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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

University of Massachusetts Boston


College of Advancing & Professional Studies
Instructional Design Graduate Program
Instructor Information
Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA
a.koutropoulos@umb.edu
Phone (W): 617-287-5990
Skype (W): akoutropoulos
Office Hours: virtual office hours by request
Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email
account. Please review the following website for a job aid that will assist you in
forwarding your UMB email account to your personal account if you prefer:
http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Accou
nt
Classes begin Tuesday May 26, 2015 and ends Thursday August 20, 2015
Please note that we wont be observing Spring Break in this online course. In lieu of
spring break you will have an extra week at the end of the semester to polish up your
final project if you need it
Summer 2015 Academic Calendar:
https://www.umb.edu/academics/caps/credit/summer/calenda

Course Information
Course Title:

INSDSG 601: Introduction to Instructional Design

Prerequisites:

Matriculated MEd student - or - permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite
Skills:
1. Basic computer skills, which include:
a. Operating system skills (e.g.: opening applications, file management)
b. Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint application knowledge
c. Internet Skills (e.g.: ability to navigate the Internet, search,
upload/download files)

d. Some knowledge of a course management system would be useful


e. Helpful: Teaching/training experience
2. Ability to set a schedule to tasks to be completed for online course
and to follow through.

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Course
Description:
This course provides an introduction to the cognitive and
experiential content of the program, emphasizing the components of the
instructional design model. Various instructional design models are
analyzed and students are expected to complete, as a final project, an
instructional design plan for a learning/training event.
Technical
Requirements: This course has the option to use Blackboard Collaborate web
conferencing system. It is a good idea to go through Blackboard
Collaborate at the beginning of the semester to make sure you can
access the service and work out any bugs before you really need to use it
for work. One cautionary note: some students who have attempted to
participate in a Blackboard Collaborate session from their work sites have
found that firewalls block their access so this is something to check out
before your session.
You will also need a headset with microphone to fully participate and
can also use a webcam if you have one. If you experience difficulty with
the audio over the web then there is an opportunity to also call in via
phone (phone charges may apply depending on your location). There is
also the capability to upload PowerPoint presentations, use a group
whiteboard and utilize text chat. All group Blackboard Collaborate
sessions are recorded and archived for future reference
This course will also employ a variety of media that may require the
presence of free plugins like Flash, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Real Player and
Windows Media Player.
Students will be developing designs for their own learning intervention
projects during the semester however there is no requirement to use
specific applications for development. This choice is up to the student
and is often driven by what is available at the worksite or owned
personally.
Required
Text(s):

Other
Reading:

Dick, W., Carey, L, & Carey, J. O. (2015). The systematic design of


instruction (8th edition). Pearson. (Abbreviated in the syllabus and course
as D&C)
Other readings, including academic articles, will be available on
Blackboard as soon as the course begins.

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


You should also bookmark Purdue Owl. This resource will help you with
APA citation which will be necessary for your various projects:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
Recommended
Texts
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the
American Psychological Association. Washington, D.C.: American
Psychological Association.
Course
Objectives:

By fully participating in this course, you should be able to:


1. Explain the use of instructional design models in the development
of learning interventions,
2. Describe and explain one of the leading instructional design
models - Dick & Carey,
3. Analyze, compare, and contrast the Dick & Carey Model with other
ID models,
4. Apply the Dick & Carey model of instructional design toward the
design of a learning intervention,
5. Develop learning goals and objectives,
6. Identify appropriate materials and activities for course designs,
7. Evaluate and critique course designs,
8. Discuss broadly about fields that are related to instructional design.

