHz squarewave switching between +5V and 0V.
System reset (RSTIN)

On power-up, a 1 second logic low reset pulse, [RSTIN->, is applied to D42 pin 27
from the reset generator circuit. This can also be manually applied for troubleshooting purposes by temporarily bridging jumper X28 (See paragraph 4.3.5).
The [RSTIN-> pulse forces the processor to restart its operation from the beginning
of its operating program which forces it to run through its initialisation routine.
Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI)

When the input to D42 pin 29 (NMI) goes low it instructs the system software to
interrupt its present operation and execute a power-down routine to save critical
data.

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The source of this input is determined by X17 which is normally made 2-3 and
selects the power failure detection circuit output [PFO> as the controlling signal
this circuit is shown on diagram sheet 5 (See paragraph 4.3.15.4).
Reference voltage (VAREF)

The input to D42 pin 54 (VAREF) is a +5V reference voltage used by the internal
A/D converters to compute the digital values for all analogue signals e.g volts/
current/VA etc. An adjustable reference voltage generator (N45 pin 8) (See paragraph 4.3.15.2), shown on diagram sheet 5, provides this input ([VREF>) via X20
which is normally made 1-2.
Clock out (CLKOUT)

This output is a 20MHz squarewave synchronised to the processor clock input and
is used by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding logic D33 (See paragraph
4.3.6) shown on the diagram sheet 3. This is to ensure that when the processor
wishes to read from/write to memory the memory access is synchronised to the
internal microprocessor action i.e. it ensures that the accessed memory address
is relevant to the current processors requirements.
Address latch enable (ALE)

This output goes high to enable the address bus to be latched into the RAM/ROM
memory address decoding logic D33 shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 4.3.6).
Bus high enable (BHE)

The logic state of this output indicates whether the processor is internally enabling
its high or low byte data bus i.e. it indicates if the micro wishes to read from
(or write to) the lower byte (D0....D7) or the higher byte (D8....D15). [BHE-> is
low when the high byte is being accessed, and vice versa, and is used by the RAM/
ROM memory address decoding logic shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 4.3.6).
Reset out (RSTOUT)

is controlled by the reset input signal, [RSTIN->, and goes high while the
input rest signal is applied. This signal is synchronised to the system clock and
returns high an integral number of clock pulses after the input reset signal is removed. The [RSTO-> signal is used by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding
logic shown on the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 4.3.6); and a buffered version,
[RSTOX->, is connected to the data bus output buffers as shown on diagram sheet
4 via jumper X25 (2-3) (See paragraph 4.3.12).
[RSTO->

Ready (Ready)

This input, when low, inserts wait states in the processors operation; thus slowing
it down. It is driven by the RAM/ROM memory address decoding logic shown on
the diagram sheet 3 (See paragraph 4.3.6) and holds off the processors operation until the appropriate address latching has taken place, thus effectively extending the read/write times when slower memory elements are being used.
Read (RD)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to read the data from the device
or memory location currently addressed by the address bus.

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Write (WR)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to write data to the device or
memory location currently addressed by the address bus.

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4.3.3

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers


(circuit diagram sheet 2).
Data bus buffer

Two type ACT245 octal bus transceivers (D32 & D36) are employed as bi-directional protection buffers between the microcontroller (D0....D15) and the data bus
(DX0....DX15). D32 buffers the low byte (D0....D7) and D36 the high byte;
however both are controlled by a common data direction signal i.e. the microcontrollers [RD-> output therefore the data direction of all 16 data bus lines are
controlled by a single signal.
These devices are described in appendix A (See paragraph A.1).
When the microcontroller drives its [RD-> output low it sets the data direction
through the buffers from B-to-A, which allows the data bus contents through to
the microcontrollers data inputs. At other times, when [RD-> is high, data flows
through the buffers from A-to-B, allowing the micro to place data onto the data
bus, which can then be written to a peripheral circuit as required.
Address bus buffer

The address bus is also buffered by two ACT245 devices (D38 & D41) but, unlike
the data bus described above, in this case the data direction is fixed by connecting
pin 1 of each device to a permanent +5V supply. Thus the address bus data always
flows through the devices in the A-to-B direction and used to select a memory location the buffered address bus is annotated (AX0....AX17).
Note: AX16 & AX17 are buffered by the control bus buffer described below.
Control bus buffer

The control bus signals [RD->, [WR->, [BHE->, [RSTO-> are all buffered by D47.
This device is configured with fixed data direction A-to-B, in the same manner as
the address bus buffer described above, by the application of a fixed +5V supply
at D47 pin 1. The buffered control signals [RDX->, [WRX->, [BHEX->, [RSTOX-> are
used by various circuits distributed throughout the circuit diagrams.
In all cases the above mentioned buffers have pull-up resistors connected to their
input and output pins e.g. resistor packs R307, R309 etc.
4.3.4

Ni-Cad Battery back-up controller


(circuit diagram sheet 2).
A 3.6V 280mAh Ni-Cad battery is fitted to the UPS Logic Board to back-up the
RAM contents and maintain the RTC time-keeping operation when the UPS is
turned OFF; when fully charged the battery offers a back-up period of up to 4 to
5 months.
The charger circuit is activated by the [OUTBAT> signal which is produced by the
processor via D25 pin 19 (diagram sheet 4). When [OUTBAT> goes high it turns
on V152 which then turns on V151 to supply the battery charge current via led
H8, R32 and V73. The charge voltage is limited to 4.7V by zener V14.
Note: the battery can be disabled for shipping/storage by opening jumper X31.
The battery is connected to the RAM memory devices and Real Time Clock
device shown on diagram sheet 3 via V32 and the battery supply annotated
[VRAM>. Thus, if the boards power supply is turned off (i.e. UPS fully powered
down) the programmable parameters held in RAM (e.g. kVA, working voltage

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and frequency, battery charging parameters and display language) are maintained; and the real-time clock keeps running. It is not therefore necessary to reprogram these parameters following every start-up.
Note: Jumper X31 must be made in order to enable this function.
The [VBATT> output is not connected to other parts of the circuit, but it is monitored by the microcontrollers analogue input [AN9> via D44, which is a quad analogue switch. [VBATT> is switched through D44 pin 2, by [FL-12> when it goes
high; this is controlled by a 12V supply rail monitor circuit (diagram sheet 5)
which inhibits the [VBATT> sense signal if the 12V power rails are invalid, thus
preventing an erroneous battery voltage fault being detected by the micro under
these conditions.
Note: the other three gates within D44 are not used and their inputs are tied to 0V.
[OUTBAT> signal details

The micro-controller monitors the NiCad battery voltage (3.6V nom) via AN9
and its internal A/D converter (as described above) and turns on the Ni-Cad
charger, by driving the [OUTBAT> signal high, if the Ni-Cad voltage falls below
2.8V. When the charger is active, the [BACK-UP BATTERY LOW] message is displayed on the Operator Control Panel (alarm #76) and led H8 illuminates. Once
the battery is recharged to 3.6V the charger is turned off by the [OUTBAT> signal
returning low and the alarm message is cancelled. Thus the Ni-Cad battery is
charged only when necessary and is not permanently trickle-charged.
Note: the NiCad charger may be active for several hours when the UPS is first
commissioned (depending on the initial battery charge state) jumper X31 must
be fitted to enable the battery back-up facility.
4.3.5

Reset generator
(circuit diagram sheet 2).
A purpose-designed Supply Voltage Supervisor (N24) provides the micro with a
1 second sec logic low [RSTIN-> reset signal on power-up. This signal, which is
applied to the micro pin 27, can also be initiated manually by temporarily making
jumper X28 (1-2). The [RSTIN> signal also resets the RAM chip select signals produced by D19a/d (shown on circuit diagram sheet 3) and points the micro to its
initialisation routines.

Caution

Using X28 to activate the reset circuit during normal UPS operation will crash the
unit, because the run signals to the rectifier, inverter and static switch will be disabled for the 1 second reset period.

On power-up (reset) the micro-controller receives initialisation data from D20


which is an EEPROM used to store the Emerson/Liebert/SICE software passport
identification. Amongst other things this configures the micros programmable
ports P0-P5 to the parameters required to operate in this application. Without this
security interlock the micro-controller will be inactive. An inverse output, [VAUX>, goes high on reset and is connected to D22 and D23 in the Inverter/Rectifier Start/Stop control logic and Load transfer control logic (circuit diagram
sheet 3). This resets the logic latches (Emergency Stop, DC Overvolts, etc.) and
re-applies the run signals to the rectifier, inverter and static switch.
Note: the reset time is determined by R157/C97, and begins when the +5V supply
rail reaches 3.6V on initial power-up.

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4.3.6

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System RAM and ROM memory addressing


(circuit diagram sheet 3).
The system memory comprises 2 x 512k EPROMs (D35 & D46) and 2 x 128k
RAM chips (D28 & D40). All these devices have an 8-bit data bus output; however, the EPROMs have a 16-bit address input while the RAM chips have a 17bit address facility.
Random Access memory (RAM)

This is the read/write memory store; sometimes referred to as the temporary


store. Any data fed in from the peripheral devices or produced during the execution of the main program will be temporarily held in RAM e.g. UPS setup parameters such as kVA, nominal voltages/frequency, serial number, passwords,
etc. This is a volatile location, meaning that when power is lost to the component
all data is also lost; thus the need for the on-board back-up Ni-Cad battery.
Read Only Memory (ROM)

This memory contains the operating system program, or firmware, which is basically a sequence of instructions to be carried out by the micro-controller in order
to make it perform the actions required of it. Upon power-up the micro is pointed
to the first instruction as part of its reset initialisation, and from then on it steps
through the programmed instructions in a sequence dictated by various events and
monitored conditions.
ROM is non-volatile, which means that it does not lose its memory contents in
the event of a loss of power.
Address decoding D33 / D19

The output enable pins of all four memory devices are controlled by the control
bus [RD-> line, therefore when this line goes low the processor can read the data
held at the current address from any of the devices. The purpose of the address
decoding circuit is to enable the microcontroller to select which of the EPROM
or RAM devices it wishes to communicate with at any given time. The memory
devices chip select inputs are controlled by a circuit comprising an ASIC i.c.
(D33) and two gates of D19.
D33s inputs are connected to A0, A14....A17, and several control bus signals
as described in paragraph 4.3.2. which are all controlled by the microcontroller.
The output signals, [CSEP1L->, [CSEP1H->, [CSRA1L->, and [CSRA1H->, adopt logic
states determined directly by these processor-controlled inputs and are synchronised to the processor operation by the 20MHz [CLKOUT> signal.
When low, [CSEP1L-> and [CSEP1H-> enable the EPROM devices via their chip
enable inputs (pin 20), while [CSRA1L-> and [CSRA1H-> perform a similar function on the RAM chips.
The [READY> output from D33 is fed back to the micro to inform it that the appropriate addresses have been loaded into D33s internal latches (See paragraph
4.3.2).
As D19 provides the chip select inputs to the RAM devices it is powered from
the battery-backed RAM supply to prevent RAM data corruption on UPS power
down.
Note: jumper X14 provides a test facility for bench testing only and all links
should be open during normal operation.

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AX15 & AX16 configuration links

The UPS Logic Board has been designed to facilitate future software upgrades by
including configuration links to permit the addressing of alternative memory devices. These links affect the routing of the AX15 and AX16 address lines, and the
standard configuration is shown below in Figure 20-19.
In the standard configuration the signals annotated [PIN29EP> and [PIN3EP> are
connected to the EPROMs A14 and A15 inputs and are therefore driven by the
AX15 and AX16 address lines respectively. The [PIN31RAM> signal (AX16) is
connected to the A15 input of both RAM devices and the [PIN3RAM> signal
(AX15) is connected to the RAM write enable inputs.
Figure 20-19: AX15 & AX16 decoding configuration links
X19

X13

[AX16>

X22

[PIN3EP>

X21

X23

[AX15>
[PIN29EP>
[WRX>

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[PIN31RAM>

[PIN3RAM>

X24

[PIN29RAM>

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4.3.7

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Basic system control logic


The term Basic System Control Logic is used here to described the signals generated by the UPS Logic Board which control the start/stop commands to the
rectifier and inverter, the battery circuit breaker trip control, and the load transfer control between inverter and static bypass.
These functions are controlled by two ASICs annotated D22 and D23 which are
shown on sheet 3 of the diagram and also in greater detail in Figure 20-20 below.
Figure 20-20: Basic system control logic (internal detail)

Z39
0V
D34-12

MNS_L

MSCROP

BAT_MA

M_BAT_MA

11

SEQ_MAINS
BLK_BYP

13
14

M_ESD

16

MSCROP

15

M_BAT_MA

12

BLK_MAINS

D26-5

D26-4

D26-6

D26-3

C63

D26-7

5
6

17

M_BAT_MA
IB_OPEN

D21-16

D21-5
D21-6
D21-9

V-AUX
M_ESD

1
2
3
4

BLK_INV_M

INV_ON

RST_OUT

L_INV

BLK_MAINS

+5V
Q3

D21-12

R110

Q2
R106

S1
R154

R109

Q1

0V
Block
Bypass

4.3.7.1

Manual
RESET

Block
Inverter

Block
Rectifier

D21-15

L_MAINS

11

BLK_REC_M

13
14

R113

R86

N15-14

M-ESD
SCR_OPN

R112

N15-8

C64

R97

R111

ESD

D22

C62

M_RESET

1
2
3

ALARMS_RES
V-AUX

D21-2
N24-6

0V

D23
12 BAT_TRP

X2-54

15 ON_INV

X3-36

16 INV_L

X5-16
X5-31

17 MNS_L

X5-17

19 ON_REC

X1-36

REC_ON

D22 Functional description

D22 provides four status signals which are used by D23 and are also monitored
by the microcontroller via the data bus input buffers.

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Emergency shutdown [ESD>

The emergency shutdown signal [ESD> to D22-4 is driven by external circuitry


and connected via X2-52 (sheet 7) as a logic high when the emergency shutdown
is applied. When D22 pin 4 goes high it drives pin 17 high which then provides a
latching input back to D22 pin 5 which holds pin 17 high until the reset circuit is
activated the latching signal is debounced by R112/C63. D22 pin 5 also turns
off the bypass enable signal via D22 pin 12 i.e. turns off the bypass SCRs.
In addition to providing the latching function, the high output from D22-17,
fed to the microcontroller via data bus buffer D26-5 to initiate alarm
#63 [CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY] (See paragraph 4.3.11.4) and it is also connected
to D23-4 where it:

[M_ESD>, is

Trips the battery circuit breaker ([BAT_TRP> = 0)


Turns Off (stops) the rectifier ([ON_INV> = 0)
Turns Off (stops) the inverter ([REC> = 0)
Static switch SCR open

The static switch SCR open signal [SCROPN> to D22-6 is produced by N15-8 or
N5-14 (sheet 6) as a logic high when the detection circuits sees a voltage drop
across one of the static bypass SCRs. When D22 pin 6 goes high it drives pin 16
high (provided the load on mains input to D22-7 is also high) which then provides a latching input back to D22 pin 8. This inhibits the output on pin 12 and
holds pin 16 high until the reset circuit is activated the latching signal is debounced by R111/C62. Thus [SCROPN> will block the bypass only when the load
is on-bypass.
In addition to providing the latching function, the high output from D22-16,
to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer D26-4 (See paragraph 4.3.11.4) where it annunciates alarm #15 [I/P: SCR CUT OFF].
[MSCROP>, is fed

DC Overvoltage fast

The DC Fast Overvoltage signal [BAT_MA> to D22-9 is driven by N13-8 (sheet


5) and is logic high when a DC busbar (battery) overvoltage condition (>620V) is
present. When D22 pin 9 goes high it drives pin 15 high which then provides a
latching input back to D22 pin 11 which holds pin 15 high until the reset circuit
is activated the latching signal is debounced by R113/C64.
In addition to providing the latching function the high output from D22-15,
[MBATMA>, is fed to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer U26-6 to initiate
alarm #58 [DC BUS: FAST OVERV.] (See paragraph 4.3.11.4) and it is also connected to D23-1 where it:
Trips the battery circuit breaker ([BAT_TRP> = 0)
Turns Off (stops) the rectifier ([ON_INV> = 0)
Turns Off (stops) the inverter ([REC> = 0)
Static bypass inhibit

The [BLKMNS> output from D22 pin 12 goes high when D22 detects any condition
which requires the load to be prevented from being connected to the static bypass
supply. This output is fed to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer U26-3 to
initiate alarm #17 [BYPASS INHIBIT REM.] (See paragraph 4.3.11.4) and is also
connected to D23-7 where, when high, it inhibits the load-on-bypass command [MNS_L> output from D23 pin 17.
The [BLKMNS> signal can be driven high by any of the following conditions:

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Emergency shutdown latch set (D22-5 = high)


Bypass SCR open latch set (D22-8 = high)
1 second Power-up reset pulse (D22-5 = positive-going pulse)
Static bypass mains phase sequence error (D22-13 = high) from D27 on
diagram sheet 5
Manual block applied from switch Q1 (D22-14 = high)
RESET

There are three reset signal sources applied to D22:


D22-1 receives a logic high reset signal from the microcontroller via the
data bus output buffer D21-2 (See paragraph 4.3.12.5). This is a software
reset programmable via the Operator Control Board
D22-2 receives a logic high reset pulse when the board is powered up (See
paragraph 4.3.5)
D22-3 is driven high when the manual reset button (S1) is pressed
The Emergency shutdown, Bypass SCR open and DC overvoltage latches
described above are all reset when any one of the three reset inputs are active.
Note: the power-up reset signal to D22-2 also resets the [BLKMNS> output from
D22-12, described immediately above.
4.3.7.2

D23 Functional description

D23 provides five major control signals, as detailed below:


Battery circuit breaker trip

A logic low [BATTRP> output from D23-12 trips the battery circuit breaker via
X2-54 (sheet 7), which is connected to the High Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.8). This signal can be driven low by any of the following
D23 inputs:

DC Fast Overvoltage to D23-1 ([MBATMA> = 1) from D22-15 (see above)


Emergency shutdown to D23-4 ([MSDD> = 1) from D22-17 (see above)
Power-up reset to D23-3 (see above)
Software trip to D23-2 [IBOPEN> generated by the microcontroller and
connected via the data bus output buffer D21-16 (See paragraph 4.3.12.5).
Note: This signal trips the battery breaker on low DC voltage as follows:
UPS on less than 15% load = 330V
UPS on greater than 15% load = 360V
The low voltage trip is programmable via the Operator Control Panel SetUp parameters, and is adjustable between 1.6V/cell and 1.69V/cell. The
30Volt window at the 15% level is not adjustable.

Inverter Start/Stop (On/Off)

The [ON-INV> output from D23-15 is connected to the Inverter Logic Board via
X3-36 (sheet 7) where it controls the inverter Start/Stop status. A logic low
[ON-INV> signal commands the inverter to Stop and can be effected by any one
of the following D23 inputs (conversely, all the following inputs must be in their
healthy low state in order for the inverter to run):
DC fast overvoltage (>620V) to D23-1 ([MBATMA> = 1) from D22-15
(see above)
Emergency shutdown to D23-4 ([MSDD> = 1) from D22-17 (see above)
Power-up reset to D23-3 (see above)

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Software control to D23-6 [INV-ON> generated by the microcontroller


and connected via the data bus output buffer D21-6 (See paragraph
4.3.12.5). This signal is low to inhibit the inverter and high to enable it.
When this signal is actively blocking the inverter (i.e. low) it initiates
alarm #31 [INVERTER: OFF REM.].
Manual inverter block to D23-5 logic high from the manual inverter
inhibit switch Q2. If the [ON-INV> signal at D23 pin 5 is active (low),
blocking the inverter, alarm #30 [INVERTER: OFF] will be active. Note
that alarm #31 will be disabled if alarm #30 is active. Alarm #31 can be
interpreted that the inverter has been selected off, while alarm #30 suggests that the inverter has been turned off for some other reason.
Rectifier Start/Stop (On/Off)

The [ON-REC> output from D23-19 is connected to the Rectifier Logic Board via
X1-36 (sheet 7) where it controls the rectifier Start/Stop status. A logic low
[ON-REC> signal turns OFF the rectifier and can be effected by any one of the following D23 inputs (conversely, all the following inputs must be in their healthy
state in order for the rectifier to run):
DC Fast Overvoltage (>620V) to D23-1 ([MBATMA> = 1) from D22-15
(see above)
Emergency shutdown to D23-4 ([MSDD> = 1) from D22-17 (see above)
Power-up reset to D23-3 (see above)
Software control to D23-14 [REC-ON> generated by the microcontroller and connected via the data bus output buffer D21-12 (See paragraph
4.3.12.5) this signal is low to inhibit the rectifier and high to enable it.
When this signal is actively blocking the rectifier (i.e. low) it initiates
alarm #20 [RECTIFIER: OFF].
Manual rectifier block to D23-13 logic high from the manual rectifier
inhibit switch S2. If the [ON-REC> signal at D23 pin 19 is active (low),
blocking the rectifier, alarm #22 [RECTIFIER: BLOCK] will be active.
Note that this will be disabled if alarm #21 is active. Alarm #21 can be
interpreted that the rectifier has been selected off via the Operator Control
Panel, while alarm #22 suggests that the rectifier has been turned off for
some other reason
Load transfer control

The transfer control logic within D23 is interlocked such that the load on inverter [INV_L> and load-on-bypass [MNS_L> commands are mutually exclusive.

[INV-L>: This output, from D23-16, goes high to transfer the load to the inverter and is connected to the Static Switch Driver Board via X5-15 (sheet 7), where
it turns off the static switch (disconnecting the load from the bypass supply) and
energises the inverter-side contactor (K1) driver circuit.
It is also connected to the Inverter Logic Board, via X3-31 where it triggers the
latches within D11 which makes the inverter voltage track the bypass supply voltage for 100ms (See section 18 paragraph 3.3.3). This is done to provide a smooth
transfer from bypass to inverter and reduce the wear on the inverter-side contactor (K1).
In order for D23 pin 16 to go high, D23 requires pin 8 ([RSTOUT>) to be low and
pin 9 ([L-INV>) high. Both these signals are produced by the microcontroller and
connected to D23 via the data bus output buffer D21 (See paragraph 4.3.12.5).

