You are on page 1of 51

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

The Organizational Climate of the SUNY New Paltz Womens Soccer, Basketball, and Tennis
Teams
Bryce Kristall, Deanna Molinelli, Devin Tracy
SUNY New Paltz

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

Table of Contents
Introduction..3
Background Information..4
Review of Literature7
A. Definition of Organizational Climate.7
B. Dimensions of Organizational Climate...9
C. Psychological Climate...10
Methodology..11
Rationale for Survey Questions14
Works Cited...18

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

Introduction
The purpose of this study is to find the current organizational climate within three certain
womens athletic teams here at SUNY New Paltz. The three teams we have chosen to study are
the womens basketball team, womens soccer team, and the womens tennis team. We have
chosen these teams specifically because all have had successful seasons in the past four years.
Each member of our research team has been a part of one of the teams for at least one season.
Deanna was a member of the 2011-2012 womens basketball team. Bryce has been on the
womens soccer roster since 2011, and Devin has been on the womens tennis roster since 2011
as well.
New Paltz Athletics is part of the SUNYAC athletic conference, which is incorporated in
Division III collegiate sports. This conference includes all SUNY schools in New York State. The
womens basketball team has 27 overall games including conference and non-conference, the
womens soccer team has a total of 18 conference and non-conference games, and the womens
tennis team has 22 matches both conference and non-conference. According to the New Paltz
athletics website, the mission of SUNY New Paltz athletics is:
The mission of the State University of New York at New Paltz Department of Athletics
within the Division of Student Affairs is to sponsor a broad-based athletic program that provides
educational and athletic opportunities for young men and women to grow and develop, and to
support the mission of the College by complementing and enhancing its diversity and quality of
life. The departments athletic program strives for competitive excellence within the SUNYAC
and other similar institutions. To fulfill this mission, the department has developed principles of
operation to provide guidance and direction to its personnel. This Mission Statement and

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

accompany principles require strong dedication and commitment from all who participate in,
coach in, and support the Department of Athletics (New Paltz Hawks, 2015).
Division III sports is extremely different than DII and DI because there is no scholarship
money given and an athlete plays voluntarily. For this reason, we thought it would be interesting
to examine the climate and commitment of athletes on these teams. Our main focus is the
organizational climate of each team and how it can affect an outcome of a season.
Background Information
The womens soccer team is currently coached by Colleen Bruley who has been
coaching the team for seventeen years. With 116 victories, Bruley is the winningest coach in the
programs history. The Hawks have earned a berth in the State University of New York Athletic
Conference (SUNYAC) Tournament seven times under Bruley (1999, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2010,
2011, 2012), and in 2011 In Bruleys fifteenth year she coached the team to its most successful
season when they won its first-ever league title in 2011, also earning a spot in the NCAA
Division III Women's Soccer Championship Tournament. The team made it to the third round of
the NCAA tournament called the Sweet 16. This coach has also led the team to four SUNAC
titles and three different NCAA Division III tournament appearances. This program has seen
great success, therefore we thought it would be interesting to analyze the climate of the team to
see if climate correlates to successful results.
The womens soccer team is comprised of 28 players. Only 24 players are allowed to
travel to away games, but all can have the possibility of playing in home games. Unlike tennis,
this sport is extremely team based and they all need to work together in order to achieve winning
results. When one player is down or having an off game it is up to the other players to step up
and keep up the high level of play. Each game is 90 minutes long. If the game is tied at the end

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

there are a maximum of two ten-minute periods. If it is still tied after that then it goes to penalty
kicks, where it is a shootout with five chosen players from each team. Soccer is a physically and
mentally intense sport because players need to stay focused throughout the entire game.
Soccer is a fall sport and the season starts August 16th for preseason training and ends at
the SUNYAC championship tournament in the beginning of November. The fall season got off to
a very promising start of 6-0, but struggled the remainder of the season just missing a spot in the
SUNYAC playoffs. Compared to the womens basketball and tennis teams, soccer is the shortest
season and it will be interesting to compare the organizational climates of these teams when they
all spend varying amounts of time together as a team.
The 2014-2015 season marks Jamie Sewards ninth season coaching for the SUNY New
Paltz womens basketball team. Prior to Sewards arrival the Hawks had never gone above .500
in a single season. He is currently the only coach in New Paltz history to get at least 100 wins. In
his nine seasons, Seward has held a record of 153-89. He has also led the Hawks to seven
SUNYAC womens basketball championship appearances. In 2012-13, Seward and his team
were able to capture the SUNYAC title and make their first appearance in the NCAA tournament.
Seward won his first SUNYAC Coach of the year award in 2012-13, as well as the 2013 Russell
Athletic/WBCA NCAA Division III Region 2 Coach of the Year award, which made him an
automatic finalist for National Coach of the Year.
Currently, the womens basketball program has 15 players on the roster and five get to
play on the court at the same time. The game consists of two 20-minute halves and a 15-minute
halftime. The basketball team is definitely a team-centered game, wherein every person must
work together to ultimately win the game. Each player has to know each persons strengths and
weaknesses when they are out there on the court. We think that it would be interesting to know