Core
Competencies:
The objectives for this course focus on the following program level
outcomes for the MEd in Instructional Design: Please see this link for a full
description of the outcomes: http://idfaculty.wikispaces.umb.edu/Program-Learning-Outcomes.
Specifically this course addresses the following PLOs:
Theory into Practice: 1.1, 1.2, 1.4
Analysis: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6
Design: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4,
Develop: 4.1, 4.6
Implement: 5.1, 5.4,
Evaluate: 6.1,
Reflective Practice: 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6
Leadership: 8.1, 8.2, 8.5
In addition, this course addresses the following IBSTPI instructional
designer competencies:
Professional Foundations:
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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Communicate effectively in visual, oral, and written form
(essential)
o Update and improve knowledge, skills, and attitudes pertaining
to the instructional design process and related fields (essential)
o Identify and respond to ethical, legal, and political implication of
design in the workplace (essential)
Planning & Analysis
o Identify and describe the target population and environmental
characteristics (essential)
o Select and use analysis techniques for determining instructional
content (essential)
o Analyze the characteristics of existing and emerging
technologies and their potential use (essential)
Design & Development
o Use an ID & Development process appropriate for a given
project (essential)
o Organize ID programs and/or products to be designed,
developed, and evaluated (essential)
o Design instructional interventions (essential)
o Select or modify instructional materials (essential)
o Develop instructional materials (essential)
Evaluation & Implementation
o Revise instructional and non-instructional solutions based on
the data (essential)
o

Required
Assignments:
This course is designed on a Badges First approach, as such most
activities are based on a Mastery Approach. This means that you either
pass, or you dont pass, the assessment. If you dont pass, for some
assessments there are opportunities to additional tries. The assignments
in Blackboard will indicate what can be re-done and what cannot. The
following are the major assignments in the course:
1. Final Project Design of a learning intervention: This project will
be undertaken in small chunks throughout the semester. Each small
chunk will be worth a small part of the grade of the final project. This way
you have the ability to go back and iteratively improve on the design of
your learning design, and if a small part isnt good enough on the first try,
it wont impede your overall progress of the final project, and you have an
opportunity to address it with feedback from me.
2. Theories of Learning Jigsaw: This is a two-person jigsaw
assignment to explore theories of learning that are of interest to the
student dyad. The culminating deliverable will be a document between
1000-1500 words, properly cited using APA that provides an introduction
to the learning theory of interest to the students. The document may
include multimedia (including videos and images) to enhance the text
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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


written by the students. The assignment can be submitted as a discussion
forum post, a blog post, a Microsoft word document, a wiki, or any other
mode that the students are comfortable using. Students will earn a badge
that showcases the theory of learning that they picked to introduce and
analyze.
3. Instructional Design Models Jigsaw: This is a two-person jigsaw
assignment to explore theories of learning that are of interest to the
student dyad. The culminating deliverable will be a document between
1000-1500 words, properly cited using APA that provides an introduction
to another instructional design model that is of interest to the students.
This introduction will also be a compare-and-contrast to our main model,
the Dick & Carey Model. The document may include multimedia
(including videos and images) to enhance the text written by the
students. The assignment can also be submitted in a variety of ways.
Students will earn a badge that showcases the model that they picked to
introduce and analyze.
4. Instructional Design Special Topics Jigsaw: This is a jigsaw
assignment to explore different areas of instructional design, from tools,
to modalities, to approaches in design. This can be done solo, as a dyad,
or as a group of 3. The choice is up to the student(s). The culminating
deliverable will be a document between 1000-2000 words (1000 for 1
person, 1500 for two, 2000 for a group of three), properly cited using APA
that provides an introduction to a selected topic in instructional design.
The document may include multimedia (including videos and images) to
enhance the text written by the students. The assignment can also be
submitted in a variety of ways. Students will earn a badge that showcases
the model that they picked to introduce and
5. Weekly Feedback and Reflection: Reflection is one of the key
elements in learning. Feedback is also important to designers and
instructors. For this reason at the end of each week there is a weekly
feedback quiz with 4 questions. You can answer these questions, and
reflect on your weekly learning, either in the quiz, or you can blog
throughout the course and reflect about your learning. The option is
yours. If you do choose to blog, please posts specific post URLs in the
weekly feedback quiz.
6. Participation: Participation is key in any class, whether you are online
or on-campus, in a one-day workshop, or a semester-long course. If
youre not active in the course in some way, its hard to know if things are
making sense. By actively participating you are not only enriching your
educational experience, but those of your fellow classmates, and mine, as
well! For this reason, participation in the course through discussions in
the forum is worth 20% of the overall grade for this course.
Course Rubric:
Because Blackboard does not have the capacity for pass/not pass
the numeric grading means the following for all assignments:
0 points no assignment submitted
50 points assignment submitted but it doesnt pass, see comments
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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

