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English 110 Course Materials

Spring 2015
Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Grossmont College

Section 1 General
Materials

Reading & Writing Reflections & Goal Setting Chart English 110

College Reading
Advice Essay

What it Takes to
Be Great
Summary

Module Title and


Writing
Assignment

Score

Writing Assignments

Strengths
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
comments, peer-response comments, or your
own perceptions)

Weaknesses
Where Im Going: Goals for My Next Writing
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
Assignment
comments, peer-response comments, or your (using language from the Rubric)
own perceptions)

In order to keep track of your progress over the course of the semester, you will complete the chart below after you receive every graded
writing and reading assignment. Use the rubric, my comments and/or peer-response comments to assist you with this task.

Research Paper

Take a Stance
Essay

Editorial in
Response to How
Self Fulfilling
Stereotypes Can
Drag Down
Performance

Module Title and


Writing
Assignment

Score

Writing Assignments

Strengths
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
comments, peer-response comments, or your
own perceptions)

Weaknesses
Where Im Going: Goals for My Next Writing
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
Assignment
comments, peer-response comments, or your (using language from the Rubric)
own perceptions)

The Secret to
College Success
Charting and
Annotations

What it Takes to
Be Great Journal

Module Title and


Writing
Assignment

Score

Strengths
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
comments, peer-response comments, or your
own perceptions)

Reading/Journals/Prewriting Assignments
Weaknesses
Where Im Going: Goals for My Next Reading
(using language from the Rubric, teachers
Assignment
comments, peer-response comments, or your (using language from the Rubric)
own perceptions)

Reading, Notetaking and


Prewriting Work for
Research Paper

Reading and
Prewriting Work for
Take a Stance
Essay

Reading and
Prewriting Work for
How Self Fulfilling
Stereotypes Can
Drag Down
Performance

Reading/Journals/Prewriting Assignments

English 110
Cindi Davis Harris, EdD Teacher
Late Work Coupon
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period late without suffering any penalty.
Late work will not be accepted, even with a coupon, if it is submitted
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This coupon MAY NOT be used on the Final
One class period late is defined as the next class meeting after the
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Please attach this coupon to the late assignment with the following
information.
Name:
Assignment:
Due Date:
Date Submitted:
This coupon may be used for only one assignment. Other late work will not
be accepted.
Please note: Not all assignments are weighted equally. Use this pass wisely.
If this coupon is not redeemed, the bearer may turn it in at the end of the
semester for 25 extra credit points.

Your name
Instructor Cindi Harris
English 110
23 January 2012
Assignment Title
When submitting an assignment that is written in paragraphs (such as summaries,
paragraphs, and formal written reflections), follow this format.
For each new paragraph, indent the first line an inch. Use tab indents rather
than space markers. Make sure that your assignment is DOUBLE-SPACED and uses a
FONT such as Times New Roman and a FONT SIZE of 12. Give each assignment at
title and center the title above the text. All of the heading information, title and document
is double spaced. There is no single spacing, triple spacing, quadruple spacing, etc.
anywhere in the document!
For written summaries and assignments where you cite from another source, you
must use MLA style parenthetical citations, attribution, and include a correctly formatted
work(s) cited section. A sample of a correctly formatted Work Cited section is included
here. The first entry citation is a standard work cited entry for a magazine or newspaper
article. The second citation is for a book. The work cited section should have a centered
heading. With the exception of the research paper, I do not expect you to include a
separate Work or Works Cited Page. Please double space and include it at the end of the
assignment. Use a hanging indent if the citation is longer than one line.

Work Cited
Last Name, First Name. Title of Article with Quotation Marks. Title of Publication in
Italics. 1 January 2008. Print.
Last Name, First Name. Title of Book in Italics. City of Publication: Publisher. 2008.

Reading Journal & Activities Explanation


English 110
For each text you read, you will be assigned to complete various reading activities which aim to
show not only your comprehension of the assignment, but also (and perhaps more importantly)
your own awareness of how you have come to understand what the text says. We call this
thinking about your own thinking Metacognition. Your ability to be metacognitive is key to
success in reading, not only in this class, but in your other academic classes as well.
Activity type
Annotations

Metacognitive
Journals

Explanation of Activity
ANNOTATIONS throughout the entire text that clearly show thoughtful reading
(e.g. making connections, asking questions, comments, predictions, clarifying,
etc)
The LEFT COLUMN captures what the text says by
! Paraphrasing or directly quoting evidence from the text
! AND
! Identifying the strategy used to understand the text such as:
connections, questions, chunking, predictions, etc
The RIGHT COLUMN
! Reflects on what the quote identified in the left column means
! AND
! Describes how the use of the strategy helped the reader to better
understand the quote identified in the left column.
! AND
! Discusses how the quote adds to the meaning of the text as a whole

Organization
& Timeliness

Turn in the reading log materials on time, in a legible and organized manner
with the scoring guide attached to the back. Identify correct page numbers for
each part of the text identified.

Charting

The LEFT COLUMN


! Attempts to identify what each section of the text says by paraphrasing
or directly quoting key passages/main ideas of the text

If assigned
and/or
collected

The RIGHT COLUMN


! Attempts to explain what each section of the text does by using natural
authentic language that:
o begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active verb
o describes the function of each section, and avoids using
traditional essay terms such as introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
! Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main argument of the text.
The main argument must be a complete sentence

Mapping
If assigned
and/or
collected

Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of reasoning in a text


! Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a complete sentence
! Identifies the main supporting reasons/supporting claims of the text
! Identifies the evidence used in support of a claim.

Why I Read Assignment


To help you reflect on what are probably many different reasons why you read, this
exercise asks you to list your recent reading experiences and then to reflect on your
motives and strategies, which probably varied with the occasion.
To start - Use a new sheet of paper. Divide it into two columns
Step 1 What you Read
In the left column, jot down as many items as you can remember reading in a 24
hours period. Try to make this list as long as you can by including texts that you just
happened across in the course of the day.
o Text messages?
o Notes on Facebook or other networking sites?
o Homework assignments?
Step II Why You Read
In the right column, what prompted you to read each item
o Was it an assignment for school, perhaps for work?
o A discussion with a friend?
o A need to find out something specific, such as tomorrows weather or the
score in yesterdays game, or the latest news from home?
o Relaxationthumbing through a magazine or surfing the Web?
o Or was it chancethe item was just there, such as a cafeteria menu or
a hallway poster?
Step III Annotate
Now, use the margins to annotate your list to indicate the extent to which this
recent 24 hours of reading were typical for you.
Highlight or note which items you enjoyed reading, which were less enjoyable;
which were important to read?
Which items were everyday items; which were unusual? On a more typical
day, for example, what else would you have been like to read?
Since this exercise is meant to help you explore your own reading activities, add
whatever you think gives a full picture of you as a reader.
Step V Reflect On Your Reading Habits and Why You Read
When you are finished listing and annotating, read back through your list and
answer the following three questions
1. What do your reading habits say about you as a reader, as a college student,
and as a person (music lover? technology user? sports fan? college student?
_____?).
2. What do you think about how much time you spend reading on assignment
as opposed to just following your own inclinations.
3. Try to come to some conclusions. Why do you read?
Some models and examples for how to do this assignment are on Blackboard

Taking Stock of How You Read


The first step in self-consciously managing your reading process is to become aware of
what you already do when you read. Inevitably, we adjust our reading strategies to fit
our purposes. Consider the intricacies of bus and train schedules, the baffling help
screens for new Web design software, or the densely packed explanations in your
college textbooks. How you read these texts will be governed by your purpose. If you
need to know when the next train to Richmond leaves or how to import a pie chart into
your marketing proposal, you can skip over lots of irrelevant material. On the other
hand, if you are preparing to give a workshop on the essential features of a new
computer program or trying to grasp the basic concepts of macroeconomics, you must
look beyond specific details to discern overall patterns and meanings.
For Writing and Discussion
The beginning of a college writing course is a good time to examine your individual
reading processes. This exercise invites you to think about how you read and how you
read differently according to situation and purpose.
On Your Own
Choose two different reading situations that will occur in the next day or two. When you
actually do the reading, record all the details you can about these two activities. Use
the questions below to guide your two accounts. (Read all the way through the list
before you start.)
1. List your reasons or purposes for undertaking each reading.
2. Describe the setting as fully as possiblethe place where you are reading, the
surroundings, the level of noise or other distractions, the presence or absence of
other materials besides the text (pens, laptop, coffee, etc.).
3. Notice what you do to get startedwhat do you say to yourself, what do you
actually do first, what rituals, if any, do you have for this kind of reading? (You
might want to compare your approach to reading with that of Sheri, on p. 33 of
Reading Rhetorically.)
4. What are your initial expectations regarding each reading? Do you expect the
reading to be easy or difficult, enjoyable or a chore? Do you expect to learn
something new, to be entertained, to be surprised, or perhaps to be inspired?
5. List all of the strategies you use as you readglancing ahead; pausing to reread;
reading word-for- word, scanning, or skimming; taking notes. How do you manage
this particular reading experience? That is, what do you do to keep yourself moving
along?
6. Note how often you stop, and think about why you stop. What do you do when you
stop? How do you get restarted?
7. How long does it take you to complete this reading? Is that what you expected?
8. What are the results of this reading experience? Did the text meet your
expectations? What criteria are you using to judge whether the reading experience
was successful or satisfying in this case?
After you have completed your two accounts, compare the various aspects of the way
you read the two texts and note differences and similarities, then answer these two
additional questions:
9. To what extent did your purposes for reading and the reading situations account for
these differences or similarities?
10. What most surprised you about your reading processes?