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

the similarities in climates between sports like tennis because it is more individualized than
soccer and basketball.
The season for the womens basketball team usually takes place in the months of October
through early March. They also have a week to go home for the holiday season in December and
then right after New Years they have to come back until school starts, called the intersession
period. This is definitely unlike any other sport here on campus because no one is here when they
come back, so the team spends plenty of time together. We are curious in our research to find if
the intersession period has an effect on the organizational climate of the womens basketball
team.
The womens tennis team is currently coached by Robert Bruley, who has been
the coach of the team for seventeen years. During his time here at New Paltz he has a record of
158-88 over 16 seasons. Under his leadership the tennis team has finished either first or second
in the SUNYAC conference for twelve consecutive years. Bruley has also led the team to four
SUNAC titles and three different NCAA Division III tournament appearances.
The team is currently made up of twelve women and seven of them who start. There are
also two senior co-captains on the roster. These seven players participate in both doubles and
singles. There are three doubles teams and six singles players for the Hawks. The players
individual results affect the ultimate team scoring at the end. In a collegiate match there are nine
possible points a team can receive and if they win five of those nine, they automatically win the
match. This sport is extremely psychological because it is a mental game focusing solely on
individuals until the results are determined. This is the main reason why we will incorporate
psychological climate in our study.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

The womens tennis team has a different schedule than the rest of the programs here at
New Paltz. Instead of just one traditional season, either in the fall or spring semester, the team
plays in both semesters. In the fall portion of their schedule, the team competes in their
conference season. The season starts August 16th, like womens soccer, for preseason training and
ends at the SUNYAC championship tournament during Columbus weekend. The fall portion of
the season ended in the SUNYAC championship match against SUNY Geneseo in a 5-0-match
loss. The fall season was successful though with a 9-3 overall record and .750 winning
percentage.
For the spring portion of the womens tennis teams schedule, there is more nonconference competition. Tennis is the only fall sport that goes on a spring break trip partially paid
for by the college. During this trip the team plays colleges from all over the country and plays
regionally ranked teams. If the team succeeds during the spring portion of their schedule it is
possible to gain an NCAA bid for the NCAA tennis tournament.
Because we are studying three different organizations, our study is a good way to test the
usefulness of the concept of climate. Over the past four years each of these teams has done well
within their division. Studying the climate of each team will be an ample amount of perspectives
being researched and a sufficient determination of similarities in climate in organizations.
Review of Literature
Definition of Organizational Climate
The purpose of our study is to observe and compare the organizational climate of the
womens basketball team, womens soccer team, and womens tennis team. The main key
concept that applies to our research is organizational climate. We have chosen two different
definitions of organizational climate. According to Corman, Banks, Bantz, and Mayer (1990),
The climate of the organization is generally assumed that as an employee or member is

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

assimilated into an organization, he/she develops an evolving set of perceptions about what the
organization is like as a communication system (p.186). The second definition we took from
Corman, Banks, Bantz, and Mayer (1990) is, Organizational climate differed from
communication climate in its focus on organizational structure, individual responsibility,
rewards, job challenge, warmth, and tolerance (p. 49). We feel both of these definitions apply to
our study and give insight to what we are looking for in the organizational climate in the three
different sports teams during our research.
Another definition we have found, which is less complex but easier to understand is from
Tagiuri (1968). Organizational climate is relatively enduring quality of total environment that
(1) is experienced by occupants, (2) influences their behavior, and (3) can be described in terms
of values of a particular set of characteristics (or attributes) of the environment (Tagiuri, 1968,
p. 13). Although this is a less complex explanation and definition, it highlights the main points of
what organizational climate is. Without member involvement and interaction, there is no
organizational climate. Organizational climate is the result of the behaviors, values, norms, and
standards in the day-to-day functions of the organization. According to Putnam and Cheney
(1985) organizational climate is the product of the members immediate experience with the
organization (p. 137). Essentially, there is a direct correlation between the connectedness with
colleagues (teammates) and organizational climate. The organizational climate is dictated by the
connectedness with colleagues (teammates). You cannot have one without the other.
The main aspects of organizational climate that apply to our study include: role clarity,
responsibility, growth, connectedness with colleagues (teammates), team commitment, standards,
rewards, fairness, collaboration, and flexibility (Permarupan, Mamun, Saufi, Zainul, 2013, p.
64). Role clarity is knowing what is expected from you and understanding how those