85 points assignment passes, see comments for potential


improvement
100 points assignment passes and is exemplary, small comments for
improvement

Assignment/Deliverable

Final Project

Jigsaw activities

Weekly Feedback and


Reflection
Participation (as defined
above)

Course
Policies:

Relevant
Course
Objective
1, 4, 5, 6, 7

1, 2, 3, 8

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

MEd PLO

Grade
%

1.2, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4,


2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2,
3.4, 4.1, 4.6, 5.1,
5.4, 6.1, 7.1, 7.2,
7.3, 8.1, 8.5
1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 4.1,
4.6, 5.4, 6.1, 7.4,
7.5, 7.6, 8.2, 8.5
7.4, 7.5, 7.6

30%

1.2, 1.4, 7.4, 7.5,


7.6

20%

40%

10%

Participation - Attendance and presence are required for this class. The
Discussion Board and selected posts on umassid.com make up our
"classroom" so logging in defines your presence. I expect you to let me
know ahead of time if you will be unable to participate for a specific
week, or if this is not possible, to be in touch with me as soon as you can
thereafter. E-mail is the best way to notify me.
You are expected to log on to the course website a minimum of three
times a week and to post a substantive contribution to the discussion at
that time. You are expected to post an original discussion forum post by
Thursday, 6 p.m. EST, of each week; and then reply to at least two of your
peers by Sunday at 6 p.m. EST. Simply saying "I agree" is not considered
a substantive contribution! You must support your position, or add
somehow to the discussion when logging on. Try to relate the topic to
your own experience if possible. Please review the rubric for discussion
board postings in the Getting Started module so you can see how I will
evaluate your contributions.
Group Work This course depends on your involvement with online
discussion and activities. Be aware that the responses and learning of
your peers depend on your timely contributions, especially for the group

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


assignments in the course. You will be directed each week whether to
post your assignments/reflections in either the Discussion Board to a
specific topic or to another communication/collaboration site or
designated folder.
Please review the descriptions of the assignments while you work on
them and before you post the finished product. A common mistake is to
become intrigued with a wonderful tangential idea and not address the
assignment requirements. It may be fun to do but you may lose points.
Norms to ponder: timeliness, confidentiality within your group, dealing
with group issues within the group, and civility and supportive criticism
only. We want this to be an intellectual "safe" zone. For specific
assignments that require you to work in a group I dont specify internal
group deadlines. There is one assignment deadline and your group
should negotiate amongst its members what should be done and by what
time. At the conclusion of each group activity (namely the jigsaws) each
team member will submit to me a peer review of each members work. If
your team believes that you did not contribute to the deliverable of the
jigsaw you might not get points for your participation in that team. If you
work in a group, you need to complete a post-action report on your fellow
team members, otherwise your assignment will not be considered
complete.
Late Work Adhering to proven characteristics of andragogy, there will
be an emphasis on the exploratory and experiential. We will utilize
discussion, small group work, and individual activities to engage with the
material. For this reason, it is very important that you keep up with the
reading assignments and log in a minimum of three times per week,
which includes posting your weekly reflection question by Thursday 6
p.m. EST so that there will be sufficient time to interact with your peers.
Discussion topics will be turned off a few days following the end
of the discussion in order to keep the class moving. Lack of
preparation and failure to engage in the many learning opportunities in
this course will be taken into account in your final grade. Course
deliverables are expected to be on time unless there is some extenuating
circumstance. Points will be deducted for late work at a rate of 5-points
for every day a deliverable is late. This includes discussion forum
assignments and work. No late work will be accepted five days after the
due date. (Example: if an assignment is due on Sunday, the last possible

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


day to submit it is the following Friday. Your maximum grade for the
assignment at that point will be 75%)

Grading
Grading:
Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see
table below)
Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a C. Grades
lower than a C that are submitted by faculty will automatically be
recorded as an F.
Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the
Universitys grading policy.

UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy


Lette
r
Grad
e

Percentage

Quali
ty
Point
s

93-100%

4.0

A-

90-92%

3.7

B+

87-89%

3.3

83-86%

3.0

B-

80-82%

2.7

C+

77-79%

2.3

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


C

73-76%

2.0

0-72%

0.0

INC

Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work
has been accomplished in majority of coursework. Contract of
completion terms is required.