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[RSTOUT> is

a 1 second hold-off command issued by the microcontroller when it


is performing its initialisation checks during power-up; and [L-INV> is the transfer-load-to-inverter command issued when all its software-controlled parameters
have been verified (e.g. Inverter voltage OK, Sync OK etc.).

[MNS-L>: This output, from D23-17, goes high to transfer the load to the
bypass and is connected to the Static Switch Driver Board via X5-17 (sheet 7),
where it turns on the static switch driver circuit, connecting the load to the bypass
supply. It is also connected to D22-7 where (when low) it disables the bypass
SCR open input to D22-6 when the load is not connected to the bypass supply.
In order for D23 pin 17 to go high D23 requires:
pin 7 to be low (i.e. no [BLKMNS> from D22)
AND
either pin 8 [RSTOUT> to be high not requesting load-on-inverter
OR
pin 11 ([L-MNS>) high requesting load-on-bypass.
The signals to pins 8 and 11 are produced by the microcontroller and connected
to D23 via the data bus output buffer D21 (See paragraph 4.3.12.5). [RSTOUT> is
a 1 second hold-off command issued by the microcontroller when it is performing
its initialisation checks during power-up; and [L-MAINS> is the transfer-load-tobypass command issued when all its software-controlled parameters have been
verified for appropriate action (e.g. Critical bus volts not OK, overload, bypass
volts OK etc.).
4.3.8

CAN bus communications drivers and control logic


(circuit diagram sheet 3).
The CAN bus communications system is described in paragraph 5.3.9. (Operator
Logic Board).

4.3.9

Real-time clock (RTC)


(circuit diagram sheet 3)
The MC68698 (D18) is a peripheral device which contains a real-time clock/calendar, a 32 x 8 bit static RAM, and a synchronous, serial, three-wire interface for
communicating with the micro-controller. As its title suggests, the real time
clock accurately counts seconds, minutes, hours (AM/PM), Day-of-the week,
date, month and year (including auto-incrementing leap-year). In the UPS Logic
Board application it provides date stamping to the Operator Control Panel messages and service data as entered via the Maintenance Menu Screen (see paragraph 2.4.6.3 on page 2-40). The device operates from the Ni-Cad back-up
battery to maintain its time-keeping function and prevent data loss when the general +5V control power is turned off. It also contains many other circuit functions,
such as an alarm facility, watchdog timer etc. which are not used in this application but may be mentioned briefly in the following description.
Power supply details

D18 is powered from the Ni-Cad-backed [VRAM> supply which is available at all
times provided jumper X31 is made 1-2 (See paragraph 4.3.4). This supply is
connected to pin 16 (Vcc), pin 13 (Vbatt) and also, via an R-C delay circuit
(R1087/C54), to pin 10 (POR). The general +5V control power rail is also monitored by the device at pin 12 (VSYS).

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The delayed input to pin 10 is seen as a Power On Reset (POR) and resets the
device by briefly holding pin 10 low while the device is powered-up. Note that as
the battery-backed supply is present at all times, this is effectively a once-only
reset that takes place when X13 is initially made (i.e. battery connected) and is not
affected by subsequent application/removal of the UPS Logic Boards +5V control power supply.
The boards +5V supply rail is monitored at D18 pin 12; and when the voltage at
this pin is less than 0.7V above the Ni-Cad voltage (pin 16) the device switches
to a low-power standby mode whereby it maintains its time-keeping function but
internally inhibits the serial communication facilities with the micro-controller.
This prevents the passage of invalid or spurious data while the micro-controller is
powering-down and so prevents RTC data corruption.
Clock control

The RTCs internal timer operation can be controlled from one of two sources;
i.e. either from an external crystal-controlled clock reference or a 50/60Hz mainsderived sinusoidal signal. In this particular application an external crystal is used
and the 50/60Hz input to pin 11 (LINE) is grounded via R107.
For crystal operation pins 14 and 15 are connected to a 32.768kHz, 1.048576kHz,
2.097152kHz or 4.194304kHz crystal, as shown on the circuit diagram. A programmable internal divider circuit enables the particular external clock frequency
to be scaled down to that used by the internal logic. The internal clock signal is
made available at pin 1 (CLKO) but in this particular application is not used, and
remains unterminated.
Serial communications interface

Four lines, connected to pins 4 to 7, implement a bi-directional communications


interface with the micro-controller, and allow the micro to write configuration and
control data to the RTC and read the time and register data. As described above,
such communication is inhibited if the UPS Logic Boards +5V power rail is unavailable.
The [ORCS> input to pin 7 (SS) is seen as a chip select input in this application
and must be held high while either a read or write event is taking place. Data is
input (written) to the RTC by [ORDI> to pin 5; and output (read) from the device
by [ORDO> from pin 7. In each case the data takes the form of a serial data stream
clocked in/out by the serial clock signal [ORSK> applied to pin 4. Note that all
four of these signals are under direct control of the micro-controller and applied
to the data bus via the buffers shown on diagram sheet 4.
Other connections

The functions connected to pin 2, pin 3 and pin 9 are not used in this particular
application and these pins are tied to their default logic levels as shown.

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Section 20:

4.3.10

Data bus buffers chip select decoding


The data bus communicates with the peripheral circuits and devices via 16 octal
buffers which are selected in pairs to provide a 16 bit data bus transfer. The microcontroller selects a particular buffer-pair by appropriately addressing the chip
select decoding circuit (D52) which then enables the required buffers. Details
of the digital signals handled by each buffer are provided in the following paragraphs.
Figure 20-21: Data bus buffer control (block diagram)
D8
[CSIN1->

D17
CP

OE

D2

D25
CP

OE

D1
[CSIN2->

D9

OE

CP

D26

CP

D51

D50
CP

OE

D60

CP

D7

D54
CP

CP

D10
CP

<CSOU3-]

D55

OE

[CSDIS->

<CSOU2-]

D21

OE

[CSIN3->

<CSOU1-]

<CSOU4-]

D56
CP

DATA
BUS

Control Bus
Microcontroller
Address Bus
AX11
AX12
AX13
AX14
AX15
AX16
AX17
[RDX->
[WRX->

20-394

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

D52

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

[CSDIS->
[CSIN1->
[CSIN2->
[CSIN3->
[CSOU1->
[CSOU2->
[CSOU3->
[CSOU4->

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Data bus input buffers


(diagram sheet 4).
Digital signals which are read by the microcontroller as part of its control function
are connected to the data bus via six type HCT 245 octal bus transceivers (See Appendix A.1) which are accessed in pairs to provide a 16-bit data transfer (See
Figure 20-21). The buffers data direction pins are held permanently high, therefore the data flow is fixed from A-to-B in each device. Chip select signals from
D52 are connected to the buffers output enable pins which provides the means
for the micro to select each pair of devices as required.
The remainder of this sub-section lists the digital signals connected to the data bus
through the bus input buffers, and provides signal details where appropriate.

4.3.11.1

Buffer D8 activated by CSIN1


XRADT1

Source: Sheet 7 X1-31


Description: From the Power Rectifier overtemperature sensing device this
input is not normally used and is held permanently low by jumper X10 (1-2) on
the Rectifier Logic Board. If used, in an overtemperature situation this input initiates alarm #24 [RECTIFIER: OVERTEMP.] and the rectifier and inverter are
shut-down 1 minute later accompanied by alarm #62 [CUT-OFF: OVERTEMP].
This alarm must be reset by pressing the manual reset push-button.
OVLREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-32


Description: Rectifier Overload this input goes high when the rectifier is operating in input current limit mode (H6 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board)
(See section 4 paragraph 2.3.4.2).
This initiates alarm #23 [RECTIFIER: I/P LIMIT].
BLKREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-33


Description: Rectifier Blocked this input goes high when the Rectifier Logic
board is in its stop mode (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6). This can be due to the
Rectifier Logic Board detecting an internal fault or a stop (block) command
issued by the UPS Logic Board (See paragraph 4.3.7.2).
The internal fault channel is triggered by either: incorrect phase rotation; Rectifier Logic Board power supply failure; or low input voltage (-20%). The external
fault channel initiated by the UPS Logic Board will be accompanied by alarm #21
[RECTIFIER: OFF REM.] or alarm #22 [RECTIFIER: BLOCK] (See paragraph
4.3.7.2).
SEQREC

Source: Sheet 7 X1-34


Description: Rectifier input phase sequence error this input goes high when
the Rectifier Logic board phase sequence monitor detects an error on the incoming 3 phase mains supply (H8 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board) (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.1).

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IN-LOW

Source: Sheet 7 X1-35


Description: Rectifier input undervoltage this input goes high when the Rectifier Logic board input voltage monitor detects a -20% undervoltage condition on
the incoming 3 phase mains supply (H9 illuminated on the Rectifier Logic Board)
(See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.2).
XATI1 / XATI2 / XATI3

Source: Sheet 7 X2-40 / 41 / 42


Description: Not used no connection on High Voltage Interface Board.
4.3.11.2

Buffer D2 activated by CSIN1


SW-REC

Source: Sheet 7 X2-43


Description: Rectifier input switch monitor this input goes low when the rectifier input mains power switch is closed. This signal passes through the High
Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the input switch
is open, this signal initiates alarm #04 [RECTIF. BREAKER OPEN].
SW-IN

Source: Sheet 7 X2-44


Description: Static Bypass switch monitor this input goes low when the Static
Bypass mains power switch is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the bypass switch is
open, this signal initiates alarm #02 [BYPASS BREAKER OPEN].
SW-BYP

Source: Sheet 7 X2-45


Description: Maintenance Bypass switch monitor this input goes low when
the Maintenance Bypass switch is closed. This signal passes through the High
Voltage Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the maintenance
bypass switch is closed, this signal initiates alarm #06 [ON MANUAL BYPASS].
SW-OUT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-46


Description: Output switch monitor this input goes low when the Output
switch is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage Interface Board
(See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the output switch is open, this signal initiates alarm #03 [OUTPUT BREAKER OPEN].
FUSINV

Source: Sheet 7 X2-48


Description: Not used - held permanently low due to link fitted to connector
X16 on the High Voltage Interface Board (see main equipment wiring diagrams).
If used, this input monitors the inverter fuse and on fuse failure initiates alarm #38
[INVERTER: FUSE FAIL].

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FUSREC

Source: Sheet 7 X2-49


Description: Not used - held permanently low due to link fitted to connector
X17 on the High Voltage Interface Board (see main equipment wiring diagrams).
If used, this input monitors the rectifier (input) fuses and on fuse failure initiates
alarm #25 [RECTIFIER: FUSE FAIL].
FUSBAT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-50


Description: Battery fuse monitor this input goes high if the battery fuse ruptures (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.15).
The fuse is detected by a micro-switch located on the fuse which, when activated,
initiates alarm #57 [BATTERY: FUSE FAIL].
TH

Source: Sheet 7 X2-51


Description: Inverter thermostat monitor this input goes high if an inverter
thermostat opens (overtemperature > 90C) (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.13). In
the event of an overtemperature situation occurring, this input initiates alarm #34
[INVERTER: OVERTEMP.] and the rectifier and inverter are shut-down 1 minute
later accompanied by alarm #62 [CUT-OFF: OVERTEMPER]. This alarm must be
reset by pressing the manual reset push-button (S1).
4.3.11.3

Buffer D1 activated by CSIN2


SW-BAT

Source: Sheet 7 X2-53


Description: Battery circuit breaker monitor this input goes low when the Battery switch (or contactor) is closed. This signal passes through the High Voltage
Interface Board (See section 7 paragraph 2.3.7). When the battery switch is open,
this signal initiates alarm #05 [BATTERY BREAKER OPEN].
OVLINV

Source: Sheet 7 X3-32


Description: Inverter Overload this input goes high when the inverter is operating in current limit mode (H14 illuminated on the Inverter Logic Board) (See
section 18 paragraph 3.3.7). In an Overload condition, this signal initiates alarm
#33 [INVERTER: CURR.LIMIT].
BLKINV

Source: Sheet 7 X3-33


Description: Inverter Blocked this input goes high when the Inverter Logic
Board is in its stop mode (See section 18 paragraph 3.3.8). This can be due to
the Inverter Logic Board detecting an internal fault or a stop (block) command
issued by the UPS Logic Board (See paragraph 4.3.7.2). The internal fault channel is triggered by either: IGBT desaturation, ribbon cable disconnected, Inverter
Logic Board power failure. The external fault channel initiated by the UPS Logic
Board will be accompanied by alarm [#30], [#31] or [#32].

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XINVI1

Source: Sheet 7 X3-40


Description: Not used held permanently low due to X13 (2-3) on the Inverter
Logic Board which disables this alternative temperature sensor route. The active
thermostat route is via [TH> described earlier.
XSTAI1

Source: Sheet 7 X5-13


Description: Not used held permanently low due to X11 (1-2) on the Static
Switch Driver Board. No thermostat is fitted on the heatsink.
XSTAT2

Source: Sheet 7 X5-14


Description: Inverter output contactor monitor goes low when the inverter
output contactor is closed (load on inverter) and is used by the transfer control
logic software routine.
LINK X12

Source: On-board jumper X12


Description: Not used.
4.3.11.4

Buffer D26 activated by CSIN2


MRESET

Source: Sheet 3 switch S1


Description: RESET switch goes high when the on-board manual reset switch
(S1) is pressed and is used by the micro to unlatch block commands issued by
some of its software routines.
BLKMNS

Source: Sheet 3 D22 pin 12


Description: Static Switch blocked monitor this input goes high to inform
the micro that the static switch control logic (on this Board) is inhibiting the static
switch (alarm #16 [BYPASS INHIBIT]). This can be invoked by any of the following signals applied to D22 (See paragraph 4.3.7.1).
static switch manual inhibit switch (Q1) closed
bypass phase sequence error detected
emergency shutdown operated (latched)
open circuit SCR (latched)
UPS Logic Board power supply failure
MSCROP

Source: Sheet 3 D22 pin 16


Description: Static Switch SCR open circuit monitor this input goes high to
inform the micro that an open circuit static switch SCR has been detected (on this
Board) (alarm #15 [I/P: SCR CUT-OFF]). This signal is latched within D22 and
must be reset using S1 to return to normal conditions.

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M-ESD

Source: Sheet 3 D22 pin 17


Description: Emergency shutdown monitor this input goes high to inform
the micro that an emergency shutdown (Emergency Stop) has been applied (See
paragraph 4.3.7.1) (alarm [#63] [CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY]). This signal is
latched within D22 and must be reset using S1 to return to normal conditions.
MBATMA

Source: Sheet 3 D22 pin 15


Description: DC Overvoltage this input goes high to inform the micro that a
DC Overvoltage has been detected (See paragraph 4.3.7.2) (alarm [#58]
[DC BUS: FAST OVERV.]). This signal is latched within D22 and must be reset
by S1 to return to normal conditions.
SEQMNS

Source: Sheet 5 D34 pin 10


Description: Bypass phase sequence error this input goes high to inform the
micro that a Bypass phase sequence error has been detected (See paragraph
4.3.14.1). Note that the Rectifier Logic Board detects a phase sequence error on
the UPS (rectifier) input mains supply (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.6.1). A phase
sequence error initiates alarm [#14] [I/P: PHASE ROT.ERROR] and also enables
alarm [#16] [BYPASS INHIBIT] via the micro.
EEDO

Source: Sheet 2 D20 pin 4


Description: Output from the security EPROM to initiate the micro-controller.
DRDO

Source: Sheet 3 D18 pin 6


Description: Real Time Clock output (See paragraph 4.3.9).
4.3.11.5

Buffer D51 activated by CSIN3


PAIN1 to PAIN8

Source: Sheet 7 X7
Description: Data from parallel control bus not used in a single-module installation. The Parallel Logic board interfaces with the micro via this buffer and
is active only in the 1+1 and multi-module system configurations
4.3.11.6

Buffer D60 activated by CSIN3


BLK-SYN

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 11


Description: Sync disable this is an input from the optional remote alarms
board (AS400 interface board) which goes high (+5V) when the UPS is ON and is normally used to prevent the inverter synchronising to a
frequency-wild standby generator. The On Generator status signal is applied as a
closed contact across the Remote Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 3-4.
GENERATOR

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Note: The response to the ON-GENERATOR event is programmable via the Operator Control Panel FUNCTION software screen which allows three separate
functions to enabled/disabled:
Synchro Block is concerned with the [BLK-SYN> signal mentioned here
and, when enabled, prevents the inverter from tracking the bypass frequency when it is being provided by the standby generator.
Charge Inhibit is concerned with the battery recharge current limit
function which, when enabled, reduces the RECTIFIER current limit by
15%.
Current Limit is concerned with the rectifier input current limit
[XRADD1> function which, when enabled, reduces the input current limit
by 35%.
The reduced current limit functions are employed to lower the potential
maximum current demand if the standby generator is undersized.
BLK-EXT

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 12


Description: From external alarms (AS400 interface board). This input provides a means of allowing the inverter to be turned OFF/ON from an external
signal via the Remote Alarms Board. The Block (OFF) signal is applied as a
closed contact across the Remote Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 1-2.
Note: Jumper X6 on the Remote Alarms Board must be selected 2-3 in order to
enable this function.
BLK-01

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 9


Description: From external alarms (AS400 interface board) Not used.
BLK-CHG

Source: Sheet 7 X8 pin 10


Description: Rectifier Disable This input provides a means of allowing the
rectifier to be turned OFF/ON from an external signal via the Remote Alarms
Board. The Block (OFF) signal is applied as a closed contact across the Remote
Alarms Board terminal block X5 pins 1-2.
Note: Jumper X6 on the Remote Alarms Board must be selected 1-2 in order to
enable this function.
Links X26

Source: Sheet 4 jumper X26


Description: The four sections of jumper X26 are detailed in a Table on the circuit diagram sheet 1 and summarized below:

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Table 20-15: X26 Jumper details


LINK 1-2

Open
(Standard)

Closed

LINK 3-4

LINK 5-6

Open

4.3.12

Manual-transfer mode enabled (off-line operation).


Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter only
when the bypass is unavailable i.e. the bypass is the
preferred supply source. Note: there will be a 3-cycle
break on transfer to inverter,
Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor disabled

Closed
(Standard)

Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor enabled. i.e. The


inverter is given 5 seconds to reach nominal voltage
otherwise it is latched OFF.

Open
(Standard)

Enables the Event History monitor to store up to a


maximum of 10 alarms.

Closed

LINK 7-8

Auto-transfer mode enabled (on-line operation).


Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter when
the inverter is available i.e. the inverter is the preferred supply source

Resets the Event History monitor. Note: After the 10th


event, the monitor buffer is full an cannot store any
further events. The buffer should be reset to 0 after
each maintenance or commissioning to enable new
events to be captured.

Open
(Standard)

Password protection enabled.

Closed

Password protection disabled

Data bus output buffers


(circuit diagram sheet 4).
Digital signals generated by the microcontroller as part of its control function are
fed to the peripheral circuits via 10 type-74C273 octal latches (See Appendix A.2)
which are accessed in pairs to provide a 16-bit data transfer (See Figure 20-21).
The chip select signals from D52 provide the latch clock signals and data is
therefore transferred through the latches when the appropriate chip select signal
switches from low to high. A logic low [RSTDX-> reset signal is connected to all
the data bus output buffers via jumper X25 (3-2) and drives all their outputs low
when applied. [RSTDX-> is produced by the microcontroller (See paragraph 4.3.3)
and shown on the circuit diagram sheet 2.
The remainder of this sub-section lists the digital signals connected through the
latches, and provides signal details where appropriate.

4.3.12.1

Buffers D7 and D10 activated by CSDIS

These two devices connect the data bus output to the two on-board 7-segment diagnostic displays (H11 & H12). For a detailed description of the displayed parameters (see paragraph 4.3.17 on page 20-422).
4.3.12.2

Buffer D17 activated by CSOUT1


XRADD1

Destination: Sheet 7 X1 pin 37

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Description: Reduced current limit when this output goes high it reduces the
Rectifier Logic Boards input current limit threshold by 35% (See section 4 paragraph 2.3.4.2).

Conditions: This software-selectable output is activated when the UPS is running on standby generator as described on page 20-399 ([BLK-SIN>).
REC-B & REC-A

Destination: Sheet 7 X1 pin 38 / 39


Description: Charge mode selection these two outputs are connected to a decoder on the Rectifier Logic Board where they invoke one of four permissible
charge modes (see section 4 table 4-3).

Conditions: These outputs select Test, Boost, Float and Manual charge modes
in response to selections made on the Operator Control Panel. The automatic
Boost mode parameters, i.e. duration and threshold, are also operator-defined
(see paragraph 2.5.6 on page 2-53). LEDs on the Rectifier Logic Board illuminate to indicate the active charge mode.
XAT01 & XATO2

Destination: Sheet 7 X2 pin 55 / 56


Description: Not used
INV-F

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 37


Description: Base frequency selection informs the Inverter Logic Boards
staircase pattern generator of the UPS systems base frequency (i.e. 50/60Hz).
(See section 18 paragraph 3.3.2).

Conditions: This output is high for 50Hz and low for 60Hz as selected on the
Operator Control Panel see Selecting the UPS SETUP parameters in the commissioning procedure (see paragraph 2.4.5.3 on page 2-35).
INV-B & INV-A

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 38 / 39


Description: Inverter working voltage selection these two outputs are connected to a decoder on the Inverter Logic Board where they select one of four permissible charge modes (see section 18 table 18-10).

Conditions: The logic states of these outputs are determined by the working
voltage selected by the operator see commissioning procedure (see paragraph
2.4.5.2 on page 2-34). LEDs on the Inverter Logic Board illuminate to indicate
the active selection.
4.3.12.3

Buffer D25 activated by CSOUT1


XSTAO1 & XSTAO2

Destination: Sheet 7 X5 pin 19 / 20


Description: Not used

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RE485-

Destination: Sheet 7 D58 pin 2


Description: This output selects the Read Enable pin of D58, which is an
RS485 communications driver connected to the parallel interface connector X7
pins 59/60 not used.
OE485

Destination: Sheet 7 D58 pin 3


Description: This output selects the Output Enable pin of D58, which is an
RS485 communications driver connected to the parallel interface connector X7
pins 59/60 not used.
TP5

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 5


Description: Not used (test point for system software).
OUTBAT

Destination: Sheet 2 V152


Description: This output, when high, enables the on-board Ni-Cad battery
charger.

