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Toyota: “Fall In Love With Driving Again”

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Table of Contents

Toyota Hybrid Range “Fall in Love with Driving Again” Campaign...........3 Toyota Hybrid Range Context.............................................................................3 Customer Behaviour........................................................................................3 Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Objectives..............................................4 Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Strategy and Positioning........................5 Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Methods.................................................7 Print Adverts....................................................................................................7 TV Adverts.......................................................................................................7 Online Adverts.................................................................................................7 Outdoor Adverts..............................................................................................7

Sponsorship.....................................................................................................8

Digital PR.........................................................................................................8

Scheduling..........................................................................................................8

Resources...........................................................................................................9

Financial Resources.........................................................................................9 Human Resources............................................................................................9 Control, Evaluation and Feedback......................................................................9 Managing Corporate Reputation...................................................................10 Charities that Toyota Support...........................................................................10 Derbyshire Wildlife Trust................................................................................10 Toyota good causes..........................................................................................10

Environment..................................................................................................10

References........................................................................................................12

Appendices........................................................................................................15

Toyota Hybrid Range “Fall in Love with Driving Again” Campaign

In 2014 Toyota sought to promote their Hybrid range of cars through a multi- platform communications campaign. This campaign became known as the “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign, named after its slogan as it appeared across most tools of communication for this campaign. This campaign featured several forms of advertising including, TV, print and outdoor, as well as both online advertising and digital PR.

Toyota Hybrid Range Context

The Toyota Hybrid range currently features five designs across three models; the Yaris Hybrid, two Auris Hybrid designs and two Prius Hybrid designs (Toyota N.D1). The development of this range is largely to do with their positioning strategy and trying to create an ecological and environmental company, offering products in the historically non-environmental market that is the automotive industry.

Customer Behaviour

Both the Yaris and Auris models were initially non-hybrid and are currently on sale in both forms, clearly using psychographic segmentation; environmentally aware customers and those who seek more excitement from a car: the fastest petrol engine Auris has a faster 0-60 time than the fastest hybrid Auris, by 0.4 seconds (Toyota 2014), and all the Hybrid cars offering considerably less C0₂ emissions, such as the 5 door hatchback Auris Icon Hybrid, releasing 50 g/km less than it’s petrol engine counterpart (Toyota 2015).

However, there’s further segmentation criteria with regards to the Toyota Hybrid range, such as price. With regards to starting prices the Hybrid options are considerably more expensive, with the cheapest Auris Hybrid having a retail price of £19, 864.79 and the cheapest Auris with a petrol engine having a retail price of £14, 164.19 (Toyota 2015). However, the Hybrid options do make this money back in the long run as they are more fuel efficient; with the Toyota Auris Excel petrol engine offering 68.9 mpg, and the Hybrid engine offering 78.5 mpg (Toyota 2014). As well as the Hybrid range potentially being a cheaper option as a company car, with the average company car tax for the Auris Excel petrol engine being 19%, and the Hybrid option only being 11% (Toyota 2014), making a considerable difference when contemplating the cost of a new car.

Furthermore, a new car is typically a high involvement purchasing meaning that the D.M.P is extended, particularly the information search element. This could prove to be highly beneficial for the Toyota Hybrid range as a prolonged research period will allow for the benefits of the Toyota Hybrid range to stand out more, particularly as the range of cars offered with a hybrid engine has significantly improved recently; with Toyota now including the Prius+, a 7 seat option suitable for larger families who might previously have been deterred (Toyota N.D1).

Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Objectives

Dario Giustini, the brand and marketing communications senior manager for Toyota, and Toyota’s leader of the “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign quite vaguely believes that “the objective of our marketing campaign is to demonstrate that consumers fall in love with driving again thanks to Toyota

Hybrid” (Lepitak 2014). However, Toyota’s communications objectives for the “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign incorporated all aspects of the DRIP framework; differentiate, reinforce, inform and persuade (Fill 2011: 11).

