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University of Nebraska at Omaha Undergraduate Catalog 2007-2008

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ADMINISTRATION
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA
Administration
John Christensen, Ph.D., Interim Chancellor Sheri Rogers, Ph.D., Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs Julie Totten, B.S., Interim Vice Chancellor for Administration Joe Huebner, B.S., Associate Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance Wade Robinson, Ph.D., Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Deborah Smith-Howell, Ph.D., Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
The Board of Regents
Randolph Ferlic, M.D., Omaha Charles Hassebrook, Walthill Howard L. Hawks, Omaha Jim McClurg, Lincoln Bob Phares, North Platte Kent Schroeder, J.D., Kearney Bob Whitehouse, Papillion Charles Wilson, M.D., Lincoln Student Members: University of Nebraska at Omaha, Alex Williams University of Nebraska at Kearney, Mike Eiberger University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Matt Schaefer University of Nebraska Medical Center, Jonathan Henning

The Central Administration
James B. Milliken, Ph.D., President Interim Executive Vice President and Provost, Linda Pratt, Ph.D. Vice President for Business and Finance, David Lechner Vice President and General Counsel, Richard R. Wood, J.D.

The Colleges
Shelton Hendricks, Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences B.J. Reed, Ph.D., Dean, College of Public Affairs and Community Service David Allen, Ph.D., Dean, College of Engineering Marjorie Kostelnik, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education and Human Sciences Hesham Ali, Ph.D., Dean, College of Information Science and Technology John Langan, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education Lou Pol, Ph.D., Dean, College of Business Administration Gail Baker, Ph.D., Dean, College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media Thomas Gouttierre, M.A., Dean, International Studies and Programs Steve Shorb, M.A., Dean, University Library

TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA GENERAL INFORMATION
Administration......................................................................2 Profile...................................................................................5 Policies ................................................................................6 Admission ............................................................................8 Registration and Procedures .............................................17 Residency Policy ...............................................................23 Tuition and Fees.................................................................28 Student Affairs ...................................................................34 Financial Assistance ..........................................................42 Student Rights and Responsibilities..................................45 Student Code of Conduct..................................................49 Academic Integrity .............................................................54 Discrimination Policies.......................................................56 General Services................................................................59 Campus Security ...............................................................62 Graduate Studies and Alumni............................................63 International Studies and Programs ..................................64

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Core Curriculum.................................................................67 Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources ...................68 Architecture........................................................................71 Arts and Sciences..............................................................75 Business Administration ..................................................108 Communication, Fine Arts and Media .............................120 Education.........................................................................136 Education and Human Sciences .....................................147 Engineering ....................................................................157 Information Science and Technology ..............................174 Public Affairs and Community Service ............................186 Division of Continuing Studies....................................196 Campus Wide Programs..................................................201 American Humanics....................................................201 Reserve Officers Training Corps .................................201 University Honors Program.........................................202

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources .................206 Architecture......................................................................207 Arts and Sciences............................................................209 Business Administration ..................................................238 Communication, Fine Arts and Media .............................244 Education.........................................................................254 Education and Human Sciences .....................................263 Engineering ....................................................................264 Information Science and Technology ..............................275 Public Affairs and Community Service ............................280 Campus Wide Programs..................................................287

FACULTY ........................................................................290 INDEX .............................................................................301

WORLD WIDE WEB ADDRESS: http://www.unomaha.edu

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GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL INFORMATION

PROFILE
University of Nebraska at Omaha
UNO, located in the heart of Nebraska’s largest city, is proud to serve as the state’s metropolitan university. We offer nearly 170 programs of study in a learning environment that features the best of both worlds – a smallschool atmosphere within a thriving city where internship, employment and entertainment opportunities are plentiful. We are committed to placing students first, striving for academic excellence and engaging with the community. The main campus, located at 60th and Dodge streets, is surrounded by beautiful parks and residential neighborhoods. Located a mile to the south, The Peter Kiewit Institute of Information Science, Technology and Engineering is changing the way business and higher education partner with each other to achieve common goals. At UNO, students connect, collaborate and create. Approximately 15,000 students call UNO home. Our campus community also extends a warm, Midwestern welcome to more than 700 international students each year. Students at UNO can select from 110 bachelor’s degree programs, 42 master’s programs, five doctoral programs and two specialist’s degree programs. The university also offers nine post-baccalaureate certificate programs. Students may enroll and register via the Web at www.unomaha.edu. Residential housing is available at University Village on the main campus, and at Scott Residence Hall and Scott Village on the south campus at 67th and Pacific streets. Opportunities to get involved in campus life are many and varied, as UNO has more than 100 student organizations, including traditional fraternities and sororities. Maverick athletic pride is high, with men’s and women’s teams competing successfully in North Central Conference II athletics. Our Division I ice hockey team makes its home at the Qwest Arena in downtown Omaha, Nebraska’s premier entertainment and sports venue. Our faculty and staff are here to help create a university experience that matches students’ individual goals and dreams. For more information, call (402) 554-2800, or visit the Web at www.unomaha.edu.

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For more information…
6001 Dodge St. Omaha, NE 68182 (402) 554.2800 www.unomaha.edu

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GENERAL INFORMATION

POLICIES

Accreditation
The accreditations listed below indicate the concern of the faculty and administration of the University of Nebraska at Omaha to meet rigorous standards of academic quality. These standards include such factors as professional attainments of faculty, quality of research, library holdings, physical facilities and general support for the respective programs by funding authorities. Students, therefore, can be assured their educational experiences at UNO will meet high standards of quality. The University of Nebraska at Omaha is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The commission can be contacted at 30 North LaSalle St., Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504; telephone 1-800-621-7440. UNO also has programs which are accredited or approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, the Council on Education for Public Health, the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Council on Social Work Education, the Engineering Accreditation Commission and the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (401) 347-7770, www.abet.org. the American Home Economics Association (for undergraduate programs), the American Dietetic Association, the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, the Educational Standards Board of the Boards of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, the American Chemical Society, the Council on Aviation Accreditation and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Its courses are accepted for purposes of teacher certification by the Nebraska State Department of Education. Course credits from the University of Nebraska at Omaha are accepted by other member colleges and universities of the North Central Association and by member institutions of other regional accrediting agencies. As part of its ongoing evaluative processes, UNO has instituted a comprehensive program of assessing student academic achievement, with special emphasis on student learning. This program involves a variety of activities, such as capstone courses, special examinations, performances, surveys, exit interviews, etc. All of these are designed to assess student learning, with a view to making changes and improvements as appropriate. The active and committed involvement of each person asked to participate is essential for this important program to achieve its intended purposes. Additional information is available from the Coordinator of Assessment, Office of Academic Affairs, EAB 203.

2. the right to request the amendment of the student’s education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy or other rights; 3. the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent; 4. the right to file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning alleged failures by the University of Nebraska at Omaha to comply with the requirements of FERPA; and 5. the right to obtain a copy of the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s Student Records Policy. A copy of the policy is available at the Registrar’s Office, Eppley Administration Building, Room 105. For information regarding the Student Records Policy, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (402) 554-2482 or on the Registrar’s Office World Wide Web home page at: www.ses.unomaha.edu.

Affirmative Action/Policies Prohibiting Discrimination and Sexual Harassment
Students on each campus of the University of Nebraska shall be admitted and enjoy the programs and privileges of the University without regard to individual characteristics other than qualifications for admission, academic performance and conduct in accord with University policies and rules and laws applicable to student conduct. Employees on each campus of the University of Nebraska shall be employed and equitably treated in regard to the terms and conditions of their employment without regard to individual characteristics other than qualifications for employment, quality of performance of duties and conduct in regard to their employment in accord with University policies and rules and applicable law. The University of Nebraska at Omaha is committed to maintaining an environment for all students, faculty, staff, and visitors that is fair and responsible - an environment which is based on one’s ability and performance. To that end, it is the policy of the University of Nebraska at Omaha that any form of discrimination because of race, color, age, disability, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), national origin, marital status, Vietnam-era veteran status, political affiliation, sexual orientation, or any unlawful reason shall not be tolerated. In keeping with this commitment, the University also will not tolerate discrimination prohibited under this policy against students, faculty, staff and visitors by anyone acting on behalf of the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other physical, verbal, or visual conduct based on sex constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to the conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of employment or academic standing, (2) submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as the basis for an employment or academic decision, or (3) the conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working/academic environment. This statement is in keeping with federal employment and educational opportunity guidelines.

Privacy Act
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1. the right to inspect and review the student’s education records;

GENERAL INFORMATION

POLICIES
Appropriate corrective action will be taken in those instances where the foregoing policies have been violated. Any student or employee who is found to have violated any of the foregoing policies will be subject to disciplinary action. Further, the University commits itself to a program of affirmative action to encourage the application of minority, women and handicapped students, to identify and eliminate the effects of any past discrimination in the provision of educational and related services, and to establish organizational structures and procedures which assure equal treatment and equal access to the facilities and educational benefits of the institution for all students. The University of Nebraska at Omaha complies with all applicable laws promoting equal educational and employment opportunity and prohibiting unlawful discrimination, including those addressing the obligations of the institution under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Further information on these policies, as well as the Statement on Consensual Relationships and Procedures for Resolution of Complaints can be found on page 55. Students and faculty should contact the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, 202 Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-2262; and staff should contact Personnel Services, 205 Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-2321.

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• selecting a major early in the college career and adhering to the same; • working closely with academic advisers to develop a four-year curricular plan; • pre-registering early during each semester’s preregistration period; • registering for and completing 15-18 credit hours per semester, with acceptable grades; • engaged in fewer than 20 hours per week at a job; • in case of a possible delay caused by unavailability of a course, notifying the department chair prior to the end of the semester before that in which the course is needed. For its part, the University guarantees each student enrollment in courses that permit graduation in four years; if that is not possible, mutually acceptable alternatives may be provided, including allowing the student to substitute a different course. The mutual commitment outlined in this resolution by both the university and the student will result in four-year graduation.

Service-Learning Courses
Service-learning courses are offered by many academic departments at UNO. These courses allow students to combine community service with academic study and reflection. These courses are designated as “servicelearning” on the E-BRUNO registration system.

Financial Information
Annual financial reports and the annual general operating budget are available to interested persons in the University Library.

University Regulations
The University and its various colleges, divisions and departments reserve the right to change the rules controlling admission to, instruction in and graduation from the University or its various divisions. Such regulations are operative whenever University authorities deem necessary and apply not only to prospective students but also to currently enrolled students. The University also reserves the right to withdraw courses, to reassign instructors and to change tuition and fees at any time. In some cases prerequisites for courses offered at the University are effective even if they are not listed in this catalog. See the current class schedule or your adviser for more information.
NOTE: Modifications in the academic calendar and program could be necessitated by emergency conditions.

Discontinuance of Program Offerings
Acceptance of registration by the University of Nebraska and admission to any educational program of the University does not constitute a contract or warranty that the University will continue to offer the program in which a student is enrolled. The University expressly reserves the right to change, phase out or discontinue any program. The listing of courses contained in any University bulletin, catalog or schedule is by way of announcement only and shall not be regarded as an offer of contract. The University expressly reserves the right to: 1. add or delete courses from its offerings, 2. change times or locations of courses or programs, 3. change academic calendars without notice, 4. cancel any course for insufficient registrations, or 5. revise or change rules, charges, fees, schedules, courses, requirements for degrees, and any other policy or regulation affecting students, including, but not limited to, evaluation standards, whenever the same is considered to be in the best interests of the University.

Degree Completion Guarantee
Board of Regents Resolution The Board of Regents recognizes that it is important for University of Nebraska undergraduate students to earn their bachelor’s or first-professional degrees in a timely fashion. The University of Nebraska, therefore, commits itself to providing each student all necessary assistance to ensure graduation within four years of entering the university system, provided the student has appropriate high school preparation, pursues a course of study that is intended for four-year completion, and adheres to prudent practices in pursuing a degree. Prudent degree-seeking practices include:

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION

ADMISSION APPLICATION DEADLINE DATES
Freshman applicants should apply during the first semester of their senior year of high school. Transfer students should apply during the semester preceding their intended enrollment. Undergraduate Admission Application deadline dates: Fall Semester - August 1 Spring Semester - December 1 Summer Session - June 1 All applications (Web and paper) must be submitted to the Admissions Office by the deadline or be postmarked by the deadline in order to be considered. Applications not received by the deadline will be returned to the student and can be resubmitted by the student for future terms. All inquiries and correspondence relating to the admission of students should be addressed to: Office of Admissions University of Nebraska at Omaha Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0286 or www.ses.unomaha.edu •

guarantee admission or enrollment in any specific classes. Check, money order (payable to the University of Nebraska at Omaha) or credit card payment is accepted. Credit card payments require completion of a Credit Card Authorization Slip or can be made via a secure Web server at www.ses.unomaha.edu/admissions/.html Application fees submitted to any University of Nebraska system campus are valid for one year and are transferrable to UNO. Indicate the date and the campus to which the fee was paid. Applicants who pay the $45.00 application fee but who do not enroll within one year must reapply for admission and resubmit the application fee. Previously enrolled undergraduate students on any University of Nebraska system campus (UNK, UNL, UNMC) need not submit the application fee.

Health Requirement Information
All new, incoming students born on or after Jan. 1, 1957, must provide official documentation of two (2) MMR vaccinations (measles, mumps, rubella). Failure to comply with this requirement may result in the withholding of future registrations. For further information, please contact UNO Student Health Services, (402) 554-2374.

APPLICATION PROCESS
Students may apply for admission directly online at www.unomaha.edu. The online application provides a simple and efficient way to apply for admission. An application for admission may also be obtained from the UNO Office of Admissions, 103 Eppley Administration Building, 6001 Dodge Street, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 or by calling (402) 554-2393, TTY (402) 554-2135, or toll free 1-800-858-8648 in NE/IA only. Submitting an application or being granted admission to UNO does not guarantee enrollment in any specific courses. The applicant must submit a completed application and first-time applicants must pay a non-refundable application fee of $45.00 (U.S. dollars). For complete details, please refer to the “Application Fee” section. Submitting an application and application fee to UNO does not guarantee admission to the University or enrollment in any specific course or program. All credentials received in connection with applications for admission become the property of UNO. They cannot be duplicated, returned to the applicants, or forwarded to any agency or other college or university. Hand-carried or student submitted transcripts are not acceptable. The University reserves the right to change existing admissions policies and applicable deadline dates without prior notice.

University of Nebraska System Identification Number/Use of Social Security Number
A social security number is requested on the application for admission for the sole purpose of verifying credentials, document matching and for determining eligibility for and awarding of financial aid or scholarships. For security purposes, all students who apply for admission are assigned an University of Nebraska (NU) identification number for campus services, logging onto E-BRUNO and for student photo identification purposes. The NU identification number is an eight digit, unique number within the University of Nebraska system, and is transferable between University of Nebraska system campuses. For more information, visit the Web at www.ses.unomaha.edu/registrar/nuid.php.

FRESHMAN APPLICANTS Documents Required
1. Undergraduate Application for Admission 2. Application fee of $45.00 (non-refundable) 3. One (1) official high school transcript and/or official GED Equivalency Scores • One (1) official high school transcript must be sent to the UNO Office of Admissions directly from the high school. The high school transcript must be a cumulative record of all high school coursework completed. If the high school transcript does not verify graduation at the time the application is submitted, a final high school transcript must be sent following graduation. Hand-carried or student submitted transcripts will not be accepted. • Students with the GED (General Education Diploma) whose high school class would have graduated in 1997 or after must submit an

Track Your Admission Status Online
Admissions standing, including verifying program of study and the status of any remaining final documents, may be checked via E-BRUNO (https://ebruno.unomaha.edu) by logging on and selecting “Admissions Application Tracking.”

APPLICATION FEE
A $45.00 undergraduate application fee is required for all new and transfer students and must be paid when the application is submitted. Applications will not be processed unless the fee is included. The following information applies: • The application fee is non-refundable and does not

GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
official high school transcript of high school coursework completed, GED equivalency scores, and ACT or SAT test results. Official GED scores must be sent directly from the State Department of Education. Students who would have graduated from high school prior to January 1997 need only submit official GED scores. 4. Official ACT or SAT scores • Prospective applicants may take either the ACT or the SAT during their junior year or early in their senior year of high school. Freshman applicants no longer in high school may arrange to take the ACT exam though the UNO Testing Center. Official scores are to be sent to the University of Nebraska at Omaha directly from the testing service; the UNO ACT code is 2464. The UNO SAT code is 6420. Hand-carried or student submitted test results will not be accepted. • Students who graduated from high school prior to January 1997 are not required to submit ACT or SAT scores, unless applying to the College of Engineering or the College of Information Science and Technology. • UNO does not require the writing component of the ACT or the SAT. • Information on the ACT or SAT may be obtained from high school counselors or from the UNO Testing Center, (402) 554-4800, Eppley Administration Building, Room 113. • If you have attempted ANY collegiate coursework after high school, all attendance must be disclosed on the application for admission. Students may not choose to disregard prior postsecondary coursework previously attempted. This applies to studies completed at any accredited or unaccredited institution, coursework that was withdrawn, failed or incomplete. Failure to do so will result in a denied application and/or disenrollment from the university. See “Transfer Applicants”. Diploma - GED) and students who are home-schooled must meet the following criteria for assured admission:

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Core Course Requirements 1. English - 4 units* All units must include intensive reading and writing experience. Innovative interdisciplinary courses and courses in speech and journalism may be substituted if they include substantial amounts of reading and writing. 2. Mathematics - 3 units* Must include Algebra I, II and Geometry. 3. Social sciences - 3 units* At least one unit of American and/or world history and one additional unit of history, American government and/or geography; and a third unit of any social science discipline or subject. 4. Natural sciences - 3 units* At least two of the three units selected from biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. One of the units must include laboratory instruction. 5. Foreign languages - 2 units (same language)* Students who are unable to take two years of one foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission. Such students will be required to take two semesters of a foreign language at the University of Nebraska or other accredited postsecondary institution. 6. Additional requirement - 1 unit* One unit chosen from any of the above academic disciplines.
*a unit is equivalent to one school year in a class, grades 9-12

Performance Requirements In addition to meeting the above core course requirements, students applying for admission should be: 1. Ranked in the upper one-half of their high school class 2. OR have received an ACT composite score of 20 or higher (writing section not included) 3. OR have received an SAT total score of 950 or higher (Verbal/Critical Reading and Math). Admission by Review (Special Merit) Students who do not qualify for Assured Admission by meeting all entrance criteria may be considered for Admission By Review on the basis of special merit. Each applicant will be reviewed and considered for admission on an individual basis. The student’s cumulative high school grade point average, class rank, ACT/SAT scores and the grades received in the core course requirements are all considered a primary factor in the admission evaluation and decision. The student may be asked to provide letters of recommendation from the high school counselor or principal, as well as an educational purpose statement. Students who do not meet the 16 core course requirements and/or whose high school cumulative grade point average is below a 2.5 or class rank falls below the 3rd quartile, will be encouraged to attend a community college to strengthen their academic record before attending UNO. UNO works closely with the local community colleges to determine courses that transfer and satisfy the admission requirements.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Freshman Applicants
The Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska established minimum admission requirements for first-time freshman students effective fall 1997 semester. Prospective students should be aware that individual colleges may require additional credentials or have other requirements for specific programs. It also should be noted that these requirements may not pertain to policies for transfer students, international applicants, readmission and nondegree students. Freshman students who graduated from high school prior to January 1997 are exempt from meeting the core course and ACT/SAT requirements unless they are applying to a specific program with additional requirements.