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

expectations relate to the goals of the organization. Responsibility is the feeling that you can do
your job without being micromanaged and possess accountability. Growth means members
perceive an environment where they are praised, recognized, and appreciated by colleagues and
their leader for their accomplishments. Connectedness with colleagues means members perceive
an environment where they trust their colleagues and where their colleagues make an effort to
form an interpersonal connection with them. Team commitment is feeling proud and expressing
pride in belonging to the organization. It means trusting that everyone works towards a common
objective and works positively together across organizational structures. Standards are the degree
to which challenging, but attainable goals are set. Rewards means being recognized for good
work and the degree to which recognition is directly related to levels of performance. Fairness
means members perceive an environment where benefits, resources, and workload are fair,
balanced, and equitable, people treat each other with respect, and leaders act in an ethical
manner. Collaboration means members perceive an organizational environment and culture that
enhances collaboration, cooperation, and encouragement between all organizational members.
Flexibility is the degree to which you feel there are no unnecessary rules or procedures and the
feeling that new ideas are easy to get accepted. These aspects influence the behaviors, values,
and norms in the daily functions of the organizations. These key factors are the major aspects we
will be continuously thinking about during our research of the organizational climate within the
women's basketball team, womens soccer team, and womens tennis team.
Dimensions of Organizational Climate
There are various dimensions of organizational climate and these dimensions are best
described in Putnam and Cheney (1987). In this chapter the authors express four major
dimensions of organizational climate. They include: individual growth, degree of structure or

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

10

role clarity, reward, and consideration, warmth or support, or what we would call connectedness
with teammates. Individual growth includes activities that improve personal awareness and
identity, develop talents and potential, enhance quality of life and contribute to the realization of
dreams and aspirations. These four basic dimensions are the foundations of the different types of
organizational climate. All dimensions of organizational climate as listed are their own separate
variable. Therefore the best way to measure the different variables or dimensions is to distribute
a questionnaire (Putnam and Cheney, 1985, p. 132).
A different dimension of organizational climate, which is important to our study, has to
do with leadership functions. The Ideal Management Climate, created by Falcione and Werner
(1978), has become an important model for leaders in different industries. The Ideal
Management Theory consists of supportiveness, trust, openness, and participative decisionmaking. There is also an emphasis on high performance goals or setting standards for colleagues.
This goes directly with our research because the responsibility of the team leaders and managers
to communicate to their members what the standards are within the organization will set the
climate for the season. Trust, which is a type of positive communication, is also an extremely
important component because when people trust one-another there is more success within a
team. This statement is true of all the scholars description and the factors of organizational
climate.
These four sets of factors all contribute to the organizational climate of the organization.
All of these sets are very similar in that they deal with a lot of personal reflection of the
individuals role in the organization such as role clarity, connectedness with colleagues,
collaboration, and support. The factors are extremely intertwined and influence the
organizational climate.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

11

Psychological Climate
In a study done by Muchinsky, the author explains how positive communication and trust
leads to many other positive relationships in an organization. Thus, positive communication
relates to positive psychological environment and the way employees or members view the
organization (Muchinsky, 1977, p. 600). According to Muchinksy, the more positive the
communication is in an organization directly corresponds with the happiness of its members or in
our case teammates.
Muchinsky expresses in his study how psychological climate is a key component within
organizational climate. The climate of an individual can greatly affect the climate of the entire
organization (Muchinsky, 1977, p. 595). Since this aspect of organizational climate focuses on
individuals, we feel it is important to incorporate in our study. The way an individual feels about
an organization or team can have an effect on the team as a whole therefore changing the climate
either positively or negatively. Through our survey we believe this aspect will be shown and will
thus help us grasp the different climates of each team.
Methodology
For our study, we will be applying quantitative research. Quantitative research will be
very useful in our analysis because we want to study the organizational climate of each team as a
unit. According to John D. Anderson, quantitative research is objective, seeks explanatory laws,
includes numbers and must have a large number of respondents (Anderson, 2006). Another
commonly used definition according to Earl Babbie (2013) is, quantitative methods emphasize
objective measurements and the statistical, mathematical, or numerical analysis of data collected
through polls, questionnaires, and surveys, or by manipulating pre-existing statistical data using
computational techniques. Quantitative research focuses on gathering numerical data and
generalizing it across groups of people or to explain a particular phenomenon (Babbie, 2013).