This campaign is likely to have planned to differentiate in a number of ways; differentiate from other brands, differentiate from other models, and most importantly, differentiate from preconceptions about Hybrid cars. This is particularly important as these preconceptions have resulted in the market for Hybrid cars being rather small with only 29% of drivers contemplating purchasing a Hybrid car (see Appendix 1). This is likely due to the preconception that Hybrid cars are boring, a concept Toyota are clearly differentiating from shown by their slogan of “Fall in Love with Driving Again”.

Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Objectives Dario Giustini, the brand and marketing communications senior manager for Toyota,

(Appendix 1)

The use of the slogan “Fall in Love with Driving Again”, also represents the reinforcement aspects of Toyota’s objectives. This is because it in itself references past enjoyments of driving, that appears to have been replaced with stress and practicality. Appendix 2 represents this trend with the four most sought after features relating to practicality as oppose to enjoyment or comfort.

Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Objectives Dario Giustini, the brand and marketing communications senior manager for Toyota,

(Appendix 2)

Throughout the campaign Toyota informed viewers about information relating to the car range, in an attempt to balance the emotional approach of “Fall in Love with Driving Again” with the rational approach involving finances, warranties and the practicality of the vehicles (see appendix 3 for the balanced rational and emotional approached). The inform aspects of this campaign have a rather high importance due to the purchasing of a car being high involvement, therefore requiring a more rational thought process as oppose to an emotional. Furthermore, by Toyota using a rational communications approach, they shorten the information search process in the D.M.P, making the process easier for the customer and possibly creating brand loyalty or preference.

Finally, this campaign clearly uses a range of techniques to persuade and create preference, again through the uses of both emotions and rationality. However, the rational aspects are the more prominent as all forms of communications make reference to competitive advantages such as the 5 year warranty, 0% APR representative and security by consumer figures (see appendix 3).

Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Strategy and Positioning

Toyota’s positioning strategy is their way of differentiating themselves from their opposition. They position themselves as an ecological, everyday use, passenger car company. This is shown through in a number of ways, most notably, their regular development of environmentally friendly cars, such as their Hybrid range which alone has already saved 34, 000, 000 tonnes of C0₂ emissions (Toyota N.D2). Furthermore, they position themselves as a provider of hybrid cars for the everyday user, with their hybrid cars being considerably more affordable without compromising practicality. Proven with retail prices starting at £15, 414. 79 for a hybrid 5 door hatchback Yaris (Toyota 2015).

Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure

(Figures 1 and 2: Perceptual Maps of the whole passenger vehicle market using main companies)

However, Toyota have a rather negative brand image and position with regard to their hybrid range. This is largely due to opinion formers such as Jeremy Clarkson offering rather negative opinions of hybrid cars as a whole, but more specifically, Toyota hybrid cars: “Toyota had just about convinced the world that if you wanted a hybrid you could pretty much kiss goodbye to the concept of fun” (Clarkson 2014). Opinion formers and leaders offering these negative views have led to negative views for not only Toyota but also Hybrid cars, and has led to many negative preconceptions for the Toyota Hybrid range.

However, Toyota have a rather negative brand image and position with regard to their hybrid range.

(Figure 3: Perceptual Map of the Hybrid Car Market)

However, the communications strategy in the “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign largely relates to enjoyment and exuberance. This is largely an attempt from Toyota to reposition their hybrid range as a more enjoyable brand, without having to compromise either their practicality or their overall image as an environmental company. Their “Fall in Love with Driving Again” communications attempt to create a positivity towards this range in a number of ways, most significantly, their sponsorship of movies on ITV (see appendix 4) which is clearly an attempt to align the Toyota Hybrid range with enjoyment. Furthermore, the online PR Toyota uses for this campaign further highlights this repositioning attempt as for the large part it relates to enjoyment and relaxation (Saatchi & Saatchi N.D). This rebranding attempt is considerably similar to the successful repositioning that Volvo undertook in the early 90s with their car, the Volvo 850 (Newton and Iddiols 1993), in which Volvo where able to successfully adapt their brand image to being more than simply “safety”.