Assured Admission (Freshman Applicants)
Graduates of a regionally accredited high school or who have completed the equivalent training (General Education

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION

All students admitted under Admission By Review will be monitored for academic success until they remove all academic deficiencies. It is anticipated that no more than 25% of the first-time traditional freshman students would be admitted under Admission By Review. Students with academic course deficiencies admitted under “special merit” will be required to sign an Admission by Review Agreement and make up any core course deficiencies by successfully completing an approved college-level course in each area of deficiency within the first 30 hours attempted at UNO. A First Year Experience class is required for students who are admitted under “Admission by Review” who meet the core course requirements but do not meet performance requirements. Home-Schooled Students Home-schooled are reviewed for Assured Admission requirements. Students earning a GED in lieu of high school graduation must provide ACT or SAT scores plus official high school transcripts from any high school schools attended, if applicable. Home-schooled students must submit official GED scores, official ACT or SAT scores, and official transcripts from any high schools or post-secondary schools attended, if applicable. An ACT composite score of 20, writing section not included, (or equivalent SAT score) may be substituted in lieu of GED scores. High school coursework completed through home-study curriculum should be presented on a record showing the scope and sequence of the instructional program designed to lead to basic skills for 912 grades as denoted in State Statute 79-1701. The following must be submitted by the primary teacher/administrator of the home school: • Typed transcripts (semester format) of completed coursework. Grades or averages earned in each course must be included. • A curriculum synopsis of courses paralleling the University of Nebraska core course requirements. Include brief description of each course. • Textbook titles and author information for each course completed. • Summary of methods for foreign language requirement, if applicable. • Summary of methods for natural science laboratory requirement. • Any additional documents requested by the university. Applicants who do not meet all entrance criteria and who do not qualify for assured admission may be considered for admission under Admission by Review on the basis of special merit. Applicants are reviewed and considered for admission on an individual basis. Students who are admitted without completing all 16 core course requirements are required to sign an Admission by Review Agreement and successfully complete an approved college-level course in each area of deficiency within their first 30 semester hours of credit at UNO. General Education Diploma (GED) Applicants at least 18 years of age who successfully complete equivalent training such as General Education Diploma (GED) will be reviewed for Assured Admission

requirements. Students who earn a GED in place of high school graduation, who are not applying as a transfer student (with 12 or more semester hours), should submit official high school transcripts reflecting all high school coursework completed and official GED scores. Students who are under the age of 21 are required to provide official ACT or SAT results. Applicants who do not qualify for assured admission by meeting all entrance criteria may be considered for admission to the University under Admission by Review on the basis of special merit. Each applicant will be reviewed and considered for admission on an individual basis. Students who are admitted without completing all 16 core course requirements will be required to sign an Admission by Review Agreement and successfully complete an approved college-level course in each area of deficiency within their first 30 semester hours of credit at UNO. Special Talent Students Applicants under this category must submit two letters of reference, one from the principal or counselor and the other from another school official, an Educational Purpose Statement, and the application documents previously listed. A representative from the appropriate UNO department (i.e., academic department head, athletic director, special needs counselor, director of Multicultural Affairs) will serve on the Admissions by Review Committee and will be involved in evaluating the evidence of special talent and making a recommendation to the Admissions Office. The admission decision will be based on academic potential and application of special talent in an academic setting. Special talent students will be required to make up core course deficiencies within the first 30 hours attempted at UNO.

Freshman Applicants Graduating from High School Prior to January 1997
Freshman students who graduated from high school prior to January 1, 1997 are exempt from meeting the core course requirements so long as they present evidence of ability to complete university coursework. Applicants must have graduated from a regionally accredited (North Central or equivalent) high school or have earned a high school equivalency degree (General Education Diploma - GED). ACT or SAT scores are required only if applying to the College of Engineering or the College of Information Science and Technology.

Deferred Admissions
Students who are not admissible under Assured Admission or Admission By Review may be required to obtain additional academic preparation at another postsecondary institution before being eligible for admission to UNO.

TRANSFER APPLICANTS
To be eligible for admission, transfer students must be in good standing at the college or university last attended. Transfer students presenting fewer than 12 attempted semester hours of coursework from a regionally accredited collegiate institution following high school graduation (excluding grades of “W”) will be required to meet the freshman admission requirements for assured admission or

GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
under any ABR category that applies. Transfer students who have attempted 12 or more semester hours from a regionally accredited collegiate institution following high school graduation (excluding grades of “W”) who are in good standing at their previous institution(s) will not be required to meet the 1997 admission standards but must meet the admission requirements as set by the college to which they apply. Each UNO college has policies related to which catalog degree requirements that apply. Transfer students from UNL and UNK who were admitted with deficiencies to UNL or UNK under the Fall 1997 admission standards will be required to complete their deficiencies within the first 30 hours of their enrollment in the University of Nebraska system. Any student who has been placed on academic dismissal or suspension from any college or university within the last year, regardless of the student’s eligibility to return to the prior institution, will be denied admission. The student would be eligible to reapply for admission to UNO after one full year following the end of the last term in which the student was suspended. Many of UNO’s undergraduate colleges have a minimum GPA requirement of 2.00 or above and additional admission requirements. See “Admissions Requirements for Selected Undergraduate Colleges” on page 15.

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Documents required:
1. Undergraduate application for admission 2. Application Fee of $45.00 (non-refundable) 3. Official college transcript(s) must be sent directly to the UNO Office of Admissions from the Registrar’s Office of each previous college or university attended regardless of whether credit was earned. Hand-carried or student-submitted transcripts are not acceptable. If you are currently enrolled in college courses, please request that a final official transcript be sent to the Office of Admissions as soon as possible after you have completed your coursework. If the records are not in English, an official translation must be provided by the student. 4. All previous college coursework attempted or completed must be reported on the application regardless of whether credit was earned. Transfer students may not choose to disregard prior postsecondary coursework previously attempted. This applies to studies completed at any accredited or unaccredited institution, coursework that was withdrawn, failed or incomplete. Failure to provide this information will be considered fraudulent and may result in withdrawal of admission or dismissal from the university. 5. Students provisionally admitted pending the receipt of all final official transcripts required for admission must certify they will meet the minimum admission criteria for the college/major to which they are admitted. The applicant’s signature on the Undergraduate Application for Admission certifies that, to the best of their knowledge, they meet the minimum admission requirement to the college/

major for which they have applied. After all transfer credits are received and evaluated, if a student does not meet the minimum required grade point average for the college/major in which they applied/enrolled, their program of study will be changed by the Office of Admissions. A delay or failure to provide an official transcript from each institution previously attended will result in an enrollment hold. 6. Students placed on academic suspension or dismissed from any institution within the last calendar year will be denied admission regardless of the student’s eligibility to return to the prior institution. Any student providing a transcript indicating suspension or dismissal within the last year will be disenrolled from classes and any tuition paid to date for the semester would be refunded. 7. Transcripts sent to the UNO Office of Admissions for students who do not enroll will be retained one year. If the student applies for admission beyond that, new transcripts would need to be provided for admission consideration. 8. Students who are granted provisional admission must submit all documents required for admission within the first eight weeks of the first term enrollment. Failure to do so will result in an enrollment hold blocking further registration. Only one term of provisional admission/enrollment is allowed. No extensions or waivers of the enrollment hold will be granted. It is the student’s responsibility to provide all credentials required for admission. 9. Several UNO colleges have minimum GPA and additional requirements. Failure to meet minimum requirements for a program may result in admission delays. To avoid delays, select a college/major program for which all requirements have been met. 10. All students applying to the College of Engineering or the College of Architecture must submit an official high school transcript. 11. Transfer students must be graduates of a regionally accredited (North Central or equivalent) high school or have completed the equivalent academic training (GED).

Awarding of Credits for Advanced Standing
• Credits submitted only on official transcripts from other colleges or universities will be evaluated for admission to an undergraduate college by the Office of Admissions. Transcripts will become a part of the student’s permanent record maintained in the Office of the Registrar. The dean of the UNO college will determine the manner in which transfer credits will apply toward degree requirements. In general, credits and grades earned at other University of Nebraska campuses will be accepted, computed into the student’s grade point average, and will become a part of the permanent record from which official transcripts will be made. Only courses with a grade of “C-” or better will be accepted for transfer from accredited two- and four-year colleges and universities. The College of

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION

Education and Human Sciences will accept a grade of “D” (including “D-”) from University of Nebraska system schools, excluding courses required by the major department. Sixty-four semester credit hours is the maximum allowed for transfer to most undergraduate UNO colleges from regionally accredited two-year colleges. The College of Engineering and the College of Education and Human Sciences will allow a maximum of 66 semester hours of credit. Credits to be transferred with a grade of “C-” or better from provisionally accredited colleges will be placed in escrow until such time as 30 semester hours have been successfully completed at UNO. Students wishing to transfer credits from recognized institutions outside the United States may need to provide a course syllabus and catalog for evaluation of transfer credits.

Nebraska System Visiting Inter-Campus Students
1. All visiting students from any of the University of Nebraska campuses must complete the InterCampus Application form, available online at www.ses.unomaha.edu/admissions/. 2. The student must have approval from the home campus adviser and the Student Accounts office. 3. A new online Inter-Campus Application form must be submitted to the UNO Office of Admissions each semester a student wishes to enroll as an InterCampus student. 4. All financial holds from the degree-granting campus must be cleared before submitted the Inter-Campus Application. 5. Inter-campus students who have been placed on academic suspension at any of the University of Nebraska campuses during the last calendar year are not eligible to enroll at UNO.

Nebraska System Transferring Change of Campus Students
If you were previously or are currently enrolled at another University of Nebraska campus but desire to transfer to UNO, complete the Change of Campus form available online at www.ses.unomaha.edu/admissions/ and a UNO Application for Admission. By completing the Change of Campus form and following the instructions, the credentials from the previous or current campus will be transferred to UNO. In general, credits and grades earned at other University of Nebraska campuses will be accepted, computed into the student’s UN grade point average and will become a part of the permanent record from which official transcripts will be made. There is no application fee. Students who are provisionally admitted pending the receipt of all final official transcripts required for admission must certify they will meet the minimum admission criteria for the college/major to which they are admitted. The applicant’s signature on the Undergraduate Application for Admission certifies that, to the best of their knowledge, they meet the minimum admission requirement to the college/ major for which they have applied. After all transfer credits are received and evaluated, if a student does not meet the minimum required grade point average for the college/major in which they applied/enrolled, their program of study will be changed by the Office of Admissions. A delay or failure to provide an official transcript from each institution previously attended will result in an enrollment hold. Any student providing a transcript indicating suspension or dismissal within the last year will be disenrolled from classes and any tuition paid to date for the semester would be refunded. Many UNO colleges have minimum GPA and other additional requirements. Refer to the application or the “Admissions Requirements for Selected Undergraduate Colleges” section for these requirements. Failure to meet the minimum GPA requirement for a desired program may result in admission delays. To avoid these delays, select a college/major program for which requirements have been met. Students placed on academic suspension or those dismissed from any institution within the last calendar year will be denied admission regardless of the student’s eligibility to return to the prior institution.

Former UNO Students Not in Attendance at UNO Within the Last Two Years
Former UNO students who have not been enrolled at UNO within the last two years must complete an Application for Undergraduate Admission. Another application fee is not required. Former UNO students will be exempt from meeting the freshman admission standards if not previously admitted under the Fall 1997 admission standards (all prior deficiencies must be completed per their initial admission agreement). Applicants will be readmitted into the university into the selected UNO college for which they are eligible for enrollment. Many UNO colleges have a minimum GPA requirement of 2.00 or above, as well as some additional requirements. For specific admission requirements to the colleges, please consult the degree requirements section in this catalog. 1. Readmission Criteria • The Admissions Office denies readmission to any student under academic suspension who has been out of school less than one calendar year. • Students who have been academically suspended from UNO should contact the Registrar’s Office for reinstatement information. • Many of UNO’s undergraduate colleges have additional admission requirements. See the section entitled “Admissions Requirements for Selected Undergraduate Colleges”. 2. Documents Required • Application for Admission (Undergraduate Application) available online at www.ses.unomaha.edu. • If the student has attended other colleges since last attending UNO, official college transcripts are required.

Non-Degree /Visiting Student Applicants
1. Individuals who do not intend to complete a degree at UNO may apply as a non-degree/visiting student. 2. A visiting student from another institution or a summer session applicant interested in enrolling for personal or professional enrichment may be admitted as a non-degree student.

GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
3. Non-Degree/Visiting Admission Criteria • If the student has attended another institution within the last calendar year, an official “Statement of Good Standing” or an official transcript indicating good academic standing from the last college or university attended is required. • Any student who has been placed on academic dismissal or suspension from any college or university within the last year, regardless of the student’s eligibility to return to the prior institution, will be denied admission. The student would be eligible to reapply for admission to UNO after one full year following the end of the term in which the student was last suspended. • Non-degree freshman applicants who graduated from high school after January 1, 1997 must submit official high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores. Applicants will be individually reviewed for admission. 4. The Non-Degree classification is not recommended for certification, recertification or for enrolling in professional Education courses. 5. Students changing from a “Non-Degree” classification to a degree program will be expected to provide additional documentation and meet admission requirements. An application for admission to the degree program must be filed with the Office of Admissions. 6. Non-degree students are not eligible for scholarships or financial aid.

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support of an admission application or to obtain residency are discovered to be altered or fraudulent.

Recent UNO Graduates
All UNO graduates must submit a new application to continue their undergraduate studies.

Applicants Who Apply for Admission and Decide Not to Enroll.
Students who apply for admission and decide not to enroll for the indicated term should do the following: * If possible, the applicant should notify the UNO Office of Admissions in writing or via e-mail of the change in plans. Upon receipt of this notification the student's application will be withdrawn. * If the student wishes to enroll for a future term, a new application for admission must be submitted. • A previously paid application fee is good for one year from the term it was originally submitted. * Transcripts which have been sent to the UNO Office of Admissions for students who do not enroll will be retained for one year. If the student applies for admission beyond that, new transcripts would need to be provided for admission consideration. * If the student has been awarded any financial aid, the student should notify the Financial Aid Office to cancel any aid that may have been awarded.

Early Entry Applicants
The University of Nebraska at Omaha Early Entry Program allows currently enrolled high school students of high academic achievement and potential the opportunity to enroll in regular college courses on the University campus. This program encourages high school students whose maturity, achievement, aptitude and goals warrant special consideration to enroll in the UNO Early Entry Program. Early Entry Students enroll in University courses at a level not available to them through their high schools. This program is meant to enhance the students’ educational programs, not to replace any part of them. Some opportunities a student may gain by enrolling in the UNO Early Entry Program are: • Early Entry students may be enrolled in high school and at the university concurrently. Courses may be taken during the fall or spring semesters or during the summer sessions. Students enrolled in the Early Entry Program attend regular University classes and receive University credit. • The College credits earned may be applied toward a UNO degree and are usually transferrable to other colleges, giving students a head start on their college programs. The program is not restricted to high school students planning to attend UNO after graduation. • Enrolling as an Early Entry student allows the advanced high school students the opportunity to broaden their college education by getting an early start and enhances the successful transition to college. Early Entry enrollment is available through three Colleges at the University of Nebraska at Omaha: The College of Arts & Sciences offers the Early Entry Program

Academic Suspension or Dismissal
Students whose academic records reflect they were placed on academic suspension or dismissal during the last calendar year at any college or university are not eligible for admission to UNO. Once the university has received a transcript or other notification indicating suspension or dismissal within the last calendar year, regardless of the student’s eligibility to return to the prior institution, admission will be cancelled and/or the student will be disenrolled from classes and any tuition paid to date for the semester would be refunded. The student would be eligible to reapply for admission to UNO after one full year from the end of the last term in which the student was suspended.

