A Country Risk  Assessment of  NIGERIA: 
International Business Opportunities and Threats 

Lawrence O. Emeagwali                                                                                                 The American University,                                                                                               Cyprus. 
© 2009 

 

2   

ABSTRACT 
The  Nigerian  investment  environment  is  a  very promising  one,  laden  with  lots  of  opportunities.  The  country  which  is  a  major  oil  producing,  exporting  and  dependent  nation  also  has  other  lucrative  sectors  filled  with  investment  opportunities.  Its  mineral  resources  includes  coal,  tin,  bauxite and zinc to mention a few while more recently, huge business opportunities exist in the  aviation,  IT,  energy  and  education  sectors  of  the  economy.  Its  government  and  people  are  foreign  investment  friendly  and  the  government  has  recently  taken  bold  steps  to  encourage  FDIs.  Foreign  investors  incorporated  in  Nigeria  have  equal  access  to  financial  instruments  offered  by  all  banks  as  well  as  the  Nigerian  stock  exchange.  However,  investors  have  to  be  cautious  and  sensitive  to  occasional  ethnic  tensions,  intellectual  property  violations,  identity  thefts,  as  well  as  uneven  import  and  export  tariff  systems.  Despite  all  of  these  the  general  business  environment  is  very  conducive  for  foreign  investments  as  the  opportunities  far  outweigh the threats. 

                         
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

3   

  TABL E OF CONTENTS  Abstract ………………………………………………………………………….2  Introduction …………………………………………………………………… 4  Historical Environment …………………………………………………… 4  Geopolitical Environment ……………………………………………….. 5  Social Environment …………………………………………………………. 6  Economic Environment ……………………………………………………. 7  Political Environment ………………………………………………………. 8  Cutural Environment ……………………………………………………….. 8  Opportunity and Threats ………………………………………………….. 9  Conclusion and Recommendation ………………………………….. .10                     
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

4   

  INTRODUCTION 
BACKGROUND  Nigeria  is  the  most  populous  black  nation  on  earth  and  sits  on  a  geographical  location  of  about  923,768  sq  km  in  the  west  of  Africa,  and  shares  borders  with  the  gulf  of  Guinea,  lying  between  Benin and Cameroon. Nigeria is geographically and administratively divided into 36 states and 1  territory.  Its  states  include  Abia,  Adamawa,    Akwa  Ibom,  Anambra,  Bauchi,  Bayelsa,  Borno,  Cross  river,  Delta,  Ebonyi,  Edo,  Ekiti,  Enugu,  Federal  Capital  Territory,  Gombe,  Imo,  Jigawa,  Kaduna,  Kano,  Katsina,  kebbi,  kogi,  kwara,  Lagos,  Nassarawa,  Niger,  Ogun,  Ondo,  Osun,  Oyo,  Plateau,  Rivers,  sokoto,  Taraba,  Yobe  and  Zamfara  states.  The  capital  of  Nigeria  is  Abuja,  which  is also referred to as the Federal Capital Territory.  Out of the country’s total geographical size, 910,768 sq km is made up of land and about 13,000  sq  km  of  water.  Its  land  border  is  a  total  of  4,047km  which  it  shares  with  bordering  countries  such as Benin (773km), Cameroon (1,690km), Chad (87km) and Niger (1,497km). In addition, its  coastline spans a total of about 853km.  The  country’s  land  terrain  consists  of  plains  in  the  North,  lowlands  which  merge  into  central  hills and plateau in the South and mountains in the Southeast.  Nigeria  lays  claim  to  maritime  territory  which  consist  of  about  200  nm  of  exclusive  economic  zone, 200m of continental shelf or to the depth of exploitation and a total of 12nm of territorial  sea. 