(The research says) Good Readers


1. Activate background knowledge and make connections
between new and known information.
2. Self-question the text to clarify ambiguity and deepen
understanding.
3. Draw inferences from the text using background
knowledge and clues from the text.
4. Determine importance in text to separate details from
main ideas.
5. Employ fix-up strategies to monitor comprehension.
6. Use sensory images to enhance comprehension and
visualize reading.
7. Synthesize and extend thinking.

Text to Reader Connections


1. Text to self: Connections between the text and
your experience and memories. The more
experiences and memories you can make, the
easier the material is to read.

2. Text to world: Connections you make between the


text and what you know about the world (facts and
information).

3. Text to text: Connections you make between two


or more types of texts or to other places in the text.
You make connections related to content,
structure, or style (This is like what I read.

Good Readers Ask Questions All The Time


Good readers ask questions before, during and after theyve
read the text AND good readers attempt to answer their
questions as they read the text.
There are two types of questions
1. Pondering questions
a. One that doesnt have a simple answer (e.g. what is
the meaning of life)
2. Clarifying questions
a. Can be answered simply
There are four ways to answer questions.
1. The answer is Right There in the text if I keep reading
the answer will be in the next sentence or two.
2. I must Pull it Together by noticing information provided
from several parts of the text. Together, the parts make up
the answer.
3. The answer requires that I use both information from the
text and my own prior knowledge, in other words the
answer is derived through both the Author and Me*.
4. Some answers are On My Own. The text doesnt directly
answer my question, but it may help inform my answer.
* Its important to note that looking up unfamiliar vocabulary
in a dictionary is only one part of either a Pulling it Together
or an Author and Me answer. In order to fully answer the
question, I must return to the text and check my answer with
the what the text says.

Hocked Gems
With Hocked Gems
Financing Him
Our hero bravely defied
All scornful laughter
That tried to deceive his scheme.
An egg, not a table typify
unexplored planet.
Now three sturdy sisters sought proof
Forging sometimes through calm vastness
Yet, more often over turbulent peaks and valleys
Days became weeks as many doubters spread fearful
rumors about the edge.
At last, welcome winged creatures appeared
signifying momentous success.

Dooling and Lachman, 1972, p. 216-222, quoted in Tama and McClain. (1998). Guiding Reading and Writing in the
Content Areas: Practical Strategies. Dubuque, Iowa

Trigger Words
when group
(adverb clauses, prepositional phrases modify any verb or action part of the
sentence)
as, after, before, during, since, until, when, while, at

where group

(prepositional phrases modify any verb or action part of the sentence)


above, across, against, along, alongside, among, around, at, before, behind,
below, beneath, beside, between, beyond, by, down, from, in, inside, into, near,
off, on, out, outside, over, past, through, to, toward, under, up, upon

why group

(subordinate clause, adverb clause, infinitive phrase modify any verb or action
part of the sentence)
because, so that, since, to + verb, in order to + verb

condition group
(adverb clause/conditional clause, prepositional phrase modify any verb or
action part of the sentence)
although, if, though, even if, even though, unless, despite, in spite of, regardless

how group

(adverb, prepositional phrase, comparison/simile modify any verb or action


part of the sentence)
-ly, with, without, by, like, as

who/which/that/-ing
(relative clause trigger words modify any noun in a sentence)

Little Words Matter!



1. His first three attempts to pass his driving test failed, yet he never gave
up.

2. His first three attempts to pass his driving test failed, so he gave up.

3. His first three attempts to pass his driving test failed, and he never gave
up.

Little words show the relationship between ideas in sentences

FANBOYS
Word
Meaning
For
Explanation or because
and
An additional idea
nor
negation (an additional negative idea)
but
except, contrasting idea
or
alternative
yet
qualification or contrast
so
consequence or conclusion

Coordinating Conjunctions
Word
Sentence Relationship
because, since, in order to
reason or explanation (why)
although, if, even though, except
contrasting idea
that, in order that, so that
purpose or reason
unless
condition
whether, rather than
choice

Other things to notice
Punctuation (what does it tell you about whats coming next?)

Pronouns (what to the pronouns refer to?)

Corandic

Corandic is an emurient grof with many fribs;
it granks from corite, an olg which cargs like
lange. Corite grinkles several other tarances,
which garkers excarp by glarcking the corite
and starping it in tranker-clarped storbs. The
tarances starp a chark which is exparged with
worters, branking a slorp. This slorp is garped
through several other corusces, finally frasting a
pragety, blickant crankle: coranda. Coranda is
a cargurt, grinkling corandic and borigen. The
corandic is nacerated from the borigen by means
of loracity. Thus garkers finally thrap a glick,
bracht, glupous grapant, corandic, which granks
in many starps.


Questions/Evidence

Thinking (Answer AND how did you know?)

1.

What is corandic?

2.

What does corandic grank


from?

3.

How do garkers excarp the


tarances from the corite?

4.

What is coranda?

5.

How is the corandic



nacerated from the borigen?

6.

What do the garkers finally


thrap?

The House


The two boys ran until they came to the driveway. "See, I told
you today was good for skipping school," said Mark. "Mom is never
home on Thursday," he added. Tall hedges hid the house from the
road so the pair strolled across the finely landscaped yard. "I never
knew your place was so big," said Pete. "Yeah, but it's nicer now than
it used to be since Dad had the new stone siding put on and added the
fireplace."

There were front and back doors and a side door, which led to

the garage, which was empty except for three parked 10-speed bikes.
They went in the side door, Mark explaining that it was always open
in case his younger sisters got home earlier than their mother.

Pete wanted to see the house so Mark started with the living

room. It, like the rest of the downstairs, was newly painted. Mark
turned on the stereo, the noise of which worried Pete. "Don't worry,
the nearest house is a quarter mile away," Mark shouted. Pete felt
more comfortable observing that no houses could be seen in any
direction beyond the huge yard.

The dining room, with all the china, silver, and cut glass, was

no place to play so the boys moved into the kitchen where they made
sandwiches. Mark said they wouldn't go to the basement because it
had been damp and musty ever since the new plumbing had been
installed.

"This is where my Dad keeps his famous paintings and his coin

collection," Mark said as they peered into the den. Mark bragged that
he could get spending money whenever he needed it since he'd
discovered that his Dad kept a lot in the desk drawer.

The Three Main forms of Persuasion


As Described by Aristotle
Ethos Logos - Pathos
Appeal
Logos

Definition
To appeal to your
readers mind, you
give reasons. If
your reasons make
sense and your
examples and
details are specific
and clear, your
logos will be
convincing.

Pathos

If you want people


to do something or
stop doing
something they
enjoy, pathos is
essential because
you are appealing
to peoples
emotions, how they
feel. Emotions stir
you automatically:
fear, pity, hope,
anger, guilt.

Ethos

A writer must be
ethical, having
good character.
You must believe
writers in order for
them to persuade
you. If readers
dont trust a writers
character, they
wont trust the
writers appeals to
reason or emotion.

In your own words

Your Example

Guidelines for Analyzing Logos

What clues are there that the writer is trying to be logical?

Where does the writer use reasons that make sense?

What is the writers line of reasoning.

Is the writers thesis reasonable and worth considering?

Is the writers supporting evidence clear, specific, and convincing?

Does the writer use accurate facts, examples, and details?

Guidelines for Analyzing Pathos

What clues are there that the writer is appealing to the readers
emotions?