Conditions: This output enables the Ni Cad battery charger if its voltage falls
to 2.8Vdc and disables it again once the battery voltage rises to 3.6V.
Note: when the charger is enabled the [BACK-UP BATTERY LOW] warning is annunciated (alarm [#76] active).
4.3.12.4

Buffer D9 activated by CSOUT2


EECS / EESK / EEDI

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 7


Description: These outputs control the data acquisition of EEPROM D20
ORCS

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 7


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) chip select (See paragraph 4.3.9).
ORSK

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 4


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) serial communications clock input (See
paragraph 4.3.9).
ORDI

Destination: Sheet 3 D18 pin 5


Description: Real Time Clock (RTC) serial data input (See paragraph 4.3.9).

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SELANA / SELANB

Destination: Sheet 6
Description: These two outputs are connected to the address inputs of three 2pole multiplexers which select the analogue signals for the microcontrollers A/D
inputs e.g. selecting the analogue signals for display purposes (kVA values are
calculated in software using V x I).
4.3.12.5

Buffer D21 activated by CSOUT2


ALMRES

Destination: Sheet 3 D22 pin 1


Description: Software controlled RESET This output, when high, resets the
Emergency Shutdown, DC Overvoltage and Open SCR fault latches within D22.

Conditions: This facility is not programmed into the current software and it is
therefore not used.
INV-ON

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 6


Description: Inverter ON request This output, when high, requests D23 to
issue an [ON_INV> command signal which is connected to the Inverter Logic
Board and turns ON the inverter provided other D23 inputs are correct (See paragraph 4.3.7.2).

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.3 on page 7-160)


RSTOUT

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 8


Description: Software controlled reset When low, this output resets the
load-on-inverter signal the [L_INV> and load-on-mains signal [L_MAINS>.

Conditions: The signal deactivates the above signals while the micro is reloading the default parameters, which can be activated using the RELOAD UPS DATA
selection on the Operator Control Panel menu screens. Note: the load should
always be on the Maintenance Bypass before performing a system reload.
L-INV

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 9


Description: Load-on-inverter request This output is interlocked with the
signal within D23 (See paragraph 4.3.7.2). In order to command the
load-on-inverter this signal must be high and the [RSTOUT> signal low.

[RSTOUT>

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.10 on page 7-180)


LMAINS

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 11


Description: Load-on-bypass (mains) request In order to command the
load-on-bypass this signal and the [RSTOUT> signal must be high see also
[RSTOUT>, above.

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.10 on page 7-180)

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REC-ON

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 14


Description: Rectifier ON request This output, when high, requests D23 to
issue an [ON_REC> command signal which is connected to the Rectifier Logic
Board and turns ON the rectifier (provided other D23 inputs are correct (See paragraph 4.3.7.2)).

Conditions: (see paragraph 7.2.2 on page 7-158).


IBOPEN

Destination: Sheet 3 D23 pin 2


Description: Trip battery circuit breaker This output, when high, requests D23
to issue a [BAT_TRP> command signal which is connected to the High Voltage Interface Board and turns OFF the battery circuit breaker driver transistor.

Conditions: This signal is software driven via a programmable parameter setting entered from the Operator Control Panel to trip the battery circuit breaker
when the battery is fully discharged (see page 2-37). The Emergency Shutdown
and DC Overvoltage inputs to D23 pins 4 and 1 also trigger the battery trip signal
when active (See paragraph 4.3.7.2).
TP6

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 6


Description: Not used (test point for system software).
4.3.12.6

Buffer D50 activated by CSOUT3


PAOUT1....PAOUT8

Destination: Sheet 7 X7
Description: Data to parallel control bus used in parallel installations only.
4.3.12.7

Buffer D55 activated by CSOUT3


PAOUT9 / PAOUT10

Destination: Sheet 7 X7
Description: Data to parallel control bus not used in a single-module installation.
OUT-03

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 25


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc.).
Conditions: Not used
MNS-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 26


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc.).

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Conditions: Logic high if mains (bypass) supply error i.e. overvoltage [#11],
undervoltage [#12], absent [#10] or bypass blocked [#17].
BATED

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 27


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if the battery voltage falls to its end-of-discharge level
[#56] as set by operator through Operator Control Panel (see page 2-37). It is
also active if the battery breaker is open [#05] or the battery fuse is open [#57].
CHG-INH

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 28


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if the battery charger is inhibited (driven by the
[BLK-CHG> signal described

on page 20-400). Jumper X4 pins 1-2 must be linked

on the Alarm Board.


SWBYP

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 29


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Logic high if maintenance bypass isolator is closed accompanied
by alarm #06 [ON MANUAL BYPASS].
OUT-01

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 23


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Not used in the present software implementation
4.3.12.8

Buffer D54 activated by CSOUT4


OUT-02

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 24


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Not used in the present software implementation
OVT-BAT

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 18


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface, Remote
Alarms Monitor etc).

Conditions: Logic high in the event of battery overtemperature Not used in


the present software implementation.
SYN-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 16

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Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface, Remote


Alarms Monitor etc).

Conditions: Logic high if the inverter is unsynchronised to the bypass supply


i.e. if the phase displacement is more than 9. This condition will initiate alarm
#35 [INVERTER: OUT OF SYNC].
ALL-GEN

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 17


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: This is the Common Alarm output to the Alarm Board and is
active if any of the following alarms are present: [#05], [#06], [#10], [#11], [#12],
[#16], [#17], [#24], [#33], [#34], [#52], [#56], [#57], [#66].
A400ON

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 31


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: This alarm is active when the load is on the UPS (inverter or bypass) and is interlocked with the Maintenance Bypass being closed.
A400UF

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 32


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Condition: Mains Failure alarm; enabled by alarm [#01] and active when [#22]
is energised.
A400BL

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 33


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Low Battery warning; enabled by alarm [#01] and active when
[#56] is energised.
A400BY

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 34


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Load on Bypass; active when alarm [#18] is energised.
4.3.12.9

Buffer D56 activated by CSOUT4


MNSREC

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 20


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Rectifier input voltage failure active when H9 is illuminated on
the Rectifier Logic Board.

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CS-KO

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 19


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Bypass-side Static Switch blocked goes high if a fault is detected
on the static switch (alarm [#16] present).
BAT-DSC

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 13


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Battery discharging active when alarm [#22] is present.
OVL

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 14


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Overload active when alarm [#33] or [#66] is present.
OVT-DIS

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 15


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Overtemperature active when alarm [#24] or [#34] is present.
OVT-AMB

Destination: Sheet 7 X8 pin 30


Description: Output to I/O interface (remote alarms, AS400 interface etc).
Conditions: Output Air overtemperature not used.
XINV01

Destination: Sheet 7 X3 pin 24


Description: Mains error inhibit to Inverter Logic Board transfer control.
Conditions: On the Inverter Logic Board a circuit within D11 provides a control signal [RIF> which briefly transfers the voltage reference signal to the bypass
supply just before the inverter-side contactor is closed; (see paragraph 3.3.3 on
page 18-251). This signal, [XIN01>, goes high to inform the Inverter Logic Board
of a mains (bypass) voltage error and prevents the switch-over to the bypass
supply reference from taking place; and so prevents the inverter locking to an outof-spec voltage.
TP7

Destination: Sheet 7 X18 pin 7


Description: Not used (test point for system software).

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)
Section 20:

4.3.13

Frequency sensing and control signals


Figure 20-22: Frequency synchronisation control
X2
D53

VI-A

8Vp-p

F-IN

X4

X3

X18-3
63
16
BACKM

34

BACK

D17
DATA
BUS
D54

phase
align

FRFB

34

R247
15 INV-F
50 /60 Hz
selection

37

37

INV-F

44

Clock
signals
to tri-wave
generator

SYNC-KO

D1

Sync error
detection

D60

27
26

Frequency
Divider

43
CLK
288kHz

MICROCONTROLLER

Bypass supply R-phase


voltage sensing

15

BLK-SYN

Sync Inhibit

Phase
Locked
Loop

50/60Hz

D42

X18-2
62
15
F-INM

4
9

VCO

X18-4
64

SYNCM

D59

50/60Hz signal
synchronised to
bypass (when present)

15

SYNC

Master Freq
reference for
Inverter Osc
(correction)

UPS Logic Board

4.3.13.1

35

35

SYNC

14

13

Phase
Comparator

D6 3
Inverter Logic Board

Frequency control principles

The inverter frequency is determined by the VCO section of a phase locked loop
i.c. (D6) on the Inverter Logic Board which provides a 288kHz (nominal) clock
signal to a frequency-divider (within D1) which then clocks the multiplexers in
the reference voltage generator circuit (See section 18 paragraph 3.3.2).
Base frequency selection

The inverter base frequency is selected via the Operator Control Panel during
commissioning and is read by the microcontroller through the CAN bus. The
micro responds by appropriately setting the [INV-F> output from D17-15 Low =
50Hz and High = 60Hz. This is connected to the frequency divider on the Inverter Logic Board where it determines the division factor i.e. when [INV-F> is low
the 288kHz VCO output is divided by 5760 to produce a 50Hz output at D1-26/
27; when [INV-F> is high the division is 4800 and produces a 60Hz output.
Frequency synchronisation

It is desirable that the inverter output is synchronised to the bypass supply under
normal operating conditions as this enables a closed load transfer to be carried

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out in the event of a UPS fault where-by the static switch SCRs are turned on at
the same time as the inverter contactor is opened, and the load does not experience
a supply break.
If the inverter is not synchronised to the bypass supply there could be a large voltage difference across the static switch SCRs while the load is on-inverter (i.e.
SCRs OFF) which might damage the UPS/load equipment during a subsequent
closed transfer: in such circumstances an open transfer takes place if the UPS
develops a fault, where-by the inverter contactor is opened prior to turning ON
the static switch SCRs. This causes a load supply break of up to 1 second, which
is an inbuilt feature designed to avoid load damage.
The frequency synchronisation control mechanism is quite complex and effectively based on two nested phase locked loops. The inner loop comprises D6 on
the Inverter Logic Board and the outer loop is functionally provided by the microcontroller, under software control.
4.3.13.2

Frequency sync control and operation


Inverter Logic Board phase-locked-loop (assuming 50Hz operation.)

The phase comparator section of D6 compares the 50Hz output from D1-26,
connected to D6-3, with a frequency reference signal annotated [SYNC> which is
produced by the microcontroller and connected to D6-14 (available at test point
X18-4). If the phase comparator detects any phase difference between these two
signals its output at D6-13 will modify the VCOs frequency in such a way as to
make the frequency divider output at D1-26 match the [SYNC> signal frequency
i.e. the VCO frequency will be modified until the phase comparator within D6
sees no error between these signals, whereupon the circuit can be considered to
be phase-locked. Thus the inverter frequency tracks the [SYNC> signal reference
frequency.
[SYNC> signal generation (assuming 50Hz)

The microcomputer monitors the bypass supply R-phase waveform [VI-A> via a
comparator which extracts its frequency information, [F-INM>. This signal can be
seen at X18-2 as a squarewave coinciding with the bypass supply R-phase zerocrossing points. The Inverter Logic Board frequency dividers 50Hz output (D127) is also monitored and is available at X18-3, annotated [BACKM>.
Under software control, the micro operates on these two signals in the same way
as described above for the Inverter Logic Boards phase-locked-loop. That is, it
performs the phase comparator and VCO functions described above and produces a 50Hz output, [SYNC>, whose absolute frequency is controlled by the detected phase difference between [F-INM> and [BACKM> i.e. the width of the pulse
is directly proportional to the amount of phase difference.
Example of sync control

The overall operation of the synchronisation control circuits can best be explained
by example. Consider the case where the bypass frequency suddenly jumps from
50Hz to 50.5Hz:
1. The micro will sense the jump in bypass frequency through a rise in [F-INM>
to 50.5Hz.
2. The micro will sense a phase error between [F-INM> and [BACKM> due to their
frequency difference and will ramp-up the [SYNC> signal frequency because
it senses that the bypass frequency is higher than that of the inverter.

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3. The phase comparator in the Inverter Logic Boards phase-locked-loop will


see the ramping [SYNC> frequency and detect that it is now higher than the
frequency dividers 50Hz output.
4. The phase comparator error output (pin 13) will call for an increase in VCO
frequency, which will thus increase the frequency divider clock rate and
thereby demand an increased inverter frequency.
5. The two 50Hz outputs from the frequency divider also ramp-up in line with
the inverter frequency and have two affects:
a) The increasing output at D1-26 is fed back to the phase-locked-loop
(D6-3) where it maintains phase-lock i.e. it ties the clock frequency to
the [SYNC> signal and maintains close tracking of this signal.
b) The increasing output from D1-27 is fed back to the microcontroller via
R247 where it allows the phase error function to maintain a close check on
the bypass/inverter frequency and phase relationship.
6. When the inverter frequency has risen to match the 50.5Hz bypass frequency,
and the [F-INM> and [BACKM> signals are in phase:
a) The [SYNC> frequency will stop ramping up and remain at 50.5Hz, synchronised to the bypass supply due to the action of the micro.
b) The VCO clock frequency will remain constant i.e. 290.88kHz
(5760 x 50.5 as 5760 is the divider factor for 50Hz systems).
c) The outputs from D1 pins 26 and 27 will be steady at 50.5Hz and synchronised to the [SYNC> signal.
7. If [SYNC> is synchronised to the bypass supply (6a) and the frequency divider
outputs/inverter are synchronised to the [SYNC> signal (6c) then this results in
the inverter being effectively synchronised to the bypass supply, are required.

Important notes: The above description requires qualification by the following notes.
a) The internal mechanism of the frequency divider chip ties its 50Hz outputs to the zero-crossing points of the R-phase inverter voltage. Thus, as
the micro uses the bypass R-phase supply as its frequency sensing source,
this effectively ensures that the inverter and bypass supplies are synchronised correctly from a phase alignment viewpoint.
b) To aid description the above example assumed that the bypass frequency
underwent a stepped change; however, in practice any change in bypass
frequency is likely to occur gradually: in which case the circuit dynamics
are usually able to maintain a phase-locked condition during the period of
change, resulting in the inverter frequency tracking the bypass frequency
at all times without incurring a detectable phase error.
c) The synchronising window and slew-rate are adjustable and selected
from the Operator Control Panel setup menus. The window defines the
limits to which the inverter is allowed to track the bypass frequency and
normally set to 2%; while the slew-rate defines the maximum permitted rate-of-change of inverter frequency and is usually set to 0.1Hz/s. i.e.
this determines the fastest rate of change of bypass frequency tolerated by
the synchronisation circuit whilst maintaining sync.
If the bypass frequency goes outside the permitted window the inverter
frequency will return to its base frequency and await the mains return

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within the sync window, where-upon it will re-synchronise. An


[INVERTER: OUT OF SYNC] (alarm #35) warning will be displayed
while this situation is in effect.
d) In the event of a bypass supply failure the microcontroller will drive its
[SYNC> output to the centre frequency i.e. 50Hz.
Sync phase adjustment

R247 is connected to a phase-shift circuit on the Inverter Logic Board and provides the means for trimming any error in the phase relationship between the inverter [BACKM> and bypass [F-INM> sense signals once the sync control circuit is
phase-locked due mainly to component tolerances. Therefore, once the inverter
is synchronised this resistor can be adjusted to reduce the residual phase difference between the inverter R-phase output and the bypass R-phase supply.
4.3.13.3

Non-Sync detection and alarm

An alarm condition [SYN-KO> is flagged by the microcontroller when it detects


that the [BACKM> and [F-INM> signals are more than 11 out-of-phase. This is communicated to the Operator Logic Board via the CAN bus and also, via D54-6, to
the I/O interface connector X8-16 where it can be used to provide a remote alarms
indication (sheet 7). [SYN-KO> is high when a non-sync condition is present.
4.3.13.4

External sync inhibit

In certain circumstances it may be necessary to inhibit the synchronisation loop


for example when supplying the UPS from a stand-by generator whose frequency
regulation is poor. This can be achieved by an external input via the I/O connector
X8-11 [BLK-SYN> which is connected to the microcontroller via D60-2. This input
must be taken high to inhibit the synchronisation function (See paragraph
4.3.11.6).
Note: The control can be activated only after being enabled in the Function parameter software setup screen (see paragraph 2.4.7.3 on page 2-43).

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4.3.14

4.3.14.1

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Analogue signal processing


The UPS Logic Board monitors the UPS input voltage, output voltage, inverter
voltage, battery voltage, output current and battery current. These inputs are processed by analogue circuits (sheets 6 & 7) which provide appropriate signals for
the microcomputers A/D input port. In some cases the inputs are also converted
to digital alarm/status signals which are connected to the micro via the data bus.
Bypass voltage signal processing

Figure 20-23: Bypass voltage sensing block diagram


Line-Neut

Line-Line

N6
Buffer

N29
Sum-Amp

3-Phase
Bypass
Volts
Sense

+5V
+2.5V
0V

VIABM
To A/D
Multiplexers
(Display uses)

VIBCM
VICAM
REF-2 (2.5V)

8Vp-p

N29d
Rectifier

[SVI>

To SCR OPEN det.

[SVIM> To A/D Multiplexers


(Bypass volts monitor)

A-Ph

B-Ph

N14
Filter

N14
Filter

[F-IN> To Micro
(sync control - bypass R-ph)

D27
Ph-Seq

[SEQMNS>
To Micro
(Phase Sequence
error detector)

Voltage sensing

The bypass voltage sense signals ([VI-A> - [VI-C>) are developed on the High Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.6) and connected via X2 pins 15, 16, 17
to N6b/c/d which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 5). The signals at N6 outputs therefore equate to approximately 1% of the bypass supply line-neutral voltage (e.g.
2.4Vrms at 240V working) and are connected to several blocks as shown in
Figure 20-23.
Voltage monitoring

N29a-c take the line-to-neutral sense voltages produced by N6 and converts them
into line-to-line sense voltages suitable for connecting to the microcontroller A/D
inputs. Taking N29a as an example; this amplifier differentially sums the [VI-A>
and [VI-B> signals from N6 and produces the [VIABM> L-L signal. However the
amplifier attenuates the resultant signal to about 30% (e.g. 1.38V for 240V working) due to its feedback resistance ratios: also, the non-inverting input is connected to VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage) rather than to the 0V rail, which therefore
applies a 2.5V offset to [VIABM>. Thus in a 240V system working at nominal voltage [VIABM> is approximately 3.9Vp-p centred on a 2.5V reference. This signal
sits well within the microcontrollers A/D 0-5V input level, and is shown connected to the A/D multiplexer circuit (sheet 6).
Note: if the bypass voltage is missing [VIABM> will be 2.5Vdc due to the absence
of any ac signal.

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Bypass frequency and phase sequence monitors

The bypass R-phase signal [VI-A> from N6-14 is connected to a zero-crossing circuit comprising N14a/d which produces a squarewave output [F-IN> at D34-6
which coincides with the R-phase zero-crossing points. This signal is used by the
microcontroller in its frequency synchronisation control (See paragraph
4.3.13.1).
A similar squarewave coinciding with the S-phase is obtained via N14b/c and
buffered by D34-8. These two squarewave signals are connected to a D-type flipflop (D27) which detects their phase relationship. Under normal circumstances
the R-phase signal should lead that of the S-phase; therefore when the rising-edge
R-phase signal clocks D27, its data (D) input should be low, producing a permanent high on its Q output which inverted to a low [SEQMNS> signal at D34-10.
In the event of a phase sequence error, D27 will have a permanent low clocked
through to its Q output and produce a high [SEQMNS> signal.
is connected to the microcontroller via the data bus buffer D28-7
where it flags a phase rotation error [I/P: PHASE ROT.ERROR] alarm #14 (See
paragraph 4.3.11.4).
[SEQMNS>

3-phase voltage monitor

A full-wave, three-phase diode bridge comprising V34-V36 & V40-V42, produces a dc voltage proportional to the full three-phase supply which is fed to N29d.
This amplifier attenuates the signal by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the output at N2-14 is approximately 2.5Vdc at nominal working
voltage. Note that this is a ripple voltage since there is very little capacitance
around the amplifier. Thus if any bypass phase voltage goes out of tolerance (e.g.
10% window) the detector will sense the error. It does not require all three
phases to go outside the error window.
N2-14 provides signals to two other areas: [SVIM> is connected to the microcontroller A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 and used by the
micro to monitor the bypass voltage for a each individual phase (e.g. 10% voltage error); and [SVI> is connected to the circuit (also on sheet 6) which detects an
open circuit static switch SCR.
4.3.14.2

Inverter voltage sensing

Figure 20-24: Inverter voltage sensing block diagram


error detected on individual phase

8Vp-p

2.2Vdc

Line-Neut
3-Phase
Inverter
Volts
Sense

N3a-c
Buffer

N3d
Rectifier

[SVINVM>
To A/D Multiplexers

Voltage sensing

The inverter voltage sense signals ([VINV-A> - [VINV-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.5) and connected via X2 pins 18, 19,
20 to N3a-c which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 5). The signals at N3 outputs
therefore equate to approximately 1% of the inverter line-neutral voltage. A fullwave, three-phase diode bridge produces a dc voltage proportional to the full
three-phase output which is then fed to N3d. This amplifier attenuates the signal

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by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the output at N3-14
is approximately 2.5Vdc at nominal voltage, and connected to the microcontroller
A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6. This is a ripple voltage as
described previously, and is monitored by the inverter voltage error software
function (i.e. 10%).
4.3.14.3

Battery (bus) voltage sensing

Figure 20-25: Battery voltage sensing block diagram


[VBM>
3.25Vdc
@ 446V(bat)

To A/D Multiplexers

N13a
Buffer

[V-B>

N13c
Comparator

[BAT-MA>
DC Overvoltage (Fast)
(set to 620V(bat))

Battery volts monitor

The DC busbar (battery) voltage sense signal [V-B> is developed on the High Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.3) and connected via X2 pin 27 to N13a
which is a unity-gain buffer (sheet 5). The signal sensitivity is set on the High
Voltage Interface Board to approximately 7.3mV per Volt(bat) therefore [VBM> is
about 3.255V at nominal 446V float charge voltage. This signal is connected to
the microcontroller A/D input, via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6, where
it is used by several software functions, such as: display metering; slow DC overvoltage (max 2.4V/cell window); Low Battery warning (1.82V/cell window); End
of Discharge (1.67V/cell window); and % charge/autonomy time algorithms.
DC Overvolts detection (Fast)

is also monitored by N13c, which is configured as a comparator and used


to detect a DC Bus overvoltage condition. N13c has a fixed threshold which operates ([BAT-MA> goes high) when [VBM> reaches approximately 4.45V, which
equates to a DC Bus voltage of around 620Vdc.