  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

5   

Weather  conditions  in  Nigeria,  changes  between  arid  conditions  in  the  North,  tropical  conditions in the middle belt or the center, and equatorial climatic conditions in the south.  Nigeria  has  got  huge  deposits  of  natural  resources  in  both  land  and  sea.  Some  of  these  resources  include  petroleum,  natural  gas,  iron‐ore,  tin,  limestone,  coal,  lead,  zinc,  bitumen,  niobium  and  arable  land  to  mention  a  few.  The  country  is  among  the  ten  largest  oil  producing  and  exporting  countries  of  the  world,  and  its  arable  land  constitutes  about  33.02%  of  its  total  land mass.  Despite  all  of  these,  the  country  like  most  other  countries  of  the  world,  still  deals  with  a  lot  of  geographical  and  environmental  issues,  which  include,  increased  deforestation,  increasing  desertification, oil spillages and the resultant oil pollution of water, air and soil; soil degradation  and loss of soil nutrients; fast pace of urbanization resulting in the loss of arable land.    HISTORICAL ENVIRONMENT  The  history  of  Nigeria  dates  as  far  back  as  about  1000  AD.  In  the  northern  cities  of  Kano  and  katsina,  records  to  suggest  the  existence  of  ancient  and  historic  Hausa  kingdoms  can  easily  be  found.  These  kingdoms  along  with  the  Borno  empire  which  was  close  to  lake  chad,  grew  and  prospered  as  significant  travel  routes  and  terminals  for  north  African  and  South  African  trade,  which  involved  the  trade  by  barter  of  slaves,  ivory  and  kola  nuts  for  salt,  glass  beads,  corals,  cloth,  weapons,  brass  rods  and  the  ancient  cowry  shells  which  were  legal  tender  as  at  that  period.  Other  kingdoms  which  existed  in  Nigeria  include  the  Yoruba  Kingdom  of  Oyo,  which 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

6   

influenced most of west Africa as far as Togo, and also the Benin kingdom which as early as the  15th  and  16th  centuries,  had  developed  a  functional  and  highly  efficient  army  and  ceremonial  courts.  In  the  early  19th  century  however,  Islam  was  promulgated  in  the  north  by  a  prominent  Fulani  leader,  Usman  Danfodio,  while  Christianity  was  already  being  introduced  in  the  south  by  British  slave  traders  and  missionaries.  Between  1885  and  1914,  the  British  interest  went  from  trade, to control of both the south and north, where it had a wide sphere of influence. It united  the  north  and  south  in  1914,  and  used  its  popular  administrative  strategy  of  divide  and  rule  to  strengthen  its  grip  and  control  of  the  area.  However,  after  World  War  II,  there  were  growing  nationalistic  tendencies  and  sentiments,  and  demand  for  independence;  and  in  response  to  these  intense  demands,  the  British  government  legislated  consecutive  constitutions  which  moved  Nigeria  into  a  federal  based  self‐  government  structure.  The  country  finally  gained  independence in 1960.   However, its existence between 1960 and 1999, were marred with different problems, different  coups  saw  the  country  suffer  about  16  years  of  military  rule  and  dictatorship,  one  or  two  experiments  with  short‐lived  democracy  in  between  and  a  civil  war  which  spanned  about  3  years.  However,  following  the  death  of  the  last  military  dictator  General  Sani  Abacha,  an  interim  government  led  by  General  Abdulsalam  Abubakar,  handed  over  power  to  a  democratically  elected  president  Olusegun  Obasanjo  in  1999.  Obasanjo  who  had  been  a  political prisoner in Gen. Sani Abacha’s military regime, assumed office in 1999 and successfully  handed  over  to  the  newly  elected  and  current  democratic  government  of  President  Umaru  Musa  Yar’Adua,  after  serving  two  terms  in  office.  This  is  the  first  time  the  country  would  witness a civilian‐civilian transition in its long history. 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