What emotions do you think the writer is trying to rouse: sorrow, fear,
guilt, hope. . .?

Is there any biased or loaded language used?

Are there any controversial ideas or emotional subjects that will stir
up passions?

Guidelines for Analyzing Ethos

What clues in the writing make the audience believe the writer is
trustworthy, fair-minded, and credible?

What clues, if any, make the audience believe the writer may be
untrustworthy, not fair-minded, and not credible?

What authority does the writer have on this subject? How can you
tell the writer has had experience with the subject?

What is the writers tone (attitude) toward the subject? Serious?


Sincere? Indifferent? Sarcastic?

What is the writers tone toward the audience? Friendly?


Concerned? Indifferent? Arrogant?

What voice do you hear in the writer the sound of his or her
personality? How does the voice suggest the writers moral
character?

Types of Evidence
Note taking guide
Type of Evidence
Personal Experience
a specific actual event that includes
information that shows the reader the
event is real. The example should include
the following: What happened? Who was
involved? Where and when did it happen?

Statistics/Research/Known
Facts
Numbers, findings, or proven information
the writer uses to support a reason. Data
may be reported in percentages, fractions,
decimals, whole numbers, etc. The
conclusions of such studies may be used.
It is the responsibility of the writer to report
statistics and facts accurately and
objectively.

Allusions
A brief reference to a person, text, event,
place, or phrase that the writer expects
the reader to have some knowledge. The
knowledge the reader possesses about
the allusion is used to support or explore
the claim usually through application of
the writers argument.

Examples
Detailed examinations of texts or events in
order to apply the ideas of the writer to
something tangible and thus support the
argument.

Authority (sometimes called


expert testimonials)
a person (and sometimes an organization)
with credentials that demonstrate
expertise in the topic being discussed.

Analogy
a comparison between two different things
that also have significant similarities.

Hypothetical situation
an incident created to feel real. A writer
should create details that tell what
happened, to whom it happened, and
where and when it happened when using
a hypothetical situation. Writers should
rarely use hypothetical situations to
support their reasons because as
evidence they are not as strong as real life
examples, statistics, authority, and
analogies.

What it is (in my own words


notes)

My example

Four Moves in an Introduction


(Sutton, 2000)
Academic introductions tend to begin with these four basic
moves. Use these to craft the introduction to your research
paper.

1. Begin with a general statement about the topic


and its significance. (1 or more sentences)
2. Summarize previously known information (at least
two sentences)
a. give an example or two to support or expand
upon the general statement.
3. Establish what is not known about the topic.
a. This usually takes the form of a condition
statement or a however statement or it
raises a question (that is going to be
answered in your paper). (usually one
sentence, but may be more)
4. State what you will talk about in your paper. (your
thesis)
Sutton, B. (2000). Swale's "moves" and the research paper assignment. Teaching
English in the Two-Year College, 27(4), 446-451.

Four Summaries Whats the Difference?



In Dont Blame the Eater, David Zinczenko argues that the fast food industry should be held
accountable for the current obesity crisis in this country. Zinczenko establishes that the fast food
industry holds some blame for this current crisis by describing his own experiences as an overweight
teenager who consumed far too much fast food due to overworked parents, coupled with a lack of
healthy food choices and an overabundance of fast food outlets at his disposal. This all-to-available
nature of fast food, coupled with a lack of clear nutrition information, Zinczenko claims, was the
reason his own childhood obesity, but is also the cause of increases in the number of obese
Americans and in the number of cases of type-two diabetes in children. These increases, Zinczenko
notes, have led to a number of lawsuits related to obesity and fast food consumption. Zinczenko
concludes by urging the fast food industry to provide better nutrition information or the lawsuits will
continue as state governments begin to see the relationship between rising health care costs, and the
fast food industrys profits.


In his article, Dont Blame the Eater, David Zinczenko blames the fast food industry for
fueling todays so-called obesity epidemic, not only by failing to provide adequate warning labels on
its high-calorie foods but also by filling the nutritional void in childrens lives left by their overtaxed
working parents. With many parents working long hours and unable to supervise what their children
eat, Zinczenko claims, children are easily victimized by the low-cost, calorie-laden foods that the fast
food chains are all too eager to supply. When he was a young boy, for instance, and his single mother
was away at work, he ate at Taco Bell, McDonalds and other chains on a regular basis, and ended up
overweight. Zinczenkos hope is the with the new spate of lawsuits against the food industry, other
children with working parents, will have healthier choices available to them and that they will not,
like him, become obese.
In my view, however, it is the parents, and not the food chains, who are responsible


In Dont Blame the Eater, David Zinczenko notes that clear and accessible nutrition
information for fast food would help to stem childrens health issues caused by consuming too much
fast food. Citing research by the National Institutes of Health, Zinczenko notes that before 1994 only
5 percent of childhood diabetes cases were obesity related whereas today at least 30% of all diabetes
cases are classified as Type 2 Diabetes, the type of diabetes caused by obesity. Zinczenko points out
that this increase in childhood diabetes caused by obesity, coupled with overworked parents who
rely on fast food to feed their children, and complicated by the lack of clear and accessible calorie and
nutrition has led to a number lawsuits attempting to hold the fast food industry accountable for the
damage they are causing to our childrens health. To ward off the inevitability of even more lawsuits,
Zinczenko calls on the fast food industry to provide better nutrition information by labeling their
food or risk facing lawsuits by overweight and angry consumers.
I agree with Zinczenkos claim that fast food should provide better nutrition information, but
that is not enough. They should also make the food more nutritious. For example, Zinczenko notes
that he was an overweight teen.


In Dont Blame the Eater, David Zincenko compares lawsuits that seek to hold the fast food
industry accountable for the current obesity crisis to lawsuits against the tobacco industry which
sought to hold them accountable for causing cancer in order to establish that the fast food industry
should do a better job of informing consumers about the dangers of eating fast food. Zincenko claims
that the fast food industry is to blame for the current obesity crisis because fast food restaurants are
ubiquitous and that fast food nutrition information and labeling are nearly non-existent or are
misleading. It is this lack of or misleading nutrition information, Zincenko claims, which is at the
heart of increases in childhood obesity, type II diabetes, and increased health care costs. As state
governments begin to see the relationship between these rising health care costs, and fast food
industry profit, Zincenko calls on the fast food industry to provide better nutrition information.
I agree with Zincenkos claim that the fast food industry should be held liable for misleading
consumers about the relative health of its food because it sheds light on the issue of fast food
advertising and how it teaches us to believe that fast food is fun and healthy.

Editing Marks Glossary


I've been told that my handwriting can be difficult to decipher. Hopefully this
document will assist you in understanding editing marks.
Editin2 Mark

RD
c;b
~

"

V\

What it means
RO-Run-on Sentence - Add a FANBOYor a period somewhere.
CS- Comma Splice - You used a comma, and what you really
need is a period.
FRAG- fragment. The sentence is missing a subject or verb
[or in some cases both)
VT - verb tense - Either you shifted verb tenses, or you used
the wrong verb tense
WF - Word Form - You used the wrong form of the word

~
~

'})S
fJJ'}(l
~

6JV
~W
(J.Y0J

:t-

WC - Word Choice - I get what you mean, but you used the
wrong word. Choose a better one
DS- You should double space this part ofthe document
Agr - Agreement - The subject of your sentence and your verb
don't agree
Ref - Reference. You've used a pronoun (I, you, he, she, it,
they, this, that) and it's unclear what it is referring to
T - Transition - one idea does not seem connected to the next
Coh - coherence. The paragraph doesn't seem to have one
coherent idea to it (you may have needed transitions, or you
have enough undeveloped information for more than one
paragraph
Org - Organization # - Space - You need to add a space

Eliminate the crossed out words

/l/
q!ltJ-

[!-tv(

Transpose - in other words, reverse the order (usually it


refers to putting punctuation inside a quotation mark)
Quote (use quotation marks) or N-Quote (don't use quotation
marks
Ital (put this in italics) or N-Ital (don't use italics)

Section 2
Journal Forms,
Charting Forms,
Idea Maps,
Audience, Purpose & Genre
Charts

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Metacognitive Journal

Title of Text

Pages/Section

Date

Chapter

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

Charting a Text

Directions: As you read, identify where the text shifts in topic and/or purpose. For each paragraph or group of paragraphs
that develops a single idea note what the text is SAYING (the essential details of the section), then determine what the
section is DOING, using ing verbs to describe the function or purpose of the section. After charting the entire text, identify
what you believe to be main argument of the entire text.