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

12

Quantitative method of research will be helpful because we want to study the association
between the climate of the organization and all of its members. We will be using numbers and
statistics that ultimately will begin to break down each category we have picked to measure.
Babbie (2013) also tells us that quantitative research can be used to generalize concepts more
widely, predict future results or investigate causal relationships (Babbie, 2013). In our research
however, we are more focused on being able to look at the numbers and each concept.
The participants in our study are all undergraduate students at SUNY New Paltz. We will
be researching the current players on the womens tennis, soccer and basketball teams. Each of
these teams is a part of the SUNYAC DIII conference, which includes all SUNY schools in New
York State. All participants are all women over the age of 18. The womens tennis team is made
up of twelve players, six of which start for the team. The womens soccer team has a total of
thirty members, with eleven players who start. The womens basketball roster is fifteen in total
and five who start. There are distinct differences between tennis and the other two sports because
there are no substitutions in the sport. Soccer and basketball are sports where substitutions are
used frequently, consequently, and are team sports. Each participant in the research will express
their interpretation of the organizational climate of their sport and give us a sufficient amount of
data to understand the atmosphere of each collegiate sport. The possible total number of
participants in our survey will be 55 but we are aware some will not want to participate so the
number could be lower.
We realize that because we are doing three different teams, it would be very difficult to
try to make them all meet at the same time. Due to this, we will have different days in which we
will hand out the surveys. To ensure confidentiality, we have all decided that it would be best if
we handed out the surveys to the team we have not played with. Devin Tracy will be

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

13

administering the surveys to the womens basketball team, Bryce Kristall will be administering it
to the womens tennis team and Deanna Molinelli will distribute it to the womens soccer team.
The womens basketball team is currently no longer is season; however, the team has regular
weekly meetings with their coach. We will pick a day after spring break and hand out our survey
to the team. We will be handing them out at the gym in a classroom so that other teams will not
be able to see the survey. The womens tennis and soccer teams both have a season in the spring,
so we will administer those surveys after a practice. We feel as if this is the easiest way to ensure
that the most amount of surveys are being distributed and that they are getting into the hands of
the right team. Before we hand out any surveys we will make sure that we state our script. Our
script will consist of our names, our class that we are doing this for and that we will be studying
the organizational climate within their team. The participants will be told that we will be the only
individuals that will see the results of the survey, it is completely voluntary and anonymous, and
you must be over the age of 18. The surveys will also be color coded in relation to the sport.
Womens soccer will be blue, womens basketball will be orange, and womens tennis will be
green. As far as their responses go, we will make sure they are aware that all surveys will be
destroyed upon completion of our research and they will be sealed in a white envelope. This
survey will take between 10-15 minutes and student athletes can choose whether or not to
participate.
Our survey will consist of a scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. A one,
will represent that the student athlete strong disagrees with the statement and five, will mean that
they strongly agree with the statement. This will provide our participants with a range of options
and if they feel neutral or have no feelings towards a statement, they can circle a three.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

14

Various amount of factors play into organizational climate. Our survey question includes
different categories, these include: clarity, responsibility, growth, connectedness with members,
team commitment, standards, rewards, fairness, trust, and collaboration and flexibility
(Permarupan, Mamun, Saufi, Zainul, 2013, p. 64). These questions will give student athletes a
Better sense of their team dynamic.
Rationale for Survey Questions
All of us are going to distribute a survey of thirty-four questions to each team to collect
our research. By distributing a quantitative survey we feel we will receive the best results
possible for our study. We will use a Likert scale for the survey. The scale will range from 1-5, 1
meaning strongly disagree and 5 meaning strongly agree; 3 will be neutral or no opinion. When
choosing questions to be asked in the survey, we focused on questions that relate to being a
member on a sports team. All questions will be labeled under variables connected with
Organizational Climate. The following variables will be used in our research:

Role Clarity: Knowing what is expected from you; understanding how these
expectations relate to the goals of the team (Lyon & Ivancevich, 1974).

1. The teams objectives and goals are clear to me.


2. Members have shared understanding of what the team is supposed to do.
4. The members have a clear understanding of what to do during practice.
5. I receive information I need in order to perform well.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

15

Responsibility: Feeling that you have authority delegated to you; feeling


that you can do your job without being micromanaged; accountability
(Permarupan, 2013).
1. During practice and competition, I feel the other members put an equal
amount of effort in.
2. My individual participation to the team adds value to the team as a whole.
3. Each member takes responsibility for their actions.
4. Roles and responsibilities within the team are understood.
Growth: Members perceive an environment where people have
opportunities to learn, grow professionally, and develop skills that lead to
advancement and career growth (Permarupan, 2013).
1. I have the opportunity to further develop my skills and abilities for my
sport by being a part of a SUNY New Paltz varsity team.
2. I find I am challenged daily in my sport.
3. Since starting season I have grown closer to my teammates.