Provisional Admission
Students who are granted Provisional Admission must submit all documents required for admission within the first eight weeks of the first term of enrollment. Failure to do so will result in an enrollment hold blocking further registration. Only one term of provisional admission/enrollment is allowed. No extensions or waivers of the enrollment hold will be granted. It is the student’s responsibility to provide all credentials required for admission.

Fraudulent and Incomplete Applications
The University reserves the right to deny or revoke admission, including dismissal from the University, if any information is given falsely or withheld on the admission application or if transcripts/documents submitted in

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION

for students to take coursework in most academic discipline areas. Many Early Entry Students will begin with math, or foreign language courses. Students are advised through the Dean’s Office of the College of Arts and Sciences, Arts & Sciences Hall - room 240, (402) 554-2458. The College of Arts & Sciences has provided Early Entry opportunities for hundreds of students who have often become our high scholastic achievers at the University. The College of Information Science and Technology offers the Early Entry Program for students interested in pursuing cutting-edge coursework designed to challenge them in information technology fields. Students must be prepared for college level coursework. Students are advised through the College of IS&T academic advising office. Courses may be taken in computer science and management information systems as well as many other areas of academic discipline. Additional information is available by calling (402) 554-3819. The College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media offers the Artist Prep Program for advanced high school students who wish to enrich their experience in the arts. Students must be prepared for college level coursework and letters of recommendation to the Artist Prep Program by their high school fine arts teacher (if applicable) and/or private teacher must accompany the application. An audition or portfolio is required for entry into the Artist Prep program. Courses may be taken in music, creative writing, theater, art and art history, as well as many other areas of academic discipline. Additional information on the Artist Prep Program is available from the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media, Weber Fine Arts Building 311, (402) 554-2238. Requirements for Admission to the Early Entry Program To be admitted to this program, the UNO Office of Admissions must receive the following: • A completed Early Entry Application. • A $45.00 non-refundable application fee (once a student has enrolled at UNO, an application fee for future terms of enrollment would not be required). • A high school transcript of all coursework completed to date and a copy of immunization records must accompany the Early Entry Application. • The student must have achieved a minimum ‘B’ average in all high school academic core coursework (3.00 on a 4.00 scale). If a GPA from an accredited high school is not available, the ACT or SAT (or equivalent achievement test) may be required to determine the student’s academic potential/eligibility. • Recommendation and approval of courses from the high school counselor based on the student’s academic performance. Recommendations for home schooled students are handled on an individual basis. • Signature of approval from the parent or guardian. • Students whose first language is not English are required to demonstrate English proficiency. Additionally, all education records presented to the university must be in English. Additional information regarding the Early Entry Program: • A maximum of six (6) semester credit hours may be earned each term. • A new Early Entry application must be completed

each semester a student wishes to be considered for this program. A new application fee would not be required. • Once a student has graduated from high school, in order to continue enrollment at the University, the student must submit an Application for Undergraduate Admission, complete official high school transcript and ACT or SAT test results, and meet the minimum freshman admission requirements established by the University of Nebraska Board of Regents. Inquiries regarding the Early Entry program should be directed to the UNO Early Entry Program coordinator at (402) 554-3810. Applicants Who Apply for Admission and Decide Not to Enroll: Students who apply for admission and decide not to enroll for the indicated term should do the following: • If possible, the applicant should notify the UNO Office of Admissions in writing or via e-mail of the change in plans. Upon receipt of this notification the student's application will be withdrawn. • If the student wishes to enroll for a future term, a new application for admission must be submitted. • A previously paid application fee is good for one year from the term it was originally submitted. • Transcripts which have been sent to the UNO Office of Admissions for students who do not enroll will be retained for one year. If the student applies for admission beyond that, new transcripts would need to be provided for admission consideration. • If the student has been awarded any financial aid, the student should notify the Financial Aid Office to cancel any aid that may have been awarded.

U.S. Citizens, Permanent Residents, Immigrants, Refugees and Asylees
To be eligible to apply for undergraduate national admission (other than Nebraska high school graduates not on a visa), a student must be either a U.S. citizen, or have been granted permanent resident, asylee, immigrant, or refugee status by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Proof of such documentation (I551 form Permanent Resident Card — formerly Green Card, Naturalization Certificate, official notice of asylee or refugee status) will be required for admission. If the student cannot provide such documentation, the student would need to apply through the office of International Studies and Programs. Please contact the Office of International Studies and Programs (402) 554-2293, for an application.

Student’s Current/Mailing Address
All university correspondence will be sent to the address indicated in the “Mailing/Current Address” section on the Application for Admission. It is the student’s responsibility to keep their address updated/current on E-BRUNO at https:/ebruno.unomaha.edu/login.html. Failure to do so may result in the student not receiving critical information pertinent to their enrollment at the University.

English Proficiency/Policy for Students for Whom English Is Not Their Language of Nurture

GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
1. Undergraduate applicants whose language of nurture is not English may demonstrate English proficiency through: a. successful completion of UNO’s intensive English program, ILUNO,* or b. submission of a qualifying TOEFL or IELTS score. i. The minimum TOEFL or IELTS score requirements for undergraduate applicants to most programs range from: TOEFL Score - Internet 57 to 61 IELTS Score - Overall 5.0 to 5.5 Scores of less than 61 on the Internet-based TOEFL or 5.5 overall on the IELTS must be validated either by the ILUNO program or the UNO English placement exam. Enrollment in ILUNO may be required. Scores greater than or equal to 61 on the Internet-based TOEFL or 5.5 overall on the IELTS do not need to be validated.
* Programs in the College of Education, the College of Engineering, or the English department are not eligible for admission through completion of the ILUNO program.

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English courses and on the English portion of the ACT or SAT. If the waiver is granted, students will then take the English Placement Exam. 4. All documents submitted to the university must be either completed in English or accompanied by official English translations. Documents must be submitted directly to UNO by an official of the issuing institution. When it is impossible for the issuing institution to submit documents, certified true copies may be submitted. 5. After admission to the University, undergraduate students must take the English Placement Exam before they will be allowed to enroll in English courses. Further, they must enroll in that course or sequence of courses indicated by their placement exam.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS
Requesting an Application An international application for admission may be obtained on the Web at http://world.unomaha.edu or from International Studies and Programs, UNO, Arts and Sciences Hall 241, 6001 Dodge St. Omaha, NE 681820080, by email at world@unomaha.edu, by phone (402) 554-2293, by fax (402) 554-2949, or on the Web at world.unomaha.edu. Required Documentation Applicants must submit a completed international application and first-time applicants must pay a nonrefundable application fee of $45.00. The application fee of $45.00 (U.S. dollars) paid by check, money order, or credit card is required from all NEW undergraduate students at the time an application is submitted. Applications will not be processed unless the fee is included. Applicants who do not enroll within one year must reapply and resubmit the application fee. Submitting an application and fee to UNO does not guarantee admission to the University. International students must submit complete secondary school or university transcripts or mark sheets, and certificates or diplomas awarded. Official, certified copies in the native language and certified English translations are required. These documents should be sent to UNO directly from the foreign institution. When it is impossible to have records sent directly from the foreign institution, certified true copies may be submitted. Students enrolled in other U.S. institutions should have official transcripts sent directly to UNO from their current school. English Proficiency Requirement Undergraduate applicants whose native language is not English should present an official TOEFL or IELTS score. For more information about undergraduate English proficiency requirements, please see the section titled “Policy for Students for Whom English is Not Their Language of Nurture”. Proof of Financial Support for F-1 or J-1 Visa Applicants or Holders U.S. Federal law requires all international students applying for an F-1 or J-1 visa to demonstrate they have adequate funding through personal, family, or a sponsor’s financial resources. Students must provide evidence that

ii. The English major and all programs in the College of Education and the College of Engineering require higher minimum scores. They are: Education, Engineering TOEFL Score - Paper 500; Computer1 73; Internet 61 IELTS Score - Overall 5.5 English TOEFL Score - Paper 600; Computer1 250; Internet 100 IELTS Score - Overall 7.0 Institutional TOEFL tests are not available for direct applicants to the University. Enrollment in the ILUNO program may be required if English language ability is below acceptable standards. 2. Advanced ILUNO students may take undergraduate academic classes in combination with language training in ILUNO* provided that eligibility be limited to: a. those courses designated by individual departments as appropriate, b. those students enrolled in 1600 and/or 1700, and c. those students recommended by the ILUNO director or assistant director in consultation with the instructor of record.
* Programs in the College of Education, the College of Engineering, or English department are not eligible for the concurrent undergraduate-ILUNO enrollment option.

3. Naturalized citizens of the United States, refugees, immigrants, and non-immigrants may request a waiver of the English proficiency requirement. To qualify, applicants must have graduated from an accredited U.S. high school, and show acceptable scores in four units (years) of standard high school

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GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION

they have sufficient funds in their possession, at the time of their application for admission, to finance their first year of study. If financial assistance is provided by a sponsor or sponsoring organization, a statement from the sponsor or sponsoring organization is required. Bank statements must have original signatures and bank seals or stamps. The UNO financial affidavit and any supporting documents or bank statements should be no more than six months old at the time they are submitted. Failure to submit a complete financial affidavit will prevent UNO from issuing an I-20 or DS-2019. Health Insurance Due to the high cost of health care in the U.S., UNO offers health insurance to its international students at a reasonable rate. Students who do not have a universityapproved policy from overseas are required to participate in this plan. F-1 or J-1 Visa Applicants or Holders Applying to NonDegree Programs International students who are F-1 or J-1 visa applicants or holders may apply as non-degree students if they: a. have written permission from their current U.S. college or university to be enrolled both at UNO and their current school; b. are referred as a participant on an international exchange program between UNO and their home institution; OR c. have a recommendation letter from their home institution or employer. Students applying under this section should contact the Office of International Admissions for letter content requirements. Admission Packets for International Students Most admission decisions are made withing three weeks after all required documentation is received. Upon admission to UNO, a letter of admission and the I-20 or DS-2019 form will be mailed directly to the student.

Admission Requirements for Selected Undergraduate Colleges
Certain UNO Colleges have minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) and high school units* requirements for admission to their college. For specific admission requirements to the Colleges, please consult the degree requirements section which begins on the following pages: Core Curriculum.................................................................67 Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources ...................68 Architecture........................................................................71 Arts and Sciences..............................................................75 Business Administration ..................................................108 Communication, Fine Arts and Media .............................120 Education.........................................................................136 Education and Human Sciences .....................................147 Engineering ....................................................................158 Information Science and Technology ..............................174 Public Affairs and Community Service ............................186 Division of Continuing Studies....................................196
*A unit is one year of high school coursework.

GENERAL INFORMATION

REGISTRATION AND PROCEDURES
Registration Requirements
Prior to the start of classes each session, students must register for courses according to instructions published on the UNO Web site. To be eligible to register, a new or readmitted student (one who has not enrolled during the previous two years) must have completed all admissions information. Prior to registering, students should seek assistance from an academic adviser within his/her college. Some colleges and departments require advising prior to registering. Every student is encouraged to review the requirements for their intended degree objective with an assigned academic adviser. This review should be scheduled in preparation for and prior to each registration. Students who have outstanding debts or fees owed to the University will not be permitted to register until these obligations have been met. Academically suspended students may not register for additional coursework until an application for reinstatement has been filed with their collegiate dean and approved. Due to limited facilities and staff, the University cannot guarantee that all students will be able to enroll for every course they wish in each semester.

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Adding, Dropping, Late Adds and Refund Schedules
Courses may be added or dropped using E-BRUNO during regular registration hours. Adding a course to your schedule via E-BRUNO may be done up until the course starts, or through the 100% refund period. The start date for a course can be found by viewing the Class Listings. Adding a course after the 100% refund period ends is considered a Late Add, and requires permission from the instructor. If permission is granted to add the course late, the instructor will have a permit added to your schedule. You must then register for the course via E-BRUNO. A $25.00 Late Registration Fee will be assessed to those students whose initial enrollment takes place after the start of the session. Exceptions to this are thesis, internship, or independent study. Dropping a course can be done via E-BRUNO up until the last day to withdraw, which may be found by viewing the Academic Calendar. Or - if you are currently enrolled by going to E-BRUNO, clicking on "Drop/Add/Withdraw Classes", and then clicking on "View Refund Schedule" for a particular course. Some courses, which do not follow the start and end dates for the term, are called course exceptions. To find the last day to withdraw for these courses, you must click on "View Refund Schedule" if currently enrolled, or you may contact the Records & Registration Office at (402) 554-2314 or by email at registrar@unomaha.edu. Important notice: Requests to drop a course submitted via fax or U.S. mail will be processed based on the dates appearing on the fax or U.S. mail post mark. Refund schedules for a particular course can be found by going to E-BRUNO, clicking on "Drop/Add/Withdraw Classes", and then clicking on "View Refund Schedule" for a particular course. Refund schedules can also be found going to Tuition Refund Schedule. Students who drop or withdraw from one or more courses, or who completely withdraw, will be obligated to the University for that portion of tuition that is indicated on the refund schedule. Students who completely withdraw are also obligated to pay the nonrefundable portion of tuition and fees for the course(s) from which they are withdrawing. Technology Fee is refundable at the same rate as tuition. UPF Fees are refundable only upon withdrawal from all UPF chargeable courses. All other fees are non-refundable. Students who have paid all tuition will be given a refund computed from the date they withdrew from their course(s). If any portion of the original tuition and fees payment was charged to a credit card, any refunds will first be credited to the credit card account. All remaining credit balance refunds will be paid to the student by check. Students can expect three weeks to elapse before refund checks are mailed to them.

Classification
A student’s academic classification is determined by the number of semester hours of academic credit earned. Academic Range in Classification Semester Hours Freshman 0 through 26 Sophomore 27 through 57 Junior 58 through 90 Senior 91 or above

University Credit Courses
All credit courses offered by the University may be applied toward any degree or certificate granted, except as stated by each department. The system of course numbers is arranged to indicate the level of instruction. The first figure in each number designates the group to which a course belongs: 1000-1990 Courses open primarily to freshmen 2000-2990 Courses open primarily to sophomores 3000-3990 Courses open primarily to juniors 4000-4990 Courses open primarily to seniors 8000-9990 Courses open only to graduate students Courses offered by the university are listed in the “Course Description” section of this catalog. For the most current, up to date listing of course descriptions, visit the Web at www.ses.unomaha.edu and click on “Course Descriptions” under the “Registrar” column. From time to time courses may be added or dropped from a curriculum. For graduate courses see the Graduate Catalog. All courses listed in this catalog cannot be offered each semester. Some departments indicate in which semester the course is normally offered. While the departments will attempt to follow the guidelines established for periods of course offerings, there is no guarantee that the course will be offered during the semester indicated. Furthermore, students cannot be guaranteed placement in a course offered during a particular semester.

Permits and Authorizations
Many courses require specific prerequisites to be met and/or require permission from the department prior to registration. Course prerequisites are automatically met based on previous coursework you have performed while at UNO or through transfer credit as determined by your adviser. If the registration system indicates the course for which you wish to register requires prerequisites or is

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GENERAL INFORMATION

REGISTRATION AND PROCEDURES
Academic Amnesty
Each college has established a policy and procedures for students who wish to declare academic amnesty for one or more semesters. Students should read the “Academic Amnesty” policy for their college in this catalog, or contact their dean’s office. Students who declare “Academic Amnesty” are not eligible to graduate with honors.

restricted, you must contact your academic adviser or your college advising office. If it is determined you may register for the course in question, a permit or authorization will be entered by your academic adviser or the department. Course prerequisites can be found by viewing the online catalog, or by logging into E-BRUNO, selecting "Scan Course Listings" and clicking on the title of a course listed. An Authorization is entered via E-BRUNO to your schedule. An Authorization will override any prerequisite such as a course, permission needed, or GPA requirement. A Permit is issued via E-BRUNO to your schedule if you need to override a prerequisite, a time conflict, or a closed course. A Permit will also override co-requisites, such as courses that require both a lecture and lab, allowing you to register for only one. This does not register you for the course! It only means you are able to proceed with registration for that course. Once the correct permit or authorization is entered on the system, you you must register for the course via E-BRUNO. Permits and authorizations are course section and term specific. You must ensure the permit or authorization is issued for the exact course you want. You will not be able to register for a different section of the same course. For example, if a permit or authorization is issued for ENGL1160-003 (call #00985), you will not be able to register for ENGL-1160-006 (call #00988). Permits and authorizations not used before the end of the 100% refund period will be deleted from your class schedule.

Grading
Grades are determined by the daily record of the student and the record made on quizzes, mid-semester and semester examinations. The weight attached to each of these factors is determined solely by the instructor of the course. The grading system is as follows: Symbol Definition Quality Points A+ outstanding 4.0 A outstanding 4.0 Aoutstanding 3.67 B+ proficient 3.33 B proficient 3.0 Bproficient 2.67 C+ satisfactory 2.33 C satisfactory 2.0 Csatisfactory 1.67 D+ below standard 1.33 D below standard 1.0 Dbelow standard 67 F failing 0. CR credit * NC no-credit, failing * NR no grade reported * S satisfactory: Grade of “C” * or better for graduate ; “D” or better for undergraduate U unsatisfactory, failing * AU audit * I incomplete * Follow rules listed in catalog; cannot be changed to “IP”; can be extended by one semester by instructor request to registrar. IP course in progress * Used for thesis, independent study, research project, or other arranged course; applies to both graduate and undergraduate; remains indefinitely. W withdrew (good standing) * R repeated course *
(* — not used in calculating grade point averages)

Academic Course Credit
Course credit is determined by the number of hours per week a class is in session, with some exceptions such as laboratory, physical education, band and choir. A course scheduled to meet three times per week for a semester merits, therefore, three semester hours credit. No more credit than the amount stated in the catalog is permitted in any course. To receive credit all work must be done under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Students should expect to spend a total of two to three hours per week for each credit hour enrolled.