Saying

Doing

Main Argument Hypothesis

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

MAIN ARGUMENT

IDEA MAP

EVIDENCE

CLAIM/REASON

Answering Questions about


Audience Purpose Genre
Question
What is the genre
of this text? What
types of
arguments do this
genre make?
What is the
subject/topic of
this argument?

Who is the writer


of this text?

What is the
context of the
argument? Where
and when was it
originally
published?
Who is the
audience for this
argument?

What is the
purpose/aim of
this argument?

Answer

Evidence from the text (my


evidence) or Why it Matters

Answering Questions about


Audience Purpose Genre
Question
What is the genre
of this text? What
types of
arguments do this
genre make?
What is the
subject/topic of
this argument?

Who is the writer


of this text?

What is the
context of the
argument? Where
and when was it
originally
published?
Who is the
audience for this
argument?

What is the
purpose/aim of
this argument?

Answer

Evidence from the text (my


evidence) or Why it Matters

Section 3 Writing
Assignments,
Scoring Guides and
Checklists

English 110 College Composition


Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Fall 2014
Academic Summary What it Takes to Be Great by Geoffrey Colvin
What is it?

An academic summary is a fair and accurate portrayal of the main argument


and the main supporting claims of a text.

Format/Page
Requirement:

1 Margins, proper heading which follows model in course syllabus, Times New
Roman 12 point font; double spaced; 1 to 1 1/2 pages. Follows MLA
guidelines for any and all citations.

Learning Focus:

An academic summary serves an important purposeto show an instructor


that you have read and understood the main argument and main supporting
claims of a text. This particular summary differs in some ways from the ways in
which you might summarize an argument for the purpose of making your own
argument. In this case, I am primarily concerned with your ability to articulate
the main arguments/claims of the text fairly and accurately and to NOT
include your opinions, commentary, or evaluations about the argument or
topic.

Instructions:

An academic summary should include the following:


Sentence I The main argument Your first sentence should introduce
the text, author, date of publication followed by a that clause,
which states the main argument of the text.
Sentences 2 - ? The main claims The remaining sentences must
identify all the main claims of the text. The claims should be presented
in the same order that they logically appear in the text. Those
sentences should be linked with logical and accurate transitions.

Tips:

Use the sentence templates and guides in They Say/I Say and the model in
Reading Rhetorically to help you to organize and frame your summary. Do
not be afraid to use exact same syntax (sentence structures) provided in They
Say/I Say. Academic English is a new dialect to many of you. The frames are
very useful. It is NOT cheating to use them.
Especially useful chapters for this assignment are:
! They Say/I Say Chapter 2 (Her Point Is; The Art of Summarizing)
! They Say/I Say Chapter 8 (As a Result: Connecting the Parts)
! Reading Rhetorically Chapter 3 (Listening to a Text)
Do NOT try to write a summary if you have not carefully read the text. It
cannot be done.

Deadlines

A preliminary draft of this essay is due in class on

A final draft of this essay is due in class on

In order to submit the final draft, you must submit all required rough drafts and prewriting work.

Harris Spring 2015

Excellent

Complete

Minimal

Unacceptable

Academic Summary Preliminary Draft Review


Sentence one includes:

Name of author, title of article, and a phrase which indicates


where and when the article was published

A rhetorically accurate verb

A clause in which the main argument of the text is stated clearly


The rest of the summary

Identifies the main supporting claims presented roughly in the


same order they appear in the original text.

Includes minimal references to evidence or detail or these are


only included to provide clarity about the texts claims.

Is written in your own words. In other words, ideas are


paraphrased and there is NO use of direct quotes.
In addition, the summary

Uses effective transitions so that ideas are linked logically to each


other, but the summary avoids listing.
Overall

The summary is a fair and accurate representation of the authors


main argument and supporting reasons

Summary does NOT include the opinion of the writer

The summary also includes

A correctly written works cited entry following MLA style and is


formatted according to MLA formatting requirements.
Grammar, usage, and mechanics

The summary has been proofread, edited and is clear of


mechanical errors such as fragments, run-ons, word usage, and
comma errors.
Total Points Earned

Harris Spring 2015

Summary Assignment Checklist


All items on this checklist MUST be complete in the order they appear.
Assignment

Date

Stamp/Initials

1. Read and Annotated What It Takes to Be Great

2. Metacognitive Journal

3. Charting

4. Idea Map

5. Preliminary Draft*

6. 2nd Draft*

7. Final Draft* Uploaded to Blackboard All notes due


in class

8.

9.

10.

* Must have all previous work completed in order to receive credit for this assignment.
* Final draft will NOT be graded unless ALL steps are complete.
Total Stamps/Initials


Harris Spring 2015

English 110 College Composition Spring 2015


Advice Essay Writing Assignment
Instructor Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Format/Page
Requirement:

Follow MLA Style: 1 Margins, proper heading and format, which follows model in course
syllabus, Times New Roman 12 point font; double spaced; 2-3 pages.

What is this
assignment
about?
Prompt:

This essay asks you to provide some advice to high school seniors OR to someone who is
considering returning to college after some time, about the reading and writing
demands of college and how to prepare for them.
Every fall colleges welcome a new freshman class to their campuses. These students
come to college with certain expectations about the reading and writing demands of
college, as well as how prepared they believe they are to meet those challenges.
Think about the myriad of reasons why you read, considering how your purpose for
reading affects both your attitude about the text as well as how you go about reading it.
Then think about how it feels to be an insider and outsider to a conversation and how it is
an analogy for you as a reader.
Write an essay to an audience of high school seniors who will be attending college in
the fall OR to an audience of adults who are considering returning to college in the
future after spending some time in the military or at work, in which you use your
experiences in the first three weeks of college to give advice about the demands of
college reading and what they can do to be successful at it once they get here.

Steps for
writing the
essay

Tips

Your essay could follow this general structure

Address an audience directly. This is a community that you know. Open the
conversation by establishing that you are aware of the existing conversations
and points of view about reading in that community.

Introduce yourself. Describe who you are as a reader as well as the reasons why
you read. Include your thinking about yourself as an insider/outsider to college
reading task as well as the types of texts you generally read and why.

Provide detailed examples of how you read two different texts. Make this
section of the paper as concrete, specific, and vivid as possible so that a reader
can visualize your experiences and learn from them. Do more than merely
describe them though. Make a point about them.

Make clear the significance / implication / larger points that your experiences
with reading make. In other words, what claim are you making about how and
why you read. What would you want an audience of insiders to believe or
learn about you as a reader, and how your experiences with reading are (or are
not) typical of college students.

Consider Burkes Parlor Metaphor as a way to describe being an insider and/or


outsider to academic reading tasks.

Take stock of WHY you read. Take notes of what you have read, and why in the last
24 hours.

Take stock of HOW you read. Choose two different situations to read in.

Re-read your notes and come to some conclusions about yourself as a reader. Free
write for at least a page about what you have learned about yourself as a reader as
a result of taking stock of why and how you read.

Read through several of the advice articles on USATodays Campus life section
http://college.usatoday.com/category/campus-life/. The articles published on this
website provide good models for how to write an advice essay directed toward a
specific audience.

Bring to class all drafts on the assigned date for review and revision.
As you begin your planning and writing process consider:

What events and details are most important to your purpose of writing? Which
ones are not important?

What ideas and emotions surrounding the events are worth sharing with your
readers?

What can you do so that your readers can visualize what you are describing

Deadlines
Typed preliminary draft due in class
Final draft due in class

Unacceptable Skill
Application

Limited Skill
Application

Competent Skill
Application

Exemplary Skill
Application

Advice Essay Assignment Peer/Self Review

Controlling Idea and Argument


Does the entire essay:

Stick to the first person point of view (you are writing about your reading
experiences. It is appropriate to use the first person in this paper)

Address the audience directly

Make an argument that is cohesive and is supported throughout the


paper.
Opening
Does the essay:

Begin with an opening that addresses and shows an awareness of the


needs of the audience that is being addressed.

Include an introduction of the writer of the paper as a way of establishing


credibility?

Include descriptions of the different types of reading the writer does and
why?
Development of Ideas
Does the paper as a whole:

Include a discussion of how being and insider/outsider may affect or


influence college-level reading tasks?

Include at least two vivid and concrete descriptions that show how the
writer reads differently (or similarly) in two different situations?

Use concrete sensory details to describe the reading situations in enough


detail so that the reader can visualize it?

Include the writers thoughts, feelings, reactions, and reflections?