[VBM>

[BAT-MA> is connected to the Basic System Control Logic where it trips the bat-

tery circuit breaker, turns off the rectifier and inverter, and trips a latch (See paragraph 4.3.7.1). In an overvoltage situation [DC BUS: FAST OVERV.] alarm
#58 the Basic System Control Logic responds by issuing a high [MBATMA>
signal which flags the micro-controller via data bus buffer D26 (See paragraph
4.3.11.4).
4.3.14.4

Battery current sensing

Figure 20-26: Battery current sensing block diagram


REF-2 (2.5V)

[I-B>

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N13b
Buffer

[IBM>
To A/D Multiplexers

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Battery current monitor

The battery current sense signal [I-B> is developed on the High Voltage Interface
Board (See paragraph 2.3.22) and connected via X2 pin 31 to N13b which has a
gain of approximately1.5 (sheet 5). The signal sensitivity is set on the High Voltage Interface Board by jumper X38 and the output [IBM> is connected to the
micro-controller A/D input via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 where it
is used for display purposes, and % charge and Autonomy Time algorithms.
4.3.14.5

Output voltage sensing

Figure 20-27: Output voltage sensing block diagram


+5V
+2.5V
0V

Line-Line
3-Phase
Output
Volts
Sense

N5
Buffer

N31
Sum-Amp

VOABM
VOBCM
VOCAM
REF-2 (2.5V)

8Vp-p

N15a
Rectifier

[SVI>

To A/D
Multiplexers
(Monitoring &
display)

[SVOM> To A/D Multiplexers


(Critical bus monitor)

N15b-d
Comparator

[SCROPN>
To Micro
(SCR open cct.)

Line-Neut
N30
Buffer

VOAM
VOBM
VOCM

To A/D
Multiplexers
(monitoring & display)

REF-2 (2.5V)

Voltage sensing

The bypass voltage sense signals ([VO-A> - [VO-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.6) and connected via X2 pins 21, 22,
23 to N5a-c which are unity-gain buffers (sheet 6). The signals at N5 outputs
therefore equate to approximately 1% of the output line-neutral voltage (e.g. 2.4V
(8Vp-p) at 240V) and connected to several blocks as shown in Figure 20-27.
Voltage monitoring

The signals from N5a-c are connected to two sets of buffers which provide lineto-neutral and line-to-line monitoring voltages which are connected to the microcontroller A/D inputs via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6 and used for
metering & display purposes.

L-N voltage monitoring. is provided by N38a-c which attenuate the voltage


sense signals by approximately 55% and also applies a 2.5Vdc offset due to the
non-inverting connection being terminated at VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage). At
240V nominal voltage the monitor output signals [VOAM>, [VOBM>, VOCM> are
therefore 1Vrms (2.8Vp-p) centred about a +2.5V reference which sits well within
the microcontrollers A/D 0-5V input level.
Note: if the output voltage is missing [VOAM> etc. will be 2.5Vdc due to the absence of any ac signal.

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L-L voltage monitoring. is provided by N31a-c. Taking N31a as an example;


this amplifier differentially sums the A and B phase signals from N5 and produces
the [VOABM> L-L signal. However, the amplifier attenuates the resultant signal by
about 70% (e.g. 1.38V for 240V working) due to its feedback resistance ratios:
also, as with the L-N circuit described above, the non-inverting input is connected
to VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage) rather than to the 0V rail, which applies a 2.5V
offset to [VOABM>. Thus in a 240V system working at nominal voltage [VOABM>
is approximately 3.9Vp-p centred on a 2.5V reference.
3-phase voltage monitor

A full-wave, three-phase diode bridge comprising V29-V31 etc, produces a dc


voltage proportional to the full output three-phase supply which is fed to N15a.
This amplifier attenuates the signal by 55% due to the values of the feedback resistors; therefore the [SVOM> output at N15-1 will be approximately 2.5Vdc at
nominal working voltage. Note that this is a ripple voltage since there is very little
capacitance around the amplifier. [SVOM> is connected to the microcontroller Ato-D inputs via the multiplexer circuit shown on sheet 6. This is used by the
micro-controller as a critical bus voltage error monitor (factory set to 10%) for
transfer functions.
Open Circuit Static Switch SCR detection

As shown in Figure 20-27, the output voltage (3-phase) sense signal [SVOM> and
bypass voltage (3-phase) sense signal [SVI> are both connected to the Static
Switch SCR open circuit detector.
4.3.14.6

Output current sensing

Figure 20-28: Output sensing block diagram


REF-2 (2.5V)

3-Phase
Output
Current
Sense

N4a-c
Buffer

N4d
Sum-amp

[IOAM>
[IOBM>
[IOCM>

[IONM>
To A/D Multiplexers
(Overload & Timers)

(Display Metering)

Output current monitor

The UPS output current sense signals ([IO-A> - [IO-C>) are developed on the High
Voltage Interface Board (See paragraph 2.3.19) and connected via X2 pins 32,
33, 34 to N4a-c which attenuate the sense signals by approximately 75% and also
applies a 2.5Vdc offset due to the non-inverting connection being terminated at
VREF-2 (2.5V reference voltage). The output signals [IOAM> etc. are connected to
the microcontroller A/D inputs via the multiplexer circuit, and the 2.5V offset is
sufficient to make the a.c. current signal sit within the 0-5V A/D input voltage
range. These signals are by the micros overload algorithm (i.e. 150% for 1
minute, 125% for 10 minutes, 110% for 1 hour, 101% for 9 hours. They also represent the values shown on the Operator Control Panel Measurements display
screen.

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N4d calculates the neutral current by differentially summing the three line currents in a balanced three phase system the algebraic sum of the currents should
equal zero, thus if the system is unbalanced then the amount of imbalance represent the current flowing in the neutral path. The neutral current signal [IONM> is
also subject to the 2.5V offset and applied to the microcontroller A/D inputs via
the multiplexers in the same way as the line current signals.
4.3.14.7

Analogue signal monitoring multiplexers

The microcontroller has ten A/D inputs ([AN0> to [AN9>).


[AN6> to [AN9> are fed by

fixed inputs signal sources; however, [AN0> to [AN5>


are fed via a series of multiplexers which allow the micro to select from various
signal sources. Three type 4052 multiplexers are used for this purpose, each addressed by two signals ([SELANA> and [SELANB>) produced by the microcontroller via data bus buffer D9 (See paragraph 4.3.12.4). Sheet 6 contains the
multiplexer circuit and illustrates the various monitored signals connected to their
data pins (See Appendix A.3). The multiplexers are inhibited if the -12V power
supply monitor detects an undervoltage by applying a logic high [FL-12-> to the
multiplexer inhibit inputs (pin 6) (See paragraph 4.3.15.3).
Note: the inputs annotated [T1> - [T4> are temperature sensing inputs refer to the
High Voltage Interface Board description (See paragraph 2.3.12).
Note: the micro can access the A/D signals in parallel and where necessary can
calculate values for the display e.g. kW = V x I.

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)
Section 20:

4.3.15
4.3.15.1

Power supplies
General description and voltage regulators

The UPS Logic Board 12V power supply rails are provided from two parallel
sources and will be available if either source is live. The first source is from the
Rectifier Logic Board, which is itself powered from the AC-DC Power Supply
and available whenever the UPS input (rectifier) supply is live (see paragraph 2.1
on page 3-5); the second if from the Inverter Logic Board, which is powered from
the DC-DC Power Supply and is available whenever the rectifier is working or
the batteries are connected to the DC Busbar (see paragraph 3.1 on page 3-7).
From the UPS Logic Board the 12V supplies are passed directly to all the remaining circuit boards and the communications port etc.
4.3.15.2

Reference voltage generators

Several devices require a stable +5V power supply which is provided by a simple
3-terminal +5V regulator (N1), shown on sheet 7.
In addition to the +5V power supply rail, there are also two reference voltage generators on the circuit board. One generates a regulated +5V, [VREF>, from the
+12V line and the other generates a regulated 2.5V output, [VREF-2>, from the
+5V supply rail. These reference voltages are used in conjunction with the microcontrollers A/D analogue inputs and are shown on sheet 5 of the circuit diagram.
+5V reference voltage [VREF>

This provides a stable power supply for the A/D converters within the micro
which is necessary for them to maintain their conversion accuracy.
2.5V reference voltage [VREF-2>

The micro-controllers internal A/D converters operate on stable 0V and +5V


power rails, as described above. Therefore if an AC signal is to be monitored (e.g.
bypass voltage), or a positive-and-negative going DC signal (e.g. battery current),
then a 2.5V offset is required shift the 0V point of the monitored signal into the
centre of the A/D converters input working range. This enables the A/D circuit
to convert both halves of an AC waveform and both positive and negative transitions of a dc signal voltage.
4.3.15.3

-12V undervoltage detector

Comparator N45a (sheet 5) serves as a -12V supply rail monitor and detects when
the -12V is less than approximately -9.8V. The operating threshold for this circuit
is set by V70 which applies a zener referenced voltage across R242/243 from the
+12V rail and under normal conditions sets N45-3 at about 1.86V. The -12V rail
is monitored via a resistor divider (R240/241) which is fixed at +3V at one end by
V70.
Due to the chosen resistor ratios, the voltage at N45-2 rises above 1.86V when the
-12V rail is less than -9.8V, at which point N45-1 switches low and produces a
logic high [FL-12-> signal and low [FL-12>.
When [FL-12> goes low it inhibits the back-up battery voltage sense signal to the
microcontroller via D44, as shown on diagram sheet 2 (See paragraph 4.3.4).
When [FL-12-> goes high is disables the microcontrollers A/D input multiplexers,
as shown on sheet 6 (See paragraph 4.3.14.7).

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)
4.3.15.4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

+12V undervoltage detector

Comparator N45b (sheet 5) serves as a +12V supply monitor. The operating


threshold for this circuit is set by [VREF-2> which applies a stabilised +2.5V to
N45-6, at about 1.86V. The +12V rail is monitored via a resistor divider (R246/
245/R244) which pulls the input to N45-5 below the 2.5V threshold when the
+12V rail fall below the 9.8V level. When this occurs the output at N45-7 switches from high to low which is reflected at D57-8 and the resulting low [PFO> flag
resets the microcontroller via its non-maskable interrupt (NMI) (See paragraph
4.3.2). The micro jumps to a save data subroutine as the supply rails are crashing.

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4.3.16

SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

External communications
RS232 communications

In addition to the bi-directional communication facility with the Operator Logic


Board via the CAN Bus, the microcontroller can also be accessed externally via
a standard RS232 communications connection (X9). This is designed to be used
with a portable computer for diagnostic, calibration and configuration purposes.
Communication takes place through D16 which is a standard RS232 line driver/
receiver connected to the micro via [TXO0> and [RXO0>, as shown on sheet 7 (See
Appendix A.6).
RS-485 Parallel control communications

An RS485 communications facility is also shown on sheet 7, based around D58


(See Appendix A.5). The differential I/O bus of this device (pins 6 & 7) is connected to the Parallel Logic Board via X7 ([TXRX+>, [TXRX->).

Transmit mode. the transmit mode is enabled when [DE485> is high, whereupon the [TXDI> data from the microcontroller, applied to D58 pin 4, passes through
the device and drives its differential outputs as described in appendix A.5. Note
that X32 should be made in order to connect the bus termination resistor (R250)
across the transmission line to present the correct impedance to the differential
outputs.

Receive mode. the receive mode is enabled when [RE485-> is taken low, whereupon the data on the differential I/O bus is converted into a data-stream and connected to the microcontroller via [RXDI>.

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4.3.17

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

On board 7-segment indications summary


The following table provides a summary of the alarm codes indicated on the two
7-segment LEDs together with their alarm interpretations and associated Operator
Panel audible and visible alarm annunciations. Note that there is no on-screen
alarm history facility, but where two (or more) alarms are active simultaneously
the associated codes will be displayed in a cyclic fashion at 1 second intervals
Note: Where the fault LED state is annotated (*) this indicates that the alarm is
latched and must be reset using S1 on the UPS Logic Board

CODE

Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

01

[ NORMAL OPERATION ]

OFF

OFF

02

[ BYPASS BREAKER OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

03

[ OUTPUT BREAKER OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

04

[ RECTIF. BREAKER OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

05

[ BATTERY BREAKER OPEN ]

Continuous

ON

06

[ ON MANUAL BYPASS ]
Manual bypass breaker closed

Pulsed

Flashing

10

[ I/P: ABSENT ]
Bypass supply absent i.e. <50V

Intermittent

Flashing

11

[ I/P: OVER LIMITS ]


Bypass supply over voltage
upper limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

12

[ I/P: UNDER LIMITS ]


Bypass supply under voltage
lower limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

13

[ I/P: FREQUENCY ERROR]


Bypass supply over/under freq
window limit set via mimic menu

Intermittent

Flashing

14

[ I/P: PHASE ROT. ERROR ]


Bypass phase rotation error

Continuous

ON

15

[ I/P: SCR CUTOFF ]


Bypass SCR open circuit

Continuous

ON *

16

[ BYPASS INHIBIT ]
Bypass supply blocked
hardware block on UPS Logic Board

Pulsed

Flashing

17

[ BYPASS INHIBIT REM. ]


Bypass blocked via operator menu

Pulsed

Flashing

18

[ LOAD ON BYPASS ]

Intermittent

Flashing

19

[ BYPASS OVERTEMPERAT. ]
Static bypass overtemperature
warning

Continuous

ON

20

[ RECTIFIER: OFF ]
Software block via micro

Intermittent

Flashing

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

21

[ RECTIFIER: OFF REM. ]


Rectifier blocked via operator menu

Pulsed

Flashing

22

[ RECTIFIER: BLOCK ]
Hardware block via UPS Logic Board

Continuous

ON

23

[ RECTIFIER: I/P LIMIT ]


Rectifier input current limit

Intermittent

Flashing

24

[ RECTIFIER: OVERTEMP. ]
Rectifier overtemperature

Continuous

ON

25

[ RECTIFIER: FUSE FAIL ]


Input fuse failure (F10,F11,F12)

Continuous

ON

30

[ INVERTER: OFF ]
Software block via micro

Intermittent

Flashing

31

[ INVERTER: OFF REM. ]


Inverter blocked via operator menu

Intermittent

Flashing

32

[ INVERTER: BLOCK ]
Hardware block via UPS Logic Board

Continuous

ON

33

[ INVERTER: CURR. LIMIT ]


Inverter 150% current limit active

Continuous

ON

34

[ INVERTER: OVERTEMP. ]
Inverter overtemperature

Continuous

ON

35

[ INVERTER:OUT OF SYNC ]
Inverter unsynchronised to bypass
warning

Intermittent

Flashing

36

[ INVERTER: OVERVOLTA. ]
Inverter overvolts warning

Continuous

ON

37

[ INVERTER: UNDERVOLTA. ]
Inverter undervolts warning

Continuous

ON

38

[ INVERTER: FUSE FAIL ]


Inverter fuse failure

Continuous

ON

39

[ OUTPUT: OVERVOLTAGE ]
Inverter overvoltage trip
critical bus overvoltage trip to bypass

Continuous

ON

40

[ OUTPUT: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Critical bus undervoltage trip to
bypass level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

41

[ OUTPUT: NO VOLTAGE ]
UPS in off-line mode

Continuous

ON

42

[ OUTPUT: WRONG W.FORM ]


Critical bus peak voltage error

Continuous

ON

43

[ INVERTER: WRONG FREQ ]


lnverter frequency error
inverter frequency window is twice
the bypass window

Continuous

ON

CODE

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

44

[ INVERTER: SEL. BLOCK ]


Paralleling current error

Continuous

ON *

50

[ BATTERY: UNDER TEST ]


Battery test in operation

Pulsed

OFF

51

[ BATTERY: TEST FAILED ]


Battery test has failed

Intermittent

Flashing *

52

[ BATTERY: DISCHARGING ]
Battery is discharging

Intermittent

Flashing

53

[ BATTERY: E.O.D. ]
Battery end_of_discharge trip
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

54

[ MAX.DUR.BOOST CHARGE ]
Boost charge period expired

Pulsed

Flashing

55

[ DC BUS: OVERVOLTAGE ]
DC slow overvolts warning
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON *

56

[ DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE ]
Low battery warning
level set via mimic menu

Continuous

ON

57

[ BATTERY: FUSE FAIL ]


Battery fuse (F13) failure

Continuous

ON

58

[ DC BUS: FAST OVERVOLT. ]


Fast dc overvoltage
fixed at 620V

Continuous

ON *

60

[ BYPASS OVERUSE ]
Transfer counter exceeded
i.e. >8 transfers in 1 minute

Continuous

ON *

61

[ CUT-OFF: OVERLOAD ]
Overload timer expired

Continuous

ON *

62

[ CUT-OFF: OVERTEMPER. ]
Overtemperature timer expired

Continuous

ON *

63

[ CUT-OFF: EMERGENCY ]
Emergency power-off activated

Continuous

ON *

66

[ OVERLOAD ]
Overload present (warning)

Continuous

ON

67

[ CUT-OFF: OVERLOAD ]
Overload timer expired

Continuous

ON *

70

[ BAD EEPROM PROGRAM. ]


Start-up error use mimic reset

Pulsed

ON

CODE

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Display Alarm Messages


(Correct Meaning)

Audible Alarm
(Operator Panel)

FAULT LED (red)


(Operator Panel)

71

[ ERR. LRC PARAM.PAG1 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

72

[ ERR. LRC PARAM.PAG2 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

73

[ ERR. LRC PARAM.PAG3 ]


Incorrect display variable

Pulsed

ON

74

[ ERR LRC ALARM HIST. ]


Alarm History buffer error

Pulsed

ON

75

[ ERR LRC EVENT HIST. ]


Alarm History buffer error

Pulsed

ON

76

[ BACK-UP BATTERY LOW ]


Internal PCB ni-cad battery Low

Pulsed

ON

80

[ ERROR LRC TABLE ]

81

[ ERROR LRC PANEL ]

82

[ MODEM WRONG CONFIG. ]

83

[ ERROR LRC ALARM MEM. ]

84

[ MODEM NO RESPONSE ]
Modem incorrectly connected

85

[ MODEM FALSE COMMAND ]


Modem incorrectly configured

86

[ MODEM TIMEOUT TRASM. ]


Modem baud-rate error

87

[ CAN BUS NO RESPONSE ]


UPS-to-display not connected

88

[ AUTONOMY XXXX min ]


Battery autonomy time

CODE

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CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

4.4

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Summary information
Table 20-16: UPS Logic Board configuration jumpers
Jumper

Link
Position

X11

NO LINK
1-2

X12

X13

X14

X15

X16

X17

X19

X20

X21

X22

X23

20-426

OPEN

Function
Disable RS232 port (standard)
Enable RS232 port
(standard)

1-2

Not Required

3-4

Not Required

1-2

EPROM Enable

2-3

RAM Enable (standard)

1-2

Not Required

3-4

Not Required

5-6

Not Required

7-8

Not Required

1-2

PLL option with CAP IN

2-3

PLL option with FIN AUX

OPEN

Testing only
normally
open

(standard)

CAN Bus to display disabled

1-2

CAN Bus to display enabled (standard)

1-2

ALE enable data save

2-3

Power supply fail enable data save (standard)

1-2

EPROM II enable (not required)

2-3

RAM II enable (not required)

1-2

+5V PCB enables microprocessor ref. For VA calculations


(standard)

2-3

V ref. enables microprocessor ref. For VA calculations

1-2

Not Required

2-3

RAM enable (standard)

1-2

EPROM enable (standard)

2-3

Not Required

1-2

Not Required

2-3

EPROM enable (standard)

3-4

Not Required

4-5

Not Required

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 4 - UPS Logic Board (4550004 E)

Jumper

Link
Position

X24

1-2

RAM enable (standard)

2-3

EPROM enable (not required)

3-4

RAM enable (standard)

4-5

EPROM enable (not required)

1-2

Manual reset of output buffers

2-3

Microprocessor reset of output buffers (standard)

1-2

Open (Standard)
Auto-transfer mode enabled (on-line operation).
Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter when the
inverter is available i.e. the inverter is the preferred supply
source.
Closed
Manual-transfer mode enabled (off-line operation).
Automatic load transfer from bypass to inverter only when
the bypass is unavailable i.e. the bypass is the preferred
supply source. Note: there will be a 3-cycle break on transfer to inverter.

3-4

Open
Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor disabled.
Closed (Standard)
Inverter voltage fail lockout monitor enabled. i.e. The
inverter is given 5 seconds to reach nominal voltage otherwise it is latched OFF.

5-6

Open (Standard)
Enables the Event History monitor to store up to a maximum of 10 alarms.
Closed
Resets the Event History monitor. Note: After the 10th
event, the monitor buffer is full an cannot store any further
events. The buffer should be reset to 0 after each maintenance or commissioning to enable new events to be captured.

7-8

Open (Standard)
Password protection enabled
Closed
Password protection disabled

X25

X26

X28

OPEN
CLOSED

X29

OPEN
1-2

X31

OPEN
1-2

X32

OPEN
1-2

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Function

Power up reset enabled (standard)


Power up reset disabled
2.5V power supply monitor enabled (standard)
2.5V power supply monitor disabled
Internal battery disabled
Internal battery installed and charger enabled (standard)
RS485 port disabled
RS485 port enabled (standard)

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Table 20-17: UPS Logic Board potentiometer adjustment


Potentiometer

Function

R209

5 volt reference adjustment. Check at X20 pin 1

R212

2.5 volt reference adjustment. Check at anode of V45

Table 20-18: UPS Logic Board LED indication

20-428

LED

Colour

H1

Red

Function
Internal battery charger operating

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Section 7:

Chapter 5 - Operator Logic Board

5.1

Chapter overview
This chapter contains a circuit description of the Operator Logic Board used
across the entire 7200 Series UPS model range, and should be read in conjunction
with circuit diagram SE-4550005-F (4 pages).
Signal annotations shown on the circuit diagrams are shown in italics in the following text e.g. [CLKOUT>. Where a signal is active low it is followed by a negating symbol e.g. [RSTD->

5.2
5.2.1

General description
Circuit board functions
The Operator Logic Board provides a microprocessor-controlled interface between the Operator Control Panel and the microcontroller-based UPS control
system on the UPS Logic Board. Its primary functions can be summarised as follows:
Display indication
The UPS Logic Board provides the Operator Logic Board with data pertaining to various system operating parameters which are converted to a
format suitable for driving the Operator Control Panel LCD display.
Operator input
The Operator Control Panel switches are monitored by the Operator Logic
Board which converts any switch operation into a format understood by
the UPS Logic Board.
External communications options
The Operator Logic Board provides several external communications
facilities for use with remote alarm/control stations.
Connector X8 provides a two-way RS232 read/write control port.
Connector X5 provides a one-way RS232 read only control port.
Connector X5 provides a one-way RS485 read only control port.
The board also contains an RS232/modem interface which can be used for
diagnostic purposes.
Isolated power supply
An isolated power supply is contained on the Operator Logic Board which
is used by the circuits associated with the communications facilities. Internal communications between the Operator Logic Board and the UPS
Logic Board is by means of a CAN bus (Controller Area Networking).
Power supply isolation increases noise immunity and helps avoid spurious
data transfer between the micro-computer systems contained on each
board.