Student Study Load
1. A normal student load is 12 to 17 credit hours. 2. Full-Time Undergraduate students must be enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours in a fall semester, spring semester, or summer term to be considered a full-time student. Half-Time Undergraduate students must be enrolled for a minimum of 6 credit hours in a fall semester, spring semester, or summer term to be considered a halftime student. 3. Students shall not carry 18 or more semester hours of work unless they have maintained an average of “B” (3.0) in a regular 15-hour load during the preceding semester. Permission to register for 18 hours or more should be obtained from the student’s academic adviser. 4. Audit hours do not apply in counting hours for full time status.

Grade Point Averages (GPA)
UNO GPA The GPA included in the student’s transcript reflects courses taken only at UNO, UNL, UNMC and UNK. Degrees with Honors GPA Grades awarded in ALL courses taken at ALL colleges and universities attended are included in computing the GPA for determining eligibility for graduation honors.

GENERAL INFORMATION

REGISTRATION AND PROCEDURES
Not Reported “NR” Grades
If a Not Reported “NR” grade is reflected on a grade report, the student should immediately report it to the faculty member. A grade of “NR” is not a terminal grade and must be changed to the appropriate letter grade.

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basis of their grading standards during the first week of class in a semester.

Audit Registration Policies and Procedures
Students may only register to audit a course on or after the first day of the semester. Audit students may not participate in recitation, turn in papers, or take examinations. Academic credit is not awarded for audited courses nor do they apply in counting hours for full- or halftime status. Foreign language and physical education activity courses cannot be taken on an audit basis. Audit registration is subject to available class space, requires the written permission of the instructor, and must be done in person at the Records and Registration Office, EAB 105. Audit tuition is one-half of the applicable resident undergraduate or graduate tuition rate. The half-price tuition rate for audit courses is available only during the first week of the semester. Audit enrollments are assessed the same student fees as credit enrollments. Likewise, audits are refunded at the same rate as credit enrollments Students who register to take a course for credit and change to audit after the first week of class will be required to pay the full applicable tuition rate.

Grade Appeals Procedure
Students wanting to appeal a grade given for a course should refer to the college in which the course was offered for the appropriate procedure.

Credit/No-Credit (CR/NC) Privilege
1. Students need permission to take a course Credit/No-Credit from the instructor and from the department chair. This is done by obtaining a Credit/No-Credit registration card from the Records and Registration Office in EAB 105, and having it signed as noted. 2. The primary objective of the Credit/No-Credit privilege is to encourage students to attempt courses in areas they would normally avoid because of lack of background. The Credit/No-Credit privilege, therefore, extends the concept of a liberal education and for this reason it will not ordinarily be available within a student’s major or minor unless written approval of the Department Chairperson is given. 3. Each college and department has the final authority in determining the extent of its participation in the program. All students should be made aware of the applicability of this program in the college in which they are enrolled. 4. A minimum grade of “C-” is required to receive credit (for CR/NC courses). Rules Governing Credit/No-Credit: 1. A maximum of 24 hours may be taken for university credit on a Credit/No-Credit basis. This privilege may be restricted by each department or college. 2. Waiver of prerequisites for courses taken on a Credit/No-Credit basis shall be determined by the department offering the course. 3. Those students with less than 58 semester hours of academic credit earned may not take more than two courses during a regular semester and not more than one course during a summer session on a Credit/No-Credit basis. 4. The deadline for declaring the “Credit/No Credit” grading option for a class is at the end of the 50% refund period. The 50% refund period is the end of the third week for fall/spring semester classes and the proportionate period for summer classes. 5. A student may change from a Credit/No-Credit basis to a graded basis prior to the end of the last day for officially withdrawing from a course during a semester, but not thereafter. 6. A grade of “No-Credit” will be recorded on a student’s record but will not be included in determining the cumulative grade point average. 7. Faculty will report “Credit” or “No-Credit” designations for all students enrolled in a given course on that basis. All faculty are responsible for informing students who enroll on a Credit/No Credit

Incomplete
To receive an “incomplete,” students must contact their professor prior to the end of the semester, request a grade of incomplete, and make arrangements to complete the work. The rules which govern the issuance of the incomplete are as follows: 1. The grade “I” is used by an instructor at the end of a semester or summer session to designate incomplete work in a course. It is given when a student, due to circumstances such as illness, military service, hardship or death in the immediate family, is unable to complete the requirements of the course in the term in which the student is registered for credit. Incompletes will only be given if the student has already substantially completed the major requirements of the course. 2. Each instructor will judge each situation. The instructor will also indicate by a departmental record, with a copy to the student, how the incomplete is to be removed, and if the instructor is at the University at the time of removal, supervise the makeup work and report the permanent grade. 3. In the event the instructor is not available at the time of the student’s application for removal of an incomplete, the department chairperson will supervise the removal of the incomplete and turn in the permanent grade for the student. 4. A student shall have no longer than the end of the next regular semester following receipt of the “I” to remove the incomplete. After that time, the “I” will automatically become a “W”, or such other grade specified by the instructor depending on the amount and quality of the coursework previously completed. Exceptions to this rule will be permitted if initiated by the student and approved by the instructor, department chair person and Dean. Exceptions to this rule will be made only in response to circumstances over which the student

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articulated equivalent course is taken at UNO. Students should consult with an adviser prior to enrolling in courses at UNO to ensure that the direct equivalent course is taken. Upon completion of the course, either the student or the adviser must contact the Records and Registration Office in Eppley Administration Building, room 105, to have the previous grade removed from the GPA. • Some courses may be an exception to the University repeat policy due to the type of courses they are. Such courses as thesis, internships, physical activity, special topics or independent study can be taken again for credit without having to remove the first grade. Undergraduate Courses – Special Exceptions Some courses, such as Thesis, Internship, Physical Activity or Independent Study may be repeated without removing the previous grade. (A complete list of these courses can be found by clicking on the links below under the heading "UNO Courses That Can Be Retaken Without Removal of Previous Grade." ) For these undergraduate courses, only grades of F will be removed "automatically" when these courses are repeated. All other repeats must be done by contacting the Records and Registration Office in EAB 105 and completing the "Removal of Previous Grades" form. Graduate Courses – General Rule Only grades of C’s, D’s and F can be repeated, and only the most recent grade will be counted into the GPA. • Letter-graded courses must be repeated for a letter grade. • ALL courses and grades will continue to be a part of the student’s permanent record (transcript). • Repeats must be completed before a degree is granted. Once a degree is granted, repeated courses will not change the GPA established at the time the degree was awarded. Graduate Courses – Special Exceptions For courses such as Thesis, Internship, or Independent Study, repeats are subject to the same rules as listed above under "General Rule". Repeats in this category cannot be done automatically. Students must contact the Records and Registration Office in EAB 105 and complete the "Removal of Previous Grades" form.

has no control, and these must be detailed. 5. In registering for courses, students receiving one or more “I” grades from the previous semester should take into account the time needed to complete the required work and plan their schedules accordingly.

Academic Honors
Full-Time Dean’s List and Part-Time Dean’s List Students seeking their first bachelors degree are eligible for this academic honor. Students must earn a minimum of 12 quality hours with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 in a given fall or spring semester for full-time students, and consecutive fall or spring semesters for parttime students. These academic honors are not offered during the summer term. Part-time students whose honors are considered on a continuous enrollment will have summer hours included in their calculations for Dean’s list. Dean’s lists are posted to the academic record only during the fall and spring semesters. Contact UNO’s Registrar’s Office, Eppley Administration Building, Room 105, with any questions. Full-Time Chancellor’s List and Part-Time Chancellor’s List Students seeking their first bachelors degree are eligible for this academic honor. Students must earn a minimum of 12 quality hours with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 4.0 in a given fall or spring semester for full-time students, and consecutive fall or spring semesters for part-time students. These academic honors are not offered during the summer term. Students earning these academic honors will also earn the corresponding full-time or part-time Chancellor’s List honor. Contact UNO’s Registrar’s Office, Eppley Administration Building Room 105, with any questions.

Academic Performance
A student must maintain a cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0 or above to remain in “good academic standing” in the University. However, the colleges may require a higher grade point average. For purposes of participation in recognized extracurricular activities, “good academic standing” is defined as a cumulative GPA of at least 1.75 for the first 45 hours attempted and at least 2.0 for 46 or more hours attempted, including all college level courses taken for credit at the University of Nebraska.

Repeating Courses: UNO Policy on Grades
Undergraduate Courses When an undergraduate course is repeated, only the most recent grade will be calculated into the GPA. • Letter-graded courses must be repeated for a letter grade. • ALL courses and grades will continue to be a part of the student’s permanent record (transcript). • When determining eligibility for graduation with honors, every grade awarded is computed into the GPA. • Repeats must be completed before a degree is granted. Once a degree is granted, repeated courses will not change the GPA established at the time the degree was awarded. • Students may replace grades earned at another University of Nebraska system campus if the

Academic Probation
A student whose cumulative grade point average is below 2.0 after having attempted six or more semester hours work will be placed on probation. Probationary status will remain in effect as long as the student’s cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) remains below 2.0. No student will be allowed to enroll for any course on a pass/fail or Credit/No Credit basis while on probation. Probation constitutes a period of formal warning that the student is doing unsatisfactory work. The student is encouraged to use every opportunity during time on probation to seek counsel and guidance from various university agencies which have been established to offer assistance in study and academic planning. For information on such services, the student should consult with his or her academic adviser or counselor.

GENERAL INFORMATION

REGISTRATION AND PROCEDURES
Academic Suspension
Starting with the Fall 2005 semester, students will no longer be suspended at the end of the fall term; students will only be suspended at the end of the spring term. This rule applies to all UNO colleges, including University Division, and all UN-L based programs in the Colleges of Architecture, Agriculture, Education and Human Resources, and Engineering. Students who are on probation will be suspended at the end of the spring semester when their semester grade point average is lower than 2.0 and the cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) falls below the following standards: Hours Cumulative Attempted GPA 0-12 No Suspension 13-45 1.75 46 or more 2.00 Suspensions under these conditions will be automatic. Academic suspension will be for a minimum period of one year. Students will be notified by their primary academic college of their suspension, and given instructions on how to appeal, should they choose to do so, and any appropriate deadlines associated with an appeal. Appeals properly filed shall delay implementation of the suspension until the appropriate appeals committee has acted. However, if the appeal is denied, the student shall be disenrolled and tuition shall be refunded.

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by the completion of the fifteenth additional hour. Students must consult an academic adviser prior to starting this program. Two baccalaureate degrees may be awarded simultaneously when the student becomes eligible to receive them. Outstanding Debts and Fees Owed to the University Diplomas or official transcripts will not be released for students who have outstanding debts or fees owed to the University. Degrees with Honors The Baccalaureate degrees with honors are awarded as follows: 1. To all graduates whose scholastic average for their entire university career and at UNO is 3.51 or above, but below 3.63, the degree cum laude. 2. To all graduates whose scholastic average for their entire university career and at UNO is 3.63 or above, but below 3.87, the degree magna cum laude. 3. To all graduates whose scholastic average for their entire university career and at UNO is 3.87 or above, the degree summa cum laude. To qualify for honors, a student must have earned at least 60 semester hours within the University of Nebraska system, 30 hours of which must be completed at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and in which letter grades of “A,” “B,” “C,” or “D” are received. Grades awarded in all courses taken at all colleges and universities attended are included in computing the Grade Point Average (GPA) for determining eligibility for honors. It should be noted that the GPA included in the student grade reports issued by the Registrar’s Office reflects only courses taken at UNO, UNL, UNMC and UNK. Baccalaureate Degrees with Honors Extra Muros These degrees are awarded to transfer students who have not completed the required 60 semester hours of credit within the University of Nebraska system required for cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude honors. To be eligible for Honors Extra Muros the transfer students must meet the following standards and requirements: 1. They must: • Have a scholastic average for their entire university career of 3.51 or above, but below 3.63, to receive degree cum laude. • Have a scholastic average for their entire university career of 3.63 or above, but below 3.87, to receive degree magna cum laude. • Have a scholastic average for their entire university career of 3.87 or above, to receive degree summa cum laude. 2. Provided that they: • Have a minimum of 24 graded hours from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and • Have a minimum total of 77 hours of graded course credit.

Reinstatement Following Suspension
Applications for reinstatement of students on academic suspension from the University of Nebraska at Omaha shall be obtained from the college from which the student was suspended and submitted to the Registrar. This application must be submitted at least one month prior to the official beginning of the semester or term for which the student is applying (refer to academic calendar for specific dates).

Graduation
Application for Degrees All applications for degree must be filed via the Web at www.ses.unomaha.edu/registrar/graduate.html by following the guidelines listed. All requirements for graduation must be completed and certification by the appropriate college must be on file in the Office of the Registrar no later than the close of business on the fifteenth working day following the date of commencement for a particular semester. This includes the satisfaction of all grades of “Incomplete”. Attendance at Commencement Academic regalia is required for degree candidates to participate in the ceremony. Students not wearing academic regalia will not be permitted to participate in the ceremony. Candidacy for a Second Baccalaureate Degree A student who has met the requirements for a baccalaureate degree at the University of Nebraska at Omaha must complete a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at the University for a different (second) degree. A plan of study for the additional hours, approved by the department head primarily concerned, must be filed in the Office of the Dean of the College offering the degree

General Academic Regulations
The Academic Year Two semesters of approximately 15 weeks each

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considered. The advisory council’s recommendation to the respective dean will be the last step for the student, and the dean’s decision will constitute the final determination for the University. The routing of appeals shall be in the department and collegial unit offering the course in which the student is enrolled.

constitute the academic year. The unit of instruction is the semester hour, which signifies one recitation a week throughout the semester, or equivalent. Examinations During the semester, examinations and quizzes are arranged by the faculty. The last week of the semester is designated as Final Examination Week. Prep Week The last week of regularly scheduled classes during fall and spring semesters is designated as “prep week.” Except for makeup examination tests in self-paced courses, posttests in the English Composition Program or laboratory exams , no major examinations (accounting for more than 20 percent of a student’s grade) may be given during this period. Papers, projects, or presentations assigned well in advance (at least two weeks) of “prep week” may be due during this period.

Behavior
Section 5.0 of the By-laws of the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska states: “Students, like all members of the academic community, have the responsibility to create and support an educational environment. Each member of the community should be treated with respect and dignity. Each has the right to learn. This right imposes a duty not to infringe upon the rights of others. The academic community should assure its members those opportunities, protections and privileges that provide the best climate for learning.”

Attendance
Classes are conducted on the premise that regular attendance is desirable. The individual instructor has responsibility for managing student attendance and for communicating at the beginning of each semester those class attendance policies which prevail in that course. If a student is absent or anticipates an absence, the student’s primary responsibility is directly to the instructors, and the student should consult with them accordingly. If a student anticipates absence for an extended period, the student should promptly notify instructors and be prepared to document the reason for extended absences. Instructors or other University officials who may require students, individually or collectively, to be absent from their classes due to a field trip or similar officially-recognized activity are responsible for providing adequate information to the students involved so that they may provide notice to other instructors. Should there be cause on the part of the individuals involved to feel that the reasons for absence were not considered with equity, a decision with punitive consequences may be appealed. The appeals procedure is the same as that provided for in each collegial unit for other academic, classroom-related items (grades, cheating, etc.). The student should submit the justification for the appeal in writing to the department chair and, if unsatisfactory, to the collegial dean. The final step in the appeals process rests with the student submitting a written statement requesting the consideration of the respective dean’s advisory council, indicating the specific nature of the appeal to be

GENERAL INFORMATION

RESIDENCY POLICY
REGULATIONS FOR DETERMINATION OF RESIDENCY FOR TUITION PURPOSES
Residency requirements are subject to change by the Board of Regents and/or Nebraska State Legislature.

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Preamble
Pursuant to Article VII, Section 10 of the Constitution of the State of Nebraska, and Neb. Rev. Stat., 85-501 and 85502 (1980 Supp.), the University has been authorized to develop regulations and make determinations regarding Nebraska residency for tuition purposes.These regulations provide the bases upon which University staff shall determine, on a uniform intercampus basis, whether an individual qualifies as a Nebraska resident for tuition purposes. It should be emphasized that the statutes provide a set of minimum standards which will govern a determination of resident status for tuition purposes only. In some instances, it will be possible that an individual may qualify as a “resident” of Nebraska for one purpose (such as securing a Nebraska driver’s license) and still not meet the standards established by the Board of Regents for resident tuition status. Individuals seeking a Nebraska residency determination for tuition purposes should, therefore, carefully study all aspects of the law and these regulations before seeking resident tuition status.

Tuition Categories”. After determining the appropriate category, each applicant should: (1) complete and submit an Application for Residence Classification, (2) provide photocopies of appropriate support documentation, and (3) apply within the published time period. (Note: Merely changing residence information on any other University form will not change your resident status.) Applications for residence for a specific semester or summer session can be submitted to the Office of Admissions prior to the first day of classes for that period of enrollment. The last day to qualify for residency for a specific term is the last day of the registration “add period.” The last day to apply for residency (including the submitting of all supporting documentation) is the end of the third week of classes of the semester for which the tuition was charged. For summer sessions, the application deadline is the end of the first week of classes. All students must register and enroll in classes for the term in which residency in sought. Failure to register for the term for which residency is sought will result in the cancellation of the residency application Applications determined to be incomplete after the last day to apply will be voided. To apply for a subsequent semester or term, one must submit a new application and provide appropriate updated support documentation.