Provides a thoughtful conclusion, summarizes the writers reflection and


gives advice to future college students.
Organization
Do the paragraph):

Follow an organized sequence so that a general audience can


understand?

Explain the relationship of ideas to one another


Sentence Writing Style
Do sentences

Use appropriate transitional words that help the reader move from one
idea to another?

Include sentence variety (compound sentences, subordination and


coordination) effectively
Grammar, Punctuation & Mechanics

Are there run on sentences or comma splices?

Are there unintentional or unnecessary fragments?

Do subjects & verbs agree? Are verb tenses correct and do not shift?

Are commas used correctly in dependent and independent clauses? In


introductory phrases?

Are words used correctly? (its/its, there/their/theyre, your, youre, etc)


Format
Is the paper formatted:

According to MLA and assignment guidelines?


ALL prewriting work must be included in order to submit a final draft including:

Prewriting Activities (Parlor Metaphor, Why I Read, How I Read)

First Draft

Peer Review Notes

Final Draft

Cow Stamps

Advice Essay Assignment Checklist


All items on this checklist MUST be complete in the order they appear.
Assignment

Date

Stamp/Initials

1. Read and Annotated The Secret to College


Success

2. Metacognitive Journal

3. Charting

4. Idea Map

5. Parlor Metaphor Homework

6. Why I Read Activity

7. How I Read Activity

8. Preliminary Draft*

9. 2nd Draft*

10. Final Draft* Uploaded to Blackboard All notes due


in class

* Must have all previous work completed in order to receive credit for this assignment.
* Final draft will NOT be graded unless ALL steps are complete.
Total Stamps/Initials


Harris Spring 2015

English 110 College Composition


Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Spring 2015
Stereotype Threat Editorial
Format/Page
Requirement:

1 Margins, proper heading which follows model in course syllabus, Times New Roman 12
point font; double spaced; 2 pages at the most.

What is a letter
to the editor?

The opinion page of any major newspapers includes signed editorials generally written by
individuals who have stake in a current event, columns written by regular columnists who
write regularly about issues and topics in the news, as well as unsigned editorials which
are written by someone on the editorial staff and which generally represent the opinion
of the newspaper.
A well-written editorial has several qualities to it. First it is relatively short. Print newspapers
have limited space to print public opinion. Second, it follows a predictable structure that
meets the needs of readers. It generally starts with an opening line or phrase that sets the
context for the writers point of view, followed by a brief summary of the issue that has
prompted the response. Finally, it takes a stance on the issue in which the writer points out
his or agreement or disagreement with others who are writing about similar issues.

What is the
learning
focus?

This assignment gives you the opportunity to illustrate that you can do the basic moves
that are essential to all academic writing.
!
Open a conversation
!
Summarize an issue with a focus toward your response
!
Provide a clear stance on an issue
!
Quote from a text
!
State the extent to which you agree or disagree with something that they say.

Instructions:

Write an editorial to the college newspaper about the extent to which Grossmont
College should address the needs of students who may be subject to Stereotype Threat.
As you consider the stance you will take on this issue, you may want to consider the
extent to which the college should be responsible for mitigating the effects of stereotype
threat? To what extent are students responsible for understanding the effect(s) of
stereotype threat on their own performance? What, if anything, should be done about
this issue? Use what you have learned about stereotype threat both from the How SelfFulfilling Stereotypes Can Drag Down Performance by Shankar Vedantam and your
Psychology course in formulating your response to this issue. Remember that your
audience includes students, faculty, and administrators who read the student
newspaper.

Tips:

!
!
!
!
!

Use They Say / I Say and Reading Rhetorically Both are useful resources
Use your charting and mapping work to help with the summary
Play the Believing and Doubting Game to help you think about what you agree
and disagree with
Do not try to write this at the last minute.
Upload your work on time

In order to submit the final draft, you must submit all required rough drafts and prewriting work. For this
assignment, you must submit.
Writing Work
o Annotated Article
o Rough drafts with revision work
o Metacognitive Journals
o Claims Chart
o MC Journal Scoring Guide
o Idea Map

Harris Spring 2015

Stereotype Editorial Peer/Self Review


Paper must be formatted as follows:

Opening Paragraph(s)

Opens the conversation, addresses the concerns of the


audience (your ethos), and identifies the importance of the issue
or topic?

Provides enough background (such as news, facts or a brief


review of the news, event, or occasion that provoked the
editorial) to set the context, as well as to establish your credibility
as a writer

Establishes the direction of your argument


The Body paragraph(s)

Include relevant and specific claims in support of the main


argument/thesis?

Use specific, accurate, and well-chosen evidence, which is used


to support the claims and the overall argument?

Address counterarguments (what the other side would say) and


refutes them?

The paper ends with thoughtful discussion of what the reader


ought to believe or do after reading the editorial?

Accurately and appropriately introduces quotes/evidence using


the moves in They Say/I Say

Explains and analyzes the quotes/evidence by using the


academic moves described in They Say/I Say
Persuasiveness

Is organized. Makes logical and reasonable claims that are


supported by evidence. The discussion of the quote/claim is clear
(logos) and reasonable.

Appeals to audience emotions through purposeful and


persuasive examples and word choice.

The writer of the essay seems credible and knowledgeable, fair


and balanced.
Mechanics

No fragments. run-on, or comma splice sentences.

Commas are used correctly with depended clauses and


introductory phrases.

Modal verbs are used effectively and appropriately.

Active and passive verbs are used appropriately.

Verb tenses are correct. Subjects and verbs agree.

Uses accurate and appropriate words and word forms.

Pronouns have clear references


Formatting

Is formatted according to the MLA format and the guidelines


provided above

Has a correctly written works cited entry

Unacceptable
or missing
element

Inconsistent/
limited has skill

Consistent or
Competent Skill
Application

"
"

It has a title that is centered on the page


It is double-spaced and is in Times New Roman, 12 Point Font
The proper header information is on the top of the page on the left hand side (your name, my
name, course name, date)
It has a correct Work Cited entry at the bottom of the page that is on the left margin
The Work Cited heading is centered
Excellent/Super
ior Skill
Application

"
"
"

Harris Spring 2015

Editorial Assignment Checklist


All items on this checklist MUST be complete in the order they appear.
Assignment

Date

Stamp/Initials

1. Read and Annotated The Secret to College


Success

2. Metacognitive Journal

3. Charting

4. Idea Map

5. Audience, Purpose, Genre Worksheet

6. Believing and Doubting Game

7. Map of your Editorial (main arguments and claims)

8. Preliminary Draft*

9. Charting of your editorial*

10. 2nd Draft*

11. Final Draft* Uploaded to Blackboard All notes due


in class

* Must have all previous work completed in order to receive credit for this assignment.
* Final draft will NOT be graded unless ALL steps are complete.
Total Stamps/Initials
Harris Spring 2015

English 110 Spring 2015


Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Take A Stance / Position Paper Writing Assignment
Format/Page
Requirement

1 Margins, proper heading which follows model in course syllabus, Times New Roman 12
point font; double spaced; 2 4 pages at the most.

What is a
Position
Paper?

A Position Paper is a common type of academic argument writing assignment. Typically, a


Position Paper is written after reading about and discussing a particular issue. Quite often,
the readings cover more than one issue, and as a writer you must choose a particular
area of focus.
Position Papers are a very real genre in many different contexts. In college, professors will
ask you to write positions papers to show that you understand more than one side of an
issue and can support one side over others. In the workplace, corporate position papers
are used to argue for or against business strategies or alternatives. The ability to argue
effectively is a useful skill that will help you throughout your life.

What is the
learning focus
of this
assignment?

The central goal of writing a position paper is not only to state and defend your position on
the issue but also to show how your stance relates to other positions. As you write the
Position Paper, you will continue to practice skills such as summarizing other points of view,
developing a stance (a yes / no / ok, but thesis statement) that contains an overall
claim, developing supporting reasons and citing evidence, using direct and indirect
quotes. We will also introduce the following skills:
!
!
!
!
!
!

Prompt

Identifying an issue related to a gender and/or cultural norms that is raised in a set
of texts
collecting information from readings on a particular issue
positioning one's claim in relation to other positions on the issue
documenting sources using MLA in-text citations and works cited
choosing an effective organizational strategy
using transitions for coherence

Each of the articles in this module considers how individual beliefs and cultural norms are
shaped by society, the media, as well as by the culture we live in. In addition, each text
seeks to inform our understanding about how stereotypes of femininity (the quality and
nature of female sex) or masculinity (the quality and nature of the male sex, limit girls and
boys). Each text seeks to answer one or more of the following questions
!
!
!