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CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board

5.2.2

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Input/Output connections
Figure 7-29: Operator Logic Board connections
RS232
Modem
Facility
(read/write)

RS232
Comms
(Reserved)
(read only)

RS485
Comms
Facility
(read only)

X8

X5

X4

Operator Logic Board


X1

X9

X2
Isolated
power supply
feed

X4
Operator
Panel

CAN Bus

X6
UPS Logic Board

The Operator Logic Board has six connectors (See Figure 7-29) whose connections are summarised below.
X1 Connection to the Operator Control Panel
X2 System control and monitoring signals to/from the UPS Logic
Board. This connection takes the form of a serial data link (CAN Bus).
X4 Standard RS485 comms port (read only)
X5 Standard RS232 comms port (read only)
X8 Standard RS232 comms port/modem interface available for external
control/monitoring/diagnostics facilities (read/write)
X9 Control power supplies (12V) from the system control power rails
via the UPS Logic Board.

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D19

D20

RS232
Read
Only

RS485
Read
Only

X23

D2 = 80C166

P3

P5

P1

P4

P0

20MHz
Clock

AX

Switches

LEDS

DX

Ds

s
he
itc
Sw

LE

ROM

Display
Latch

R21
Contrast
Adjustment

Serial
Decode
D11

Address Bus or Data Bus

RAM

CAN D12
Decode

LEDs
Bar Gr
Switch
Charac
X1

RS232
Port X8
Read/
Write

CAN Bus

5.2.3

Data

Horn

Reset
Power
X26

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control
CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board

Block Diagram
Figure 7-30: Operator Logic Board basic block diagram

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CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board
5.2.3.1

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

System overview
Processor system

The Operator Logic Board control system is based on a type 80C166 microcontroller, as shown in Figure 7-30. This device, which is identical to that used on the
UPS Logic Board, contains six configureable ports through which it communicates with peripheral circuits/devices, together with several system control
lines. It also contains several internal A/D converters, four programmable timers
and internal ROM (32k) and RAM (1k).
The ports are configured by an initialisation routine performed by the system software on power-up and can be summarised as follows.
Port 0
Port 0 is configured as a multiplexed Data/Address bus and is connected
to both the Address and Data bus ports of the peripheral devices through a
series of controlled latches, providing an 8-bit data bus <DX0...DX7> or 16bit address bus <AX0...AX15>.
Port 1
This is configured as a 16-bit output port. Its primary outputs, [LD1> to
[LD9> drive the Operator Control Panel LEDs. Other outputs provide the
LCD display read and write control signals and chip select signals for
the RS485 communications port device.
Port 2
Three lines of this port are used in conjunction with the CAN serial data
controller. For reasons of clarity this port is not shown in Figure 7-30.
Port 3
This port is configured to work with the internal timers and is used to control the RS232 and RS485 access, and also the audible warning sounder
associated with the UPS Alarms annunciation.
Port 4
The lower two lines only are utilised on port 4. These provide the upper
two address lines <A16...A17> the lower address lines <A0...A15> are provided by port 0. These lines, which do not pass through the selectable
buffers used by the lower 16 address lines, are always available and used
as inputs by the address decoding which produce the chip select signals
used by the various peripheral devices.
Port 5
The lower five lines of this port <P5-0...P5-4> monitor the Operator Control Panel switches and detects their operation.
System control lines
In addition to the I/O ports, the microcontroller also has a control bus with
I/O lines generally associated with a microprocessor-based system; such
as a system clock, reset, address latch enable, power reset and Read/Write
control. These are connected to the peripheral devices where required.
Memory

The microcontroller uses both internal and external memory; 256k of RAM and
256k of EPROM are fitted to the board as standard and holds the system operating
software. Facilities are included on the board to allow alternative memory configurations to be used as described later.

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board

Data/Address latch & buffers

The 16-bit data/address bus is connected to the various peripheral devices and
boards via input and output data latches/buffers, as shown in Figure 7-30. These
buffers are controlled by individual chip select select lines to direct the data flow
to/from the appropriate source, as required by the system control software.

5.3
5.3.1

Detailed circuit description


Introduction
The Operator Logic Board circuit diagram (SE-4550005-F) comprises 4 sheets.
With reference to the block diagram description, the drawings can broadly be described as follows:
Sheet 1 contains a signal map identifying the functions covered on the
remaining pages. It also contains a summary chart detailing the various
configuration jumpers (X11 X25).
Sheet 2 contains the switched-mode isolated power supply circuit.
Sheet 3 contains the
basic microcontroller system.
data bus, address bus and control bus buffers.
address decoding.
system RAM and ROM memory and its associated configuration links.
power-up reset generator.
Sheet 4 contains the
CAN bus communications drivers and control logic.
RS232 (modem) communications interface.
RS485 communications interface.
Operator Control Panel interface.
As with all micro-based system, the microcontrollers operation is determined by
the program held in the systems memory and, as this is hidden to the service engineer, there is very little that can be done to ascertain that the board is working
correctly apart from checking the validity of its input and output signals, and other
signals generated on the board which are required by the central processor system.
The following description deals with the board on this basis, and should provide
sufficient information to allow a troubleshooting engineer to determine whether
or not the board is functioning correctly. A detailed software description is
beyond the scope of this manual.

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CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board

5.3.2

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Basic microcontroller system


(circuit diagram sheet 2)
Figure 7-31: Micro system control signals
Power Supply

20

Reset

27

+5V Vref

54

XTAL1

ALE

RSTIN

RSTOUT

VAREF

D2

Caution

RD
WR

25

Address latch enable

28

Reset Out

26

Read

95

Write

Control Bus

Clock

When monitoring the signals described in this section it is best done with control
power only i.e. with the UPS power sections shut down and the circuit boards
live via the control power supply. Some signals are irregular, or have very large
mark:space ratios, and are best monitored with a logic probe. The logic sequence/timing of these signals depend upon various circuit conditions and cannot
therefore be accurately defined; however, for field test purposes, the presence of
a variable switching logic signal at these points would generally indicate that the
basic processor control bus is serviceable and the system software is running.
Power supply

The microcontroller is powered from the isolated +5V rail which is provided by
a switched-mode power supply circuit shown on diagram sheet 2 (See paragraph
5.3.12).
System clock (XTAL1)

A dedicated crystal-controlled clock generator (E2) provides a system clock


signal which is connected to the microcontroller pin 20. This signal is a 20MHz
squarewave switching between +5V and 0V.
System reset (RSTIN)

A one second logic low reset pulse, [RSTIN->, is applied to D42 pin 27 on powerup from the reset generator circuit. This can also be manually applied for troubleshooting purposes by bridging and un-bridging jumper X26.
Reset out (RSTOUT)

is controlled by the reset input signal, [RSTIN->, and goes high while the
input rest signal is applied. This signal is synchronised to the system clock and
returns high an integral number of clock pulses after the input reset signal is removed. The [RSTO-> signal is connected to the address decoder circuit from
where it resets the peripheral devices.

[RSTO->

That is, upon receipt of the wake-up request ([RSTIN->) the microprocessor
issues a wake-up call ([RSTO->) to all the other relevant devices.

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Reference voltage (VAREF)

The input to D2 pin 54 (VAREF) is a reference voltage used by the internal A/D
converters; however, in this application the A/D circuits are not used and this
input is connected directly to the general +5V supply rail.
Address latch enable (ALE)

When the multiplexed Address/Data bus (port 0) carries Address information this
output goes high. This is used to control the address bus buffers as described
below.
Read (RD)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to read the data from the device
or memory location currently addressed by the address bus.
Write (WR)

This output goes low when the processor wishes to write data to the device or
memory location currently addressed by the address bus
5.3.3

Data bus, address bus and control bus buffers


(circuit diagram sheet 3.)
Overview

As described above, the microcontrollers Port 0 acts as a multiplexed 16-bit Address/Data bus. When this bus carries Address information the [ALE> output goes
high to enable the address bus latches (D5 and D6) whose buffered outputs are
then treated as a 16-bit address bus [AX0...AX15>. Conversely, when [ALE> is low
the bus information is interpreted as Data and connected to the peripheral devices
via an 8-bit data bus latch (D7) in conjunction with the read [RD-> control line.
Address bus buffer

Two 74HCT573 devices serve as the address buffers (D5 & D6) these are described in Appendix A (See appendix A.4).
In this application the Output Enable pins are connected to a permanent logic low
(0V) and the devices are therefore permanently enabled. The Address/Data bus
contents are thus transferred to the buffers output when the Address Latch Enable
[ALE> signal, connected to D5/D6 pin 11, goes high.
The buffered address bus is annotated (AX0....AX15) and is shown connected to
the ROM (D8) and RAM (D9) memory. It is also connected to the peripheral devices shown on the circuit diagram sheet 4.
Data bus buffer

A type 74HCT245 octal bus transceiver (D7) is employed as bi-directional buffer


between the microcontroller (D0....D7) and the data bus (DX0....DX7).
The data direction through D7 is controlled by the microcontrollers [RD-> output.
Thus, when the microcontroller drives its [RD-> output low it sets the data direction from B to A through the buffers (See appendix A.1), which allows the data
bus contents through to the microcontrollers data inputs. At other times, when
[RD-> is high, data flows through the buffers from A to B, allowing the micro to
place data onto the data bus which can then be written to a peripheral circuit as
required.

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Control bus buffer (diagram sheet 4)

Two 74HCT245 devices serve as the control bus buffers (D18 & D17). These are
identical to the data bus buffer but have a fixed data direction (A-to-B) as pin 1 is
permanently connected to +5V in each case. D17 interfaces the tactile switches
(ENTER, UP, DOWN) and the three mimic LEDs on the Operator Control Panel.
D18 deals with the 6-segment bargraphs (%load & autonomy time) and the control bus [RD> and [WR-> signals. The buffered control signals [RDX-> and [WRX->,
are used by various devices distributed throughout the circuit diagrams.
In all cases the above mentioned buffers have pull-up resistors connected to their
input and output pins to protect their internal logic e.g. resistor packs R52 - R54.
5.3.4

Reset generator
(circuit diagram sheet 3.)
A purpose-designed Supply Voltage Supervisor (N4) provides the micro with a
one second logic low [RSTIN-> reset signal on power-up. This logic low pulse,
which is applied to the micro pin 27, can also be initiated manually by making
jumper X26 (1-2). It also sends a logic high reset signal [RSTO-> to the address
decoding circuit (D10) from where it resets the peripheral devices via their appropriate chip select or chip enable inputs (See paragraph 5.3.6).
Note: the reset time is determined by R4/C1, and begins when the +5V supply rail
reaches 3.6V on initial power-up.

5.3.5

Alarm buzzer
(circuit diagram sheet 3.)
The alarm buzzer is driven by the processors port 3.0 output via driver transistor
V11. Various alarm sound sequences are used to annunciate different types of
alarm warning and responses. These are obtained by the processor producing various mark:space drive waveforms and are therefore strictly processor dependant.
During troubleshooting the alarm sounder can be inhibited by fitting a jumper to
X23 (1-2) which clamps the base of V11 to 0V and prevents it from turning on.

5.3.6

Address decoding D10


(circuit diagram sheet 3.)
The microcontroller communicates with

the system memory RAM and ROM (D8 and D9).


the Operator Control Panel via connector X1.
the UPS Logic Board via D12 and the CAN Bus.
the Serial Line Controller (D11) which interfaces with the RS232 and
RS485 communications facilities.
Under the control of the micro, the address decoding circuit (D10) produces individual enable signals for each of the above mentioned devices which allows
the micro to select a particular device with which it wishes to communicate at any
point in time.
D10 is a purpose-designed ASIC chip which decodes address lines AX11...AX17
together with the control bus [RD->, [WR-> and [RSTO-> lines, and from these
inputs it provides the following controlled signals:
logic low selects the EPROM memory chip (D8).
[CSRAM-> logic low selects the RAM memory chip (D9).

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[CSCAN-> logic low selects the CAN bus interface (D12 on sheet 4).
[CSER-> logic low selects the Serial Line Controller (D11 on sheet 4).
[CSDISP-> logic low selects the Operator Control Panel (X1 on sheet 4).

Buffered AX16 and AX17 address bus lines.

System RAM and ROM memory addressing


(Refer to diagram sheet 3.)
Figure 7-32: AX14 & AX15 decoding configuration links
X14
[WRX->
[PIN31EP>

X19

[AX15>

X15

[PIN3EP>

X18

X16
[RDX->
[PIN29EP>
[AX14>
+5V

[AX17>

[PIN3RAM>

X17

X12

[PIN3EP>

[PIN31RAM>

[PIN29RAM>

X13

D9 pin 28

The system memory comprises a 256k EPROM (D8) and 256k of RAM (D9).
AX14 & AX15 configuration links

The Operator Logic Board has been designed to ease future software upgrades by
including configuration links to permit the addressing of alternative memory devices. These links affect the routing of the AX15 and AX16 address lines, and the
standard configuration is shown in Figure 7-32.

EPROM (D8) Configuration. In the standard configuration the signals annotated [PIN29EP> and [PIN3EP> are connected to EPROM D8s A14 and A15 inputs
and are therefore driven by the AX14 and AX15 address lines respectively. The
[PIN31EP> input to D8 is concerned with selecting the program mode, and is left
open circuit due to the lack of jumper on X14. [PIN30EP> is held at a permanent
+5V (due to the jumper 2-3) on X12.

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Two conditions must be satisfied to connect the devices D0....D7 outputs to the
data bus. First, the EPROMs output enable pin (pin 24), which is controlled by
the control bus [RDX->, must be low. Second, the chip select (CS) input to pin
22, which is connected to the buffered [AX16> address line obtained from D10,
must also be low. Note that [AX16> is not subject to the [ALE> signal switching
through D5/D6 and is therefore permanently accessible by the processor.

RAM (D9) Configuration. In the standard configuration the signals annotated


[PIN29RAM> and [PIN3RAM>

are connected to the RAMs A14 and A15 inputs.

[PIN29RAM> is not used and is open-circuit due to the lack of jumper fitted to X17
pin 2. [PIN3RAM> is connected to the buffered Address line [AX14> due to the
jumpers on X18 and X17

Once again, two conditions must be satisfied to connect the devices D0....D7 outputs to the data bus. First, the RAMs output enable pin (pin 22), which is controlled by the control bus [RDX->, must be low. Second, the chip select (CS)
input to pin 20, which is connected to the [CSRAM-> output from D10, must also
be low.
5.3.8

Interface to the Operator Control Panel


(circuit diagram sheet 4 see also drawing SM-0360803-B sheets 2/3.)
The Operator Control Panel is connected to X1 and its interface signals can be
segregated into three areas; namely LED Driver; LCD Driver; and Push-button
Detection each of which is described below.
LED Driver

Multiplexed power supplies. The operator control panel contains 17 leds arranged in three banks two banks of 6 led and one bank of 5 leds. The anodes
of all the leds forming a particular bank are connected, via current limiting resistors, to a common +5V power supply; therefore three supplies are required in
total. Referring to the diagram sheet 4, these supplies are obtained by three multiplexed signals ([LD7>, [LD8>, [LD9>) which are produced by the microcontroller
and then buffered by D17 and transistors V12-V14 to provide [LC0>, [LC1>, [LC2>.
These transistors are thus switched sequentially (i.e. strobed) to provide the
positive power feed to each bank of leds in turn.

LED Control. Each bank of leds are controlled by a common control bus produced by the microcontroller annotated [LD1> to [LD6>. These signals are buffered
by D18 and connected X1 as [LD0> to [LD5>. As the micro strobes the positive
supply to each bank of leds it drives its control bus lines low to illuminate a
particular led within the bank. By driving the leds in this manner the micro has
full control over which leds are illuminated.
Note: the positive supply is strobed at a rate of 83.3Hz and therefore the leds do
not appear to flicker when illuminated.
LCD Driver

The LCD Display device on the Operator Control Panel displays 4 lines of twenty
characters and is used to indicate status information, alarm warning messages and
also provides the messaging system used by the operator to select various operational parameters.
The textual message information is stored in the Operator Logic Boards ROM
and output to the Operator Control Panel by the microcontroller, via the data bus

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[DX0> to [DX7>, at convenient intervals in a suitable form which can be interpreted


by LCD display device.

As the microcontroller sees the LCD device as just another device on the data
bus it must also provide a means of addressing it when required. This is achieved
through a combination of the [CSDISP> chip select signal from the address decoding circuit of D10 (See paragraph 5.3.6) and a Write signal [RWDISP> produced directly by the processor port 1. To access the LCD display [CSDISP> must
be taken high and [RWDISP> low.
Note: A reset signal [RSDISP> is also produced by the micro port 1 which can totally reset the LCD display device.
Other lines connected to the LCD device are concerned with its power supply requirements. The device requires +5V at X1-32; 0V at X1-30 and X1-2; and a variable contrast supply in the range 0V to +5V at X1-4.
Push-button Detection

The five push-button on the Operator Control Panel are connected to a common
0V supply presented to X1 pin 31 and, when pressed, they route this 0V back to:
X1 pin 21 (UP)
X1 pin 23 (DOWN)
X1 pin 25 (ENTER)
X1 pin 27 (ESCAPE)
X1 pin 29 (ALARM CANCEL)
These signals, annotated [P-0> to [P-4>, are buffered by D17 and the resulting
[TST1> to [TST5> signals are polled by the microcontroller at regular intervals to
enable it to detect when a particular push-button is pressed.
5.3.9

Interface to the CAN Bus


(circuit diagram sheet 4.)
The Operator Logic Board uses the CAN bus to communicate with the UPS Logic
Board. This bus carries bi-directional data between these two boards; e.g. operational status and alarm parameters are passed from the UPS Logic Board to the
Operator Logic Board for processing and display on the Operator Control Panel.
Selections made by the operator at the Operator Control Panel are passed via the
Operator Logic Board to the UPS Logic Board to set the system operating parameters.
The CAN bus (see appendix B) utilises an 82C200 controller and 82C250 interface chip, both of which are described in appendix A.

82C200 control signals. The CAN bus controller is connected to the microcontrollers 8-bit data bus (DX0....DX7) in the same way as the other peripheral
devices. The microcontroller must therefore provide a means of addressing it
when required. This is achieved through a combination of the [CSCAN> chip select signal from the address decoding circuit of D10 (See paragraph 5.3.6) and
buffered read/write signals ([RDX-> and [WRX->).
Note: an initialising reset signal [RSCAN> is also produced by the micro port 3
which starts communications.

82C250 control signals. This device is described in detail in appendix A (See


appendix A.10). Jumper X24 should be made 1-2 to connect the 120 Ohm line termination resistor across its I/O line terminals. High speed mode is permanently
selected due to pin 8 being grounded.

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5.3.10

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Serial (modem) Interface


(circuit diagram sheet 4.)
Serial (modem) communications is afforded by D11, which is a type 8521A Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (USART) working in
conjunction with D13, which is a bi-directional line driver device type LT1133.

8521A operation. This device (D11) converts the parallel data into a serial data
format for transmission, and vice-versa for data reception. This device is described in detail in appendix A (See appendix A.8).
D11 is connected to the 8-bit data bus (DX0....DX7) and selected by a logic low
[CSSER-> signal produced by the address decoding circuit. Read/Write control is
afforded by the buffered [RDX-> and [WRX->, both of which are active low.
The microcontroller port 3 provides the 8521 with its general clock signal, [CLKSER> at approximately 1.25MHz, and also a reset signal [RESSER> which is
active high.
The Data/Control input (D11 pin 12) is controlled by the buffered address line
which is high for data transfer and low for control word transfer.

[AX0>,

The serial I/O data and control lines are interfaced to the modem port (X8) via the
LT1133 driver circuit which converts the 8521A outputs to RS232C levels.
5.3.11

RS232 & RS485 Interface


(Refer to diagram sheet 4.)
Two of the controlled timers within the microcontroller (D2) are configured to operate as further communication interfaces. Data I/O transfer is processed via port
3 with one port annotated [TXD0> & [RXD0>, and the other [TXD1> & [RXD1>. These
I/O data lines are raised to RS232 levels by D19 (MAX232) and RS485 levels by
D20 (75176) D20 is controlled by the [RE485-> & [OE485> outputs from port 1.
RS232 communications via D19 and X5

The RS232 interface (D19) is provided by a standard MAX232 device (See appendix A.7).
This is a dual channel device: channel 1 interfaces [TXD0> & [RXD0> which is permanently connected to the RS232 I/O port at X5. Channel 2 interfaces [TXD1> &
[RXD1> and is connected to X4 via jumpers X20 (1-2), X21 (2-3), X22 (2-3). This
is the standard configuration for these jumpers.
RS485 communications via D20 and X4

The RS485 interface (D20) is provided by a SN75176A differential bus transceiver (See appendix A.5).
This is a single channel device which interfaces [TXD1> & [RXD1> only, via jumpers X20 (2-3), and is connected to X4 via jumpers X21 (1-2), X22 (1-2). When
the jumpers are configured in the above positions they effectively route the RS485
communications through to X4 whilst still enabling RS232 communications at
X5.
The transmit data and receive data flow is controlled through D20 by means of
the [RE485-> & [OE485> inputs to pins 2 and 3. A truth table showing the full affects of these inputs is provided in appendix A (See appendix A.5).

