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Question: What are Jewish Dietary Laws?

Answer: A person keeps kosher if he or she follows Jewish Dietary Laws. Jewish Dietary
Laws are derived from Biblical laws and rabbinical extensions.
In a nutshell, Jewish Dietary Laws say:
1. Certain animals may not be eaten at all. Only animals that are ruminant (chew its cud)
and have split hooves may be eaten.
2. Of the animals that may be eaten, the birds and mammals must be slaughtered in
accordance with Jewish law.
3. Certain parts of permitted animals may not be eaten.
4. All blood must be drained from the meat or broiled out of it before it is eaten.
5. Meat (the flesh of birds and mammals) cannot be eaten with dairy.
6. Eggs, fruits, vegetables and grains are considered pareve, and can be eaten with either
meat or dairy. Fish is also considered pareve, but some kosher observant Jews do not
eat fish with meat.
7. Utensils that have come into contact with meat (while hot) may not be used with
dairy, and vice versa. Utensils that have come into contact with non-kosher food
(while hot) may not be used with kosher food.
8. Grape products made by non-Jews may not be eaten.

Only animals that chew their cud and have cloven hooves are kosher (Lev.
11:3; Deut. 14:6). Thus beef, sheep, lamb, goats and deer may be eaten, while
pork, camel and rabbits may not. These restrictions include the flesh, organs,
milk and any by-products.
Sembelihan

These animals must have no disease or flaws (Num. 11:22). Many ritual slaughterhouses
perform post-mortem examination's of the lungs for adhesions. Animals free of these
adhesions are designated glatt ("smooth") kosher.
Kosher animals must be ritually slaughtered in order to remain kosher (Deut. 12:21). The
primary goal of ritual slaughter is to rid the animal of as much blood as possible, for ingesting
blood is forbidden by the Torah. Ritual slaughter involves cutting the animal's throat with an

extremely sharp knife with no nicks (this is regarded as the most humane method of
slaughter). The meat must then be kashered, or made kosher, by hanging the carcass to drain
as much blood as possible. The meat must then be washed, salted ("kosher salt" is designed
for this purpose), and cooked well-done.
LEPAS SEMBELIH SALT THE MEAT TO GET ALL THE BLOOD OUT. LET SIT FOR
AN HOUR ,SO THAT THE SALT WILL EXTRACTED THE BLOOD AWAY FROM
MEAT.

The prohibition of eating the sinew of kosher animal's


thigh ("gid ha nasheh")
The two primary tissues are forbidden in the hindquarter:

The Inner sinew - the Sciatic nerve - which


branches out from the rear of the spinal column and
runs down the inner side of the kosher animal's leg,
is forbidden by the Torah.

The outer sinew - the common peroneal nerve which runs across the thigh on the outer side of the
kosher animal's leg, is forbidden by the sages
(chullin 91a)

Every last trace of these nerves must be removed, and


the fat covering the sciatic nerve which look like strings
and certain other veins are removed.