What is the relationship between language, gender, culture, and identity?


What norms of behavior are enforced through language and social interaction?
What external forces work to shape individual beliefs and cultural norms?

Identify a gender or cultural norm that you have some experience with (either direct or
indirect experience) and in a well-developed essay, take a stand on the effect you see
that norm has on identity. In developing your supporting reasons, you should consider the
consequences for conforming or not conforming to a norm. How does the norm affect
how individuals see themselves? What effect or impact does conforming or not
conforming have on the individual? What effect does conforming or not conforming have
on culture? What actions could / should people take regarding conforming to norms?

Audience

Instructions for
writing the
paper

Use the texts you have read or watched in this unit, your Psychology textbook and lecture
notes from Psychology 120, as well as your own experiences in supporting your position.
An academic audience that includes the authors of the readings and others interested in
the issue upon which you are focusing. It is important to remember that you are writing for
an informed insider audience of strangers. You can trust that they know and are interested
in the issue of your paper, but you do not know how much they know or even who they
are.
Your effective position papers will have
An Introduction that
!
Begins with a statement that describes the norm your paper will examine
!
Provides definitions of key terminology. Make sure you make clear to the reader

!
!
!

(and to yourself) what you mean by a norm.


Includes brief summaries regarding the various points of view that people hold
about the norm.
Provides any additional relevant background information and establish the
question you will answer in your paper.
A direct statement (thesis) to assert your position related to conforming or not
conforming to the norm

Body Paragraphs that


!
Clearly identify supporting claims (reasons) in defense of your position
!
Acknowledge opposing points of view (and refutes them)
!
Cite evidence drawn from the readings and your experience.
!
Explain and analyze the evidence
A Conclusion that
!
Reestablishes your thesis to make your position clear. This position should be one
that grows logically from your analysis and discussion of the issues
Strategies
and tips for
an effective
paper

!
!

!
!
!
!
!
!
Texts:

Use a specific, clearly stated thesis that takes a strong stand on the issue / norm
your paper will discuss.
Develop your argument by clearly stating your reasons and providing relevant,
effective evidence both from your own experience, as well as from the readings
(yes, you have to use the texts).
Organize your paper in a way that effectively conveys information to your
readers, is easy to follow, and presents your position in relation to those of the
authors.
Document sources (both written and video sources) using MLA in-text citations
and works cited.
Write in a style that is clear, readable, appropriate to audience, and free from
distracting errors in spelling, grammar, and usage.
Use They Say / I Say and Reading Rhetorically Both are useful resources
Keep organized. Take good notes. Read thoroughly and with the purpose of
understanding (not just to get it done.)
Do not try to write this at the last minute.
Upload your work on time

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. The Danger of a Single Story. TedTalks. Web.


Bartlett, Thomas. "The Puzzle of Boys." The Chronicle of Higher Education. 22 Nov. 2009.
Web. 10 Jan. 2015. Web.
Kilborne, Jean. "Beauty...and the Beast of Advertising." Media and Values. Center for
Media Literacy, 1 Jan. 1990. Web. 10 Jan. 2015. Web.
Tannen, Deborah. "Who Does the Talking Here?" Washington Post. The Washington Post, 15
July 2007. Web. 10 Jan. 2015. Web.
Sommers, Christina. "Oh, Come On, Men Aren't Finished." Slate. 15 Sept. 2011. Web. 10 Jan.
2015. Web

Important Dates

First Preliminary Draft Due

Second Draft Due

Third Draft Due

Full Draft Due

!
!

Essay must be uploaded to Blackboard before class begins


All prewriting, drafts, notes, articles, metacognitive journals, charting, scoring
guide will be collected in class.

Competent

Proficient

Opens the conversation by identifying the


topic to be discussed but may not explain the
significance of the issue
Summarizes the various points of view about
your topic in order to provide background
information, but may not be fair or accurate.
May list ideas rather than show the
relationships between / among them. May not
attribute points of view to a source.
May not provides definitions of key
terminology
Provides some background information that
establishes the question you will answer in your
paper.
Includes a direct statement (thesis) to assert
your position on this issue

Opens the conversation by identifying the


topic to be discussed and explains the
significance of the issue
Accurately and fairly identifies summarizes
the various points of view about your topic in
order to provide background information.
Clearly attributes points of view to a source.
Provides definitions of key terminology
Provides any additional relevant background
information that establishes the question you
will answer in your paper.
Includes a direct statement (thesis) to assert
your position on this issue

The body paragraph(s)


Fail to support the argument (thesis) with
logical supporting claims (reasons)
Fail to acknowledge opposing points of view
(and refutes them)
Fail to support reasons with logical and
meaningful evidence drawn from the texts
and/or experience. EVIDENCE IS OFTEN
UNATTRIBUTED.
Fail to explain and analyzes the evidence
using a variety of methods of persuasion
(ethos, logos, and pathos)
The conclusion fails to re-establish the thesis
to make your position clear. This position should
be one that grows logically from your analysis
and discussion of the issues

The body paragraph(s)


Supports the argument (thesis) with
supporting claims (reasons)
May not fully acknowledge opposing points
of view (and refutes them)
Supports most reasons with logical and
meaningful evidence drawn from the texts
and/or experience. EVIDENCE IS
OCCASSIONALLY UNATTRIBUTED.
Explain and analyzes most of the evidence
The conclusion may re-establishes the thesis,
but the position does not necessarily grows
logically from your analysis and discussion of
the issues

The body paragraph(s)


Supports the argument (thesis) with logical
and clear supporting claims (reasons)
Acknowledge opposing points of view (and
refutes them)
Clearly and directly supports the reasons with
logical and meaningful evidence drawn from
the texts and/or experience. ALL EVIDENCE IS
ATTRIBUTED THROUGH CITATION OR
ATTRIBUTION.
Explain and analyzes the evidence using a
variety of methods of persuasion (ethos, logos,
and pathos)
The conclusion reestablishes the thesis to
make your position clear. This position should
be one that grows logically from your analysis
and discussion of the issues

Is disorganized.
Fails or has limited use of external transitions
that show the relationship between ideas in
the text.
Fails or has limited use of internal transitions
(such as linking words or repetition of ideas)
that show the relationship between ideas in
the text.
Many paragraphs containing more than one
topic and/or idea at a time.

Is disorganized in places, but overall has a


recognizable organizational structure
Inconsistent use of external transitions that
show the relationship between ideas in the
text.
Inconsistent use of internal transitions (such as
linking words or repetition of ideas) that show
the relationship between ideas in the text.
Some paragraphs containing more than one
topic and/or idea at a time

Has a clear and predictable organizational


structure that meets the needs of readers
Clear and consistent use of external
transitions that show the relationship between
ideas in the text.
Effective and consistent use of internal
transitions (such as linking words or repetition of
ideas) that show the relationship between
ideas in the text.
All paragraphs containing only one topic
and/or idea at a time.

Quotations

Fail to provides context for many quotea


Fail to Introduces many quotes using the
moves in They Say/I Say
Fail to explain or analyze many quotes by
using the academic moves described in They
Say/I Say

Provides context for some of the quotes


Introduces some quotes using the moves in
They Say/I Say
Explains and analyzes some quotes by using
the academic moves described in They Say/I
Say

Provides sufficient context for all quotes


Accurately and appropriately introduces all
quotes using the moves in They Say/I Say
Explains and analyzes all quotes by using the
academic moves described in They Say/I Say

Has an incorrectly formatted works cited


page (incorrect citations, may not be in
alphabetical order, no hanging indents, etc)
Most items on the works cited page are cited
in the paper; all citations/attributions in the
paper are cross-referenced in the works cited
page
Has mostly correct attribution or
parenthetical citations if necessary throughout
the paper

Has a mostly correctly formatted works cited


page (incorrect citations, may not be in
alphabetical order, no hanging indents, etc)
Most items on the works cited page are cited
in the paper; all citations/attributions in the
paper are cross-referenced in the works cited
page
Has mostly correct attribution or
parenthetical citations if necessary throughout
the paper

Has a correctly formatted works cited page


All items on the works cited page are cited in
the paper; all citations/attributions in the paper
are cross-referenced in the works cited page
Has correct attribution or parenthetical
citations if necessary throughout the paper

Readers find it difficult to be engaged in the


reading because they are distracted by errors
in usage, grammar, and/or mechanics

Readers are engaged in the reading and are


generally not distracted by errors in usage,
grammar, and/or mechanics

Readers are engaged in the reading and are


not distracted by errors in usage, grammar,
and/or mechanics

The paper follows few of the conventions of


MLA formatting: 1 Margins, proper heading
and format, which follows model in course
syllabus, Times New Roman 12 point font;
double spaced; 2-3 pages.

