You are on page 1of 33

Welcome

Environmental Restoration at the Grand 
Calumet River’s East Branch
Eric J Hritsuk, PE
Natural Resource Technology, Inc.
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake Conference
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
April 30, 2015

Great Lakes Legacy Act (GLLA) of 2002

Accelerate the pace of sediment remediation 
at Areas of Concern (AOCs) 

Use partnerships as an innovative approach 
to conducting sediment remediation


2008 Reauthorization includes habitat restoration

Delist AOCs by removing beneficial use impairment 
(BUI)

At least 35% of project costs from non‐
federal sponsor
USEPA provides up to 65%

Approaches for Generating Non‐
Federal Cost Share







Linking waterfront land revitalization and 
sediment cleanup efforts
Combining brownfield revitalization and 
contaminated sediment remediation
Establishing public‐private partnerships
Establishing a non‐federal coalition
State bond programs
In‐kind services
Settlement agreements
Clean Water state revolving funds

GLLA Goals

R

emediation

R

estoration

R

evitalization

Environmental Benefits 
of GLLA
• Higher quality habitat for fish and 
wildlife
• Better water quality
• Improved fishery
• Improved benthic habitat
• Reduce contaminant levels to biota

Economic Benefits of GLLA
• Cleaner and deeper urban waterway
• Restoration and remediation




Increases property values 
Increases recreation 
Increases tourism
Increases fishing
Increases shipping

• Projected $50 billion in restored benefits to 
the Great Lakes region (Brookings Institute, 
2007)
6

Great Lakes Legacy Act Projects
Completed or ongoing 
projects

GLLA To Date
• 21 Clean‐Ups Complete or 
Agreements Signed
• ~3,000,000 cubic yards (CY)
• Total cost: $565 Million 
• Leveraged $227 Million non‐
federal match
• 10 years of successful 
implementation under GLLA

Grand Calumet River AOC

Grand Calumet River AOC

Source: http://www.epa.gov/glnpo/aoc/grandcal/index.html

Project Background





90% of flow originates as municipal and industrial 
effluent, cooling and process water, and storm water 
overflows 
Legacy pollutants in sediments and surface water
All 14 BUIs included in 1991 remedial action plan
$2.1 million settlement with Hammond Sanitary 
District in 1999
$56 million settlement with 9 responsible parties in 
2001
US Steel completed dredging of 800,000 cy in upper 
5‐mile portion of East Branch in 2007 and performed 
additional in‐stream restoration in 2010

Project Map – Reaches 4A/4B

Partners and Stakeholders











USEPA Great Lakes National Project Office 
Indiana Department of Environmental Management
Indiana Department of Natural Resources
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Shirley Heinze Land Trust
The Nature Conservancy
Save the Dunes Conservation Fund
E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company
Resco Products Company
SulTRAC (Engineer of Record)
Great Lakes Sediment Remediation

JFBrennan, Environmental Restoration, NRT

Project Goals and Objectives





Remove contaminant mass in sediment
Reduce risks to aquatic life and human 
health
Reduce contaminant transport to Indiana 
Harbor and Lake Michigan
Improve water quality in East Branch Grand 
Calumet River and Grand Calumet River AOC
Advance the AOC toward delisting thru 
removal of beneficial use impairments
Improve biota, fish, and wildlife habitat

Major Project Components
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Remove abandoned railroad bridge
Construct temporary upland support areas
Excavate sedimentation basin to protect remedy from 
upstream contaminants
Partially dredge contaminated river sediments
Excavate adjacent wetlands to remove phragmites and 
place sand backfill with ponds
Dewater sediments and treat water
Offsite transportation and disposal of dredged materials
Place amended cap over remaining sediments
Restoration including planting native species

Railroad Bridge Removal
• Testing and removal of abandoned 
gas pipeline
• Removal of ties and walkways
• Tested for lead based paints
• Disassembly of girder sections
• Removal of timber piling 
• Debris removal and load out

Upland Support Area

Installation of Sediment Basin
 Created to provide sediment trap for upstream 
contaminated sediments
• Dredged 28,000 cy 

 4,400 ft2 sheet pile wall driven across downstream 
end 
• Raises water elevation 1 foot above normal
• Functions as a weir, trapping sediment behind it

Hydraulic Dredging


40,000 CY river; 82,000 CY 
wetland
Two 8” dredges with pipeline 
and booster pumps
Cutter shears for phragmites

Hydraulic Dredging(continued)

Water Quality Monitoring During 
Dredging
• Real time turbidity monitoring
• Measure and control downstream transport of 
contaminated sediment

Geotextile Tubes and Water Treatment
• 60 tubes stacked in 
three layers 
• Sized to treat up to 5 
million gallons per day

Load Out Operations
• Dredged sediment and used 
geotextile tubes 
• Approximately 127,000 tons
• Each truck bed was lined 
• Truck scale and tire wash
• All sediment was trucked to the 
Newton County Landfill, Indiana

Marsh Excavation
• 203,000 CY of material excavated 
mechanically
• Amphibious equipment
• Split into east and west marsh

Marsh Excavation

Sand Backfill
• Broadcast Capping System 
(BCS)™
• Evenly and gently 
distributes sand while 
minimizing intermixing 
with underlying 
sediments
• Wetlands A – F, sediment 
basin
• 100,000 ton
• Seidner Marsh
• 199,000 tons

Reactive Cap Design
Water Column

Armoring Layer
AquaGate™ (adsorptive)Treatment
Layer
Residual Contamination

Sediment Capping

River segments
• 16,000 cy of absorptive cap
• 40,000 ton of armored cap

Ecological Significance
• Numerous environmental 
stakeholders
• Globally rare dune and swale 
complex
• Rare Species
• Wild Lupine
• Harebell
• Fringed Gentian
• White Indigo
• Blazing Star

Invasive Species Control

Eradication of invasive vegetation 
(phragmites, cattails)
• Herbicide application
• Prescribed burning (planned)

Revegetation


Genotype Restrictions (Northwest Morianal 
Division of Indiana)
Native Seed: 73.90 acres (1,200 lbs.)
Native Plugs: 121,245

Maintenance and Monitoring
• Performance Standards
• Coverage (Native and Invasive)
• Representation
• Survival

• 12 months from EPA 
preliminary acceptance 
(2016)

Metrics

Project length: 1.8 miles
River depth








Pre‐dredge ~0‐10’
Post‐dredge > 6’

River sediment and wetland dredging volume: ~140,000 cy
Marsh excavation volume: ~203,000 cy
Sediment cap profile: 9” armor over 6” isolation with 
AquaGate+ORGANOCLAY™
Water treatment: 3,500 GPM during hydraulic dredging
Dewatering: ~60 geotextiles tubes stacked 3‐high
Wetlands and marsh invasive species control (47 acres) and 
restoration (74 acres)
Project duration: ~3 years plus 12 months revegetation 
maintenance 
Project budget: ~$80 million

Questions?