Connectedness with Members: Members perceive an environment where


they trust their leader and where the leader makes an effort to form an
interpersonal connection with them (Permarupan, 2013).
1. Members consult each other when they need support.
2. Interpersonal communication and relationships help enhance my
teams performance.
3. If a disagreement occurs between members, they are addressed
promptly in order to resolve them.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

16

4. I feel I am a valuable part of my team.

Team Commitment: Feeling proud and expressing pride in belonging to the


organization; trusting that everyone works towards a common objective;
working positively together and cooperating across organizational structures
(Permarupan, 2013).
1. I look forward to attending practice and games.
2. There is a good balance between athletic, academic, and personal life.
3. I believe all the members of my team are as committed as myself.

Standards: Emphasis that authority puts on improving performance degree


to which challenging but attainable goals are set extent to which mediocrity
is not tolerated (Permarupan, 2013).
1. My team operates efficiently as a unit.
2. Practices are done effectively and efficiently.
3. Practices are extremely organized and taken seriously by each
member.

Rewards: Being recognized for good work; degree to which recognition is


directly related to levels of performance (Permaurpan, 2013).
1. I feel I am recognized when I perform well.
2. Being a member of my team is rewarding.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

17

3. Each member rewards one another when individuals perform well.

Leadership: Members perceive an environment where benefits, resources,


and workload are fair and balanced and equitable, people treat each other
with respect and leaders act in an ethical manner (Permaurpan, 2013).
1. I believe the authority figures make fair decisions for the team.
2. Captains are held to a higher standard on my team.
3. I feel comfortable around my leaders and feel they have my best
interest in mind.

Collaboration: Members perceive an organizational environment and


culture that enhances collaboration, cooperation, and encouragement
between all organizational members (Permarupan, 2013).
1. My teammates encourage me to do my best.
2. I received helpful feedback during practices and games.
3. I believe my team works well together as a whole.

Flexibility: Degree to which you feel there are no unnecessary rules or


procedures; feeling that new ideas are easy to get accepted (Permarupan,
2013).
1. Members and leaders are open to new ideas.
2. Members opinions are respected at all times.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

18

3. I believe my team understands the value of academics first before


sports.

Limitations
There are various possibilities of limitations that could affect our study.
These include, pressure, conflict of interest, and our own personal
involvement. The participants may feel pressured from either their coaches
or captains to answer the survey in a way that makes the team look like they
have a good organizational climate. Another limitation is, because the individual may feel
pressure from its group leaders they may not want to participate in the survey. A third limitation
may be that because Bryce, Deanna, and Devin have personal involvement with the teams the
participants may not take the survey seriously.
Although we have a few limitations, we feel that the steps we take to conduct our survey
will help the members to understand the nature of our study and will encourage them to
participate. By reminding the athletes the survey is completely confidential and no one will see
the results besides the three of us, it will help influence participation of the study.

Analysis
After collecting out data we received 11 surveys from the womens basketball team, 14
from the womens soccer team, and 8 from the womens tennis team. This gave us thirty-three
total completed surveys out of fifty-six possible surveys. We originally intended to have the full
roster for each team to complete the surveys, but with it being optional we recognized the
potential of not reaching that goal. By collecting the surveys from each team we were able to

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

19

determine patterns between each team. Our results are illustrated in this section on bar graphs.
Each item has 10 charts, one for each dimension of organizational climate. The bar each graph
represents a different question in our survey. The results are in put into percentages in the graph.
The separate graphs are based on the dimensions studied.
The results can be seen on each bar graph. The bar graphs are put into three categories,
agree, neutral and disagree. All of the categories are put into different colors on the graph in
order to make it easier to read. The order of our research goes as follows, womens basketball,
womens soccer, and then womens tennis.
Womens Basketball

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

20

Role clarity had some interesting results. The graph above shows that
100% of the participants on the SUNY womens basketball team believed
that the teams objectives and goals are clear to them. The other categories
were also very high in numbers. 90.9% agreed that members have a shared
understanding of what the team is supposed to do. 81.81% believe that
members have a clear understanding of what to do at practice and only
9.09% disagree and are neutral. Last but not least, 63.63% agreed that they
receive information in order to perform well.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

21

Responsibility was pretty evenly distributed among the members of the


basketball team. The question, during practice and competition, I feel the
other members put an equal amount of effort in was even. 36.36% agreed
that members put an equal amount in but 36.36% also disagree. When it
comes to members taking responsibility for their actions, only 45.45% of the
womens team agreed that they do. 54.54% of the members agreed that
responsibilities within the team are understood, 27.27% were neutral and
18.18% disagreed. However, 90.9% of the members agreed that
responsibilities within the team are understood.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

The findings for growth mainly followed the same pattern across the
board. 90.9% of the members were in agreement that they have had a
chance to further develop their skills and abilities for their sport by being a
member of a SUNY New Paltz varsity team. 81.81% also felt that they are
challenged daily in their sport and 72.72% felt as though they have grown
closer to their teammates since the start of season.