7   

  GEOPOLITICAL ENVIRONMENT  Although a very wealthy nation, years of mismanagement by past military rulers, have seen the  decay  of  the  nation’s  basic  infrastructure,  leading  to  low  economic  development.  Although  the  present  government  as  well  as  the  Obasanjo  government  have  tried  to  improve  the  situation  with  the  involvement  of  the  private  sector,  and  a  targeted  effort  aimed  at  reducing  endemic  corruption  in  the  nation’s  polity,  the  country  still  needs  to  do  a  lot  in  the  provision  of  basic  infrastructure  such  as  electricity,  transportation  and  communication,  if  it  is  to  achieve  the  desired  level  of  development.  Also  due  to  lack  of  coordination  between  the  federal  state  and  local governments, as well as lack of staff to implement and monitor projects on health, poverty  and  education,  Nigeria  will  not  be  able  to  meet  its  millennium  development  goal  of  halving  poverty by 2015.  On  the  aspect  of  defense,  the  country  maintains  a  sizeable  armed  services  of  about  76,000  active  duty  personnel  comprised  of  the  Nigerian  Army  which  has  got  about  90%  of  the  total  service  personnel  as  well  as  the  Nigerian  Navy  of  about  7,000  personnel  and  the  Nigerian  Air  force  of  approximately  9,000  personnel.  Nigeria  plays  an  important  role  in  regional  and  continental peace,  contributing  the  largest  bulk of  soldiers  in  the  UN  peace keeping missions  in  Liberia,  Sierra  Leone,  Rwanda,  Yugoslavia,  and  Sudan’s  Darfur  region.  The  country  currently  pursues a policy of developing domestic military production capabilities.  Nigeria  shares  territorial  borders  with  Benin,  Cameroon,  Chad  and  Niger;  and  had  been  involved  in  a  long  territorial  dispute  with  the  republic  of  Cameroon  over  the  potentially  oil‐rich 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

8   

Bakassi  peninsula.  However,  the  issue  was  addressed  by  the  international  court  of  justice  (ICJ)  in  2002  and  in  2008;  the  Obasanjo  government  officially  cede  Bakassi  to  Cameroon  ending  the  decade‐long dispute.    SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT  Nigeria  ranks  8th  in  the  world  when  it  comes  to  its  population.  As  at  June  2009,  its  population  stood  at  almost  150million.  The  majority  of  its  population  re  aged  between  15‐64  years  old  (55.5%)  and  the  average  age  of  its  nationals  is  18.9  years  according  to  a  2009  estimate.  Generally, there are no public discriminations based on gender and although women are visible  in  every  facet  of  the  country;  from  politics  to  sports,  yet  more  still  has  to  be  done  especially  in  the  north  of  the  country  to  encourage  female  participation.  The  average  life  expectancy  of  the  Nigerian  female  and  male  is  46/45  years  respectively  and  this  is  mostly  due  to  health  related  mortality  as  well  as  illiteracy  levels.  This  means  that  the  average  productivity  of  the  Nigerian  citizen  may  be  limited.  There  are  also  more  than  250  ethnic  groups  and  thus  languages  in  Nigeria.  Occasional  ethnic  tension  and  riots  erupts  especially  in  the  predominantly  Muslim  north  with  reprisal  attacks  in  the  predominantly  Christian  south  and  east.  These  sad  phenomena marked several periods during president Obasanjo’s administration.  Since the restoration of democracy in the country, a new middle class has sprung up due to the  more  transparent  system  introduced  by  the  Obasanjo  administration  as  well  as  the  deregulation  and  consolidation  of  the  banking  and  telecommunication  sector  of  the  economy.  The  per  capita  GDP  however,  stood  at  $1,149  in  2007.  A  2003  estimate,  shows  that 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