N/A

INC/F

Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms.

N/A

Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline.

N/A

AU

Audit (only permitted on space-available basis)

N/A

NA

Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student
is still responsible for tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is
submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on cumulative GPA.)

N/A

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Methods of Instruction
Methods:

This course is an instructor-facilitated, fully online, asynchronous course


conducted via the Blackboard Learn learning management system.
Weekly discussion, small group work, and individual activities will provide
opportunities for student-to-content, student-to-student and student-toinstructor involvement. Although the course will be conducted
asynchronously, there can be opportunities for synchronous sessions
during the semester to provide real-time interaction. A variety of
multimedia will be incorporated including podcasts, video clips, narrated
streaming PowerPoint presentations, articles, weekly discussion forums,
interactive games, and weekly formative assessments. Hands-on
development for the final course project will take place in an LMS of the
students choice and will include materials developed with a range of
multimedia chosen by the student.

Accommodations
Section 504, 508 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for
curriculum modifications and adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If
applicable, you may obtain adaptation recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross
Center (508-287-7430. You need to present and discuss these recommendations with
me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period.
You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when
applying for future degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Code of Student Conduct


Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including
requirements for the Academic Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of
Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and relevant program student
handbook(s).
http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of
%20Conduct.pdf
You are encouraged to visit and review the UMass website on Correct Citation and
Avoiding Plagiarism:
http://umb.libguides.com/GradStudiesCitations

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Other Pertinent and Important Information
Incomplete Policy: Incompletes will be assigned only in cases of illness, accident, or
other catastrophic occurrences beyond a student's control. Incompletes are given
under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in
majority of coursework. A contract of completion terms is required for all incompletes
with concrete deliverables on specific due dates.
Coursework Difficulties: Please discuss all coursework matters with me sooner than
later. If caught early, course work difficulties and hiccups can prevent major issues
with your course progression. If left unattended they could interfere with progression
through the course. I am here to help!
Topics for Jigsaws: The topics for the various jigsaws are available right from the
start of the class. If you want to form groups early, please feel free to do so. Working
ahead on your spare time is a good way to make sure that you dont fall behind, and it
may even give you breathing room for other things during the later parts of the
semester!

Course Schedule
Week I

Topic

Introductions, Instructional Design and Systems

Course Begins

May 26, 2015

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi

Navigate and find resources on UMassID.com,

Navigate and find resources on Blackboard,

Explain the reason(s) for using an instructional design model,

Discuss some critiques of the profession.

Please read the content in the Getting Started link on the

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


a

course home page and post any questions you may have to the
discussion board under the Questions/Help Topic.
D&C 1
Thalheimer, W. (2008) We are professionals, arent we?. In M.W.
Allen (Ed.) Michael Allens e-Learning Annual 2008. Pfeiffer.

Activities

Assignments

Post an introductory blog post on UMassID.com

Participate in weekly discussion

Complete weekly feedback and reflection

No projects this week

Week II

Topic

Front End Analysis & Instructional Goals

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Define needs assessment, performance analysis, needs


statements, and instructional goals,
Write Instructional Goals that meet the criteria for initiating the
development of instructional interventions,
Begin to critically interpret literature in the field of education to
assess quality, accuracy, and relevance.
D&C 2

Readings/Medi
a

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Activities

Milia: Dales Cone of Experience

Thalheimer : Mythical Retention Data & The Corrupted Cone


[blogpost]

Introduction to VARK website

Riener, C. & Willingham, D. (2010). The Myth of Learning Styles.


Change.

Bailey - Edgar Dales Cone of Experience [video]

Willingham - Learning Styles do not exist [video]

Ambridge, B. (2014). 10 myths about psychology, debunked [TED


talk]

[preview] Goals vs Learning Objectives. UConn.

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection

Complete Project Proposal for final project

Assignments

Week III

Topic

Goal Analysis

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Classify instructional goals in the domains of intellectual skill,


verbal information, psychomotor, and attitude,
Perform a goal analysis to identify major steps required to
accomplish an instructional goal,
Describe key features of behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism,
and connectivism.