Our results in our survey showed that 81.81% of the basketball team
feels as if interpersonal communication and relationships have helped
enhance their teams performance and the same percentage agreed that

22

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

23

team members view them as valuable. For the other questions, only 63.63%
felt that if a disagreement were to occur between members they would be
addressed promptly. 18.18% disagreed and were neutral with that statement.
Overall, members felt connectedness to their members and a small
percentage felt otherwise.

Team commitment for the basketball team had a wide variety of


percentages. 63.63% agreed that they look forward to attending practices
and games but 36.36% do not look forward to attending practices and

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

24

games. When members were asked if they thought there is a good balance
between athletic, academic and personal life, 63.63% felt neutral, while
27.27% agreed that there was a good balance. 54.54% felt that they do not
believe that all the members of their team are as committed as themselves.
Only 18.18% agreed with that statement. In conclusion participants agreed
that they look forward to attending their sport however, most of them dont
believe that members are as committed as themselves.

The results showed that 63.63% of the basketball team believes that
practices are effective and efficient. The same percentage also agrees that

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS


practices are extremely organized and taken seriously. When it came to
believing that the team operates efficiently as a unit 45.45% agreed while
36.36% felt they did not.

Members of the team for the most part felt that being on the team is
an awarding experience. 63.63% felt that they are recognized when they
perform well and 27.27% felt they werent. 72.72% agreed that being a
member of the basketball team is rewarding and 9.09% felt neutral. When
members were asked if they felt like other members of the team rewarded
them when they performed well, 54.54% agreed. 36.36% did not agree.

25

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

26

The findings regarding leadership were interesting as well. 72.72% of


the members felt that captains are held to a higher standard. The same
percentage (72.72%) was also seen when members were asked if they felt
comfortable around their leaders and felt that they had their best interest in
mind and only 9.09% disagreed. Members responses for whether or not they
believed the authority figure made fair decisions for the team were 54.54%
agree and 36.36% disagree.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

For receiving helpful feedback during practices and games, only


36.36% agreed and 45.45% were neutral on the matter. 54.54% believed
that the team works well together as a whole and only 18.18% disagreed.
72.72% agreed that their teammates encourage them to do their best and
only 9.09% disagreed with that statement.

27

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

28

As far as flexibility goes for the womens basketball team, 72.72%


agreed that their team understands the value of academics first before
sports and 9.09% disagreed. However, when it came to members feeling as
though their opinions were respected at all times 54.54% disagreed and did
not feel that way. Only 36.36% felt as though there opinions were respected.
54.54% agreed that members and leaders were open to new ideas and
36.36% felt neutral.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

29

Womens Soccer

Chart 1: Role Clarity


80

71.4

60

57.1

57.1
50

Percentages

42.8

Disagree

40
Neutral

28.6

Agree

20

14.3 14.3

14.3

12.7
7.1

7.1

0
The team's objectives and goals are clear
The members have a clear understanding
to me.
of what to do during practice.
Members have shared understanding of
I receive information I need in order to
what the team is supposed to do.
perform well.

Questions

Members of the womens soccer team have different opinions on their role on the team.
Although a majority of the feels they have a positive role on the team because at least 50%

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

30

agreed to the questions in this category. Only about one or two (7.1% or 14.3%) disagreed that
they have a clear understanding of their role on the team.

Chart 2: Responsibility
100

85.7
80

64.3
60

Disagree

Percentages

50

50
Neutral

40
Agree
28.6

28.6

20
12.7
7.1

7.1

12.7

7.1

0
During practice and competition I feel the
Each member takes responsibility for their
other members put an equal amount of..
actions.
My individual participation to the team
Responsibilities within the team are
adds value to the team as a whole.
understood.

Questions

The womens soccer players responded that they feel they add value to the team as a
whole (85.7%) but do not feel that all the players put in an equal amount of effort during practice
and competition (28.6% disagree, 64.3% neutral). The players equally feel neutral and agree that
responsibilities are understood.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

31

Chart 3: Growth
100

85.7

85.7
78.6

80

Percentages

60

Disagree

Neutral

40

Agree

21.4
20

7.1

7.1

I have the opportunity to further


develop my skills and abilities.

7.1

I find I am challenged daily in my


sport.

7.1

Since starting this season, I have


grown closer to my teammates.

Questions

Members of the womens soccer team feel that they have an opportunity to further
develop their skills and overall grow as soccer players from being on the team. All the questions
received overwhelmingly high responses agreeing that they have or will get better at soccer. The
results were all over 75% for every question.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

32

Chart 4: Connectedness with Members


100

100
92.9
85.7
80

Percentages

60

Disagree
50
Neutral

40
Agree

20
14.3

14.3

12.7

7.1

0
Members consult each other when they
If a disagreement occurs between
need support.
members, they are addressed promptly..
Interpersonal communication and
I feel my team members view me as a
relationships help enhance my team's..
valuable part of my team.