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CHAPTER 5 - Operator Logic Board

Power Supply
(circuit diagram sheet 1.)
As many of the circuits on the Operator Logic Board are connected to external
(possibly remote) devices, such as a modem, they are all powered from an isolated
+5V power rail which is derived from an on-board dc-dc power converter based
on a purpose-designed current-mode PWM controller (UC3845). This controller
is fully described in appendix A (See appendix A.9).
Power circuit operation

The dc-dc converters input power is obtained from the UPS Logic Boards 12V
which is connected to X9 pins 1 and 3. This is filtered by C41 and L1/L2 to provide an unregulated power rail of approximately 24V; although the -12V rail is
taken as the 0V reference by the control electronics.
The converter operation is based on FET V10. When this device is turned ON it
draws current through the transformer primary (1-10) which induces opposing
currents into the secondary windings note the winding polarities.
In practice, V10 is driven by a variable PWM output from N1 (at a basic rate of
40kHz) and the net result is an alternating current induced in winding 5-6 which
is full-wave rectified by V9 to provide a d.c. voltage smoothed by L3/C52/C53.
This smoothed voltage is regulated at +5V by appropriately controlling V10s
PWM gate drive signal.
PWM control operation

The PWM controller (N1) is powered from a 16V zener-regulated supply obtained from the unregulated 24V rail note that N1 requires a minimum of
8.4Vdc to function correctly (See appendix A.9). The base PWM frequency is set
to approximately 40kHz by R35/C44 (i.e. the PWM pulse repetition rate is approximately 25s.).

Current feedback signal. A current feedback signal is obtained from R40


(0.33R) which is connected in series with the transformer primary current
switched by V10. The voltage across this resistor will thus be proportional to the
current drawn through the primary winding when V10 is turned on. This current
feedback signal is fed to N1 pin 1 which internally regulates the mark-to-space
ratio of the PWM output at pin 6 for load stepping and overloads.

Voltage feedback signal. A voltage feedback signal is obtained via an optocoupled circuit which monitors the voltage across the isolated +5V rail. N3 is a
reference voltage generator which aims at maintaining 2.5V at its reference input
(N3 pin 1 i.e. at the junction of R47/R48). This means that it therefore attempts
to maintain +5V at the top of R47 which is connected directly to the output +5V
rail.
If the +5V rail therefore rises above or falls below its nominal +5V level then N3
will reduce/increase (respectively) the conduction through the opto-isolator,
which is thus sensed by N1.
The feedback voltage is source via the +5V reference voltage produced by N1 at
pin 8 and superimposed on the junction of R33 and R34 according to the amount
of conduction of V21, as shown in Figure 7-33.

Indications. An led (H1 is connected across the isolated +5V rail and illuminates when this supply is correct.

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N1
2

5V(ref)
R32

Output
voltage
sensing

VFB

V21

COMP

R33
10k

VCC

VREF

22k

Figure 7-33: Voltage feedback signal

O/P

ISENSE

RT/CT
5

VCC
UC3842

R34
4k7

5.4

Summary information
Table 7-19: Operator Logic Board configuration jumpers
Jumper

Link
Position

X11

OPEN
CLOSED

X12

X13

X14

X15

X16

X17

X18

7-146

Function
+5v enable main CPU (Standard)
ALE enable main CPU

1-2

Main CPU enable EPROM

2-3

+5v enable EPROM (Standard)

1-2

Main CPU enable RAM

2-3

+5v enable RAM (Standard)

1-2

Not Required

2-3

Not Required

1-2

Main CPU enable EPROM (Standard)

2-3

Not Required

1-2

Not Required

2-3

Main CPU enable EPROM (Standard)

3-4

Not Required

4-5

Not Required

1-2

Write to RAM enable

2-3

Not Required

3-4

Main CPU enable RAM (Standard)

4-5

Not Required

1-2

Not Required

2-3

Main CPU enable RAM (Standard)

Testing Only
Open = Standard

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Jumper

Link
Position

X19

1-2

Not Required

2-3

Not Required

1-2

Read/Write RS232 enable (Standard)

2-3

Read/Write RS485enable

1-2

Enable port x4 for RS485

2-3

Enable port x4 for RS232 (Standard)

1-2

Enable port x4 for RS485

2-3

Enable port x4 for RS232 (Standard)

1-2

Inhibit buzzer

2-3

Enable buzzer (Standard)

1-2

Enable CAN bus to UPS logic (Standard)

2-3

Disable CAN bus to UPS logic

1-2

Enable RS485 bus to port x4 (Standard)

2-3

Disable RS485 bus to port x4

X20

X21

X22

X23

X24

X25

X26

OPEN

Function
RAM extension
Normally open

+5v power supply reset enabled (Standard)

CLOSED

+5v power supply reset disabled

Table 7-20: Operator Logic Board potentiometer adjustment


Potentiometer
R21

Function
Display contrast adjustment

Table 7-21: Operator Logic Board LED indication


LED

Colour

H1

Green

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Function
Internal power supply operating

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Section 7:

Chapter 6 - Operator Control Panel

6.1

Section overview
This section contains a circuit description of the Operator Control Panel used
across the entire 7200 Series UPS model range, and should be read in
conjunction with circuit diagram SE-0360803-B.
Signal annotations shown on the circuit diagrams are shown in italics in the
following text e.g. [CLC2>.

6.2
6.2.1

General description
Circuit board functions
The Operator Control Panel functions can be summarised as follows:
LED Display indication
This board contains LED which provides the operator with various status
indications i.e. UPS module mimic; load bargraph; battery charge/autonomy time bargraph; alarm warning indication.
Operator input switches
The Operator Control Panel switches provide the means for the operator to
effect system control through a menu/messaging system.
LCD Display Panel
The LCD display panel provides status and alarm messages for the operator together with the menus used by the operator in setting up and interrogating the UPS control system.

6.2.2

Input/Output connections
All input/output signals are connected to the Operator Logic Board via a single
34-way ribbon connector.

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6.3
6.3.1

7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Detailed circuit description


LED Display indication
Figure 7-34: LED Display indication

R2

D15

D16

LD5

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

D17

D13

D14

R1

D11

D12

D9

D10

D7

D8

D6

R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8

R3

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

X7-1

LC2

C
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8

X7-3

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

X7-5

LC1

C
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8

LC0

D5

D3

D4

D1

D2

X7-7

LD4

X7-9

LD3

X7-11

LD2

X7-13

LD1

X7-15

LD0

X7-17

The operator control panel contains 17 leds arranged in three banks as shown in
Figure 7-34 two banks of 6 led and one bank of 5 leds.
LEDs 1-5 provide module mimic indication, alarm active and battery CB
LEDs 6-11 provide the load bargraph indication and overload
LEDs 12-17 provide the battery charge bargraph indication and autonomy
The anodes of all the leds forming each of the above banks are connected, via
current limiting resistors, to a +5V power supply. These +5V supplies are provided by three multiplexed signals ([LC0>, [LC1>, [LC2>) which are provided by the
Operator Logic Board i.e. these supplies are strobed to provide the positive
power feed to each bank of leds in turn (See paragraph 5.3.8) .
Each bank of leds are controlled by a common control bus produced by the
Operator Logic Board annotated [LD1> to [LD6>. As the positive supply is strobed
to each bank of leds, the leds illuminate according to which of the control bus
lines are low. By driving the leds in this manner the microcontroller on the
Operator Logic Board has full control over which individual leds are illuminated
at any particular time.
Note: the positive supply is strobed at a high frequency and therefore the leds do
not appear to flicker when illuminated

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CHAPTER 6 - Operator Control Panel

Operator input switches


Figure 7-35: Operator switches

0V

X7-31
S1

P4

X7-21

UP
S2

P3

X7-23

DOWN
S3

P2

X7-25

ENTER
S4

P1

X7-27

ESCAPE
S5

P0

X7-29
ALARM CANCEL

The five push-button on the Operator Control Panel are connected to a common
0V supply presented to X7 pin 31 from the Operator Logic Board; when pressed,
they route a 0V signal (annotated [P-0> to [P-4>) back to the microcontroller on
the Operator Logic Board via the connections shown in Figure 7-35.
6.3.3

LCD Display Panel


Figure 7-36: LCD Display module
X7-14
X7-16
X7-18
X7-20
X7-22
X7-24
X7-26
X7-28
X7-4
X7-6
X7-2
X7-10
X7-8
X7-12
X7-32
X7-30

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
2
3
1
5
4
6
K
A

D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
VDD
VL
VSS
R/WR
RS
E
+5V
0V

4 x 20

LCD_MODULE

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7.1 Introduction
The general UPS control operation is based on the microcontroller system contained on the UPS Logic Board, as described in chapter 3 of this section (see paragraph 3.3.2 on page 7-24). The following description explains in basic terms
how the microcontroller system is programmed to operate and provides details of
the conditional flowcharts applicable to the major UPS control signals (e.g. rectifier OFF/ON, inverter OFF/ON, load transfer control).
Despite the fact that the software is not generally accessible to the service engineer, an understanding of some of the sub-routines described later can be an invaluable troubleshooting aid to differentiate between the cause and effects of
certain conditions.
The C programming language used to write the system software is closely related to the actual digital processing, and comprises a sequence of instructions
which determines the microcontroller operation. The program is held in two 512k
Read-Only Memory chips (EEPROM) D35 & D46 which are accessed by the microcontroller via the system address and data busses. D20 is also a ROM device,
and contains initialisation data.
Although it does not contain the system software itself, the Random Access
Memory (RAM) holds important data concerning the systems operation, such as
that programmed by the operator from the Operator Control Panel, which is required by the main program. Battery back-up is provided to maintain such data
when the UPS is powered down. RAM also provides a temporary store for data
produced by the main program during its routine execution.

7.2 Program structure and execution


Initialisation

When the UPS is first powered up the microcontroller receives a 1 second reset
pulse from the reset generator (see paragraph 3.3.5 on page 7-27) which forces
the micro to read the instruction contained in a particular memory location (usually 0000). This is the start point of an initialisation routine which sets up the complete microcontroller system in readiness for entry into the main program. The
initialisation routine performs functions such as configuring the microcontroller
I/O ports, peripheral communication ports and protocols, internal timers and A/D
converters; and reading system data (such as UPS module rating and configuration) from the non-volatile RAM. Some of these functions are performed once
only during the initial set-up whilst others are also revisited during the main program execution e.g. if the module kVA rating or single/parallel configuration
data is changed whilst the module is running it will not affect the main program
until the microcontroller is reset.
Note: the reset generator can also be triggered manually through the selection of
jumper X28; however, if a reset is applied whilst the UPS is running it will crash
due to the rectifier, inverter and static switch all being turned off during the reset
period. USE WITH CAUTION!

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Main program

The system software will enter its main program once the initialisation routines
have been completed. The main program comprises a series of instructions which
are executed sequentially in a continuous loop (See Figure 7-37).
Figure 7-37 shows that the main program operates on two levels; identified in the
illustration as the foreground and background routines. Notice that both the
foreground and background routines call various sub-routines whilst working through the main program loop. A sub-routine is a self-contained mini-program that can be called from various points in the main program loop.
The foreground routine services vital functions which are required to be performed at regular intervals, or at a particular time, in order to secure proper system
control: while the background routine is of secondary importance and executed
on an opportunity basis when the foreground routine is idle. For example, the
sub-routine that checks that the inverter output voltage is within limits is considered critical and is called every 250s; while the sub-routine that checks the
state of the inverter ON/OFF menu selection is less-critical and perhaps executed
once per second. All program timing functions are tied to the microcontroller
system clock (20MHz), which also synchronises the address/data bus transfer operations, and the microcontrollers internal programmable timers.
A successful real-time program requires that the main program loop is completed as fast as possible and it is therefore good practice to return to the main program from a sub-routine as quickly as possible.
Background routine

The background routine is responsible for managing the calculation of the voltage
and current signals produced by the A/D converters and storing the results in the
appropriate RAM memory locations from where they are read at regular intervals
by the foreground routine. It also reads the condition of the Operator Control
Panel buttons and sets status flags in the RAM memory.
Foreground routine

The foreground routine calls a series of sub-routines to carry out a check of the
many variables and status flags held in memory and perform various functions depending on the results i.e. the sub-routines make decisions based on the state of
the memory contents that they read.
For example: a sub-routine that controls the state of the [REC_ON> signal is called
every 500msecs. This signal determines whether or not the rectifier is requested
to turn ON (see page 7-33) and in making the decision, the sub-routine looks at
the following status flags stored in memory:
the manual rectifier inhibit switch status (UPS Logic Board).
the rectifier fuse fail status.
the selected rectifier ON/OFF status (from Operator Control Panel menu
screen).
If all three of the above conditions are conducive to starting the rectifier, the software will drive the [REC_ON> signal high which turns on the rectifier, and also
sends a status signal via the CAN bus to inform the display system of the new rectifier status. Several other sub-routines which control similar signals to
[REC_ON>, and are therefore of prime interest to the service engineer, are illustrated in detail later in this chapter.

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Figure 7-37: Main program Foreground and Background routines

START
Calculate Vb

Set Initial flags

Calculate Vinv

If clock=0001 Exec
SUB: INV-ON

SUB: INV-ON
See Flow-chart 1

If clock=0010 Exec
SUB: REC_ON

SUB: REC-ON
See Flow-chart 2

If clock=0150 Exec
SUB: SYNC_OK

SUB: SYNC_OK
See Flow-chart 3

If clock=0200 Exec
SUB: IB_OPEN

SUB: IB_OPEN
See Flow-chart 4

Background Routine

Calculate Ib
:
:
:

Running in
background

CPU
Clock

START

Set Flags
Check Display
Buttons

Foreground Routine

SUB: Look-up A/D


input (Vb)

:
:
:

:
:
:
If clock=nnnn
Execute SUB: nnnn

Return to START

:
Return to START

Page 1
Vb=432

Ib

Inv. Volts
Window

flag_1
REC_ON
flag_2
INV_ON

Vout

Vinv

DC Over
voltage

flag_3

In. Volts
Window

flag_4

Vin

:
:

Start

Start

Execute Chk1 if t=0.5s

CHK Vb

Execute Chk2 if t=100s

CHK Vin

..........

..........

..........

..........

..........

..........
..........
..........

Main Programme

Background Routines

Page 2

Low Batt
Warning

..........

RAM
MEMORY

Sub-Routine 1

Sub-Routine 2

Begin SUB:

Question 1?

No

Process A

..........
..........
Yes

Question 2

..........
..........

Process B
Process C

..........

..........

End
(Return to start)

..........
End
(Return to start)

No
Process D

End SUB:

Question a condition
(e.g. Is Vb < undervoltage trip level)

Perform a function
(e.g. Set BatU/V Flag - Trip battery etc.)

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7.2.1 Initialisation/Reset
The system reset routine is activated when the UPS is first powered up or following the application of the hardware reset (see paragraph 3.3.5 on page 7-27).
Note: the reset pulse is applied for approximately 10/20ms in order to allow the
+5V power rail to stabilise.
The Initialise/Reset routine:
resets the micros peripheral devices by forcing the output digital signals
to logic low (with the exception of the [SYNC>, [PWM1>, [PWM2>,
[PLLOU1> signals, whose states remain undefined).
verifies no-reversal of the output digital connectors.
initialises the software application into the working RAM
starts the watch-dog timer
verifies that the EEPROM holds valid system parameters (See Chart 7-1).
checks the nominal sync frequency
checks the visual display and 7-segment led (for 5 seconds)
returns a Pass/Fail status.
Checking the system parameter data

The initialisation/reset routine checks that the programmed system parameters are
acceptable for the correct operation of the UPS equipment. The parameters are
held in three pages of the EEPROM. Page 1 holds the parameters set by the Operator Control Panel and pages 2 & 3 contain the internal parameters. A Longitudinal Redundancy Counter (LRC) is associated with each page to allow error
checking.
Default values for the system parameters are held in fixed memory addresses in
the system EPROMS. The EEPROMs data can thus be reinitialised with the
EPROM default values by following the RELOAD DATA procedure on the
Operator Control Panel (see paragraph 2.4.7.5 on page 2-46). This should be carried out if an LRC error is found with the page associated with the Operator Panel
entered data.

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Flow Chart 7-1: Initialisation/Reset

Begin SUB: [RESET>

Does memory
page 2 initialse
correctly?

No

Failed LRC P2
set error 72
[ERROR LRC PAR PAG 2]

No

Failed LRC P3
set error 73
[ERROR LRC PAR PAG 3]

No

Failed LRC P1
set error 71
[ERROR LRC PAR PAG 1]

No

set error 70
[BAD EEPROM PROGRAMM]

Yes

Does memory
page 3 initialse
correctly?

Yes

Does memory
page 1 initialse
correctly?

Yes

Does UPS
Power rating
parameter exist?

Yes

Is link X12 made 1-2?

Yes

No

Initialisation passed

Initialisation failed

End SUB

Return to main program

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7.2.2 Rectifier ON/OFF subroutine


This subroutine enables the software to control the rectifier ON/OFF function.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Rectifier fuse-fail monitor ([FUSREC>)


connected to X2 pin 49 from the fuses fault detection micro-switch. A
fuse failure event activates alarm #25.
Rectifier Block (BLK_RAD>)
derived from the fault detection logic on the Rectifier Logic Board which
shuts down the rectifier if that board detects an internal fault (applied to
X3 pin 33).
Operator Control Panel ON/OFF selection ([TLC_REC>)
Applied via the CAN Bus from the Operator Logic Board. An OFF status
event activates alarm #21.
The sub-routine produces the following output:

Rectifier ON/OFF command signal [REC_ON>


connected as an input to D88 where it affects the logic state of the ultimate
rectifier control signal [ON_REC> (see paragraph 3.3.7 on page 7-29).
This signal is applied via the CAN Bus from the Operator Logic Board
and activates alarm #20 [RECT: SOFTWARE BLOCK] when in its OFF
status.

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Flow Chart 7-2: Rectifier RUN control [REC_ON>

Begin SUB: [REC_ON>


(every 500ms)

Is the
Rectifier Block signal
active on the Rectifier
Logic Board?

Yes

No

Is the Rectifier
Fuse Fail
active?

Yes

No

Is the
Rectifier selected ON
at the Operator Control
Panel?

No

Yes
Set [REC_ON>
output to ON
(Logic high)
[Turn OFF Alarm #20]

Set [REC_ON>
output to OFF
(Logic Low)
[Turn ON alarm #20]

End SUB
(return to main prog.)

REC_ON
EPO
PS FAIL

D88

[ON_REC>

To Rectifier
Logic Board

Man Inhibit (Q3)


DC O/volts

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7.2.3 Inverter OFF/ON Sub-routine


This subroutine enables the software to control the inverter ON/OFF function
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery voltage validation ([ST_BAT>)


as determined by the battery voltage monitor sub-routine (See Chart 7-7).
Inverter block (BLK_INV>)
derived from the fault detection logic on the Inverter Logic Board which
shuts down the inverter if that board detects an internal fault (applied to
X3 pin 33).
Output Isolator status ([SW_OUT>)
connected to X2 pin 46 from Isolators auxiliary contact. When open, it
initiates alarm #03.
Maintenance Bypass Isolator status ([SW_BYP>)
connected to X2 pin 45 from Isolators auxiliary contact. When Closed, it
initiates alarm #06.
External Inverter Block command ([BLK_EXT>)
connected to X8 pin 11 and applied via the optional Alarms Interface
Board.
Operator Control Panel ON/OFF selection ([TLC_INV>)
applied from the Operator Logic Board via the CAN bus. When OFF, it
initiates alarm #31.
Load status ([ST_CA>)
signifies load on inverter/bypass/open as determined by the load transfer
control sub-routine (See Figure 7-39).
The sub-routine produces the following output:

Inverter ON/OFF command signal [INV_ON>


connected as an input to D88 where it affects the logic state of the ultimate
inverter control signal [ON_INV> (see paragraph 3.3.7 on page 7-29).
This signal is applied via the CAN Bus from the Operator Logic Board
and activates alarm #30 [INV: SOFTWARE BLOCK] when in its OFF status.

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Flow Chart 7-3: Inverter RUN control [INV_ON>


Begin SUB: [INV_ON>
(every 500ms)

Is the battery
voltage within permissible
range?

Yes

Is the
Inverter Block signal
active on the Inverter
Logic Board?

No

Yes

No

Is an
External Block
being applied?

Yes

No

Are the Output


Isolator and Maint. Isolator
closed together?

Yes

No

Is the
Inverter selected ON
at the Operator Control
Panel?

No

Yes

Set [INV_ON>
output to ON
(Logic high)
[Remove alarm #30]

Set [INV_ON>
output to OFF
(Logic low)
[Activate alarm #30]

End SUB
(return to main prog.)

INV_ON
EPO
PS FAIL
Man Inhibit (Q2)

D88

[ON_INV>

To Inverter
Logic Board

DC O/volts

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7.2.4 Frequency synchronisation control


The Inverter synchronisation control is complex and, for the purpose of this description, is divided into three flow charts.
Figure 7-38: Frequency synchronisation software block diagram
[FOK>
(alarm #13)
[PLL>

Window Limits
[F_IN>

Mains OK
Routine

[SVI>

[BLK_SYN>
External Sync Inhibit

Sync
Source
Selector

Sync
Source

PLL
Calculate
Phase
Displacement

Error

PLL
Slew
Rate
Control

[SYNC>

[BACK>
Inverter Freq F/Back

[SYNC_OK>
(alarm #35)

Mains OK routine. This routine is responsible for verifying that the bypass
supply is fully available and the bypass frequency is within the selected voltage
and frequency window limits. The major output from this routine is monitored by
the Sync Source Selector routine which determines whether the inverter is to:
1. Synchronise to the bypass supply (if the bypass is valid).
2. Synchronise to the last available valid frequency i.e. if the frequency goes
outside the sync-window the selected frequency will remain at the window
edge frequency for 1 minute (debounce) then revert to the internally generated base frequency reference clock (50/60Hz).
Note: when the bypass frequency returns to within the window the PLL will
revert to synchronising to the bypass after 1 second.
3. Synchronise to the internal reference clock if the bypass supply disappears.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Bypass R-phase frequency ([F-IN>)


Manufactured from X2 pin 15 via the High Voltage Interface Board.
Nominal frequency (50/60Hz)
Selected via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Acceptable sync window (1Hz)
Programmed via the Operator Control Panel through the set-up menu,
and applied via the CAN bus.
Bypass voltage status (SVI)
This flag is set by another subroutine depending on the bypass voltage status i.e:
0 = OK (bypass voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (bypass undervoltage [below -10%]) alarm #12 active.
2 = HIGH (bypass voltage high [above +10%]) alarm #11 active.
3 = ABSENT (bypass voltage less than 50V) alarm #10 active.