(Figure 4: Perceptual Map of Toyota’s Current and Desired Positioning) Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Methods Thishttp://www.toyota.co.uk/ . These rich banner ads seem to follow the same 7 " id="pdf-obj-6-2" src="pdf-obj-6-2.jpg">

(Figure 4: Perceptual Map of Toyota’s Current and Desired Positioning)

Toyota Hybrid Range Communications Methods

This campaign has used a number of communication tools including print adverts, digital PR, a range of TV adverts, as well as several forms of sponsorship. The majority of these methods are integrated and use aspects of both rational and emotional approaches.

Print Adverts

Several print adverts were featured throughout this campaign and featured in both newspapers and magazines (see difference in print quality between appendices 3 and 5). Although several of these adverts included the slogan to elicit an emotional response towards the advert, they all referenced the financial aspects of the Toyota Hybrid Range (see appendix 3) representing the significance of rationality. Informing viewers about features and offers relating to the Toyota Hybrid range has largely been done to provide potential customers with a sense of security and trust towards the Hybrid range, again due to the high-involvement nature of purchasing a new car. However, they still incorporate the emotional approach via the slogan (see appendix 6) representing their attempt to reposition their hybrid range as being more interesting and exciting.

TV Adverts

The TV adverts release integrate both rational and emotional approaches. They primarily use visuals for the emotional approach and the copywriting for the rational, often using small print at the bottom (see appendix 8). Furthermore, the two main TV adverts used for this campaign both involve humour that relates to driving; one features a man enjoying driving in frantic Asian city (see appendix 9), with the others featuring several people driving around Europe singing along to a famous song (see appendix 10). This is an effective emotional approach as “light-hearted message appeals secure audience attention, increase memorability, overcome sales resistance, and enhance message persuasiveness” (Scott, Klein, Bryant 1990: 498). However, the second TV advert had a poor impact as the Advertising Standards Agency banned it for “depicting dangerous driving” (Mortimer 2014).

Online Adverts

The online adverts for this campaign are for the most part rich banner ads and all appear to have been featured on Toyota’s company website; http://www.toyota.co.uk/. These rich banner ads seem to follow the same

pattern; initiate with an emotional approach and follow up with their rational and approach (see appendix 11). This structure follows the traditional AIDA model: to gain attention, create an interest, cause desire and encourage an action (Moriarty, Mitchell, Wells 2012: 131). Appendix 11 is a typical banner advert for this campaign. The first two stills represent the emotional approach and attempts to get the attention of viewers and gain an interest. The last still represents the rational approach and is used to cause desire and encourage the action of visiting the Toyota Auris Hybrid website to gain more information.

Outdoor Adverts

The majority of Toyota’s outdoor advertising mirrors the design of their print advertising and is basically offered in a different format (see appendices 7 and 3). For analysis see print adverts section.

Sponsorship

This campaign also featured one direct sponsorship and coincided with another UK Toyota sponsorship. The Toyota Auris Hybrid sponsors movies on ITV (see appendices 4 and 12) with either 5 or 10 second videos featuring the car with green screened backgrounds, depicting movie clichés (see appendix 4). This sponsorship clearly represents Toyota’s attempt to reposition themselves as a more exciting car brand as it aligns them with an enjoyable past time of movies. This campaign also overlapped with Toyota’s corporate sponsorship of Derby County Football Club, which includes sponsoring the west stand of their stadium (Toyota N.D3). This again is Toyota aligning themselves with an enjoyable pastime in an attempt to reposition themselves as a fun company.