Questions

Overall, the connectedness with members illustrated the closeness and the bond the
members of the womens soccer team have with each other. 92.9% of the players feel that consult
each other when they need support. 85.7% of the players feel that interpersonal communication
and relationships help enhance the teams performance. 100% of the members feel they are
valued on the team by others. However, when disagreements and conflicts arise between
members, they feel that they are neutral on how the issues are addressed.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

33

Chart 5: Team Commitment


100
92.9

80
71.4

Percentages

60

Disagree

50
Neutral

40

Agree

28.6

28.6
21.4

20

7.1

I look forward to attending practice


and games.

There is a good balance between


athletic, academic, and personal life.

I believe all the members of my team


are as commited as myself.

Questions

The team commitment dimension had different responses to each of the questions. There
were extreme differences especially regarding the question that asked if the member believes all
the members of the team are as committed as themselves. Only 21.4% answered that they agree,
50%, which was the highest response to this question, answered that they were neutral, and
28.6% disagreed. However, the members of the team mostly look forward to practice and games
and feel there is a good balance between their athletic, academic, and personal life.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

34

Chart 6: Standards
100
92.9

80

Percentages

60

Disagree

50

50

50

50
Neutral

40

Agree

20

7.1

My team operates efficiently as a


unit.

Practices are effective and efficient.

Practices are extremely organized


and taken seriously by each member.

Questions

The responses to questions about the standards of the womens soccer team were mostly
neutral or negative. Members overwhelmingly feel that practices are extremely unorganized and
are not taken seriously by each member. 50% of the team feels practices are ineffective and
inefficient, while the other 50% are neutral.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

35

Chart 7: Rewards
100

85.7

80

64.3

64.3

Percentages

60

Disagree

Neutral

40

Agree

35.7
28.6

20
14.3
7.1

I feel I am recognized when I perform


well.

Being a member of my team is


rewarding.

Each member rewards one another


when individuals perform well.

Questions

The results of the rewards section were extremely high and positive. 85.7% of the
participants feel that being part of the womens soccer team is rewarding. 64.3% agreed that they
are recognized when they perform well and each member rewards one another when individuals
perform well. Only 7.1% (1 person) disagreed.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

36

Chart 8: Leadership
50

50

50

42.9
40
35.7

35.7

35.7

Percentages

30

Disagree

Neutral
21.4
20
Agree
14.3

14.3

10

0
I believe the authority figures make fair decisions for the
I feel comfortable around my leaders and feel they have
team.
my best interest in mind.
Captains are held to a higher standard on my team.

Questions

The responses to the leadership section were very scattered across disagree, neutral, and
agree. 50% are neutral on whether they believe the authority figures make fair decisions for the
team. 35.7% disagree that authority figures make fair decisions. 42.9% agree and 35.7% are
neutral regarding captains being held to a higher standard. 50% agree and 35.7% feel neutral that
they are comfortable around their leaders and feel they have their best interest in mind.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

37

Chart 9: Collaboration
78.6

80

64.3
60

50

Percentages

Disagree

Neutral

40

28.6

21.4

28.6

Agree

21.4

20

7.1

My teammates encourage me to do
my best.

I received helpful feedback during


practices and games.

I believe my team works well together


as a whole.

Questions

The questions from collaboration yielded high responses. 79.6% of participants agree that
their teammates encourage them to do their best. 50% agree that they receive helpful feedback
but 21.4% disagree that they receive helpful feedback. 64.3% agree that the team works well
together as a whole.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

38

Chart 10: Flexibility


78.6

80

60

57.1

50
Disagree

Percentages

42.9

42.9
Neutral

40

Agree

20
14.3

7.1

Members and leaders are open to


new ideas.

7.1

Member's opinions are respected at


all times.

I believe my team understands the


value of academics first before sports.

Questions

The responses to flexibility were also high. 57.1% of members agree that members and
leaders are open to new ideas, but 42.9% were neutral. 79.6% agree that they believe the team
understands the value of academics first before sports. 7.1% once again disagreed that members
opinions are respected at all times.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

39

Womens Tennis

From looking at this graph as a whole, it is easy to see that most


teammates agreed with the questions. 100% of the members on the tennis
team agreed about the team objectives and goals being clear to them.
62.5% of the tennis players agreed they understand what the team as a
whole is supposed to do. When it comes to a clear understanding of what to
do at practice 62.5% of players having an understanding and 37.5% are
combined for neutral and disagree. Although when it comes to receiving
information in order to perform well 87.5% agree with this statement while
only 12.5% do not.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