Who should apply for residence?
All applicants for admission to the University of Nebraska should be aware that recent arrivals to the state may be classified as residents for most intents and purposes and still be non-residents for tuition purposes under University of Nebraska Board of Regents residency policy (revised 1994). Therefore, when first applying for admission, all students who did not graduate from a Nebraska high school or who have not lived in Nebraska for a period of time long enough to determine resident status may be considered non-residents until evidence is shown of having completed all requirements for resident tuition. A change in resident status for tuition purposes is not granted automatically. Students who have been classified as non-residents must submit Applications for Residence Classification and all applicable support documentation before resident status can be determined. A student applying for residence for any semester or term beginning with the Fall Semester 1995-1996 will be required to have established a home in Nebraska at least 12 months immediately preceding the term or semester for which residence status is sought. Any individual who has moved to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a nonresident for tuition purposes for the duration of his/her attendance. The University reserves the right to question and/or request a residency application and supporting documentation from any individual who wishes to be considered for resident tuition status.

What regulations determine residence?
Students’ rights to become residents for tuition purposes at the University of Nebraska are determined according to provisions of the Nebraska Revised Statutes (reissued 1987). In accordance with these statutes, the University has been authorized to develop regulations and to make decisions regarding Nebraska residence for tuition purposes. These regulations provide the basis upon which the Director of Admissions or the Director’s designee determines whether students qualify as Nebraska residents for tuition purposes. Individuals seeking residence for tuition purposes will be required to have their applications signed before a notary public attesting to the accuracy of their statements. If it is subsequently determined that information on an application has been falsified, the applicant may be subject to disciplinary action by the University before the individual will be permitted to continue to enroll at the University. Such disciplinary action will be determined on an individual basis, and may include measures such as disciplinary probation or suspension, expulsion from the University, or reimbursement to the University for the difference between the tuition paid and the non-resident tuition rate.

Appeals
Individuals who believe they have incorrectly been denied residence for tuition purposes may appeal that decision through the Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic and Student Affairs. Definition of terms For the purpose of these regulations, the following definitions shall apply: Resident Fees: The resident tuition rate as set by the Board of Regents and applicable to the academic program in which an individual intends to enroll. Non-resident Fees: The non-resident tuition rate as set

How and when do you apply for residence?
Students who have been classified as non-residents but believe they qualify for resident status should review the various categories outlined in the section “Residence

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by the Board of Regents and applicable to the academic program in which an individual intends to enroll. Legal Age: The age of majority (19 and older) set by Nebraska statute Emancipated Minor: An individual who by virtue of marriage, financial status, or for other reasons has become independent of his or her parent(s) or guardian(s). Established Home: The place of abode in Nebraska that an individual continuously maintains a primary place of residence and where he/she is habitually present. Legal Residence: The place of domicile or permanent abode as distinguished from temporary residence. Dependent: A person who is claimed as a dependent or an exemption for federal income tax purposes by a parent, guardian or spouse.

D.

E.

Residence Tuition Categories
For further reference within this document, all residency categories require that the student, spouse and/or parent/guardian be either a U.S. citizen or a person who has been granted permanent resident, asylee or refugee status by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. A. Legal Age or Emancipated Minor: A person of legal age (19 or older) or an emancipated minor who for a period of 12 months has established a home in Nebraska where he or she is habitually present, and shall verify by documentary proof that he or she intends to make Nebraska his or her permanent residence. An emancipated minor is a person who by virtue of marriage, financial status or other reasons, has become independent of his or her parents or guardians. Note: An individual who moves to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a non-resident for tuition purposes for the duration of his or her attendance. Additionally, an individual claiming Nebraska resident status under this category will NOT be granted such a determination if he or she has claimed resident status in any other state within the past 12 months. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of intent. An emancipated minor must also submit a signed copy of the parent’s/guardian’s most recent federal income tax return as proof that the applicant is not a dependent. B. Dependent Minor: A minor (less than 19 years of age) whose parent/guardian has established a home in Nebraska where they are habitually present with the bona fide intention of making Nebraska their permanent place of residence. There is no minimum period of residence for the parent/guardian under this category. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of intent and a signed copy of parent’s/guardian’s most recent federal income tax return as proof that the applicant is a dependent. C. Legal Age Dependent: A person of legal age (19 or older) who is a dependent for federal income tax purposes of a parent/legal guardian who has established a home in Nebraska. There is no minimum period of residence for the parent/guardian under this category. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an

F.

G.

H.

Affidavit of Intent, and a signed copy of the parent’s/guardian’s most recent federal income tax return as proof that the applicant is a dependent. Married to a Nebraska Resident: A person shall be required to verify that he/she is married to an individual who, prior to the marriage, had already established a home in Nebraska. The spouse must also meet all standard qualifications for residency for tuition purposes.There is no minimum period of residence for the applicant under this category. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of Intent; provide a copy of your valid marriage license. Asylee, Refugee or Permanent Resident Alien: An individual who has become a permanent resident alien of the United States of America, has been granted asylee or refugee status, or has applied for such status and has established a home in Nebraska for a period of at least 12 months. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of Intent. Asylees or refugees must provide a photocopy of Form I-94 or other appropriate documentation which must verify that asylee or refugee status has been granted or applied for. Permanent Resident Aliens must provide a photocopy of Form I551 (formerly known as a “green card”). University or State College Staff Member or Dependent/Spouse: A staff member or the dependent or spouse of a staff member of the University of Nebraska, one of the Nebraska state colleges, or one of the community colleges. The employee must be PERMANENT and have at least part-time (.5 FTE) employment status. Instructions: Provide Affidavit of Intent, and submit verification from the human resources/personnel office indicating employment date and status. If qualifying by dependent or spouse status, proof of dependent/spouse status must be provided. Active Duty Military and Dependents: A person on active duty with the armed services of the United States of America who has been assigned a permanent duty station in Nebraska, or the spouse or dependent of an individual who has been assigned permanent duty station in Nebraska. Instructions: Provide an Affidavit of Intent, and official documentation from the military personnel office indicating active duty and permanent duty station in Nebraska. A person who is a dependent of a Nebraska resident on active military duty will be granted resident tuition status if he/she verifies that he/she is a spouse or a dependent for federal income tax purposes of an individual meeting the qualifications. Instructions: Provide an Affidavit of Intent, and official documentation from the military personnel office indicating active duty and verifying that Nebraska is the state of legal residence. Nebraska High School Graduate: An individual who is a U.S. citizen and has established a home in Nebraska and has graduated from a public or private high school in this state or received the equivalent of a high school

GENERAL INFORMATION

RESIDENCY POLICY
diploma in this state; OR a person who is not currently a U.S. citizen who resided with his or her parent, guardian, or conservator while the person was a student attending a public or private high school in this state and: a) graduated from a public or private high school in this state or received the equivalent of a high school diploma in this state; b) resided in this state for at least three years before the date the student graduated from the high school or received the equivalent of a high school diploma; c) registered as an entering student in the state postsecondary education institution not earlier than the 2006 fall semester; and d) provided an affidavit state that he or she will file an application to become a permanent resident at the earliest opportunity he or she is eligible to do so. If the parent, guardian, or conservator with whom the student resided ceases to reside in this state, such student shall not lose his or her resident status under this subsection if the student has a bona fide intention to make this state his or her permanent residence For the purposes of this section, documentary proof of a Nebraska resident shall consist o: documentation that the individual has established a home or residence in Nebraska; an official transcript form the Nebraska high school that the individual graduated from indicating that the individual graduated from that school (or the equivalent high school diploma) I. Former University/State College Resident Student: A person who has been enrolled at the University of Nebraska or one of the Nebraska state colleges as a resident for tuition purposes, and reenrolls within two (2) years of the last date of enrollment an is residing in Nebraska. There is no minimum period of residency for the individual under this category. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of Intent, and a statement from the University or the state college indicating resident classification. J. Native Americans: A person not residing in Nebraska who is a member of a Native American tribe that is indigenous to or has historically migrated to or from the State of Nebraska. A list of these tribes is available in this catalog (see “Native Americans”). Instructions: Provide documentation attesting to the applicant’s affiliation with one of the qualifying tribes. K. Recruited or Transferred Employees: Individuals who, because of their special talents and skills, were recruited to Nebraska for full-time employment in the state, or were transferred to Nebraska by a business entity, and the spouses or dependents of such individuals are exempted from the 12 month domicile rule. There is no minimum period of residence for the individual under this category. Instructions: Provide Documentation 1 and 2 and an Affidavit of Intent, and furnish a letter from the employer indicating permanent full-time employment status, the employee was either recruited or transferred to Nebraska by the business, date of initial employment in Nebraska and proof of dependent/spouse status if applicable.

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Documentation
The appropriate required documentation as identified under each residence category must be provided with the completed Application for Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. Original documents will NOT be accepted; please furnish only legible photocopies. Submitting appropriate documents in an organized and chronological order will aid in the decision-making process. Documentation 1: To be completed by applicants in category A, B, C, D, E, H, I, or K. Applicants in categories B, C, H, I, or K must provide one of the following as proof of an established home in Nebraska. Applicants in categories A, D and E must provide proof of an established home in Nebraska for at least 12 months immediately preceding the last day of the registration “Add Period” of the term or semester for which residence status is sought. Documentation must be provided for each of the 12 months and a combination of the following may be accepted. • Current lease agreements (covering the entire 12 months) • Canceled checks or proof of payment for rent • documentation showing residence in a home owned in Nebraska • Other notarized documentation approved by UNO’s residence officer Documentation 2: To be completed by applicants in category A, B, C, D, E, H, I, K, or L. Documentation for applicants in categories A, E, H, I, and L must be in the applicant’s name; documents for applicants in B, C, D, and K must be in the name of the parent/spouse. Documentation for all applicants in categories A, D, E, and L must have been in effect for at least one month. At least three of the following support documents must be obtained and kept current: • Nebraska driver’s license • Nebraska voter’s registration (voter’s registration card or certificate) • Nebraska bank account (voided personal check or bank statement) • Nebraska vehicle registration (pink slip, NOT title) • employment showing Nebraska state income tax withheld (most recent pay stub showing name and Nebraska employer) • Nebraska state income tax return for the most current year (or W-2 form with latest paycheck showing state income tax withheld.) • The University Residency Office may require additional documentation for residency consideration. Affidavit of Intent Individuals requesting resident tuition status shall be required to complete a notarized affidavit outlining the reasons under which they believe that they qualify and attesting to the accuracy of their statements. Completion of a falsified affidavit shall subject the individual to possible University disciplinary action. Proof of Dependent and/or Spouse Status If an individual is trying to qualify for residency status based upon dependent or spouse status (sections B, C, D, F, G, or K), documentation proving this status must be

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provided. Dependents of a parent/guardian must provide a signed copy of the parent’s/guardian’s most recent federal income tax return as proof that the applicant is a dependent. If applying based upon spouse’s status, a copy of the marriage certificate must be provided. Dependents or spouses of active duty military should provide a copy of the military orders of the spouse, parent or guardian verifying dependent status.

Nebraska State Income Tax Credit
Individuals who do NOT qualify for resident tuition status and/or reside outside of Nebraska but pay Nebraska income tax, and the spouses or dependents of such individuals, are entitled to tuition credit upon documented evidence of such payment to the State. The tuition credit granted shall equal the amount of Nebraska income tax paid for the immediately preceding calendar year except that the remaining obligation cannot be less than the amount of the resident tuition. Applications for the Nebraska State Income Tax Credit are available at each University campus Student Accounts Office. Specific qualifications and guidelines regarding the tax credit are provided on the applications. Pursuant to Article VII, Section 10 of the Constitution of the State of Nebraska, and Neb. Rev. Stat., 85-501 and 85502 (1980 Supp.), the University has been authorized to develop regulations and make determinations regarding Nebraska residency for tuition purposes. These regulations provide the bases upon which University staff shall determine, on a uniform intercampus basis, whether an individual qualifies for resident tuition purposes.

Section B Graduate and Professional 1. Entering graduate and professional students who have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 for all previous work attempted at all colleges attended prior to enrollment at the University of Nebraska. 2. Students who enter the program according to the above criterion and continue in good academic standing. 3. Underrepresented minorities or individuals with special talents.

Midwest Student Exchange Program
UNO is a participant in the Midwest Student Exchange Program (MSEP), an interstate educational opportunity for students in Nebraska, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. This program enables residents from these eight states to enroll in participating institutions at reduced tuition levels. Tuition for MSEP students who attend participating public institutions is equal to no more than 150 percent of the regular in-state tuition rate. In all cases, the cost to MSEP students is lower than regular non-resident tuition. The be eligible for MSEP status at UNO, students must meet the following guidelines: • the student must be admitted to UNO; • the student’s application must indicate that MSEP status is desired; • the student must meet all academic performance levels required for the UNO Advantage Program; • the student must be admitted to a degree program and have provided the required credentials necessary to determine academic qualification for the MSEP program; and • MSEP participants cannot establish residency for the purposes of paying in-state tuition. Students who meet these guidelines and have residency in one of the participating states will be eligible to receive the MSEP reduced tuition, unless they have been granted a UNO Advantage scholarship. A 3.0 minimum cumulative GPA must be maintained for the MSEP status to be continued. For more information about the MSEP, contact the Office of Admissions.

Severability
If any section of these regulations or any part of any section shall be declared invalid or unconstitutional, such declaration shall not affect the validity or constitutionality of the remaining portions thereof.

Policy on Tuition Scholarships for Non-Residents
Tuition scholarships for an amount up to the difference between resident and non-resident tuition may be awarded to selected students who are non-residents of Nebraska. The number of students receiving tuition scholarships under this competitive program shall be determined at each campus by the UNO Advantage Scholarship committee. The following students, having met all other requirements for admission, will be eligible for consideration for such tuition scholarships under this program: Section A Undergraduate 1. Entering freshmen who ranked in the upper 25 percent of their high school class, OR who scored 23 or more on the ACT, or 1060 or more on the SAT. 2. Transferring students who have a cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.00 (out of a maximum of 4.00). 3. Students who enter the program according to the above criteria and continue in good academic standing. 4. Underrepresented minorities or individuals with special talents.

Native Americans
The following have been identified as Native American tribes that are indigenous to or have historically migrated to or from the State of Nebraska. Members of these tribes who live outside the State of Nebraska qualify for in-state tuition rates upon providing documentation of membership. Arapaho Kiowa Arikara Mandan Winnebago Comanche Otoe Crow Pawnee Hidatsa Ponca Iowa Missouria Omaha Kickapoo Potawatomie Dakota Sioux Lakota Sioux Nakota Sioux Santee Sioux Jicarilla Apache Sac and Fox Northern Cheyenne Southern Cheyenne

GENERAL INFORMATION

RESIDENCY POLICY
Questions
If you have questions regarding residency or for more information about the residence regulations, contact the offices listed: Undergraduate Students: Office of Admissions University of Nebraska at Omaha 6001 Dodge Street , EAB 103 Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0286 Phone: (402) 554-2393 TTY (402) 554-2135 (800) 858-8648 (NE & IA only) Graduate Students: Graduate Studies Office University of Nebraska at Omaha EAB 203 6001 Dodge Street Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0209 Phone: (402) 554-2341 (800) 858-8648 (NE & IA only)

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GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES

TUITION, FEES, REFUNDS AND DEPOSITS
Tuition and fees for the Fall and Spring semesters are payable in two installments. The first installment is 50% of the total bill. The second installment will require payment of the remaining balance on the account. Please see the schedule below for approximate billing dates and due dates. Each time a student fails to meet a payment due date, a Late Payment Fee will be assessed to the tuition account. Note: Failure to receive the billing notice will not excuse the student from payment responsibility, nor the late payment penalties. Students may review their tuition and fees account using e-BRUNO or at cashiering.unomaha.edu. UNO accepts major credit cards for payment of tuition and fees. Credit card payments may be made via the Web at cashiering.unomaha.edu. Payments by credit card, check, cashier’s check or money order may also be mailed to the Cashiering/Student Accounts Office, Eppley Administration Building Room 109, 6001 Dodge Street, Omaha, NE 68182. When mailing credit card payments, please use the remittance form on the tuition and fees statement. This remittance form must be signed by the cardholder. Payments may also be brought to the Cashiering/Student Accounts Office during regular business hours or deposited in the after hours drop box located outside of the office. Fall Semester • For students who register April through the first week of the semester: Bill Date: end of 1st week of classes Tuition Due: 4th week of classes (18 days after bill date) Amount Due: 50% of total (required deposit) • Final Bill Bill Date: end of 4th week of classes Tuition Due: 7th week of classes (18 days after bill date) Amount Due: remaining balance Spring Semester • For students who register November through the first week of the semester: Bill Date: end of 1st week of classes Tuition Due: 4th week of classes (18 days after bill date) Amount Due: 50% of total (required deposit) • Final Bill Bill Date: end of 4th week of classes Tuition Due: 7th week of classes (18 days after bill date) Amount Due: remaining balance Summer Sessions Students will be billed periodically, from mid-April through mid-July for their summer registrations. Tuition and fees will be due and payable in full upon billing. Students who fail to pay tuition and fees by the due date will be assessed a Late Payment Fee. Failure to make payment on an account will prohibit registration for future semesters. If an account remains unpaid, it may be forwarded to a collection agency.

