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A map of

SOUS VIDE COOKING
The wide world of predictable deliciousness

We often associate sous vide with low-and-slow cooking, but times and temperatures are all over the map: steak cooks very differently than potatoes or fish do. The good news
is that salmon won't cook terribly differently than halibut, and steaks and pork chops are about the same, too. Grouping foods by type allows us to visualize the Wide World
of Sous Vide, where time and temperature determine location. Fish cook in cooler waters down south, while succulent braises can be found in the northeast, where cook times
are longer. If it's vegetables you want, head up north, where temperatures are highest. Use this map when adapting traditional recipes for sous vide and when experimenting
with new ingredients.
10 MIN

20 MIN

30 MIN

45 MIN

1 HR

2 HR

212 °F

6 HR

8 HR

12 HR

V

Leeks

Kale

Purées

E

G

E

B E A N S

Lentils

T

A

B

Onions

L

E

Pumpkin

S

90

T

La

O

R

K

Rutabagas

G

Sweet Potatoes
winter squash z
one

mb

-T

Sh

an

EN

k

O
D

R

U

)

OCTOPUS

G

Pork Shoulder

75

S

BBQ Beef Short Ribs

Lam

65

A
t
ske

IK

Pork Belly

T

-L

Pork Steak

K

S

E

Bri

k
Por

s

eek

Ch

)

S

Chuck

55
Tropic

of Lou

is Pa

steur

50

Clam
Cod

Lobster Tail

F I S H Fish Roulade

Fish are cold-blooded, so their
proteins denature at lower
temperatures than warm-blooded
animals. Thus, we cook them for
a shorter time at a lower
temperature.

Tuna

H

E
ER

E
T H E R

B E

D R A
G O
N

S

Some food-borne pathogens can multiply to
dangerous levels if cooked below 126 °F / 52 °C for
enough time. So don't travel here, or risk
gastrointestinal attack from fearsome bacteria.

45

35 °C

72
R
H

R
H

R

H

This culinary cartography is part of our class, Cooking Sous Vide: Beyond the Basics.
Visit chefsteps.com for recipes, techniques, and more about sous vide cooking.

48

24

R

H

R
H

R

H

R

H

R
H

R
H

12

8

6

4

3

2

R

H

IN
M

IN

M

IN

M

ChefSteps

1

45

30

20

We give most shellfish a quick
dip to firm them. But some
mollusks such as octopus,
snails, geoduck, and squid
need higher temperatures
and longer times to soften.

i

ram

st
Pa

E

100 °F

(S

g

b Le

ac
h

Duck Legs

Rare Rib Roast

110
105

be

T

Chicken Breast
T E
N D
E R
Me
New dium
C U
York
Strip
T S
Duck Breast

Lobster Claws

115

it

U

S H
F I
L L
S H E

Oysters

nf

L E
G

Pork Chop
Burger

co

Turkey Legs

B I R D

Turkey Breast

C

Chicken Legs
Chicken Roulade

Shrimp

80

H

Eggnog

120

85

Beef Short Ribs

E

Just as denaturing collagen tenderizes meat, denaturing pectin
softens vegetables. Cooking them in a bag means we can retain
nutrients, flavors, and color that would normally leach out with
traditional cooking methods.

G
Soft White,
Runny Yolk

95

Pinto Beans

(F

Fresh Peas

155

125

72 HR

Navy Beans

Potatoes

Parsnips

Sous vide eggs can
175
have runny or firm
yolks and soft or hard
whites. Find your
perfect egg with our
165
Egg Calculator at
ChefSteps.com.

135

48 HR

100 °C

Chickpeas

Carrots

185

145

24 HR

Time and temperature denature the collagen in meat to make tough cuts tender.
Cooking tough cuts sous vide at high temperatures will cause them to lose juices,
but they then cook in those juices and become wonderfully succulent. Meat
cooked at lower temperatures will be nice and juicy, more like steak.

205

195

3 HR 4 HR

point of boiling

E

TEMPERATURE (°F)

TIME