40

For the responsibility section in our study, the tennis team shows high
results. Each question is 75% or above. This expresses an understanding
between team members when it comes to responsibility. 75% of the team
agrees with members putting an equal amount of effort in, individual
participation adds value to the team as a whole, and responsibilities within
the team are understood. 87.5% of the tennis team agrees with each
member takes responsibilities for their actions.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

41

The results shown for our growth category also show high results.
87.5% of the members agreed that they have an opportunity to further their
skills and abilities while participating on this team. 75% believe they are
challenged daily in their sport. 62.5% of the tennis players express that they
have grown closer to their teammates over the course of the season.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

42

When it comes to the teammates on the tennis team feeling connected


with other teammates, the results vary. 62.5% of the members agree with
teammates consulting each other when they need support and 37.5 are
neutral on the subject. When it comes to communication and relationships
enhancing the teams performance 62.5% were neutral and 37.5% agree.
50% of the tennis players feel neutral when a disagreement occurs and it is
dealt with promptly and 25% disagree with this question. 62.5% of the
members feel the team views them as a valuable part of the team, 25%
disagree, and 12.5% are neutral.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

43

Team commitment for the tennis team is mostly agreed upon. 75% of
the tennis players agree with looking forward to attending practice and
games which is important for a good organizational climate. 100% of the
members believe there is a good balance between athletic, academic, and
personal life. The last question, all members are as committed as myself, has
mixed results. 62.5% are neutral on the subject, 25% agree, and 12.5%
disagree.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

44

Team standard is another section for the tennis team which has
mixed results depending on the question. 62.5% that the team operates
efficiently as a unit. When asked if practices are effective and efficient, 50%
were neutral, 37.5% agreed, and 12.5% disagreed. The last question,
practices are extremely organized and taken seriously by each member, also
has interesting results. 37.5% agreed and were neutral, while 25% of the
team disagreed.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

45

The results in this section are high and it is easy to tell most members
feel rewarded whiling being on this team. 87.5% agreed that they are
recognized when they perform well. 62.5% believe it is rewarding being a
member of the tennis team and 37.5% are neutral. 75% of the tennis players
agree with each member rewards one another when individuals perform well.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

46

The tennis team expressed high results when it comes to leadership on


the team. 75% agreed with both believing authority figures make fair
decisions and feeling comfortable around leaders and that they have their
best interest in mind. 62.5% agreed with the statement that captains are
held to a higher standard on the team. The only disagreement when it came
to leadership is 12.5% believe that captains are not held to a higher
standard.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

47

According to the chart, the tennis team has a high agreement


percentage for collaboration. 87.5% of members feel that their teammates
encourage them to do their best, which is important to establish a good
climate for the team. 75% felt they receive helpful feedback during practice
and games and 75% believe that the team works well together. Only 12.5%
disagreed about team encouragement and helpful feedback.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

48

Flexibility is an important factor in order for a team to have a good


organizational climate. As a whole there were positive results. 87.5% of the
tennis players agreed to leaders and other teammates being open to new
ideas, while 12.5% were neutral. 62.5% believe that members opinions are
respected at all times, while 37.5% were neutral. 75% of the tennis team
believes that the team as a whole understands the value of academics first.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

Discussion/Conclusion

49

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

50

Works Cited
Anderson, J. D. (2006). Qualitative and quantitative research. Imperial COE, 3.
Babbie, E. (2013). The basics of social research. Cengage Learning.
Banks, S. P., Bantz, C. R., & Mayer, M. E. (1990). Foundations of organizational
communication: A reader. New York: Longman.
Falcione, R., & Werner, E. (1978). Organizational Climate and Communication Climate: A State
of the Art. In annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Chicago.
Lyon & Ivancevich. An Exploratory Investigation of Organizational Climate and Job
Satisfaction in a Hospital. Academy of Management. V. 17. P 635-648; Dec 1974.
Muchinsky, P. M. (1977). Organizational communication: Relationships to organizational
climate and job satisfaction. Academy of Management Journal, 20(4), 592-607.
New Paltz Hawks (2015). Mission Statement. Retrieved from
http://www.nphawks.com/sports/2010/1/21/GEN_0121103704.aspx?
tab=missionstatement
Permarupan, P. Y., Al-Mamun, A., Saufi, R. A., & Zainol, N. R. B. (2013). Organizational
climate on employees work passion: A review. Canadian Social Science, 9(4), 63-68.
Putnam, L. L., & Cheney, G. (1985). Organizational communication: Historical development and
future directions. Speech communication in the 20th century, 130-156.
Tagiuri, R. (1968). The concept of organizational climate. Organizational climate: Explorations
of a concept, 11-32.

RUNNING HEAD: ORG CLIMATE OF SOCCER, BASKETBALL, TENNIS

51