Students waiting until after the initial due date for payment of tuition and fees to register or add courses will be required to pay the late registration fee and the late payment fees retroactively. Registration is not complete until cleared by the Cashier. Failure to pay tuition or fees when due, or to meet payments on loans when due, may result in cancellation of registration, legal action, collection efforts and withholding of transcripts. Outstanding financial obligations from previous semesters must be paid prior to registration. Failure to do so will prohibit registration for future semesters. The University reserves the right to change the amount of tuition or fees at any time and to assess charges for laboratory/special instructional fees, breakage, lost property, fines, penalties, parking, books, supplies, food or special services not listed in this schedule. Application Fee (Undergraduate) The application fee is payable at the time the application for admission form is filed. This fee is non-refundable and does not apply toward tuition or any other fee. Residency for the purpose of assessing tuition is determined by the status of the applicant at the time the application for admission is filed. The undergraduate application fee is not applicable toward the graduate application fee and vice versa. Application Fee ......................................................$45.00 Graduate Application Fee (Graduate College) Application Fee ......................................................$45.00 Counseling Department Admissions Testing Fee: MMPI-2 .............................................................$12.50 Tuition (Per Semester Credit Hour)
Tuition and fee rates listed are for the 2006/2007 academic year. Rates for the 2007/2008 academic year will be established by the Board of Regents in June 2007.

Programs administered by the University of Nebraska at Omaha: Undergraduate Resident of Nebraska (see residency statute) .........................................$146.00 Non-Resident.......................................................$430.25 Graduate Resident of Nebraska (see residency statute) .........................................$182.00 Non-Resident.......................................................$478.50 Programs administered by UNL and other UNLadministered colleges (including ENGR, HRFS, AGRI and ARCH): Undergraduate Resident of Nebraska (see residency statute) .........................................$160.00 Non-Resident.......................................................$475.00 Graduate Resident of Nebraska (see residency statute) .........................................$211.50 Non-Resident.......................................................$569.75 Audit Fee The audit fee is set at one-half of the resident undergraduate or graduate tuition rate. The audit tuition

GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES
rate is effective only during the first week of the semester. In addition, students registering for audit must pay all student fees. Registration for audit requires the permission of the instructor and is subject to available class space after credit registration ends. Students who register to take a course for credit and who later change to audit registration will be required to pay the full resident or nonresident tuition rate. Audit fees are refundable in accordance with the Tuition Refund Schedule. Mandatory Fees University Program and Facilities Fees The University Program and Facilities Fees (UPFF) support a wide variety of programs and services on campus. All students enrolled for on-campus courses are charged a flat fee of $56.70 plus $10.50 per credit hour with a cap at 12 hours. Students enrolled ONLY in off-campus and distance learning courses (800 and 900 section numbers) do not pay UPF Fees and do not have use of fee supported services. The UPFF receipts are divided into two separate funds: Fund A and Fund B. Fund A fees are established and allocated by the elected Student Government subject to the approval of the Chancellor in accordance with Board of Regents policy. Fund A student fees ($9.70) are refundable upon request by applying at the Administrative Offices of the Milo Bail Student Center during the third through sixth weeks of the fall or spring semester and during the third week of each day session in the summer. Students requesting a Fund A refund will no longer be entitled to the student activities supported by Fund A student fees. The Fund B portion of the UPFF is designated for services, staff salaries, maintenance of facilities and related expenses, and those additional items designated by the Chancellor. This portion is budgeted separately with emphasis upon continuing support. The Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs submits the projections to the President and Board of Regents for their final approval. Fund B student fees are not refundable unless the student withdraws from the university during the first week of the semester or if withdrawing completely, at the same percentage as tuition. Photo I.D. Fee (MavCard): Charged once per semester to all students.............$4.00 Enrollment Services Fee: ............................................$32.50 Charged once per semester to all students Technology Fee:............................................................$8.00 Charged per credit hour each semester to all students, regardless of residency or campus location. Upon withdrawal from a course, the Technology Fee is refundable at the same percentage as tuition. The purpose of this fee is to provide educational information technology resources to UNO students. Library Fee: ...................................................................$2.00 Charged per credit hour each semester to all students, regardless of residency or campus location. Upon withdrawal from a course, the Library Fee is refundable at the same percentage as tuition.

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New Student Fee: .......................................................$57.50 All first-time undergraduate students will be charged this one-time fee. The New Student Fee supports the Testing Center and the Office of New Student Enrollment. International Student Fee: ..........................................$25.00 Charged once per semester to students on a visa. Late Fees and Penalties (non-refundable): Late Registration Fee (day or evening class) .........$25.00 A Late Registration Fee will be charged to a student registering on or after the first day of the semester. Late Payment Fee Billing amounts of $400.00 or less....................$25.00 Billing amounts over $400.00 ...........................$50.00 Returned Check Charge ........................................$30.00 Returned checks must be redeemed in cash or money order. Failure to honor returned checks may result in additional late fees or legal action. Photo ID Replacement Fee......................................$5.00 Distance Education Fees (non-refundable): Revenue from these fees goes directly toward defraying the additional costs of providing Distance Education programs. Distance Education Fee.........................................$60.00 This fee is charged per course for internet and satellite TV courses. Non-Resident Fee ..................................varies by college
Please see page 3 of the schedule of student charges on the Web at cashiering.unomaha.edu/brochures.html.

This fee is charged per credit hour on internet and satellite TV courses to students who are not residents of the State of Nebraska. Laboratory/Special Instructional Fees (Non-refundable): Students enrolling in the following course sections are advised that laboratory/special instructional fees are mandatory for services and are changed accordingly. Architectural Engineering AE all courses have a per credit charge ...........$40.00 AE 3130, 3230...................................................$40.00 Architecture ARCH all courses have a per credit charge ......$24.00 Art ART 1010, 2040 ................................................$10.00 ART 1110 .........................................................$25.00 ART 1210,1220, 2000, 2040 ............................$20.00 ART 2100, 2110 ...............................................$55.00 ART 3050 .........................................................$20.00 ART 3200, 3220 ................................................$60.00 ART 3230, 3250 ...............................................$50.00 ART 3300 .........................................................$20.00 ART 3310, 3320 .............................................$100.00 ART 3360 .........................................................$20.00 ART 3410, 3420 ...............................................$25.00 ART 3510, 3520 .............................................$100.00 ART 3530 .........................................................$50.00 ART 3610, 3620 ...............................................$60.00 ART 4300 .........................................................$20.00 ART 4310, 4320 .............................................$100.00 ART 4330, 4340 ...............................................$20.00 ART 4410, 4420, 4430, 4440 ...........................$25.00

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GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES

ART 4510 .......................................................$100.00 ART 4520, 4530, 4540 .....................................$50.00 ART 4610, 4620, 4630, 4640 ...........................$60.00 ART 8310, 8316 .............................................$100.00 ART 8416 .........................................................$25.00 ART 8510 .........................................................$20.00 ART 8516 .........................................................$50.00 ART 8616 .........................................................$60.00 ART all other courses .......................................$10.00 Aviation AVN 1020, 3300 ...............................................$80.00 AVN 1024 ..........................................................$55.00 AVN 1030, 2180 ..............................................$220.00 AVN 2170 ........................................................$165.00 AVN 2174 ........................................................$605.00 AVN 2184 ........................................................$825.00 AVN 3190 .......................................................$160.00 AVN 3400 ........................................................$275.00 Biology BIOL 1020 ..........................................................$5.00 BIOL 1450, 1750, 2440 ....................................$15.00 BIOL 2210 .........................................................$35.00 BIOL 2740 ..........................................................$5.00 BIOL 3104 ..........................................................$3.00 BIOL 3230 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 3340, 3530 ..............................................$15.00 BIOL 3630, 3730 ..............................................$20.00 BIOL 3740 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4130, 4140 ..............................................$40.00 BIOL 4180 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4210 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 4220 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4280, 4320 ..............................................$15.00 BIOL 4340 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4350 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4370 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4380 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4390 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 4430 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4440 .........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4450 ........................................................$40.00 BIOL 4570,4610 ...............................................$20.00 BIOL 4640 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4654, 4664, 4720 ....................................$40.00 BIOL 4740 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4750 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4780 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4790 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4840 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 4850 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4880, 4910 ..............................................$20.00 BIOL 4920 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 4940 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 4950 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 4980 ........................................................$40.00 BIOL 8106 .........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8136, 8146, 8180 ....................................$40.00 BIOL 8186 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8190 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8200 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8216 ........................................................$15.00

BIOL 8226 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8235 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8236 ........................................................$40.00 BIOL 8250 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8276, 8286 ..............................................$15.00 BIOL 8300 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8326, 8345 ..............................................$15.00 BIOL 8346 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8356 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8376 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8386 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8396 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8436, 8446 ..............................................$30.00 BIOL 8456 ........................................................$40.00 BIOL 8535 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8576 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8635 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8646 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8654, 8664, 8726 ....................................$40.00 BIOL 8735 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8736 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8745 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8746 .........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8786 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8796 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8830, 8846 ..............................................$15.00 BIOL 8856 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8886 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8900 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8916 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8926 ........................................................$30.00 BIOL 8946 ........................................................$20.00 BIOL 8956 ........................................................$15.00 BIOL 8986 ........................................................$40.00 Broadcasting BRCT 1050, 2310 .............................................$14.00 BRCT 2370, 3030, 3320, 3330, 3370, 4350, 4450,8356 ....................................................$15.00 Business Administration BSAD 1500 ......................................................$20.00 BSAD 8800 ......................................................$80.00 Computer and Electronics Engineering CEEN all courses have a per credit charge .....$40.00 CEEN 1030, 2184, 3100, 3130, 3520, 4330, 4360, 4980 ..........................................$10.00 CEEN 2234........................................................$25.00 CEEN 3250........................................................$20.00 CEEN 3610........................................................$40.00 CEEN 4630........................................................$60.00 Construction Engineering Technology CET all courses have a per credit charge .........$40.00 CET 1250, 2000 ................................................$40.00 CEEN 2020........................................................$15.00 CET 2300 ..........................................................$20.00 Chemistry CHEM 1014 ......................................................$10.00 CHEM 1144 ......................................................$15.00 CHEM 1180 ......................................................$20.00 CHEM 1184 ......................................................$20.00 CHEM 1194 ......................................................$25.00 CHEM 2214 ......................................................$30.00

GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES
CHEM 2274 ......................................................$60.00 CHEM 2404 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 3354 ......................................................$25.00 CHEM 3364 ......................................................$25.00 CHEM 3414 ......................................................$35.00 CHEM 3424 ......................................................$35.00 CHEM 3514 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 3654 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 4404 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 4654 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 4664 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 8359 ......................................................$25.00 CHEM 8369 ......................................................$25.00 CHEM 8409 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 8419 ......................................................$35.00 CHEM 8429 ......................................................$35.00 CHEM 8519 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 8654 ......................................................$40.00 CHEM 8664 ......................................................$40.00 Chinese CHIN 1000 .........................................................$1.00 CHIN 1010 .........................................................$1.00 Chemical Engineering CHME 1120 ......................................................$40.00 CHME 2020 ......................................................$40.00 Civil Engineering CIVE all courses have a per credit charge ........$40.00 CIVE 4280,4290 ..................................................$5.00 CIVE 221 ..........................................................$15.00 CIVE 319, 334, 434, 436, 454, 468, 495, 834, 836, 854, 868 ........................................$15.00 CIVE 361, 378 ...................................................$30.00 CIVE 327 ...........................................................$50.00 CIVE 451, 851 ...................................................$25.00 CIVE 465, 865 ...................................................$55.00 CIVE 498, 898 ..................................................$60.00 CIVE 828, 829 ...................................................$40.00 Criminal Justice CJUS 4800, 8190 .........................................$2050.00 Construction Engineering CNST and CONE all courses have a per credit charge...........................................$40.00 Counseling COUN 8230 ......................................................$45.00 Drafting Design Technology DDET all courses have a per credit charge.......$40.00 Electronics Engineering Technology EET all courses have a per credit charge..........$40.00 EET 1040, 1060, 1090, 2430, 4620...................$10.00 Electrical Engineering ELEC all courses have a per credit charge .......$40.00 ELEC 2330, 2340 ..............................................$10.00 Engineering Mechanics EMEC all courses have a per credit charge ......$40.00 EMEC 1110, 1120 .............................................$15.00 EMEC 3760, 4600, 4800 ...................................$10.00 EMEC 4520 .......................................................$25.00 EMEC 8520 .......................................................$25.00 English ENGL 1050 .........................................................$5.00 ENGL 1090, 1100................................................$2.50

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ENGL 1150........................................................$20.00 ENGL 1154, 1164................................................$4.00 ENGL 4810, 4830, 4850, 4870, 4890................$15.00 Engineering ENGR all courses have a per credit charge ......$40.00 ENVE all courses have a per credit charge............$40.00 Foreign Languages FLNG 2100, 2530................................................$1.00 Fire Protection Technology FPT all courses have a per credit charge..........$40.00 French FREN 1000, 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120..................$1.00 FREN 2050........................................................$25.00 FREN 4900, 4960, 8906, 8966 trip fee (summer) .............................................$330.00 Geography GEOG 1020.......................................................$20.00 GEOG 1030.........................................................$5.00 GEOG 1060, 1070, 4050, 4610, 4630, 8056, 8616, 8636, 8990 ................................$10.00 GEOG 3540.......................................................$15.00 Geology GEOL 1170 .........................................................$5.00 GEOL 1180 .........................................................$3.00 GEOL 2754, 2764, 4610, 4950, 8616 ...............$10.00 GEOL 3100, 3300, 3454 .....................................$5.00 GEOL 3104, 3310 ..............................................$3.00 German GERM 1000.........................................................$6.25 GERM 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120...........................$1.00 GERM 2050.......................................................$25.00 General Engineering Technology GET all courses have a per credit charge .........$40.00 GET 2130 ..........................................................$20.00 Hebrew HEBR 1110 .........................................................$1.00 Health Education HED 3030............................................................$6.00 History HIST 1000, 1010 ...............................................$20.00 Honors HONR 1011.......................................................$25.00 Horticulture HORT 1300, 1310 .............................................$25.00 HORT 2210 .......................................................$35.00 HORT 2610, 2620 .............................................$50.00 HORT 2660 .......................................................$10.00 Interior Design IDSG all courses have a per credit charge .......$24.00 International Studies and Programs INST 4140 .....................................................$2350.00 Industrial Engineering ISMG all courses have a per credit charge .......$40.00 ISMG 3150 ........................................................$15.00 Industrial Systems Technology IST all courses have a per credit charge...........$40.00 IST 1160, 1180..................................................$20.00 IST 1170, 2110..................................................$18.00 IST 2200............................................................$22.00 IST 2830............................................................$19.00 IST 3160............................................................$17.00

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GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES

IST 3230............................................................$15.00 Italian ITAL 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120 ..............................$1.00 Japanese JAPN 1000, 1010, 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120 ........$1.00 JAPN 2050 ........................................................$25.00 Journalism JOUR 2100, 2150, 2160, 3110, 3270, 3500, 8816, 8836, 8856, 8876, 8896, .....................$15.00 JOUR 4430 (depends on semester) ...............$2050.00-2400.00 Mathematics MATH 1310, 1320 ...............................................$5.00 Mechanical Engineering MENG all courses have a per credit charge .....$40.00 MENG 1300 ......................................................$25.00 MENG 3100 ......................................................$20.00 METE all courses have a per credit charge ...........$40.00 Music MUS 1090, 1100, 1110 .......................................$3.00 Music Equipment & Maintenance (per class)....$45.00 Applied Music: Mandatory for enrollment in voice and all instruments: One Credit Hour ..................................$100.00 Two Credit Hours ................................$200.00 Three Credit Hours..............................$300.00 Natural Sciences NSCI 2010, 2020.................................................$7.00 Nutritional Science and Dietetics NUTR 1700, 4500, 4730, 8506, 8736 ...............$15.00 NUTR 2450, 3440 .............................................$45.00 NUTR 3400 .......................................................$25.00 NUTR 3700 .......................................................$10.00 NUTR 3710, 4520 .............................................$20.00 Professional Physical Education PE 2700, 8310...................................................$22.00 PE 3040.............................................................$16.00 Physical Education Service Program PEA 1110, 1120 ................................................$44.00 PEA 111W .........................................................$95.00 PEA 111Z ..........................................................$64.00 Physics PHYS 1034, 1054, 1154, 1164, 1354, 1754, 3504, 3524, 3544, 3564 ..................................$5.00 Political Science PSCI 1000 .........................................................$20.00 PSCI 4500, 8506 ...........................................$2350.00 Psychology PSYC 1010........................................................$20.00 PSYC 1024, 4280, 4310, 8316..........................$15.00 PSYC 3234, 4234..............................................$25.00 PSYC 8530, 9580..............................................$35.00 PSYC 8540........................................................$55.00 Russian RUSS 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120 ...........................$1.00 RUSS 2050 .......................................................$25.00 Social Work SOWK 4890, 8900 ........................................$2800.00 Spanish SPAN 1000, 1110, 2110, 2120............................$1.00 SPAN 2050........................................................$25.00

SPAN 4900, 4960, 8906, 8966........................$330.00 Speech SPCH 1110 .......................................................$20.00 Special Education SPED 4510, 4520................................................$5.00 Theatre THEA 1010 ........................................................$15.00 THEA 1050 ........................................................$14.00 Textiles, Clothing and Design TXCD 1210, 2250, 3140, 4030, 4160................$15.00 TXCD 1404, 1414..............................................$35.00 TXCD 2060, 3130, 4280....................................$10.00 TXCD 2090, 2160, 3250, 4100..........................$20.00 Urban Studies US 1010 ............................................................$25.00 Women’s Studies WMST 2010 ......................................................$20.00 Writer’s Workshop WRWS 2100, 2300, 3100, 3300, 4100, 4110, 4300, 8106, 8116 ................................$15.00 WRWS all others except 3990, 4860, 4990 ......$10.00 Other laboratory/special instructional fees may be charged as authorized by the University. Please refer to the semester Class Schedule to determine which of the above fees are related to specific courses. Conference, non-credit and off-campus contract course fees are determined for each offering based upon the cost factors and particular circumstances involved.