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Readings/Medi
a

Activities

D&C 3

Bates, T (n.d.) Chapter 2: The nature of knowledge and


implications for teaching. In A.W. Bates Teaching in a Digital Age.
UBC Open Text.

Tuckmans 4 Stages of Group Formation [video]

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection
Form a team with another classmate and pick from a Theory of
Learning topic. This will be presented over the next couple of
weeks.

Submit Goal Analysis for Final Project

Assignments

Week IV

Topic

Identifying Subordinate Skills & Entry Level Behaviors

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Describe approaches to subordinate skills analysis,


Describe relationships among the subordinate skills identified
through an analysis,
Apply subordinate skills analysis techniques to steps in the goal
analysis,
Explain key aspects of Blooms taxonomy of the cognitive domain.

D&C 4

Blooms taxonomy of Learning Domains:

Blooms interactive pyramid

Read through the submissions of your classmates for the Theories

Readings/Medi
a

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


of Learning jigsaw

Activities

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection
If its your week to post the Theories of Learning deliverable to
the designated forum. Engage in discussion.

Submit subordinate Skill Analysis and Entry Level Behaviors for


your final project

Assignments

Week V

Topic

Learner & Context Analysis

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Identify and analyze general characteristics of target student


population important in the development process,
Identify and analyze contextual characteristics of the setting
where learning will take place,
Discuss and apply key elements of Gagnes work to instruction.

D&C 5

Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Chapter 10: Gagnes Theory of Instruction. In


M.P Driscoll Psychology of Learning for Instruction. Allyn & Bacon.

Preview the materials for the next jigsaw

Readings/Medi
a

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Activities

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection
If its your week to post the Theories of Learning deliverable to
the designated forum. Engage in discussion.
Start forming teams for the second jigsaw if you havent already.
Try to work with someone new

Assignments

Submit Learner & Context Analysis

Submit review of peers for your jigsaw activity

Week VI

Topic

Writing Performance Objectives

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Write performance objectives using the ABCD method,


Demonstrate knowledge of the difference between goals and
learning objectives,
Discuss affective aspects of teaching and learning, and how those
affect design.

D&C 6

Magers tips on instructional objectives

Goals vs Learning Objectives. UConn

Huitt, W. (2001, April). Krathwol et al.'s taxonomy of the affective


domain. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA:
Valdosta State University.

Miller, M. (2005). Teaching and Learning in Affective Domain. In M.


Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and
technology

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Activities

Krathwohl handout from UConn

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection

Submit project goals and performance objectives for your final


project

Assignments

Week VII

Topic

Developing Assessment Instruments

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Describe how entry skills tests, pretest, practice test, and posttests are used by instructional designers,
Name four categories of criteria for developing criterionreferenced tests,
Write criterion-references, objective-style test items that meet the
four categories
Recommend assessments for instructional interventions that are
authentic and measure the intended learning for those
interventions.

D&C 7

UCF professor Richard Quinn accuses class of cheating [video]

Berrett, D. (2010) Cheating and the Generational Divide. Inside


Higher Education

Read thought jigsaw submissions

Participate in weekly discussion

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Complete weekly feedback and reflection


Post your Jigsaw deliverable if you chose a topic on badges,
gamification, ePortfolios, or other assessment related topic
Engage in discussion with your peers in the jigsaw forums

Submit proposed ways to assess learning in your design

Assignments

Week VIII

Topic

Developing Instructional Strategies

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Identify the five learning components of an instructional strategy,


Plan the learning components of an instructional strategy,
Describe considerations in selecting an instructional delivery
system,
Sequence and arrange content in session-level clusters,
Discuss ways in which technology can be applied to enhance
instructional strategies.