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The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Frequency status flag ([FOK>)


OFF = FAULT
ON = OK.

Disables/enables alarm #13


PLL enable flag
Enables/disabled frequency slew-rate control (See Chart 7-5)
Reference frequency status ([Sync Source>)
Selects the frequency value to which the PLL will lock i.e. to the Last
frequency or internal clock.

Flow Chart 7-4: Mains OK Routine


Begin SUB: Frequency
Calculation

Is the bypass
voltage present?
(SVI = Not 3)

Yes

No

No

Is the bypass
frequency within the
selected window?
(1Hz)

Yes

Has the 1Sec


stability timer
expired?

No

Yes

Has the 1Sec


stability timer
expired?

Sync Source = PREVIOUS (2)


frequency (Use last available
frequency as reference)

Yes

Set FOK = OFF


(bypass frequency is not OK)
Annunciate alarm #13
[BYP: FREQUENCY ERROR]
Reset delay counter = 0

Set FOK = ON
(bypass frequency is OK)
Set PLL> flag = ON
Enable the PLL slew rate
control
Sync Source = MAINS (1)

Start the "re-enable" timer


(1minute)
Set [PLL> flag = OFF
Disable the PLL slew-ratre control
Increment the 1 sec "PLL
re-enable" counter
No

Yes

Has the
"1 min re-enable" counter
timed-out?

Sync Source = BASE FREQ (3)

No

End SUB:
Return to main program

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Sync Source Selector. This subroutine enables the software to control the PLL
frequency selection (see paragraph 3.3.13 on page 7-55).
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

External sync inhibit ([BLK-SYN>)


connected to X8 pin 12 from External Alarms Interface option.
External sync inhibit ([ON_GEN>)
One of the functions of the On-Generator input is to disable the inverter
synchronisation (selected via the Operator control Panel SET-UP menu).
Permission to enable sync inhibit operation ([GREL_BLK_SINC>)
this is a programmable parameter (see paragraph 2.4.7.3 on page 2-43).
PLL Phase Locked ([PLL_ON>)
A software routine which determines if the inverter and bypass are within
9 of each other.
PLL_ON = within 9 of each other
PLL_OFF = not within 9 of each other
Timeout value for bypass frequency monitor ([FOK>)
this is a programmable parameter associated with the timeout of the
Bypass Frequency Not OK status.
The sub-routine produces the following outputs:

Sync Source
master frequency reference to the phase displacement calculation routine.
PLL locked ([SYNC_OK>)
Enables/Disables alarm #35

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Flow Chart 7-5: Sync Source Selector Routine


Begin SUB: PLL Sync

Is the
external block facility
enabled (ON_GEN) &
(GREL_BLK_SINC)

No

Is an
external Block synch inhibit
signal being applied
(BLK_SYN)?

Yes

Is the mains
frequency within the
selected window?
(FOK=ON)?

No

Yes

From Mains
frequency
validation chart

No
Sync Source = Present
PLL held to present frequency
Yes

Has the mains


been out of limits for
> 10Secs?

No

Is the PLL
phase locked within 9?
(PPL Flag=ON)

No

No
Has the PLL
been locked for at least
1 Sec?

Sync Source = BASE FREQ


PLL locked to internal clock
50/60Hz frequency

Sync Source = PREVIOUS


PLL held to previous
frequency

SYNC_OK = OFF

Yes

SYNC_OK = OFF
Active alarm 35
[INV: UNSYNCHRONIZED]

No

Active alarm 35
[INV: UNSYNCHRONIZED]

SYNC_OK = ON

De-active alarm 35
[INV: UNSYNCHRONIZED]

End SUB:
Return to main program

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Phase displacement calculation. This routine controls the rate of change of


the inverter frequency in order to track the bypass supply frequency. The target
slew rate is programmable via the Operator Control Panel i.e. the amount of displacement error is multiplied the gain factor entered under the Speed menu on
the Operator Control Panel.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Sync Source
The is the master frequency reference as selected by the Sync Source
Selector and Mains OK routines. This reference may be:
a) Present frequency
Holds the inverter frequency constant at the present value when an external inhibit is applied (e.g. via the optional Alarm Board).
b) Previous frequency
If the mains frequency goes outside its window limits, this holds the
inverter frequency constant at the last valid mains frequency (e.g. at the
window edge frequency).
c) Base frequency
Reverts the inverter back to the Base Frequency if no mains reference frequency is available.
d) Mains frequency
Forces the inverter to track the bypass frequency as long as it remains
available and within the window limits.
Inverter Frequency [BACK>
Actual inverter frequency as presented to the Inverter Logic Board.
The sub-routine produces the following outputs:

Inverter Sync ([SYNC>)


Master frequency reference to the Inverter Logic Board.
Error
A phase displacement is calculated depending on the relationship between
the two inputs (Sync Source & [BACK>). The detected error is then multiplied by a programmed gain parameter, which is entered via the
Speed display menu. This either speeds-up or slows-down the inverter
clock (nominal 288kHz) on the Inverter Logic Board in order to make the
inverter track the Sync source reference frequency.
The Gain figure obviously affects the rate at which the inverter frequency is allowed to change while undertaking its tracking function, and
is put into effect in the PLL Slew Rate Control Routine.

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Flow Chart 7-6: PLL Slew rate control (phase displacement calculation).
Begin SUB: PLL Phase
Detector

Calculate phase displacement


between inverter [BACK> and
[Sync Source]

Is the error greater


than 9?

No

No

Is the "Out-of-phase"
flag ON?

Yes

Yes

Calculate phase displacement


between inverter [BACK> and
[Sync Source]

Is the error greater


than 8?

No

Set "Out-of-phase" flag


= ON

Set "Out-of-phase" flag


= OFF

Yes

Calculate phase error direction


(lead/lag)

Calculate phase error direction


(lead/lag)

Calculated error w.r.t. slew


rate gain (set via "Speed")

Calculated error w.r.t. slew


rate gain (set via "Speed")

Add calculated "error" to


inverter clock.
(Slew-rate control routine)

Add calculated "error" to


inverter clock.
(Slew-rate control routine)

Set "Out-of-phase" flag


= OFF

Set "Out-of-phase" flag


= ON

End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.5 Battery circuit breaker control


This subroutine enables software control of the battery circuit breaker via the
[IB_OPEN> signal applied to U23 (see paragraph 3.3.7 on page 7-29).
This subroutine reacts to changes in the battery status flag (ST_BAT) which indicates whether the battery voltage is above the slow overvoltage level, below the
undervoltage trip level, or positioned satisfactorily between the two. Changes in
status affect the state of [IB_OPEN> after a suitable debounce period, which is applied to prevent spurious operation. The debounce period of all three status changes are factory programmed independently.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery voltage ([VB>)


connected to X2 pin 27 via High Voltage Interface board
Battery maximum threshold ([Vs_sup_bat>)
programmed via the Display menu system.
Battery undervoltage trip threshold ([Vs_inf_bat>)
software calculated depending on discharge current (Ib) and programmed
via the Display menu system.
Rectifier in Manual Mode status
command input from Operator Control Panel.
Battery Test Mode status
enabled & programmed from Operator Control Panel.
Battery Boost Charge Mode status
enabled & programmed via the Display menu system
On-Generator status
when enabled (from Operator Panel) reduces the battery charge when the
UPS is running On-Generator (see paragraph 2.4.7.3 on page 2-43)
requires Alarm Interface Board input.
The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Battery status flag ([ST_BAT>)


depending on the measured battery voltage, [ST_BAT> can have one of
three possible values;
[ST_BAT> = BAT_BAS (battery undervoltage alarm [53])
[ST_BAT> = BAT_ALT (battery overvoltage alarm [55])
[ST_BAT> = BAT_OK (battery voltage within acceptable range).

Battery circuit breaker control ([IB_OPEN>)


connected as an input to D88 where it affects the logic state of the ultimate
Battery Trip signal [BAT_TRP> (see paragraph 3.3.7 on page 7-29) logic
high trips the battery breaker and low enables it.

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Flow Chart 7-7: Battery Control


Begin SUB: Battery circuit
breaker control

Is the battery
voltage (VB) below the
set low volts level?
(Vs_inf_bat)

(Executed every 500ms)

No

To Next Page

(See Chart 7-9)

Yes

Yes

Is ST_BAT
already flagging an
undervolts trip status?
(BAT_BAS)

No

No

Has the Low


DC condition been
present for longer than
1Sec?

Yes
Set ST_BAT to BAT_BAS
to flag Low Voltage Trip
-activate alarm [53]
Set IB_OPEN high to open the
battery circuit breaker

HIGH
End SUB:
Return to main program
[IB_OPEN>
M_BAT_MA
RESET

D88

BAT_TRIP

M_ESD

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Flow Chart 7-7: Continued......


From Previous Page

Is the battery
voltage above the set
slow overvolts level?
(Vs_sup_bat)

No

To Next Page

Yes

Yes

Is ST_BAT
already flagging a
slow overvoltage status?
(BAT_ALT)

Yes

No

Is the battery in
TEST; MANUAL or
BOOST mode?

No

Yes

Is the
ON GENERATOR block
applied?

No

No

Has the Low


DC condition been
present for longer than
1Sec?

Yes
Set ST_BAT to BAT_ALT
to flag High Voltage Trip
-activate alarm [55]
Set IB_OPEN high to open the
battery circuit breaker

HIGH
End SUB:
Return to main program
[IB_OPEN>
M_BAT_MA
RESET

D88

BAT_TRIP

M_ESD

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Flow Chart 7-7: Continued......


From Previous Page

No

Is ST_BAT
already flagging an
OK status?
(BAT_OK)

Yes

No

No

Has the DC Bus


been stable for longer
than 5 secs?

Yes
Set ST_BAT to BAT_OK
to flag Battery OK
- for Alarm Interface board
Set IB_OPEN low to enable
the battery circuit breaker

LOW

[IB_OPEN>
M_BAT_MA
RESET

D88

BAT_TRIP

M_ESD
End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.6 Low Battery Pre-alarm


This sub-routine controls the annunciation of the [DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE]
warning (alarm # 56) when the battery voltage falls to a value just above the undervoltage trip voltage.
A delay counter provides a 1 second delay between a change in alarm status and
the alarm indication to prevent spurious operation.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery voltage ([VB>)


connected to X2 pin 27 via the High Voltage Interface board.
Battery Pre-alarm operating threshold ([Vs_pre_al_bat>)
programmed via the Operator Logic board and applied via the CAN bus.
The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Battery Pre-alarm status flag ([sta_pre_bat>)


enables/disables [ DC BUS UNDERVOLTAGE ] alarm [#56].

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Flow Chart 7-8: Low battery pre-alarm

Begin SUB: Battery Low


Voltage Pre-Alarm

No

Is alarm #56
[DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE] active
at present?

Is the battery
voltage (VB) below the
pre-alarm volts
level?

No

Yes

Yes

Has VB been
above pre-alarm level for
longer than 1Sec?

(Executed every 500ms)

Yes

Is alarm #56
[DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE] active
at present?

No

No

No

Has VB been
below pre-alarm level for
longer than 1Sec?

Yes

Yes

Remove alarm #56


[DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE]

Display alarm #56


[DC BUS: UNDERVOLTAGE]

End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.7 Battery undervoltage trip threshold


This sub-routine calculates the battery undervoltage trip (End-of Discharge) reference level ([Vs_inf_bat>) used in the battery circuit breaker control sub-routine
(See Chart 7-7).
The operating threshold value depends on the percentage battery current being
drawn; basically, the undervoltage trip voltage is raised by 10% if the battery discharge current is less than 10% of its fully-rated current. This is to prevent the battery from undergoing a prolonged low-level discharge and thus enhances the
overall battery performance and working life.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery current ([IB>)


from X2 pin 31 via the High Voltage Interface board.
Battery circuit breaker status ([SW_BAT>)
from X2 pin 53 via the High Voltage Interface board.
Number of battery elements
entered via Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Nominal End-of-discharge voltage (V/Cell)
entered via Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Background task results
2 flags are set in RAM by a background sub-routine, calculated as follows:
NOMINAL = N. BATT. EL x END DIS.
110% NOMINAL = NOMINAL + 10%
N. BATT. EL. = Number of battery cells connected in the string, as entered
via the SET UP Display menu.
END DIS. = Minimum discharge voltage per battery cell, also entered via
the SET UP Display menu.

Example: if 198 cells & end of discharge = 1.67V/Cell then:


NOMINAL = 330.6V and 110 NOMINAL = 363.76V
The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Battery undervoltage trip reference ([Vs_inf_bat>)


(See Chart 7-7)

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Flow Chart 7-9: Battery undervoltage trip threshold

Begin SUB: Battery undervoltage


threshold selection

(Executed every 500ms)

Is the battery circuit


breaker open?

No

Yes

Is the battery current


less than 10% ?

No

Yes
Use the upper level

Use the lower level

Vs_inf_bat = 110% NOMINAL

Vs_inf_bat = NOMINAL

End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.8 Battery Boost charge


This sub-routine determines when the Rectifier Logic Board is requested to operate in the Boost Charge mode (see paragraph 2.3.2 on page 4-26).
Boost charge is enabled from the Operator Control Panel and can be invoked
Manually or Automatically.
Manual selection puts the charger in an immediate Boost mode.
Automatic Boost mode is invoked if the charge current is greater than a
programmed threshold level for 1 minute following the return of the mains
supply after an outage. The system remains in the boost mode until either
the battery current falls below the threshold for 5 seconds, or the boost
charge timer (up to ten hours) expires (in which case an error is flagged
alarm #54 and further Boost charge operation is locked out.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery current ([IB>)


from X2 pin 31 via the High Voltage Interface board.
Automatic Boost charge enable/inhibit
selected from Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Manual Boost charge requested
selected from Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Battery in Test mode
flag set by another sub-routine (See Chart 7-11).
Rectifier in Manual mode
flag set by another sub-routine.
On-Generator mode
flag set by another sub-routine.
Automatic changeover threshold
programmable from Operator Control Panel (default = 10% of battery current limit threshold) and applied via the CAN bus.
1 minute timer
to determine when to enter Auto Boost Mode factory default setting.
5 second timer
to determine when to exit Auto Boost under normal conditions (i.e. battery
regains its charge) factory default setting.
Boost Mode timer (to 10 hours)
to determine when to exit Boost Mode under fault conditions (i.e. battery
fails to regain its charge and charge current remains high). Programmable
from Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Charge Mode selection signals ([REC_A> and [REC_B>)


selects charge mode on Rectifier Logic Board.
Boost charge status flag
signalling boost active/inactive/timeout
Alarm #54 driver [BOOST: TIME EXPIRED]
signalling boost charger timer expired.

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Flow Chart 7-10: Battery Boost

Begin SUB: Boost charge

Is BATTERY TEST
request active?

(Executed every 500ms)

Is rectifier in
MANUAL mode?

No

Yes

No

Is an
ON GENERATOR
condition active?

Yes

Yes

Is the Automatic
BOOST function
enabled?

No
Reset "Batt-in-BOOST" flag to OFF
(i.e. Stop Boost charge even if it is
already in progress)

Has BOOST
mode been manually
selected?

No

Yes

Yes

Is the battery
current > 10% of the
rated Batt. current
limit?

No

No

Is alarm #54
already active (latched)
[BOOST: TIMER
EXPIRED]?

Yes
Increment 1 minute delay
timer
No

Has delay
timer reached its
terminal count
(1min)?

No

Request "BOOST Charge


Mode" to Rectifier Logic Bd
(REC_A=0 / REC_B=1)
Yes

Set the "Battery In Boost


Charge" flag = ON.
Start BOOST charge timer

Increment 5 second timer

No

Is the battery
current > 10% of the rated
current limit?

No

Yes

Has timer
reached its
terminal count
(5 sec)?

Yes
Request "FLOAT Charge Mode"
to Rectifier Logic Bd (REC_A=1
/ REC_B=0)

Increment BOOST Charge


timer

Request "FLOAT Charge Mode" to


Rectifier Logic Bd (REC_A=1 /
REC_B=0)
Activate alarm #54 (latched)
[BOOST: TIME EXPIRED]

Yes

Has
BOOST charge
timer reached its terminal
count (10Hrs
max)?

Reset 5 second timer

Reset 5 second timer


No
End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.9 Battery Test


A Battery Test routine is enabled from the Operator Control Panel and can be
invoked Manually or Automatically at a set date and time (see paragraph 2.4.7.2
on page 2-42). When the TEST is invoked the rectifier is turned off and the batteries are discharged for a predefined period (nominally 5 minutes). A check is
made during the TEST period to ensure that the battery voltage does not fall
below a predefined minimum value (nominally 1.9V/Cell). If the battery fails this
check an alarm is annunciated and the rectifier is turned back on to take over the
supply to the inverter.
The battery test subroutine handles the management of the Test process.
The sub-routine is affected by the following inputs:

Battery voltage ([VB>)


connected to X2 pin 27 via High Voltage Interface BOard
Automatic Test date/time start details
programmed via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Final test voltage threshold (1.9V/cell)
programmed via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
End-of-test (FAIL) debounce delay(1.5s)
factory-fixed delay time to prevent spurious detections
Automatic Test duration period
programmed via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Battery Test request (manual)
programmed via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Battery Test request (auto)
programmed via the Operator Control Panel and applied via the CAN bus.
Rectifier in Manual status flag ([st_rad_man>)
flag set by another sub-routine.
On Generator status flag ([st_grel_blk_car>)
flag set by another sub-routine.
The sub-routine affects the following outputs:

Charge Mode selection signals ([REC_A> and [REC_B>)


selects charge mode on the Rectifier Logic Board (see paragraph 2.3.2 on
page 4-26).
State of test result on exit ([TST_BAT>)
OFF = OK and ON = FAIL.
enables alarm #51 driver [BATTERY: TEST FAILED]
Battery in test mode status flag ([abil_tst_bat>)
ON = Test in progress
enables alarm #50 driver [BATTERY: UNDER TEST ]

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Flow Chart 7-11: Battery Test


Begin SUB: Battery TEST
(Initialisation request)

(Executed every 500ms)

Is rectifier in
MANUAL mode?

Is an
ON GENERATOR
condition active?

No

No

Is a Manual
OR Automatic Test
request active?
Yes

Yes
Yes

No

Set TST_BAT to OFF (Stop


the Battery Test even if it is
already in progress)
Is the
programmed test
duration >0mins?

Yes

Increment test duration counter

No

Set [abil_tst_bat> flag=ON.


Annunciate alarm #50
[BATTERY: UNDER TEST]
Request "TEST Mode" to
Rectifier Logic Bd
(REC_A=1 / REC_B=1)
set [TST_BAT> = ON
(enable the TEST flag)

Is [tst_bat> = ON
(test enabled)?

No

Yes

Is the battery
voltage below the
test threshold?
(1.9V/cell)

No

No

No

Has the TEST


duration counter
reached its final count?
(5 mins)

Reset delay
counter to 0
Yes
Yes
Increment delay counter

No

Set [TST_BAT> = OFF


(Stop the battery test))

Has the delay


counter reached its
terminal count?
(1.5s)

Yes
Remove alarm #50
[BATTERY: UNDER TEST]
Reset delay
counter to 0

Request "FLOAT Mode" to


Rectifier Logic Bd
(REC_A=1 / REC_B=0)

Activate alarm #51


[BATTERY: TEST FAILED]

Reset the test duration


counter to 0

End SUB:
Return to main program

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7.2.10 Load transfer control logic


7.2.10.1 Transfer control system overview

The Transfer Control Logic consists of four sub-routines, each of which is associated with a particular transfer control logic state. During each cycle of the main
program (100s), only one of these four routines is executed, as determined by
the state of the Load Status Flag (ST_CA): namely
initialisation mode (ST_CA = 0).
load-on-bypass mode (ST_CA = 1).
load-on-inverter mode (ST_CA = 2).
out-of-sync transfer mode (ST_CA = 3).
That is, the four routines comprising the Load Transfer Control Logic themselves
form a closed loop which is accessed every 100s, whereby the selected routine
to be executed is determined by the condition of the Load Status Flag (ST_CA)
set on the previous pass. This is illustrated in Figure 7-39.
Example

Assuming that ST_CA is currently set to 1 (load-on-bypass mode).


The load-on-bypass sub-routines preferred action is to transfer the load to the inverter, after first examining the inverter output voltage status and confirming that
its OK.
If the inverter voltage status is found acceptable, this sub-routine grants the output
contactor (K1) permission to close and sets ST_CA =2 which means that on the
next entry to the Transfer Control Logic (100s later) the load-on-inverter subroutine will be selected for execution.
On the other hand, if the inverter voltage status indicates an error condition then
the subroutine will not grant permission to close K1 and ST_CA will remain set to
1 which means that the load-on-bypass routine will be executed again the next
time the Transfer Control Logic is called (in 100s).

Due to its complexity, the four Transfer Control Logic subroutines are described
individually on the following pages.

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Figure 7-39: Transfer Control Logic sub-routines


Power-up

ST_CA=0

ST_CA=0
Initialisation Mode
ST_CA=0

ST_CA=0
ST_CA=1

ST_CA=3
Out-Of-Sync Transfer
Mode

ST_CA=1
Load-On-Bypass Mode

ST_CA=1

ST_CA=1

ST_CA=3

ST_CA=2

ST_CA=2
Load-On-Inverter Mode

ST_CA=2

7.2.10.2 ST_CA=0 (Load status = Initialisation mode)(See Chart 7-12)

This is the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine entered during initial powerup, or when commanded by one of the other sub-routines (See Figure 7-39).
When in this routine, the software examines various flags in order to undertake
any actions appropriate to the initialisation mode of operation. For example; if
the bypass voltage status is OK it will lead to closing the bypass SCRs, and if the
inverter output voltage is OK it will lead to closing the output contactor (K1).
Once the appropriate action is determined, the load status flag (ST_CA) is reassigned (ST_CA=1 or ST_CA=2) which calls the appropriate sub-routine the next
time the Transfer Control Logic subroutine is executed (in 100s).
If no appropriate flags are set, the program returns to the main program without
changing ST_CA, i.e. leaving the load disconnected and ST_CA=0. Thus the next
time the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine is called (in 100s) this same
initialisation routine will be repeated.
Monitored flags

The initialisation mode sub-routine monitors the following flags:


1. Bypass voltage monitor status ST_SVI
The bypass voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (bypass voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (bypass undervoltage [below -10%])
2 = HIGH (bypass voltage high [above +10%])
3 = ABSENT (bypass voltage less than 50V)

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2. Bypass Blocked Status BL_RETE


This flag is generated by a software routine which monitors the condition of:
[BLK_MNS> signal (alarm #16)
which is activated by emergency power off; open bypass SCRs; phase
rotation error; open bypass breaker; PCB power supply failure.
[TLC_RETE> signal (alarm #17)
bypass inhibit selection made by operator.
BL_RETE = ON if either alarm #16 or #17 is active.
BL_RETE = OFF if alarm #16 or #17 are both inactive.