9   

approximately  68%  of  the  total  population  is  literate.  This  figure  has  increased  recently,  due  to  the  importance  and  privileges  which  degree  holders  enjoy.  The  fast  upward  mobility  of  degree  holders,  from  low  income  families  to  middle  class  status  is  spurring  this  trend.  While  the  upper  class  citizens  exists  as  the  wealthy  few,  typically  business  and  power  brokers  in  the  oil,  telecommunications, banking and politics sectors of the country.  The average lifestyle of the Nigerian citizen is depends on geographical and religious affiliations.  Life  is  more  conservative  in  the  predominantly  Muslim  north,  while  a  more  western  and  flamboyant lifestyle is the norm in the predominantly Christian east and south of the country. A  market for western products although vibrant in all state capitals of the country, is more vibrant  in  the  south,  while  the  north  is  more  inclined  to  being  a  market  for  consumables  from  North  Africa and the Middle East due to religious affiliations.  Power rests with the traditional chiefs, the local government, state government and the federal  government.  However,  companies  interested  in  investing  in  the  extractive  industrial  sector  of  the  country,  would  have  to  maintain  strong  cordial  relationship  with  the  traditional  rulers  and  chiefs  of  the  communities  which  they’ll  be  involved  in  and  must  take  corporate  social  responsibility  seriously  as  indigenous  communities  are  adept  at  mobilizing  its  residents  against  firms  perceived  to  be  causing  harm  or  seen  as  unfair  to  the  community.  This  is  exemplified  by  the  ordeals  US  oil  exploring  organizations  have  had  to  face  at  the  hand  of  the  Niger  Delta  militants in recent times.     
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

10   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT  Since  1999,  Nigeria  has  witnessed  considerable  economic  stability  with  its  GDP  purchasing  power parity rising to US $ 336.2 billion in 2008. The country’s real growth rate has seen steady  increase  since  1999  and  grew  at  about  6.4%  in  2007,  but  due  to  fluctuating  global  oil  prices,  coupled  with  internal  disruption  of  its  oil  production  by  the  activities  of  the  Niger  delta  militants,  this  growth  slowed  down  to  about  5.3%  in  2008.  Although  the  country  has  recently  put  in  great  efforts  to  diversify  its  economy  by  opening  up  the  financial  and  telecommunications  sectors  of,  it  still  depends  heavily  on  crude  oil  exports  which  account  for  about  95%  of  its  foreign  exchange  earnings.  National  capital  reserves  as  at  December,  2008,  stood  at  over  US  $35billion  while  inflation  and  interest  rates  stood  at  11.6%  and  15.48%  respectively during the same period. Unemployment rate stood at 4.9% as at 2007.  As  per  capital  markets,  the  Nigerian  Investment  Promotion  Commission  Decree  of  1995,  liberalized Nigeria’s foreign investment laws. This has led to increased and easy access to loans,  credit facilities and instruments provided by financial institutions. Any  foreign investor who has  successfully  registered  or  incorporated  their  company  in  the  country  has  equal  access  to  all  financial  instruments  available.  This  presents  a  great  opportunity  for  investors,  moreover,  as  commercial bank lending rates are high with very short maturity rates for debt instruments, the  Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) is considered by most investors to be a good financing option.  Other Economic and Foreign Investment Policies  Nigeria is Africa’s most populous nation with over 140 million people, and a source for low cost  labor,  abundant  natural  resources  and  potentially  the  largest  domestic  market  in  sub‐  Saharan 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

11   

Africa. However,  hurdles  exists  which  hinders  its  attainment of  its  potentials,  and  these  include  inadequate  infrastructure,  transportation  and  etc.  Thus  the  present  government  has  loosened  controls  over  foreign  investment  in  these  and  other  areas;  and  previous  decrees  hindering  healthy  competition,  or  giving  monopolistic  powers  to  public  enterprises  have  either  been  repealed  or  amended.  The  government  of  Yar’Adua  has  continued  to  solicit  for  foreign  investment and has implemented various reforms aimed at attracting foreign investments.  Foreign investors can own property in Nigeria through mortgages, although little problems with  the  registration  of  properties  exist,  and  the  World  Bank’s  publication:  Doing  Business  2008,  ranked Nigeria 51 out of 178 countries surveyed for registering property. The report shows that  it  takes  approximately  14  procedures  and  82  days  to  register  any  given  property;  while  costing  about  22.2%  of  the  property’s  value.  Most  properties  are  long  term  leases  which  have  certificates  of  occupancies  a.k.a  C  of  O’s  acting  as  title  deeds.  Repatriation  of  funds  has  always  been easy with minimal regulatory restrictions.    Economic opportunities  Huge  opportunities  exists  in  the  oil  and  gas  field  machinery  sectors,  aerospace  /  aviation/  avionics  sectors;  Computer  software  development  and  peripherals;  telecommunications  equipment  supply  sector;  medical  equipment,  automobile  parts,  assembly  and  manufacture  sectors and construction equipment sectors of the Nigerian economy.   
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