The paper mostly follows the conventions of


MLA formatting: 1 Margins, proper heading
and format, which follows model in course
syllabus, Times New Roman 12 point font;
double spaced; 2-3 pages

The paper follows the conventions of MLA


formatting: 1 Margins, proper heading and
format, which follows model in course syllabus,
Times New Roman 12 point font; double
spaced; 2-3 pages.

Format

Grammar /
Usage /
Mechanics

Organization and
Transitions

Development of Argument

Opening Paragraph

Novice
Fails to opens the conversation by identifying
the topic to be discussed and explains the
significance of the issue
Fails to identify or summarizes the various
points of view about the topic. Provides limited
background information.
Fails to provide definitions of key terminology
Fails to provide any additional relevant
background information that establishes the
question you will answer in your paper.
Does not include a direct statement (thesis)
to assert your position on this issue

Works Cited Page /


Citations

Position Paper Scoring Guide

Position Paper Assignment Checklist


All items on this checklist MUST be complete in the order they appear.
Assignment

Date

Stamp/Initials

1. Defining Norms Quick write

2. Read, Annotate, and Chart Article 1

3. Challenge Passage Metacognitive Journal

4. Read, Annotate and Chart Article 2

5. Read, Annotate and Chart Article 3

6. Post Reading Quick Writes & Reflections

7. Text Comparison Matrix

8. Preliminary Draft*

9. Charting of your position paper*

10. 2nd Draft*

11. 3rd Draft

12. Final Draft* Uploaded to Blackboard All notes due


in class

Must have all previous work completed in order to receive credit for this assignment.
Final draft will NOT be graded unless ALL steps are complete.
Total Stamps/Initials
Harris Spring 2015

English 110 College Composition - Linked to Psychology 120


Cindi Davis Harris, EdD
Spring 2015 - Research Paper

What is it?

A research paper is a multiple page argument in which you answer a research question. Typically,
academic research papers are written for academics who are interested in the same question or topic,
so the paper follows the conventions and moves of the discipline, and of the readers in that discipline. In
English, we use MLA as a guide for those conventions.

Format/Page
Requirement:

1 Margins, proper heading which follows model in course syllabus, Times New Roman 12 point font;
double spaced; to 4 to 5 pages with a separate Works Cited page. Follows MLA guidelines for any and
all formatting rules, conventions, and citations.

Learning
Focus:

The goal of this paper is to show that you have mastered the skills you have worked to achieve in this
class AND that you have mastered the content of your Psychology 120 course.
It will be important to remember that you are engaged in a conversation with each text you read and
cite from, and that those texts have been engaged in other questions. This assignment will require you to
fairly and accurately summarize, paraphrase, and quote from those texts as you use them to you can
make and support an argument,

Writing
Prompt

Over the course of this semester, you have engaged in an inquiry related to what it takes to be a
successful college reader, writer, thinker, and student. Your research question is:

What behaviors have most influenced your level of success in English and Psychology this semester?

Your task is to propose an answer to this question in a researched essay. In order to fully answer this
question, consider the following:

Research

Research
Instructions

Hints and Tips

Identify the extent to which you believe you were successful this semester.
What behavior(s) did you exhibit that may or may not have led to your success?
Identify and describe the behavior(s) in terms of the psychological, reading, and/or writing theories
that you have learned about in both classes.
Use psychological research to predict the impact that the behavior has had on your success, or will
continue to have on your academic career.
Use research to justify and explain changes might you make in the behavior or to argue that a
change unnecessary?
Bean, John C, Virginia Chappell and Alice Gillam., Reading Rhetorically 4th Edition,
Charles, Eric. The Secret to College Success: What Smart Kids Do. 9 Jul 2012. Web.
Colvin, Geoffrey What it Takes to Be Great. Fortune Magazine Online. 19 Oct 2006. Web.
Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein., They Say / I Say 3rd Edition, New York: WW Norton & Company.
2012. Print.
Huffman, Karen Psychology in Action, 10th Edition, New York: John Wiley and Sons. 2010. Print.
Your Blog and/or other student Blogs
Articles from Psychology 120
Articles from English 110
Keep a research journal in which not only take notes, but also in which you reflect on the research
process.
Read through your blog entries, as well as those of your peers. What behaviors do you read about
that may or may not be leading to success?
Reflect on the work, grades, effort from this semester.
Take good notes! I cannot overstate this enough. Good note-taking is essential in this paper.
Adhere to all deadlines for the research proposal, finishing research, note-taking, outlines, drafts,
completing all assignments in the order they are assigned.
Use ONLY the articles and texts provided in English 110 or Psychology 120. Do NOT do additional
outside research.
Support your claims with researched evidence.
Cite research from at least four different sources that explains the theory(ies) that underlie your
claims
Upload your finished draft to the course website on the date that it is due
Submit your research journal, including all your notes, and all drafts when you submit your final draft.
I will not grade papers without all these items.
Successful papers tend to take a specific focus on the reading, writing, thinking behaviors that led
to success, and dont solely focus on affective behaviors (such as attitude, work ethic, etc). While
these are important, they are likely not the only factors that have led to success.
It is important to remember that the focus of this research paper is about YOUR success and your
explanation for it. It is not an advice column for future students or about student success in general.
Four sources is a minimum number of sources in the paper. Successful papers generally cite research
from more than four sources.

Harris Spring 2015

Research Paper Scoring Guide


Criteria
Introduction 1st paragraph:

Opens the conversation by identifying the importance of college success


and explains the significance of it to you and to your audience.
Narrative 2nd paragraph

Accurately and fairly identifies summarizes the various points of view about
college success ACCORDING TO RESEARCH in order to provide background
information.

Clearly attributes points of view to a source.

Provides definitions of key terminology if necessary

Provides any additional relevant background information that establishes


the question you will answer in your paper.

THIS PARAGRAPH MUST END WITH YOUR THESIS STATEMENT


Confirmation & Refutations - The body paragraphs

Support the argument (thesis) with logical and clear supporting claims
(reasons)

Acknowledge opposing points of view (and refutes them)

Clearly and directly supports the reasons with logical and meaningful
evidence drawn from the texts and/or experience. ALL EVIDENCE IS
ATTRIBUTED THROUGH CITATION OR ATTRIBUTION.

Provides sufficient context for all quotes

Accurately and appropriately introduces all quotes using the moves in They
Say/I Say

Explain and analyze all quotes by using the academic moves described in
They Say/I Say

Have a clear and predictable organizational structure that meets the


needs of readers

Clear and consistent use of external transitions that show the relationship
between ideas in the text.

Effective and consistent use of internal transitions (such as linking words or


repetition of ideas) that show the

All paragraphs containing only one topic and/or idea at a time.


Conclusion Last Paragraph

Calls for action. Identifies changes that will be or may be made to behavior
and relates the argument to larger issues or reestablishes why, according to
the research, no change is necessary. This should grow naturally from the
rest of the argument that youve made
Works Cited Page - Citations

Has a correctly formatted works cited page

All items on the works cited page are cited in the paper; all
citations/attributions in the paper are cross-referenced in the works cited
page

Has correct attribution or parenthetical citations if necessary throughout the


paper
Grammar / Mechanics / Usage

Readers are engaged in the reading and are not distracted by errors in
usage, grammar, and/or mechanics including, but not limited to:
o A variety of different types an of sentence (compound sentences,
subordination and coordination) effectively
o no run on sentences or comma splices?
o No unintentional or unnecessary fragments?
o Subjects & verbs agreement Are
o Verb tenses are correct and do not shift?
o Commas are used correctly in dependent and independent
clauses? In introductory phrases?
o words are used correctly? (its/its, there/their/theyre, your, youre,
etc)
Formatting

The paper follows the conventions of MLA formatting: 1 Margins, proper


heading and format, which follows model in course syllabus, Times New
Roman 12 point font; double spaced; 2-3 pages.