Digital PR

As part of this “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign also featured a video titled “Toyota: The Hybrid Experiment” being uploaded onto YouTube and has been embedded onto many supporting websites such as Saatchi & Saatchi’s website (see appendix 13). This video featured several regular people (not actors), driving around Rome in their own cars, appearing stressed, and afterwards driving a Toyota Hybrid, appearing much calmer (Youtube 2014). This video is again represents Toyota’s attempt to reposition themselves as a more enjoyable car company as well as attempting to create brand preference by representing them as favourable over other cars.

Scheduling

Toyota initiated their “Fall in Love with Driving Again” on the 17 th of April 2014 by uploading their digital “experiment” onto their YouTube account (Saatchi & Saatchi 2014). Toyota followed this with their sponsorship of ITV movies which began on the 21 st of April 2014 (Creative Club 2015).

Their initial TV advert (appendix 8) was first broadcast on the 11 th of June 2014 (Creative Club 2015), the day prior to the 2014 Football World Cup (BBC 2014). This is likely to have happened to maximise reach with viewing figures for the World Cup peaking at 20.64 million in the UK (Wyatt 2014). Several months later Toyota released a second advert which was banned by ASA in October 2014 (Mortimer 2014).

In 2014 Toyota also released several pieces of outdoor advertising for their hybrid range starting with a simplistic advert (see appendix 14) on the 10 th of February 2014. However, they released their first billboard advert for their “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign (see appendix 15) on the 27 th of May 2014 (Creative Club 2015). This follows a similar timeline as their print advertisements which commenced on the 9 th of May (Creative Club 2015) with a double page advert (see appendix 16) for their “Fall in Love with Driving Again” campaign. These are most likely used as supporting work for their digital campaign as all these adverts encourage the action of visiting Toyota’s website where all their online ads are placed as well as their “experiment”.

Resources

Financial Resources

Toyota are a leading company in the automotive industry currently holding a 4.00% market share in the highly congested passenger vehicle market (Toyota Media 2015). They also made a £128,071,738,088 profit in the 2014 financial year (Toyota 2014b: 63) and in total, sold 94, 013 cars in 2014 (Toyota Media 2015). Furthermore, Toyota spend a lot of their money on advertising with the most recently published figures being $2.09 globally on advertising (Perez 2014), $959 million of which, was spent on TV advertising alone (Perez 2014).

Human Resources

This campaign has primarily been run by the advertising and communications agency Saatchi & Saatchi Italy, with Saatchi & Saatchi London being in charge of the online elements of this campaign (Lepitak 2014), including Toyota’s “experiment”. Saatchi & Saatchi also partnered with Goldsmiths University of London to help gather research and conduct several experiments for this Toyota campaign (Saatchi & Saatchi 2014). Lloyd Salmons, the Digital Director at Saatchi & Saatchi stated that they made the experiment as oppose to just advertising because “It is important that the emotional benefits of driving Hybrid vehicles speak for themselves rather than dictate to consumers how they should feel when driving.” (Saatchi & Saatchi 2014). Toyota also used Zenith Optimedia as their media buying company (Brand Republic 2014)

Control, Evaluation and Feedback

There are a number of ways that Toyota could attempt to measure the success of this communications campaign due to the type of industry and the type of campaign. Some measuring techniques relating to the industry include sales/profit figures, number of test drives booked or even reviews. If they evaluated this campaign on sales figures, then the campaign would be an unquestionable success, with 21, 672 Hybrid Toyota cars sold in 2014 (Toyota Media 2015b), more than a 25% year on year increase in sales of Hybrid Toyota cars (Toyota Media 2015b).

However, they could attempt to measure it more specifically to the campaign. Ways that they could do this could include: hits on their website (all campaign communications encouraged this action), advertising viewership figures, or again, using reviews of opinion leaders and opinion formers. If Toyota chose this route, the campaign would be see as considerably less successful, largely due to the banned TV advert (Mortimer 2014), which not only shortened the longevity of the campaign, but could have catastrophic implications with regards to the perception of the Toyota brand. Especially as ASA received 74 unique complaints with regards to the now banned advert (Mortimer 2014). However, the initial advert would have to be deemed rather successful as it measured a 42% recall rate a month after its initial broadcast (Brand Republic 2014).