3. Inverter Voltage Monitor Status ST_SVINV


The inverter voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (inverter voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (inverter undervoltage [below -10%]) Activates alarm #37.
2 = HIGH (inverter voltage high [above +10%]) Activates alarm #36.
3 = ABSENT (inverter voltage less than 50V)
4. Operator-selected Inverter ON/OFF TLC_INV
The Inverter ON/OFF selection from the Operator Control Panel is monitored
by the UPS Logic Board micro via the CAN Bus.
TLC_INV = ON (Start inverter)
TLC_INV = OFF (Stop inverter)

Activates alarm #31.

5. Inverter Logic Board Run Status BL_INV


The Inverter Logic Boards Stop/Run status is monitored by the UPS Logic
Board micro. When in the inverter Stop mode, alarm #32 will be active.
BL_INV = ON if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Stop mode.
BL_INV = OFF if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Run mode.

6. Overload Latch Status BLK_INV_OVL


Presented to the UPS Logic Board micro from the 150% inverter current limit
detection circuit on the Inverter Logic Board. A software delay allows 5 seconds of inverter operation before alarm #61 is latched.
BLK_INV_OVL = ON if overcurrent latch is activated contactor
BLK_INV_OVL = OFF if the overcurrent latch is not activated.

K1 tripped.

7. 10 second stability timer status BLK_INV_DP


The inverter is given 10 seconds to reach nominal voltage (i.e. within the
mimic-programmed limits).
BLK_INV_DP = ON block closure of the output contactor (K1).
BLK_INV_DP = OFF permit closure of the output contactor (K1).

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Flow Chart 7-12: Transfer Control - (ST_CA=0)


Begin SUB: Load transfer
control

Is the load
status flag in its
initialisation state?
(ST_CA=0)

No

Yes

Is the
Bypass Voltage OK?
(ST_SVI = OK)

Yes

Is the "bypass
block" status active?
(BL_RETE = OFF)

No

No
Yes

To Next Chart
Yes

No

Is the
Inverter Voltage OK?
(ST_SVINV = OK)

LOAD ON BYPASS
Set ST_CA = 1
annunciate alarm #18
[LOAD ON BYPASS]

Is the inverter
selected ON from the
Operator Panel?
TLC_INV = ON

Set [L_MAINS> = 1
Turn ON bypass SCRs
Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

No
Yes

No

Is the "Inverter
Run" status OK?
[INV_BLK>=OFF

Yes

Yes

Is the "Inverter
Overload Block" active?
[BLK_INV_OVL>
=ON

No

Is
the "10s Stability
Timer" latch active?
[BLK_INV_DP>
= ON

No

LOAD ON INVERTER
Set ST_CA=2
remove alarm #18
[LOAD ON BYPASS]
Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs

Yes

Set [L_INV> = 1
Close inverter contactor (K1)

End SUB:
Return to Main Program

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7.2.10.3 ST_CA=1 (Load status = Load-on-bypass mode) (See Chart 7-13)

This is the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine entered when the load is connected to the bypass supply; as commanded by ST_CA=0 during the initialisation
routine, or ST_CA=2 while the load is on-inverter (See Figure 7-39).
When in this routine, the software examines various flags in order to undertake
any actions appropriate to the load-on-bypass mode of operation. For example;
if the inverter voltage status is OK it will lead to the closure of the output contactor (K1), if the bypass voltage fails it will lead to the opening of the bypass SCRs.
Once the appropriate action is determined the load status flag (ST_CA) is reassigned (i.e. ST_CA=2 or ST_CA=0) which calls the appropriate sub-routine the next
time the Transfer Control Logic subroutine is executed (in 100s).
If no appropriate flags are set, the program returns to the main program without
changing ST_CA, i.e. leaving the load on-bypass and ST_CA=1. Thus the next
time the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine is called (in 100s) this same
load-on-bypass routine will be repeated.
Monitored flags

The load-on-bypass mode sub-routine monitors the following flags:


1. Bypass Blocked Status BL_RETE
This flag is generated by a software routine which monitors the condition of:
[BLK_MNS> signal (alarm #16)
which is activated by emergency power off; open bypass SCRs; phase
rotation error; open bypass breaker; PCB power supply failure.
[TLC_RETE> signal (alarm #17)
bypass inhibit selection made by operator.
BL_RETE = ON if either alarm #16 or #17 is active.
BL_RETE = OFF if alarm #16 or #17 are both inactive.

2. Auto-retransfer Mode Selection X26:1-2


If jumper X26 pins 1-2 are made it allows the examination of the onceonly transfer flag (BLK_COM_DP) which is set (ON) if the load has previously been transferred to the inverter. If X2 pins 1-2 are open this flag is
ignored.
3. Inverter block Latch Status TMP
Before the load is transferred to the inverter, a temporary flag is enabled
which monitors the status of:
Overload timeout flag (alarm #61)
Inverter run flag (alarm #32) see BL_INV below
One-transfer flag (enabled by X26:1-2 see above)
10 second Stability flag (enabled by X26:3-4)
Transfer counter flag (>8 transfers)
If any of the above flags are active, the TMP flag is set to ON and prevents
the inverter output contactor (K1) being closed. Note that if the TMP flag is
ON it can be reset only by selecting the inverter OFF/ON at the Operator
Control Panel.

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4. Inverter Voltage Monitor Status ST_SVINV


The inverter voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (inverter voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (inverter undervoltage [below -10%]) Activates alarm #37.
2 = HIGH (inverter voltage high [above +10%]) Activates alarm #36.
3 = ABSENT (inverter voltage less than 50V)

5. Operator-selected Inverter ON/OFF TLC_INV


The Inverter ON/OFF selection from the Operator Control Panel is monitored
by the UPS Logic Board micro via the CAN Bus.
TLC_INV = ON (Start inverter)
TLC_INV = OFF (Stop inverter)

Activates alarm #31.

6. Synchronisation Status SYNK_OK


A software routine within the PLL sub-routine verifies that the inverter and
bypass voltages are within 9 of each other. The inverter output contactor
(K1) is inhibited for 5 seconds after this condition is satisfied in order to validate the circuits stability and allow time for the PLL to bring the phase displacement error to zero.
SYNK_OK = ON (OK to transfer)
SYNK_OK = OFF (not OK to transfer)

7. Transfer Counter Status CTR_ATT_RETE


The transfer counter is incremented each time the load is transferred from the
inverter to bypass, and flags an error if more than eight transfers take place
over a one minute period. In such an occurrence the counter locks out the output contactor to prevent further transfers from taking place.
a) Before the load is transferred to the inverter (ST_CA=2), the transfer
counter is checked to see if this is the first transfer-to-inverter event. If it
is, a one minute timer started; if it is not, then the timer is already running.
b) Next, the transfer counter is examined. If the counter contents is less than
eight, the output contactor (K1) is permitted to close. If the counter equals
8 (or more) the one minute timer is examined to see if it has timed-out;
and if so, the temporary flag TMP is enabled (see above) which prevents
the output contactor (K1) closing.
c) The transfer counter is reset to zero if the inverter voltage falls below its
nominal range, thus it is active only as long as the inverter voltage is OK.
8. Inverter Logic Board Run Status BL_INV
The Inverter Logic Boards Stop/Run status is monitored by the UPS Logic
Board micro. When in the inverter Stop mode, alarm #32 will be active.
BL_INV = ON if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Stop mode.
BL_INV = OFF if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Run mode.

9. 10s stability counter enable status X26:3-4


The inverter is allowed 10 seconds to reach its nominal voltage (i.e. within its
selected working voltage range [10% default]). If the inverter fails to satisfy

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this condition it is turned OFF and alarm #32 annunciated. This feature can be
enabled/disabled via jumper X26 pins 3-4 (closed = enabled); the status of
which is read by this subroutine.
10.Bypass voltage monitor status ST_SVI
The bypass voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (bypass voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (bypass undervoltage [below -10%]) Activates alarm #12.
2 = HIGH (bypass voltage high [above +10%]) Activates alarm #11.
3 = ABSENT (bypass voltage less than 50V) Activates alarm #10.

11.150% Current Limit Status OVL_INV


The 150% overload condition is detected on the Inverter Logic Board and
passed to the UPS Logic Board micro. Alarm #33 annunciates the overload
fault condition.
The ST_CA=1 sub-routine monitors this signal to enable it to hold the load
on-bypass, even if the bypass voltage is outside its programmed voltage
limits, once the inverter is feeding a short-circuit present between the inverter
power blocks and the output contactor (K1).

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 7 - System software

Flow Chart 7-13: Transfer Control - (ST_CA=1)

From Previous Chart


1

Is the load
status flag in its
Load-on-bypass mode?
(ST_CA=1)

Yes

Is the "bypass
block" status active?
(BL_RETE = ON)

Set ST_CA = 0
(return to intialise mode)

Yes

Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs

No

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

No

2
Is X26:1-2 Closed?
(only one transfer to
inverter allowed)

To Chart 7-14

Yes

No

Is the "once only


transfer" flag activated?
(i.e. load on inverter
once before)

Reset "Once Only Transfer "


flag to OFF

Enable Inverter OFF latch


(TMP=ON)
To monitor:

No

Yes

1. Overload timeout flag


2. Inverter block flag
3. Transfer counter >8
4. Once only transfer flag
5. 10s Stability flag

Set Transfer counter = 0

(If any of the above is activated


then TMP=ON, else TMP=OFF)

Is the inverter
selected ON at the
mimic panel?
(TLC_INV=ON)

Yes

Is the inverter
voltage OK?
(ST_SVINV=OK)

Yes

Is
the "inverter Off
Latch" active?
(TMP=ON)

Yes

No

Disable Inverter OFF latch


(TMP=ON)

No

No
End SUB:
Return to Main Program

(Use the mimic display to rest the


latch trigger source from 1 -5 in
above dialog box)

To Next Chart

To Next Chart

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To Next Chart

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Flow Chart 7-13: Continued


From Previous Chart

From Previous Chart


A

Is the inverter
voltage not OK?
(ST_SVINV=KO)

No

No

Is the inverter in
sync with bypass?
SNYK_OK=ON

Yes

Yes

Is "Inverter Run"
signal present?
(BL_INV=OFF)

Is the transfer
counter at zero?

No

Yes

Start the 1 minute timer


Yes

No

Is
X26:3-4 Closed?
(10s inverter stability
check enabled)

No

Yes

Yes

No

Has 10s delay


expired?

Is the transfer
counter >8?

Has 1 minute
timer expired?

No

Yes

No

Set Counter >8 flag ON


(CTR_ATT_RETE = ON)
(trigger Alarm #60)
This will also set (TMP=ON)

Yes
Turn Inverter OFF
Set BLK_INV = ON
(trigger Alarm #32)
Activate 10Sec Stability flag
(i.e. TMP = ON)
Are the bypass
volts OK?
(ST_SVI = 0)

Reset 1 minute counter = 0

Is the 5 seconds
"wait in bypass"
delay expired?

No

Yes
Yes

No

Set ST_CA = 2
(Load on inverter mode)
Is the inverter
current limit active?
OVL_INV=ON

Yes

Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs
Set [L_INV> = 1
Close inverter contactor (K1)

Set ST_CA = 0
(return to initialise mode)

Set "Once only transfer" flag


(i.e. TMP = ON)

No

Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs
Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)
End SUB:
Return to Main Program

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 7 - System software

7.2.10.4 ST_CA=2 (Load status = Load-on-inverter mode)

This is the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine entered when the load is connected to the inverter supply; as commanded by ST_CA=0 during the initialisation routine, or ST_CA=1 while the load is on-bypass (See Figure 7-39).
When in this routine, the software examines various flags in order to undertake
any actions appropriate to the load-on-inverter mode of operation. For example;
if the inverter voltage status is not OK (KO) it will lead to the closure of the bypass
SCRs and the opening of the output contactor (K1). Once the appropriate action
is determined the load status flag (ST_CA) is reassigned (i.e. ST_CA=1 or ST_CA=3)
and the next time the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine is called (in 100s)
then the appropriate sub-routine will be executed.
If no appropriate flags are set, the program returns to the main program without
changing ST_CA, i.e. leaving the load on-inverter and ST_CA=2. Thus the
next time the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine is executed (in 100s) this
same load-on-inverter routine will be called.
Monitored flags

The load-on-inverter mode sub-routine monitors the following flags:


1. Output Voltage Monitor Status ST_SVO
The output voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (output voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (output undervoltage [below -10%]) Activates alarm #40.
2 = HIGH (output voltage high [above +10%]) Activates alarm #39.
3 = ABSENT (output voltage less than 50V) Activates alarm #41.

2. Inverter Logic Board Run Status BL_INV


The Inverter Logic Boards Stop/Run status is monitored by the UPS Logic
Board micro. When in the inverter Stop mode, alarm #32 will be active.
BL_INV = ON if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Stop mode.
BL_INV = OFF if Inverter Logic Board Run/Stop control is in its Run mode.

3. Operator-selected Inverter ON/OFF TLC_INV


The Inverter ON/OFF selection from the Operator Control Panel is monitored
by the UPS Logic Board micro via the CAN Bus.
TLC_INV = ON (Start inverter)
TLC_INV = OFF (Stop inverter)

Activates alarm #31.

4. Bypass voltage monitor status ST_SVI


The bypass voltage is monitored by the UPS Logic Board micro via the High
Voltage Interface Board. The ripple voltage to the A/D allows the individual
monitoring of each phase, and a software routine compares the actual values
against the programmed limit values to set the flag status:
0 = OK (bypass voltage within the mimic-programmed limits [10%])
1 = LOW (bypass undervoltage [below -10%]) Activates alarm #12.
2 = HIGH (bypass voltage high [above +10%]) Activates alarm #11.
3 = ABSENT (bypass voltage less than 50V) Activates alarm #10.

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

5. Bypass Blocked Status BL_RETE


This flag is generated by a software routine which monitors the condition of:
[BLK_MNS> signal (alarm #16)
which is activated by emergency power off; open bypass SCRs; phase
rotation error; open bypass breaker; PCB power supply failure.
[TLC_RETE> signal (alarm #17)
bypass inhibit selection made by operator.
BL_RETE = ON if either alarm #16 or #17 is active.
BL_RETE = OFF if alarm #16 or #17 are both inactive.

6. Synchronisation Status SYNK_OK


A software routine within the PLL sub-routine verifies that the inverter and
bypass voltages are within 9 of each other. The inverter output contactor
(K1) is inhibited for 5 seconds after this condition is satisfied in order to validate the circuits stability and allow time for the PLL to bring the phase displacement error to zero.
SYNK_OK = ON (OK to transfer)
SYNK_OK = OFF (not OK to transfer)

7. Transfer Counter Status CTR_ATT_RETE


The transfer counter is incremented each time the load is transferred from the
inverter to bypass, and flags an error if more than eight transfers take place
over a one minute period. In such an occurrence the counter locks out the output contactor to prevent further transfers from taking place.
a) Before the load is transferred to the inverter (ST_CA=2), the transfer
counter is checked to see if this is the first transfer-to-inverter event. If it
is, a one minute timer started; if it is not, then the timer is already running.
b) Next, the transfer counter is examined. If the counter contents is less than
eight, the output contactor (K1) is permitted to close. If the counter equals
8 (or more) the one minute timer is examined to see if it has timed-out;
and if so, the temporary flag TMP is enabled (see above) which prevents
the output contactor (K1) closing.
c) The transfer counter is reset to zero if the inverter voltage falls below its
nominal range, thus it is active only as long as the inverter voltage is OK.
8. 150% Current Limit Status OVL_INV
The 150% overload condition is detected on the Inverter Logic Board and
passed to the UPS Logic Board micro. Alarm #33 annunciates the overload
fault condition. The purpose of monitoring the flag in this instance is to force
the inverter to feed a short circuit for 5 seconds if the bypass is absent.
9. 10s stability counter enable status X26:3-4
If this function is enabled, and the bypass voltage is unavailable, the inverter
is allowed 10 seconds to reach its nominal voltage (i.e. within its selected
working voltage range [10% default]). If the inverter fails to satisfy this condition it is turned OFF and alarm #32 annunciated. This feature can be enabled/disabled via jumper X26 pins 3-4 (closed = enabled); the status of which
is read by this subroutine. If this function is disabled, the critical bus status
has no influence on the inverter run signal.

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 7 - System software

Flow Chart 7-14: Transfer Control - (ST_CA=2)

From Chart 7-13


2

Is the load
status flag in its
Load-on-inverter mode?
(ST_CA=2)

Yes

Is the
"critical bus volts
monitor" status OK?
(ST_SVO = 0)

No

Yes

No

3
No

To Chart 7-15

Is the "inverter
Run" status OFF?
BL-INV=OFF

Is the
Inverter selected
OFF at the Mimic Panel?
(TLC_INV=OFF)

Yes

Is the
bypass voltage OK?
(ST_SVI=0)

Yes

Yes

No

Is the "inverter
Run" status OFF?
BL-INV=OFF

Yes

Is the
bypass block active?
(BL_RETE=ON)

Yes

No
No
Yes

No

Is the
Inverter selected
OFF at the Mimic Panel?
(TLC_INV=OFF)

Set ST_CA = 0
Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs
Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

No

Is the inverter in
sync with the bypass?
(SNYK_OK=ON)

No

Reset Transfer Counter


Yes

End SUB:
Return to Main Program

To next chart

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To next chart

To next chart

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Flow Chart 7-14: Continued

From previous chart

From previous chart

From previous chart


F

Is the 150%
current limit flag active?
(OVL_INV=ON)

Yes

Set ST_CA = 1

Set ST_CA = 3

Set [L_MAINS> = 1
Turn ON bypass SCRs

Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

Increment transfer counter


Start 5 second "wait in
bypass" delay timer

Has 5 second
timer expired?

No

No

Is the
Inverter selected
OFF at the Mimic Panel?
(TLC_INV=OFF)

Yes
No
Set ST_CA = 0
Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFFbypass SCRs

Yes

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

Turn Inverter OFF for 1 sec.

Reset transfer counter


Set Blk_INV=ON
Alarm #32
Activiate Overload Alarm #61

Is X26:3-4
closed?

End SUB:
Return to Main Program

Yes

Has the 10s


delay expired?

Yes

Set ST_CA = 0
Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFFbypass SCRs
Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)
Reset transfer counter
No

Set Blk_INV=ON
Alarm #32
Set 10s Stability flag=ON
(i.e. TMP=ON)

No
End SUB:
Return to Main Program

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SECTION 7 - UPS System Control


CHAPTER 7 - System software

7.2.10.5 ST_CA=3 (Load status = Out-of-Sync transfer mode)

This is the Load Transfer Control Logic subroutine entered when commanded by
ST_CA=2 while the load is on-inverter (See Figure 7-39).
When in this routine, the software examines various flags in order to undertake
any actions appropriate to the out-of-sync mode of operation. For example;
once an out-of-sync transfer has occurred, a three second break is introduced
before the bypass SCRs are closed.
Once the appropriate actions are taken, the load status flag is re-assigned to either
ST_CA = 1 or ST_CA = 0, which calls for one of the routines described earlier to
be executed on the next pass of the main program.
If no appropriate flags are set, the program returns to the main program without
changing the load status flag (ST_CA still = 3). Thus the next time the Load
Transfer Control Logic subroutine is executed (in 100s) this same out-of-sync
subroutine will be called.
Monitored flags

The out-of-sync transfer mode sub-routine monitors the following flags:


1. Output contactor (K1) status flag XSTAI2
This flag is initially set (OFF) as K1 is closed while the load is on-inverter
(ST_CA=2). When undertaking an out-of-sync transfer, contactor K1
should open, then after a delay of 3 seconds the bypass SCRs should be
turned ON. The 3 second delay is controlled by the system software and is
initiated when XSTAI2 indicates that K1 is open. Note that XSTAI2 is connected to K1 auxiliary contacts and sensed via the High Voltage Interface
Board.
XSTAI2 = ON (K1 contactor is closed)
XSTAI2 = OFF (K1 contactor is open)

2. Bypass Blocked Status BL_RETE


This flag is generated by a software routine which monitors the condition of:
[BLK_MNS> signal (alarm #16)
which activated by emergency power off; open bypass SCRs; phase rotation error; open bypass breaker; PCB power supply failure.
[TLC_RETE> signal (alarm #17)
bypass inhibit selection made by operator.
BL_RETE = ON if either alarm #16 or #17 is active.
BL_RETE = OFF if alarm #16 or #17 are both inactive.

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7200 Series UPS Service Manual

Flow Chart 7-15: Transfer Control - Initialisation mode (ST_CA=3)

From chart 7-14


3

Is
the load
status flag in its "Outof-sync transfer" mode?
(ST_CA=3)

Is K1 Status
Monitor Disabled?
(XSTAI=ON)

Yes

No

Yes
Is K1 Open yet
(XSTAI2=ON)

No
Has the 3 sec time
delay expired?

No

No
Yes
Yes
Start 3 second time delay
disable K1 Status Monitor
Set XSTAI2 = ON)

Is the Bypass
Block status active?
(BL_RETE=ON)

No

Yes

Set ST_CA = 1
(annunciate Alarm #16)

Set ST_CA = 0

Set [L_MAINS> = 1
Turn ON bypass SCRs

Set [L_MAINS> = 0
Turn OFF bypass SCRs

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

Set [L_INV> = 0
Open inverter contactor (K1)

Increment Transfer Counter

Reset Transfer Counter

End SUB:
Return to Main Program

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