Refund Schedule
Students who drop one or more courses or who completely withdraw will be obligated to the University for that portion of tuition cost based on the refund schedule. Students who completely withdraw are obligated to pay the non-refundable portion of tuition and fees for the course(s) from which they are withdrawing. Refunds are computed from the date application is received by the Registrar, NOT from the date of withdrawal of classes. See policy titled “Withdrawal from Classes.” Only tuition is refunded. Most fees are not refundable after the first week of classes. Please see fee schedule. Students are not relieved from the payment of tuition and fees if they withdraw before a tuition due date, or if payment of tuition and fees has been extended by the Financial Aid Office. Students who have received financial aid are subject to special refund rules as established by the U.S. Department of Education. A financial aid recipient should first contact the Office of Financial Aid prior to any official withdrawal from the university, in order that he or she fully understands the financial implications of withdrawal. Failure to make payment will prohibit registration for future semesters. If an account remains unpaid, it may be forwarded to a collection agency. Regular Semester Before the first official day of the semester, 100 percent refunded. First week of classes, 100 percent refunded. Second week of classes, 75 percent refunded. Third week of classes, 50 percent refunded. Fourth week of classes, 25 percent refunded. Fifth week of classes, 0 percent refunded.

GENERAL INFORMATION

TUITION AND FEES
Summer Sessions (5 and 6 Week) Before first official day of semester, 100 percent refunded. First three days of classes, 100 percent refunded. Remainder of first week, 50 percent refunded. Second week of classes, 25 percent refunded. Third week of classes, 0 percent refunded. Summer Evening and Special Contract (7 and 8 Week) Before first official day of semester, 100 percent refunded. First three days of classes, 100 percent refunded. Remainder of first week, 75 percent refunded. Second week of classes, 50 percent refunded. Third week of classes, 25 percent refunded. Fourth week of classes, 0 percent refunded. Courses that run less than ten weeks have unique refund schedules. Students considering withdrawal from such a course should check with the Registrar’s Office for the applicable refund schedule.

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Special Service Fees
Thesis Binding (per copy)........................................Varies (check at Registrar’s Office) Graduation Fee ......................................................$25.00 Late Application for Degree ...................................$35.00

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GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT AFFAIRS

STUDENT SERVICES
Student Services contributes to the UNO learning environment through support programs and services which are designed to assist students in defining, clarifying and achieving their educational goals. These programs and services focus on each student’s personal, interpersonal, intellectual and physical development. In conjunction with the faculty, the units listed below serve as a system of learning, reinforcement programs and services that assist students to benefit maximally from their college experiences.

Student Employment Programs
Students seeking career-related work experience during school can gain assistance through Student Employment Services (SES), located within the Human Resources office. On-campus student worker jobs and all federal work-study positions are posted in the office and through the Web at www.unomaha.edu~www.psnl/.

Counseling Center
The Counseling Center provides short term, confidential counseling services to assist students in their educational, emotional-personal, and social development. The goal of the Counseling Center is to use all available resources to assist students in making positive adjustments in their academic and personal lives. The Counseling Center provides a professionally qualified resource team who will assist students in making academic, vocational and personal decisions, and they can offer the assistance of various assessment tools. General counseling services are provided at no charge for students and other members of the university community. Appropriate fees are charged for career counseling for people who are not affiliated with the university. The Counseling Center can also act as a referral agency for students, making available a large number of professional resources at UNO and in the community. Appointments may be made by stopping by the office, 115 Eppley Administration Building, or by calling (402) 554-2409.

Career Exploration and Outreach
The Career Exploration and Outreach office assists undergraduate students, graduate candidates, and alumni from all colleges of the University in their search for career employment. All UNO students receive personal assistance in resume preparation and job search planning. Career Exploration and Outreach sponsors programs addressing numerous career development and preparation topics, including resume writing, resume review, interviewing skills, mock interviews, networking, and how to work a career fair. Career information sessions and job fairs are hosted by Career Exploration and Outreach. These events attract hundreds of employers to campus and are held during fall and spring semesters. Students and alumni seeking employment are encouraged to register with Career Exploration and Outreach by completing a Web-based registration process, which includes resume development and registration for on-campus recruiting and resume referral. Registration is mandatory for participation in oncampus recruiting. Students can also access national, regional and local employment listings and campus-wide job databases for employment searches. The Career Exploration and Outreach office works with employers to post full-time, part-time, internship and other types of employment and experiential learning opportunities for student and alumni review on the UNO Web site. Career Planning The career development process can be helpful to students and alumni exploring career alternatives and making career decisions. Specific career development planning is offered through the college or academic units. This process is provided by faculty and/or advisers within the academics units with the assistance of Career Exploration and Outreach. Recruiting and Referral Programs First-semester seniors and graduate students completing degrees are encouraged to register with the Career Exploration and Outreach office to use the recruiting and referral services. Each semester regional employers visit the campus to conduct interviews or provide informational sessions. Interested students need to contact the Career Exploration and Outreach office for specific recruiting dates and sign-up activities. In addition, the office refers registered candidates’ resumes directly to employers requesting such information for their employment openings. An effort is made to refer all registered candidates for positions; however, employment cannot be guaranteed.

Disability Services
The Disability Services office – a division of the Office for Diversity and Equal Opportunity – is committed to providing an equal educational opportunity for enrolled or admitted students who have documented disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. The coordinator serves as the primary contact for students wishing to discuss eligibility, policies and procedures, services offered, and/or personal concerns. The coordinator is also available to help arrange services for qualified students with disabilities; i.e., reasonable academic adjustments, sign language interpreters, alternative print format, note takers, use of the testing center, assistive technology. Students must provide appropriate documentation regarding physical, emotional, learning, or other type of disability for consideration of services. Consultations with the coordinator may be scheduled at any time. For information, please call (402) 5542872 [TTY (402) 554-3799] or stop by the Disability Services office in the Eppley Administration Building, Room 117.

Judicial Affairs
As members of the academic community, students have rights and responsibilities which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. Judicial Affairs provides for the adjudication of any violation of these responsibilities as provided by the UNO Student Code of Conduct. To contact the Judicial Officer, call (402) 554-3008.

Student Health Services
Student Health Services provides primary care services free of charge (nominal fees are charged for laboratory tests and immunizations) to all students who pay UPF Fees. Preventative health services are available including

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STUDENT AFFAIRS
immunizations, blood pressure monitoring, sexually transmitted disease testing, HIV testing, cholesterol screening, and women’s health services. Treatment for minor accidents is available on a walk-in basis, with referral to community services given when necessary. In addition, Student Health Services coordinates health-related programs including alcohol and drug awareness. Student Health Services is located in the Milo Bail student Center. Hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., with physician/APRN appointments available 20 hours per week. Phone (402) 554-2374 to make an appointment.

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New Student Orientation
The University of Nebraska at Omaha provides orientation for all new undergraduate students, both entering freshmen and transfer students. The purpose of Orientation is to acquaint new students with the University’s programs and student services. During Orientation, new students spend time with student leaders and receive an introduction to UNO campus life. For additional information contact the Office of New Student Orientation, 111 Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-2677.

Testing Center
The University of Nebraska at Omaha Testing Center provides a variety of services to UNO students, faculty and staff. These services extend into the Omaha community and beyond to persons needing testing related assistance. The types of services include university placement exams, national exams, vocational, aptitude, interest inventories and psychological exams, correspondence tests and testing assistance for students with disabilities. The Testing Center also takes special requests and will work with individual needs. For more information regarding testing services, please contact the University of Nebraska at Omaha Testing Center, Eppley Administration Building 113, Omaha, NE 68182-0318 or call (402) 554-4800, or visit the Web page at testing.unomaha.edu. National Exams The Testing Center provides a variety of information and registration materials for many nationally administered exams including computer-based testing for Educational Testing Service exams. Among exams offered are the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), ACT Assessment, Miller Analogies Test (MAT), and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Placement Exams Placement exams include the English Placement Proficiency Examination (EPPE), Mathematics Placement Exam (MPE), Calculus Readiness Exam (CRE), Spanish Placement Exam (SPE), French Placement Exam (FPE), and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test (CDT). Math placement is required for any student wanting to enroll in Math 1310/1320/1330/1340/ or 1950. Placement is determined by the ACT-Math scores according to the following scale: ACT=0-18 no placement, take noncredit beginning algebra ACT=19-22 MATH 1310 ACT=23-24 MATH 1320 or 1330 or 1340 ACT=25 MATH 1930 or need only 1330 for enrollment in 1950 ACT=26+ MATH 1950
*Note: A student may enroll in any course at or below their level of placement.

Student Health Insurance
All UNO students carrying three or more credit hours have the opportunity to purchase accident and sickness insurance through a commercial group plan made available by the University. International students holding an F or J visa are automatically covered. This group policy offers competitive benefits with low-cost premiums. Students have the option of paying annually, per semester, or in three installments if 12 month coverage is chosen. For additional information, call Student Health Services at (402) 554-2374.

Multicultural Affairs
The Office of Multicultural Affairs is responsible for developing and maintaining programs and services to ensure the successful recruitment, retention, and graduation of students of color. Through scholarship aid, academic and personal support, students are empowered to achieve their personal, educational, and professional goals. Through collaborative efforts within the University and with the greater Omaha metropolitan community, the Office works to ensure an inclusive campus environment where shared understanding is facilitated, knowledge is expanded and appreciation for varied perspectives is cultivated. The Office of Multicultural Affairs administers the Davis Scholarship and the Isaacson Scholarship, both of which provide financial support for distinguished undergraduate students. The MASTER Success Program assists recipients of these scholarships with the successful completion of an undergraduate degree. MASTER Success coordinators work with the participants to improve their overall academic performance by providing student-centered workshops aimed at developing and maintaining the skills and strategies necessary for success at the university. In support of retention efforts, Multicultural Affairs coordinates the Enrichment and Mentoring Program (EMP), which allows the staff to collaborate with the faculty to measure students’ progress and to facilitate their academic success. Key components of EMP include mid-term evaluations and individualized supportive services that address the student’s academic, personal, and professional development. The Summer Scholars Program is the primary recruitment effort of the office. This program provides an opportunity for high school juniors to earn college credit while gaining firsthand knowledge of the challenges of college academics and campus life. Multicultural Affairs is located on the first floor of the Milo Bail Student Center, (402) 554-2248.

Placements are valid for five years after the ACT test date. After this time, the student must take the Mathematics Placement Exam (MPE) or the Calculus Readiness Exam (CRE) to receive placement for enrollment

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in a mathematics course. Students who have not taken the ACT, or those who took it more than five years ago, must take the MPE or CRE for math placement. Any student may challenge their ACT math placement by taking the MPE or CRE. Credit by Examination at UNO Credit by Examination allows students the opportunity to gain academic credit for knowledge they have acquired by self-study or experience. Up to 30 hours of credit toward a bachelor’s degree may be earned in most colleges by achieving acceptable scores on examinations. Two types of credit by examination are available at UNO: the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) which offers tests in many subject areas; and UNO’s Special Examination Program which involves challenging any course taught at the University by taking a departmental examination. Students must be registered to attempt departmental exams. The following general provisions apply to Credit by Examination at UNO. • Credit earned by examination may not constitute any part of the terminal residency requirements (see residency requirements in this catalog). • Credit will not be granted as substitute credit for college courses which have been failed at university level. Neither will it be granted to raise a grade earned in any course. • Examinations for credit may not be repeated. Credit by Examination may not be earned in any course taken on an audit basis. A reasonable fee will be charged to administer and/or evaluate an examination for credit or placement, and a fee equal to 50 percent of resident tuition will be charged for credit earned. Examinees must be currently enrolled to be billed the 50 percent fee. The $25.00 testing fee for departmental exams will be applied to the tuition cost. Credit earned by examination will be recorded as “CR” on the transcripts, and this credit will not be used in calculating grade point average. A department giving a student a departmental test for Credit by Examination shall be responsible for reporting the credit to the Testing Center. The time lapse shall not be greater than the semester following the time the examination was given. Within these parameters, the department or departments concerned retain responsibility in all matters, including: 1. determination of whether or not placement or examination credit should be offered in their areas; (some departments may elect not to administer departmental exams); 2. selection or preparation of examinations to be given for placement or examination credit; and 3. determination of the level of proficiency required for earning placement or examination credit.

assists high schools in planning such courses and provides examinations for them. The University of Nebraska at Omaha participates in the Advanced Placement Examination of the College Board. Students should contact their college adviser regarding the application of these credits to their academic program. The Dean’s Office of the College of Arts and Sciences manages the Advanced Placement Program at UNO. For additional information, call (402) 554-2458.

Project Achieve
The Project Achieve Student Support Services Program addresses the unique needs of any UNO student who qualifies as a first generation college student (neither parent earned a bachelor’s degree), low-income, and/or disabled and is pursuing an undergraduate degree program in the university. The program, funded through a grant from the United States Department of Education, provides supportive services mostly for increasing the rates of retention and graduation of the students in the program. Other program activities aim at fostering an institutional climate supportive of the success of the students. Participants in the program must have the desire, selfmotivation and commitment to improve their academic abilities and skills through study and participation. The program offers a variety of services, including teaching, tutoring, counseling, academic advisement and non-credit seminars and workshops. To apply, contact Project Achieve in 117 Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-3492.

University Division
University Division provides a setting in which students who are in the process of deciding upon an academic major or degree college have the opportunity to enroll in an exploratory program of studies. Students are encouraged and counseled to choose from the broad range of basic courses offered in all of the colleges of the university. Each University Division student is assigned an academic adviser from the professional staff of University Division and is expected to meet with the adviser at least twice each semester. Requirements: 1. All University Division students are expected to follow an exploratory program of studies that will assist them in fulfilling the general education requirements of the degree-granting colleges of the university. 2. All students entering University Division for the first time are strongly encouraged to enroll in and successfully complete a four-credit hour First Year Experience (FYE) course. Taught within the context of academic general education courses, these courses are designed to help students establish effective college level study habits, engage in self and career exploration processes, and become knowledgeable about university programs, resources and colleges. 3. University Division students are required to have taken the English Placement/Proficiency Exam (EPPE) and have math placement by no later than the end of their first semester of enrollment. Math

Advanced Placement (AP)
The Advanced Placement Program is based on the belief that many students are capable of completing college-level courses while still in high school. With this belief in mind, the College Entrance Examination Board

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placement is determined by the student’s ACT score. Students who do not have an ACT score must take the Math Placement Exam (MPE). Students are strongly encouraged to have completed the appropriate English and/or mathematics course(s) by no later than the end of their initial 27 credit hours of enrollment at the university. 4. University Division students are required to repeat general education courses of freshman level should they receive a grade of “D” or below in courses in which a degree college requires all of its students to obtain a “C-” or better grade as a minimum for graduation. Procedures for Transferring from University Division: University Division students who have made their decision concerning an academic major and degree college should transfer to that college as expeditiously as possible. 1. University Division students are required to transfer to the degree-granting college of their choice by no later than the end of the semester in which 36 credit hours are earned. Exceptions to this must be approved in writing by the Director of University Division. 2. A student may not be admitted to, readmitted to or enrolled as a student in University Division after he/she has earned a total of 36 credit hours of college coursework. Procedures for Transferring to University Division: Students from UNO colleges desiring to transfer into University Division must meet the following criteria: 1. Have a cumulative grade point average of no less than 1.75. 2. Have earned no more than 36 credit hours. 3. Obtain the approval of the Director of University Division.