Mastery

Competent

Novice

Research Paper Checklist


All items on this checklist MUST be complete in the order they appear.
Assignment

Date

Stamp/Initials

1. Examine and reflect on CERWA pre-test


2. Goals & Interests Survey from beginning of class
3. Examine and reflect on Reading / Writing Rhetorically
pre and post tests
4. Examine and reflect on your Reading/Writing
Reflection and Goal Setting Form
5. Record your initial reflections on your success on your
Blog

6. Notes from Four Sources (minimum)

7. Notes from Two Additional Sources (minimum)

8. Record new reflections on your success on your Blog

9. Working Thesis & Outline*

10. Research paper Opening Moves*

11. Preliminary Draft*

12. 2nd Draft*

13. Final Draft* Uploaded to Blackboard All notes due


in class

* Must have all previous work completed in order to receive credit for this assignment.
* Final draft will NOT be graded unless ALL steps are complete.
Harris Spring 2015

Section 4
Reading Journal
Rubrics and Other
Support Materials

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 point

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Journal & Annotation Scoring Guide


Title of Text
Clear
Competence

ANNOTATIONS:
!
Show that the reader was engaged in a
conversation with the text
!

Reflect the specific reading skill assigned for


reading this text.

LEFT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Contains quotes from each section of the text.
!

Identifies strategy used or question asked for each


quote

RIGHT COLUMN of MC Journal:


!
Describes what the quote in the left column
means (paraphrases quote)
!
Describes how the strategy was used to improve
comprehension.
!
Describes how quote identified in the left column
adds to the meaning of the entire text.

CHARTING
The LEFT COLUMN
!
Attempts to identify what each section of the text
says by paraphrasing or directly quoting key
passages/main ideas of the text
The RIGHT COLUMN
!
Attempts to explain what each section of the text
does by using natural authentic language that:
!
begins with the ing form of a rhetorically active
verb
!
describes the function of each section, and
avoids using traditional essay terms such as
introducing or concluding.
MAIN ARGUMENT box
Identifies the readers best hypothesis for the main
argument of the text in a complete sentence
MAPPING - Outlines the writers logic or primarily line of
reasoning in a text
TOP BOX - Identifies the Main Argument of the text in a
complete sentence
MIDDLE BOXES - Identify the main supporting
reasons/supporting claims of the text
BOTTOM BOXES - Identify the evidence used in support
of a claim.

Overall Grade on Journal


! Clear Competence on all aspects = 100 points
! Developing Competence on all or most aspects = 85 points
! Minimal Competence on all or most aspects = 75 points
! Serious Problems on all or most aspects = 60 points

Developing
competence

Minimal
Competence

Serious
Problems

Writing Resubmission Form

You may resubmit ANY writing assignment for a higher score, but to do so, you must
complete the following steps.
1. Read through my comments AND the scoring guide in order to discover what
criteria you need to meet to improve your grade.
2. Meet with me to discuss your revision. You must make an appointment to meet
with me within one week of having your paper graded. It is important that you
check Blackboard to see when this is done. Not all papers are graded at the
same time.
3. Before you meet with me list the key areas you will improve in your revised
paper in the space below. (If you do not do this, I will not meet to discuss your
revision with you!)

!
!
!
!
!
!
4. Revise your paper.
Before resubmitting your paper:
5. Upload your revised paper to Blackboard. In the comments box, briefly describe
what you did to improve your paper. Tell me which areas to look for
improvement: Comments such as: I reorganized several of the body
paragraphs or I added additional evidence in support of my claims or I
corrected all comma errors are very useful to me when I rescore your paper.
This tells me what to look for.
6. Print a hard copy of your revised paper and HIGHLIGHT and/or note each
change youve made on your NEWLY REVISED paper. These highlights should
coincide with the comments youve made about your revised paper.
7. Turn in the hard copy of the new, revised, highlighted paper with this form.

Cindi Davis Harris

Meeting Date

Resubmission Date

Writing Resubmission Form

You may resubmit ANY writing assignment for a higher score, but to do so, you must
complete the following steps.
1. Read through my comments AND the scoring guide in order to discover what
criteria you need to meet to improve your grade.
2. Meet with me to discuss your revision. You must make an appointment to meet
with me within one week of having your paper graded. It is important that you
check Blackboard to see when this is done. Not all papers are graded at the
same time.
3. Before you meet with me list the key areas you will improve in your revised
paper in the space below. (If you do not do this, I will not meet to discuss your
revision with you!)

!
!
!
!
!
!
4. Revise your paper.
Before resubmitting your paper:
5. Upload your revised paper to Blackboard. In the comments box, briefly describe
what you did to improve your paper. Tell me which areas to look for
improvement: Comments such as: I reorganized several of the body
paragraphs or I added additional evidence in support of my claims or I
corrected all comma errors are very useful to me when I rescore your paper.
This tells me what to look for.
6. Print a hard copy of your revised paper and HIGHLIGHT and/or note each
change youve made on your NEWLY REVISED paper. These highlights should
coincide with the comments youve made about your revised paper.
7. Turn in the hard copy of the new, revised, highlighted paper with this form.

Cindi Davis Harris

Meeting Date

Resubmission Date

Writing Resubmission Form

You may resubmit ANY writing assignment for a higher score, but to do so, you must
complete the following steps.
1. Read through my comments AND the scoring guide in order to discover what
criteria you need to meet to improve your grade.
2. Meet with me to discuss your revision. You must make an appointment to meet
with me within one week of having your paper graded. It is important that you
check Blackboard to see when this is done. Not all papers are graded at the
same time.
3. Before you meet with me list the key areas you will improve in your revised
paper in the space below. (If you do not do this, I will not meet to discuss your
revision with you!)

!
!
!
!
!
!
4. Revise your paper.
Before resubmitting your paper:
5. Upload your revised paper to Blackboard. In the comments box, briefly describe
what you did to improve your paper. Tell me which areas to look for
improvement: Comments such as: I reorganized several of the body
paragraphs or I added additional evidence in support of my claims or I
corrected all comma errors are very useful to me when I rescore your paper.
This tells me what to look for.
6. Print a hard copy of your revised paper and HIGHLIGHT and/or note each
change youve made on your NEWLY REVISED paper. These highlights should
coincide with the comments youve made about your revised paper.
7. Turn in the hard copy of the new, revised, highlighted paper with this form.

Cindi Davis Harris

Meeting Date

Resubmission Date

Writing Resubmission Form

You may resubmit ANY writing assignment for a higher score, but to do so, you must
complete the following steps.
1. Read through my comments AND the scoring guide in order to discover what
criteria you need to meet to improve your grade.
2. Meet with me to discuss your revision. You must make an appointment to meet
with me within one week of having your paper graded. It is important that you
check Blackboard to see when this is done. Not all papers are graded at the
same time.
3. Before you meet with me list the key areas you will improve in your revised
paper in the space below. (If you do not do this, I will not meet to discuss your
revision with you!)

!
!
!
!
!
!
4. Revise your paper.
Before resubmitting your paper:
5. Upload your revised paper to Blackboard. In the comments box, briefly describe
what you did to improve your paper. Tell me which areas to look for
improvement: Comments such as: I reorganized several of the body
paragraphs or I added additional evidence in support of my claims or I
corrected all comma errors are very useful to me when I rescore your paper.
This tells me what to look for.
6. Print a hard copy of your revised paper and HIGHLIGHT and/or note each
change youve made on your NEWLY REVISED paper. These highlights should
coincide with the comments youve made about your revised paper.
7. Turn in the hard copy of the new, revised, highlighted paper with this form.

Cindi Davis Harris

Meeting Date

Resubmission Date

Writing Resubmission Form

You may resubmit ANY writing assignment for a higher score, but to do so, you must
complete the following steps.
1. Read through my comments AND the scoring guide in order to discover what
criteria you need to meet to improve your grade.
2. Meet with me to discuss your revision. You must make an appointment to meet
with me within one week of having your paper graded. It is important that you
check Blackboard to see when this is done. Not all papers are graded at the
same time.
3. Before you meet with me list the key areas you will improve in your revised
paper in the space below. (If you do not do this, I will not meet to discuss your
revision with you!)

!
!
!
!
!
!
4. Revise your paper.
Before resubmitting your paper:
5. Upload your revised paper to Blackboard. In the comments box, briefly describe
what you did to improve your paper. Tell me which areas to look for
improvement: Comments such as: I reorganized several of the body
paragraphs or I added additional evidence in support of my claims or I
corrected all comma errors are very useful to me when I rescore your paper.
This tells me what to look for.
6. Print a hard copy of your revised paper and HIGHLIGHT and/or note each
change youve made on your NEWLY REVISED paper. These highlights should
coincide with the comments youve made about your revised paper.
7. Turn in the hard copy of the new, revised, highlighted paper with this form.

Cindi Davis Harris

Meeting Date

Resubmission Date