12   

POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT  Governance  system  in  Nigeria  is  democratic,  consisting  of  three  branches  of  government.  The  Executive, legislative and Judicial branches.  The  Executive  branch  of  government  is  occupied  by  the  president  who  is  both  the  head  of  government  and  the  chief  of  state.  This  position  has  been  occupied  by  President  Umaru  Musa  Yar’Adua  since  the  29th  of  May,  2007.  While  the  legislative  arm  of  government  is  made  up  of  a  bicameral  national  assembly  consisting  of  109  senators  and  the  House  of  Representatives  consisting  of  360  representatives.  Both  the  senators  and  representatives  each  have  4year  tenure.  The  judicial  branch  of  governance  however,  is  made  up  of  the  Supreme  Court,  which  is  the highest court, and the federal court of appeal as well as other customary and sharia courts.  The  dependence  of  the  judiciary  on  the  federal  government  for  the  appointment  of  its  top  official is a key factor which has been attributed to the present fairly unfair legal systems in the  country.  CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT  Religion  and  traditional/  cultural  affiliations  permeate  business  settings,  and  high  morals  and  respect is a custom in sincere business dealings in Nigeria. For business transactions, visitors are  expected  to  be  appropriately  dressed.  Wearing  casual  clothes  may  convey  an  unserious  or  casual  attitude,  especially  to  European‐trained  Nigerians.  People  are  commonly  addressed  by  their  titles,  especially  the  honorary  titles  of  all  traditional  leaders.  Important  business  dealings  are  usually  done  on  a  face  to  face  basis  in  Nigeria.  Meaningful  business  transactions  are  normally  not  completed  at  one  meeting.  There  are  usually  follow  up  meetings.  Nigerians 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

13   

adhere  to  the  “African  Time”  a  parlance  commonly  used  to  refer  to  their  never  been  punctual  to  meetings.  Elderly  people  are  treated  with  respect  in  Nigeria  and  juniors  are  expected  to  be  respectful in their mannerism to older people in Nigeria.  Business communications involve preferably, making personal calls, hand delivered messages or  cell  phone  or  text  messages,  to  fix  appointments.  Normal  postal  system  is  very  slow  in  Nigeria  and  the  landline  system  is  very  unreliable.  Important  documents  should  be  preferably  sent  via  registered  mail  or  reputable  courier  services  such  as  FEDEX,  DHL,  or  UPS.  All  mails  should  contain  a  street  address  and  a  private  mail  bag  (PMB)  or  a  post  office  box  (P.O.Box)  number  in  addition to the recipient’s name.  With regard to communications infrastructure, Nigeria ranks 69 in the usage of telephone main  lines as at 2008, with 1.308million subscribers, while it ranks 16th among about 200 countries, in  the  use  of  mobile  cellular  phones,  during  the  same  year,  with  approximately  62.988million  users.  Also,  the  country  boasted  of  about  83  AM,  36  FM  and  11  SW  radio  broadcast  stations  as  at  2001.  It  also  had  3  television  broadcast  stations  and  two  government‐controlled  stations  as  well as 15 repeater stations as at 2001. The country also ranks poorly in internet hosting, having  only 1,098 internet hosts early 2009, ranking 158 in comparison to other countries of the world.  Its internet usage however pegged at 11million in 2008 ranking 29th in the world.       
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