Managing Corporate Reputation

Managing corporate reputation is essential for all companies and is done so in a number of ways. Toyota have recently gained a reputation for being a rather boring company (Clarkson 2014) and have had to try and have attempted to offset this in a number of ways. They support a number of good causes and charities to present themselves as socially acceptable, but they have also attempted to create a reputation as a technologically advanced company. They have done this again in a number of ways, most evidently is their investments towards research and development; spending more than $7.5 billion dollars on research and development in 2014 (Toyota 2014b: 34).

Charities that Toyota Support

Toyota work with a number of charities in the UK, both locally and nationally, to help maintain their corporate image. These include Comic Relief/Sport Relief, NSPCC, Macmillan Cancer Support, Leicestershire and Rutland Air Ambulance, Derby South Salvation Army and the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust (Toyota UK N.D).

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust

Toyota Manufacturing UK Charitable Trust (often referred to as TMUK), is Toyota’s department responsible for their work supporting charities. TMUK are a corporate member of the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust (Toyota UK N.D2). TMUK and the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust have worked together on a number of projects since the start of their partnership in 1992 (Toyota UK N.D3), and most recently they were the first company to sign up to the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust’s “Transforming the Trent Valley Initiative” (Toyota UK N.D2). This initiative aimed to encourage landowners in the Trent Valley area to convert parts of their land into habitats for the wildlife (Toyota UK N.D2). Toyota chose to support this charity because of their vehicle manufacturing plant is located nearby at Burnaston (Toyota UK N.D4). Furthermore, supporting this charity supports Toyota’s aspirational positioning as an ecological car company, and helps validate Toyota’s ecological car range, such as their Hybrid range.

Toyota good causes

Toyota also support of number of good causes, most of which are local to their manufacturing plant at Burnaston. These causes include Business in the Community, Community Liaison Committee as well as several environmental causes (Toyota UK N.D5).

Environment

The majority of the good causes Toyota support relate to the environment and sustainability. TMUK have created a “Sustainable Plant” programme (Toyota UK N.D6) which aims to make the production of their cars more ecological and sustainable. This “Sustainable Plant” programme consists of “3 Pillars” (Toyota UK N.D6): “Leading Environmental Performance”, “Increasing Use of Renewable Energy” and being “In harmony with our natural surroundings” (Toyota UK N.D6). This devotion to the environment is why Toyota created an “array” of solar panels at their Deeside Engine Plant (Toyota UK N.D7). This “array” consists of

12, 680 solar panels, which provides Toyota with enough energy to build 22, 500 engines (Toyota UK N.D7). Furthermore, in 2004 Toyota and the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust worked in partnership to create the “Biodiversity Initiative” (Toyota UK N.D8). The aims of this initiative were to “protect and where possible, enhance the ecological value of the site” (Toyota UK N.D8), which resulted in Toyota building an “on site wildlife reserve” (Toyota UK N.D8). By supporting these types of good causes, Toyota is again validating their Hybrid range by forming an ecological and environmental brand image.

References

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Moriarty, S; Mitchell, N; Wells, W; (2012) Advertising & IMC; Coventry University edn; Harlow: Pearson

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Newton, S; Iddiols, D; (1993) “From hearses to horses: launching the Volvo 850”; Journal of the Market Research Society 35 (2); 145-159

Perez, M; (2014) “10 of the World’s most expensive advertising budgets”; TheRichest.com [online] available from <http://www.therichest.com/rich- list/world/10-of-the-worlds-most-expensive-advertising-budgets/2/> [14/03/2015]

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A Series of Field Studies Using Behavioral Observation”; Journal of Consumer Research 16 (4); 498-501

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[14/03/2015]

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%20Array.pdf> [11/03/2015]

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[13/03/2015]

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[14/03/2015]

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[15/03/2015]