D&C 8

D&C 9

Read though jigsaw submissions on Web 2.0 tools

Participate in weekly discussion

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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Complete weekly feedback and reflection


Post your Jigsaw deliverable if you chose a topic on Web 2.0 tools
Engage in discussion with your peers in the jigsaw forums

Submit Instructional Strategy for your final project

Assignments

Week IX

Topic

Developing Instructional Materials

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Describe the designers role in materials development,


Describe factors that may cause revisions of materials,
List four categories of criteria for judging the appropriateness of
existing instructional materials,
Develop instructional materials based on a given instructional
strategy,
Identify main consideration for creating, and adopting, accessible
materials.
D&C 10
For those of you in Corporate and HR training, you might find
HRDQ interesting to peruse through: http://www.hrdqstore.com/
MERLOT OER repository: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htm
OER Commons: https://www.oercommons.org/
Directory of Open Access Journals: https://doaj.org/

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection
Post your Jigsaw deliverable if you chose a topic on UDL, OER, or
Open Education related topic
Engage in discussion with your peers in the jigsaw forums

Updated: May 10, 2015


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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Assignments

Submit Materials, and their evaluations, to be created for your


instructional intervention

Week X

Topic

Formative Evaluations

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Describe the purposes for and various stages of formative


evaluation,
Describe instruments for formative evaluation,
Develop appropriate formative evaluation plan,
Describe the main considerations, applications,, and benefits of
various modalities of learning.

D&C 11

Clark, D. (n.d.) Kirkpatricks 4 Level Evaluation Model

Participate in weekly discussion


Complete weekly feedback and reflection
Post your Jigsaw deliverable if you chose a topic on the modality
of instruction
Engage in discussion with your peers in the jigsaw forums

Submit Formative Evaluation strategy for your final project

Assignments

Updated: May 10, 2015


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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Week XI

Topic

Summative Evaluations

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Describe the purpose of summative evaluations,


Describe the two phases of summative evaluation,
Design summative evaluations for specific learning interventions.

D&C 13

Gustafson, K. & Branch R. M. (2002). A Survey of Instructional


Development Models (4th edition) [everyone will read chapters 1
and 2, then read the chapter for your specific model]

Grant, M.M. (2013) Comparing Instructional Design Models


[Presentation]

In lieu of discussion this week, lets setup time for a one-to-one


skype chat as a check-in (if everyone wants to have one
synchronous sessions instead of one-to-one sessions that is OK
too!)Complete weekly feedback and reflection
Form a dyad (or group of 3) by Tuesday, and start working toward
the deliverable for

Assignments

Submit Summative Evaluation strategy for your final project

Week XII

Topic

Project Work & Big Picture

Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Updated: May 10, 2015


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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design

Readings/Medi
a

Activities

Complete a fully developed instructional design plan using the


knowledge gained through participation in INSDSG 601,
Describe main elements of other instructional design models,
Compare and contrast instructional design models for similarities
and differences,
Evaluate instructional design models for applicability and fit for
use in designing different types of learning interventions.

No new readings this week. You can reference Gustafson & Branch
as you are working on submitting your jigsaw activity.

Schultz, K. (2011). On Being Wrong [TED talk].


Read through the submitted instructional design jigsaw
deliverables in the forum

Complete weekly feedback and reflection


Participate in the weekly discussion topic
Post your Jigsaw deliverable on your selected instructional design
model topic
Engage in discussion with your peers in the jigsaw forums

Final Projects Due

Reflection on your final project due with project [you can blog this
if you opted to blog your weekly reflections]

Assignments

Week XIII

Topic

Wrap-up & Wrap-around

Course Ends

August 20, 2015

Updated: May 10, 2015


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INSDSG 601- SyllabusIntroduction to Instructional Design


Objectives

Readings/Medi
a

Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge of effective peer review practices,


Demonstrate a critical and reflective approach to practices in the
field of instructional design.

Kenny, R., Zhang, Z., Schwier, R., & Campbell, K. (2005). A Review
of What Instructional Designers Do: Questions Answered and
Questions Not Asked. Canadian Journal Of Learning And
Technology, 31(1).
Thalheimer, W. (2008) We are professionals, arent we?. In M.W.
Allen (Ed.) Michael Allens e-Learning Annual 2008. Pfeiffer.
St. John, R. (2009) Success is a continuous journey [TED talk].
[Optional] article for Tales from the Crypt discussion.

Participate in weekly discussion

[optional] Participate in the Tales from the Crypt discussion.

Complete 2 reviews of peers projects

Activities

Assignments

Updated: May 10, 2015


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