14   

  OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS  OPPORTUNITIES 
Selling Oil and gas Equipment  Selling  Aviation  and  avionic  components,  Equipments and crafts.  Selling    Computer  software  and  hardware  peripherals  Mining  of  mineral  resources,  such  as  tin,  zinc,  coal  etc.  Easy repatriation of profits  Equal  financing  opportunity  from  the  Nigerian  capital market                                      Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

THREATS 
Occasional ethnic upheavals  Fairly unreliable legal systems  Weak  enforcement  of  Intellectual  Property  protection laws  Long process of property registration     

15     

CONCLUSION  Nigeria  is  a  very  attractive  economy  to  invest  in  as  there  are  very  limited  restrictions  to  doing  business and there are no restrictions to imports except those on the import ban or prohibition   list available on the Nigerian Customs website. With a stable political environment, investments  are sure to be secure and safe. The openness of the government to foreign investments and the  ease  of  repatriation  of  funds  make  it  a  choice  investment  destination  for  most  international  investors.  However,  occasional  ethnic  disturbances  may  erupt,  but  are  usually  of  little  significance to major business activities.    RECOMMENDATIONS  Below are a few recommendations for investors intending to carry out business in Nigeria:    • Investors  interested  in  making  foreign  direct  investments  should  consider  investing  in  the  many  opportunities  available  in  the  Oil  and  gas,  Aviation,  Computer  software  and  peripherals,  Medical  equipments,  Construction  equipments  and  IT  education;  as  there  are  no  legal  barriers  preventing  entry  into  any  business,  except  the  minimum  qualifications required by the various professional bodies.  • Foreign  companies  seeking  to  do  business  in  Nigeria  are  expected  to  do  so  with  incorporated companies or otherwise incorporate their subsidiaries locally.   • Despite  the  above  recommendations,  Firms  interested  in  the  Nigerian  market  are  strongly  advised  to  seek  and  secure  the  assistance  of  experienced  commercial  lawyers, 
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr    http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

16   

since  the  enforcement  of  intellectual  property  rights  remains  a  problem  in  Nigeria  despite several official pronouncements and existing copyright laws.   • Foreign companies interested in selling in Nigeria, should bear in mind the inconsistency  of  the  nation’s  tariff  system.  Although  Nigeria  is  a  founding  member  of  the  Economic  Community  of  West  African  States  (ECOWAS)  and  supports  its  Common  External  Tariff,  however,  the  nation’s  implementation  of  non‐tariff  barriers  are  arbitrary  and  uneven  and continues to violate WTO prohibitions against trade bans.           
   

             
  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

17   

REFERENCES 

1. http://www.nigeriaembassyusa.org/investment.shtml 2. http://www.buyusa.gov/nigeria 3. http://www.buyusa.gov/nigeria/en/7.html 4. http://www.cenbank.org/ 5. http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2836.htm 6. www.ncc.gov.ng 7. http://www.nigerianfranchise.org 8. http://www.nigeria.gov.ng/fed_min_health.aspx 9. http://www.nipc-nigeria.org/valueinfo.html 10. http://www.nbc-nig.org/Licenced_stations.asp 11. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ni.html 12. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-worldFactbook/fields/2144.html?countryName=Nigeria&countryCode=ni&regionCode=af&#ni 13. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-worldfactbook/fields/2077.html?countryName=Nigeria&countryCode=ni&regionCode=af&#ni 14. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-worldfactbook/fields/2115.html?countryName=Nigeria&countryCode=ni&regionCode=af&#ni

15. http://www.doingbusiness.org/exploreeconomies/?economyid=143 16. http://www.otal.com/nigeria/nigeriaimports.htm 17. http://www.buyusa.gov/nigeria/en/serviceproviders.html?bsp_cat=80120000

  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com 

18   

   

  Lawrence O. Emeagwali        lawrenceemeagwali@gau.edu.tr   

http://strategy‐lawrence.blogspot.com