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Appendices

Appendices (Appendix 1: <a href=http://academic.mintel.com/display/730417/ ) (Appendix 2: http://academic.mintel.com/display/730417/ ) 16 " id="pdf-obj-15-4" src="pdf-obj-15-4.jpg">
Appendices (Appendix 1: <a href=http://academic.mintel.com/display/730417/ ) (Appendix 2: http://academic.mintel.com/display/730417/ ) 16 " id="pdf-obj-15-10" src="pdf-obj-15-10.jpg">
(Appendix 3: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 17 " id="pdf-obj-16-2" src="pdf-obj-16-2.jpg">
(Appendix 4: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 5: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 18 " id="pdf-obj-17-2" src="pdf-obj-17-2.jpg">
(Appendix 4: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 5: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 18 " id="pdf-obj-17-8" src="pdf-obj-17-8.jpg">
(Appendix 6: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 19 " id="pdf-obj-18-2" src="pdf-obj-18-2.jpg">
(Appendix 7: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 20 " id="pdf-obj-19-2" src="pdf-obj-19-2.jpg">
(Appendix 8: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 9: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 21 " id="pdf-obj-20-2" src="pdf-obj-20-2.jpg">
(Appendix 8: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 9: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 21 " id="pdf-obj-20-8" src="pdf-obj-20-8.jpg">
(Appendix 10: <a href=http://www.am-online.com/news/2014/10/29/toyota-in-trouble-for- yaris-advert-with-bruno-mars-song/37181/ ) (Appendix 11: http://www.toyota.co.uk/ ) 22 " id="pdf-obj-21-2" src="pdf-obj-21-2.jpg">
(Appendix 10: <a href=http://www.am-online.com/news/2014/10/29/toyota-in-trouble-for- yaris-advert-with-bruno-mars-song/37181/ ) (Appendix 11: http://www.toyota.co.uk/ ) 22 " id="pdf-obj-21-10" src="pdf-obj-21-10.jpg">

(Appendix 11: http://www.toyota.co.uk/)

(Appendix 12: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 13: http://saatchi.com/en-uk/news/fall-in-love-with-driving-again/ ) (Appendix 14: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 23 " id="pdf-obj-22-2" src="pdf-obj-22-2.jpg">
(Appendix 12: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 13: http://saatchi.com/en-uk/news/fall-in-love-with-driving-again/ ) (Appendix 14: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 23 " id="pdf-obj-22-8" src="pdf-obj-22-8.jpg">
(Appendix 12: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 13: http://saatchi.com/en-uk/news/fall-in-love-with-driving-again/ ) (Appendix 14: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) 23 " id="pdf-obj-22-14" src="pdf-obj-22-14.jpg">
(Appendix 15: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 16: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 17: http://www.toyota.co.uk/hybrid ) 24 " id="pdf-obj-23-2" src="pdf-obj-23-2.jpg">
(Appendix 15: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 16: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 17: http://www.toyota.co.uk/hybrid ) 24 " id="pdf-obj-23-8" src="pdf-obj-23-8.jpg">
(Appendix 15: <a href=https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 16: https://www.creativeclub.co.uk/fs.aspx ) (Appendix 17: http://www.toyota.co.uk/hybrid ) 24 " id="pdf-obj-23-14" src="pdf-obj-23-14.jpg">
(Appendix 18: <a href=https://www.facebook.com/toyotauk?fref=ts ) (Appendix 19: https://www.youtube.com/user/ToyotaUKTV ) 25 " id="pdf-obj-24-2" src="pdf-obj-24-2.jpg">
(Appendix 18: <a href=https://www.facebook.com/toyotauk?fref=ts ) (Appendix 19: https://www.youtube.com/user/ToyotaUKTV ) 25 " id="pdf-obj-24-8" src="pdf-obj-24-8.jpg">
(Appendix 20: <a href=https://twitter.com/ToyotaGB ) 26 " id="pdf-obj-25-2" src="pdf-obj-25-2.jpg">