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week — for unstructured, drop-in recreational use and a variety of free group exercise classes. Four basketball/ volleyball/badminton courts, a 50-meter pool, a jogging track, seven handball and two squash courts, two weight rooms, a cardio room, men’s and women’s saunas and steam rooms, and much more await the users of the HPER Building. Equipment necessary to participate is available for check-out free of charge at the Central Issue Room (HPER 113). Lockers, locks and towel service also are available. Non-credit instructional programs are provided as a service to the students of UNO to encourage expanding recreational experiences. Course offerings vary each semester. Some of the most popular classes are learn-toswim, swing/ballroom dancing, aquatic exercises, yoga, pilates, golf and the Maverick Masters Swim program. Personal training is also available. The programs offered work to promote the philosophy of “Something for Everyone,” where no one is excluded from participation because of skill level. The only prerequisite is a desire to participate. All currently enrolled students who pay UPF fees are encouraged to participate in one or more of the activities. Students’ spouses and dependent children ages 18-22 may also participate after purchasing a Campus Recreation Activity Card. As the second largest employer of students on campus, Campus Recreation offers employment opportunities to more than 100 students each semester. Positions include access monitor, office worker, central issue clerk, Outdoor Venture Center clerk, lifeguard, outdoor recreation trip leader, sports official, activity, intramural and weight room supervisors, fitness instructors, personal trainers, evening building manager, and injury prevention and care staff. To get involved, stop by the Campus Recreation Office located in Room100 Health, Physical Education and Recreation Building (HPER); (402) 554-2539 also online at www.unomaha.edu/~wwwocr. Program and building information is given out 24 hours/day by phone. Intramural Sports The intramural sports program is designed to match equally skilled organizations and persons in various activities to meet physical as well as recreational needs. Team, individual, and dual competition will take place in the following divisions: Fraternity, Sorority, Men’s Independent, Women’s Independent and Co-Recreational. There also are opportunities for individuals with disabilities to actively participate in competitive games of integrated wheelchair basketball, racquetball or tennis. Campus Recreation will provide sport chairs for use to all students, spouses, faculty, staff and alumni who participate in wheelchair based activities. Intramural sports currently include: flag football; 5x5, and 3x3 basketball; outdoor and indoor soccer; softball; wrestling; racquetball; golf; tennis; badminton; table tennis; chess; floor hockey; billiards; dodgeball; and outdoor/indoor volleyball. Other annual events include: 3-point shootouts; slam dunk contest; wheelchair basketball; bike race; golf; weight lifting; bowling; putt-putt; tug of war; pre-season flag football and 5x5 basketball tournaments; track meet and a swim meet. For more information on how to sign-up, please

Campus Recreation
By providing a wide variety of recreational activities, Campus Recreation works to enhance the quality of life for the UNO community and to facilitate the physical, social and mental health of the students, faculty and staff. Through its programs, Campus Recreation also provides educational leadership and employment opportunities for UNO students. Programs are categorized as follows: fitness/wellness, informal recreation, injury prevention and care, intramural sports, sports club, outdoor recreation, aquatic activities, special events, instructional programs and youth programs. The HPER Building is accessible to individuals with disabilities. Features of the building include accessible showers, wheelchair-accessible weight machine and racquetball courts, wheel chairs and access to the pool. The Campus Recreation staff is ready to assist individuals with disabilities in developing programs to meet their needs. Fitness/Wellness The fitness/wellness program, largest in terms of numbers of participants, opens the facilities of the HPER Building to the students of UNO — over 100 hours per

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call intramural sports at (402) 554-2634 (IM Sport Hotline). Awards for active participation and success should not be the only goal in an intramural program, but such awards do add to the competitive spirit of such an activity. It is with this idea in mind that the intramural office will offer awards to the all-university champions in each sport. Sport Clubs Sport clubs are student groups registered and sponsored by Campus Recreation that may provide a program of instruction, recreation and/or competition in a specific sport. Sport clubs assume a variety of types and sizes in order to meet many of the sport needs and interests of students, faculty and staff. Each club establishes its own organizational framework, leadership and performance level. Each sport club is a student organization that is administered by its members. Current active clubs include: bowling, rugby, cycling, table tennis, lacrosse, rock climbing, trip and skeet, ultimate frisbee, dodgeball, fencing, equestrian, tennis, swimming, volleyball, paintball, martial arts, and badminton. For more information please call (402) 554-2539, or stop by HPER 100. Outdoor Venture Center If the idea of hiking in the back country, canoeing one of the great rivers of the midwest or climbing mountains is appealing, visit the Outdoor Venture Center (OVC). The OVC, located in the HPER Building, sponsors trips and workshops in canoeing, kayaking, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, backpacking, and many other activities, which last from a few hours to week-long adventures. Activities take place locally in Nebraska and in states like Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota and Montana, just to name a few. Those wishing to plan their own adventure can make use of the OVC’s equipment rental. For students interested in leading such trips or further refining existing skills, the OVC provides a series of classes in outdoor leadership, basic rescue principles and outdoor emergency care. Aquatic Center The aquatics center is available to students, staff, faculty, activity card holders, and a limited amount of general public participants. The pool is open seven days a week for recreational and lap swimming. Various swim programs and lessons are available ranging from the Masters Swim program for advanced swimmers to lessons for less skilled swimmers aged four and older. Several water exercise classes and a diving program are also offered. All aquatic activities are conducted under the guidance and supervision of Campus Recreation personnel and staffed by skilled and qualified instructors. Climbing Wall The 28-foot tall wall and accompanying 12-foot tall “boulder” combine for a total of 4,200 square feet of available climbing space. Several climbing workshops are offered throughout the year. Helmets, climbing harnesses, belay devices, and ropes are provided free of charge; climbing shoes are not required, but are available for rent. Injury Prevention and Care Program

The Injury Prevention and Care (IPC) program is designed to provide injury prevention and care services to all faculty, staff and students injured while participating in Campus Recreation activities. It also will provide education and assistance to all Campus Recreation cardholders in regard to previous sports injuries. The IPC program offers the following services: • first aid (wound care, band aids, ice bags and Ace bandage wraps) • injury evaluations (acute and chronic) • functional movement screens • taping (must supply tape) • referral services • rehabilitation education To schedule an appointment or for more information, call (402) 554-2634. Mav Kids Youth Programs Mav-Kids is a youth-targeted program open to children of UNO students, faculty and staff, and the general public. Events including picnics, swimming, arts and crafts, sporting activities, fitness activities, and rock climbing are offered throughout the academic year. Week-long camps are held during the summer months, incorporating various activities into a “theme” for that week.

Student Organizations and Leadership Programs
The university recognizes the value of a well-rounded college experience as part of a student’s development and encourages students to participate in co-curricular activities. The Office of Student Organizations and Leadership Programs is the key to involvement in cocurricular activities on campus. Recognized student organizations include student government, student programming organization, student newspaper, fraternities and sororities, professional organizations, recreational activities, social organizations, honoraries, religious organizations, and service organizations. If you have any questions and/or would like to get involved in one of the many clubs and organization listed below, or would like to start your own club, stop by the Student Organizations office on the first floor of the Milo Bail Student Center, or call (402) 554-2711. The staff is more than willing to help. Clubs and Organizations Student Government and Agencies UNO Student Government American Multicultural Services International Student Services Legislative and Public Relations Network for disAbled Students Women’s Resource Center Greek Councils Interfraternity Council (IFC) National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) Panhellenic Council (PHC) Greek Fraternities Lambda Chi Alpha Omega Psi Phi Phi Beta Sigma

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Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Lambda Beta Sigma Phi Epsilon Theta Chi Greek Sororities Alpha Kappa Alpha Alpha Xi Delta Chi Omega Delta Sigma Theta Lambda Theta Nu Sigma Gamma Rho Sigma Kappa Zeta Phi Beta Zeta Tau Alpha Ethnic/Cultural Organizations African American Organization Association of Latino American Students Chinese Students & Scholars Association Indian Students Association Intertribal Student Council National Council of Negro Women Pan African Student Organization People to People S.P.O.W. Kun Words Honor Societies Alpha Kappa Delta (Intl. Sociology) Alpha Sigma Lambda (Continuing Studies) American Humanics Student Association Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) Delta Phi Alpha (German) Eta Sigma Gamma (Health Professions) Golden Key Honor Society Kappa Delta Pi (Education) Kappa Kappa Psi (Band) Omicron Delta Kappa Order of Omega (Greek Honorary) Phi Alpha Theta (History) Pi Delta Phi (French) Pi Gamma Mu Psi Chi (Psychology) Sigma Iota Rho (International Studies) Sigma Tau Delta (English) Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society (Biology) Professional Organizations Ad Club Alliance of Fitness Professionals Alpha Eta Rho (Aviation) American Society Heating/Ref. and A/C Engineers American Society of Training & Development Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development College Entrepreneur Organization Criminal Justice Graduate Student Organization Delta Epsilon Dietetic Chi (DEX) Delta Sigma Pi Business Fraternity Financial Management Association UNO Forensics National Broadcasting Society National Student Speech, Language & Hearing Assoc. Pre-Medical Professions Club Pre-Pharmacy Club Pre-Veterinary Club Public Relations Student Society of America Rho Epsilon Fraternity (Real Estate) Silver Wings Society of Physics Students Society of Professional Journalists Society of Women Engineers Student Education Association of Nebraska Student Marketing Association Student Social Work Organization Women in Aviation, UNO Chapter Special Interest Groups ABC Alphabet Soup Acoustical Society of America, UNO Chapter American Civil Liberties Union Americans for Informed Democracy Amnesty International UNO Chess Club Circle K- Community Service College Democrats College Republicans The Crop (Writer’s Workshop) UNO Dance Team Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance Fine Arts University Student Theater (FAUST) UNO Film Society Geography Club UNO Geoscience Society Goodrich Student Organization UNO Honors Program- Student Advisory Board Management Information Systems Maverick Athletic Training Students (MATS) Maverick Investment Club Maverick Paintball UNO Math Club Nebraskans for Peace Organization for Advancement of the Arts Pen & Sword Society Peaceful Local Action Network People to People International Psychology for Sanity R.O.S.A.S. Single Parents Association Socialist Alternative Society of American Military Engineers Student Anthropological Society Student Council for Exceptional Children Student Gaming Association Student Health Advisory Council Student Orientation Leader Organization Student Parent Network Student Recreation and Leisure Society Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) UN-Otake (UNO Anime Club) UNO Talking Hands University Village Residence Hall Council UNO Winterguard Religious Organizations Alpha Lambda Omega

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Baha’i Club Campus Crusade for Christ Catholic Campus Ministry Christ on Campus Christians at UNO Christian Student Fellowship Edge/Focus Fellowship of Christian Athletes Greek Endeavor Impact Movement Living H2O Muslim Student Association The Rock United Christian Ministries in Higher Education Unity Media and Entertainment Gateway Student Newspaper MavRadio Student Programming Organization (SPO) Campus Recreation and Sports Clubs Contact Campus Recreation at (402) 554-2539 for information on Intramurals and Sports Clubs.

education service for university families, as well as opportunities for training, research and further knowledge of the care, education and development of young children. Child care is provided for the children (18 months through 6 years of age) of students, faculty, staff and alumni from 6:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. A summer program for school-aged children is available. For more information, call (402) 554-3398. Food Services The UNO Food Services Office maintains and operates all food facilities on campus. All food sold or served on campus must be provided by UNO Food Services. The Food Court offers many dining options: Tomassito’s - Italian café featuring homemade fresh baked pizzas, calzones, chicken parmesan, dessert pizza and pane, pasta with sausage or meatballs, homemade lasagna and garlic rolls. The American Grill - chicken strip baskets, shrimp baskets, old-fashioned hamburgers and cheeseburgers, chicken sandwiches, and breakfast featuring scrambled or fried eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, bagel sandwiches and much more. Durango’s Deli - sub shop featuring Hormel meats, cheeses and toppings, made-to-order toaster subs, and homemade soups. Aztec’s - taquitos, beef and chicken tacos and enchiladas, taco salads, nachos, Aztec potatoes, and cinnamon crisps. The Rice Place - stir-fried chicken, sausage and shrimp with fresh vegetables and spices, and choice of rice and sauces. Garden Greens - salad bar featuring salad toppings, pasta salads, fresh fruits and vegetables, and a variety of dressings. The Kiosk Kafe - continental breakfasts, homemade donuts, cookies, assorted desserts, bottled juices, waters and teas, Hormel franks and polish sausage, and soft-serve ice cream. The Maverick Buffet - all-you-can-eat buffet with three daily entrees; grill offering hamburgers, grilled cheese sandwiches, and hot dogs; soup and salad bar; fresh fruits and cakes. Catering - extensive on-campus catering service for receptions, beverage breaks, lunches, dinners or banquets. MavCard Services Students should obtain a UNO ID card (MavCard) by going to the Business Office of the Milo Bail Student Center and presenting photo identification. The ID card will be needed to access many services on campus including entrance into the HPER building and for use at University Library (book checkout, etc). The card can also be used as a debit card. For more information, visit the Web at http://mavcard.unomaha.edu.

Milo Bail Student Center
The best overview of the Student Center is its mission statement, which states: “The Student Center is the ‘living room’ of the campus, a gathering place for the campus community and an integral part of UNO’s educational environment which augments the educational experience. The Student Center is more than just a facility; it is made up of operations, services and programs that enhance the quality of college life and help to retain students at the university. It is also a laboratory for experiential and developmental learning – providing opportunities for students to learn and practice leadership and striving to foster an appreciation for diversity, harmony and school spirit.” The Director of the Milo Bail Student Center is responsible for the regulation of a variety of policies on campus. These policies include “Communication and Solicitation,” “Promotional Material and Distribution,” “Student Organization Fund Raising,” and various campus food policies. Copies of these policies are available in the Student Center Administrative offices, and at mbsc.unomaha.edu. Bookstore Textbooks, supplies and other materials you may need for classes are available in the UNO Bookstore. You may also shop online at unobookstore.com. The Bookstore also carries a variety of stationery, office supplies, souvenir clothing, and gift items. Bookstore purchases may be paid by cash, check, Mastercard, Visa, Discover or American Express. The Bookstore also operates a convenience store for your “grab and go” needs while on campus. Child Care Center The University of Nebraska at Omaha Child Care Center (UNOCCC) provides high quality child care and early

Housing
On-Campus Housing University Village, located on UNO’s north campus, offers a unique residential living community with the luxury of an offcampus lifestyle with on-campus convenience. These four

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bedroom, two bath, totally furnished units provide each student with a private bedroom while sharing common space with three other students. University Village is managed by Century Campus Housing Management. The Housing Office, social activities, mailboxes and a laundry facility are available in the clubhouse. Each residence hall building has a Resident Assistant (RA) assigned to it to coordinate social, educational and recreational activities for their assigned building. The RAs are live-in students trained and dedicated to making the oncampus living experience the best that it can be. For more information, call (402) 554-8555. Scott Village, located on the South Campus, offers priority to students majoring in Information Science, Technology and Engineering and provides convenient access to the Peter Kiewit Institute and UNO shuttle services. This 480-bed, ten-building complex includes furnished, four-bedroom suites, each with a full kitchen, two full bathrooms, and a living room. The commons building, centrally located in the courtyard, features a study area, laundry facility and game room. A variety of meal plan options are available from the Scott Residence Hall dining services. Student Resident Assistants will reside on-site to work with students and provide activities that enhance the quality and experience of student life on campus. For more information, call (402) 551-8999 or email jorlich@collegepark.org. Scott Residence Hall, donated by the Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation and located on UNO’s South Campus, is a 164-bed facility, designed to house honor students attending The Peter Kiewit Institute of Information Science, Technology and Engineering. The facility is organized in four-bedroom suites and is connected to the Scott Conference Center. Residents of Scott Hall have access to an unlimited dining meal plan, lounges on each floor, fitness center, study room, game room and laundry facilities all within the building. Student Resident Assistants, as well as a Resident Director, reside on-site to work with students to determine and provide activities to enhance student life, peer interaction and on-campus living. For more information, call (402) 551-8999 or email jorlich@collegepark.org. Off-Campus Housing Referral Service This office, located in the Milo Bail Student Center, has information on a variety of housing options available in the greater Omaha area, including sleeping rooms, roommate information, apartments, houses and domestic exchange. For more information, see mbsc.unomaha.edu/och.htm or call (402) 554-2788.

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equivalent) of 26 AND either rank in the top 25% of their class or have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher. The scholarship is renewable for 3 additional years if the student maintains full-time enrollment and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. This award cannot be stacked with other scholarships that together would equal or exceed tuition and fees. Nebraska Legacy Scholarship The Nebraska Legacy Scholarship provides the differential between in-state and out-of-state tuition to incoming freshmen that are children of University of Nebraska graduates. Students eligible for review must rank in the upper one-third of their graduating class, or have a minimum ACT composite score of 23 or minimum SAT composite score of 1060. The scholarship is renewable for up to four years. UNO Advantage Scholarship UNO offers scholarships for an amount up to the difference between resident and non-resident tuition to selected new students who are not residents of Nebraska. For consideration, students must complete and submit complete and submit an Application for Undergraduate Admission by February 1 and meet the minimum eligibility criteria (minimum 23 composite ACT score/minimum 1060 composite SAT or rank in top 25% of high school class). Transfer students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA (4.0 scale) to be considered. Meeting the minimum criteria does not guarantee that a scholarship will be awarded. There are a limited number of scholarships, and they are awarded competitively. University Honors Scholarships Approximately 40 University Honors Scholarships are available to sophomore, junior and senior students enrolled at UNO. These scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic achievement, and provide for up to 15 hours of resident tuition per semester. Students are nominated for this award by their college. Veteran Tuition Waivers Students who are children or spouses of veterans who died or were totally disabled as a result of service in World War I, World War II, Korea or Vietnam should contact their county Veteran’s Assistance Office to determine their eligibility for tuition remission under the laws of the State of Nebraska. University Tuition Grants A limited amount of University Tuition Grant funds are available to UNO students, and are normally awarded on the basis of financial need. The purpose of this assistance is to provide financial aid to students who need help paying their educational expenses. To be considered for this aid, a student must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, preferably by March 1. Federal Work-Study Students may be considered for Federal Work-Study assistance, a type of federal aid that provides part-time employment opportunities on campus. Eligible students are paid at least the minimum wage according to the number of hours worked each pay period.

Student Financial Aid
Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Stafford Loan, University Tuition Grant, state grant, certain scholarships, Federal Perkins Loan, and Federal Work-Study are all forms of financial assistance for which UNO undergraduate students may be considered on the basis of financial “need.” In order to apply, a student should submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1 prior to the academic year for which assistance is needed. Scholarships A wide range of scholarship programs has been established to recognize excellent high school achievement by incoming freshman students and exceptional scholastic performance by upperclass students already in attendance at the University. Scholarship funds have been provided for students by corporations, clubs, community organizations and friends of the University. Most incoming freshmen are not required to submit a scholarship application. Please visit the Web at www.ses.unomaha.edu to see if an application is required. Awards are based upon factors stipulated by the donors. UNO offers scholarships to the most worthy, promising applicants who meet the qualifications of the particular scholarship programs. Entering freshman students must take the ACT test no later than the December testing date of their senior year to be eligible for scholarship consideration. Regents’ Scholarships The Regents of the University of Nebraska have provided funds for the Regents’ Scholarships, offered to entering graduates of Nebraska high schools with high academic potential. These scholarships provide for the payment of resident tuition for the freshman year, and are renewable each year upon maintenance of full-time enrollment and a UNO cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher. The award is renewable for up to five total years, or until 135 credit hours or a bachelor’s degree is earned. Visit the financial aid Web site at http://www.ses.unomaha.eud/finaid to learn more about the current eligibility criteria. World-Herald Honors Scholarships and Distinguished Scholarships The University annually awards two Omaha WorldHerald Honors Scholarships and five Distinguished Scholarships. These scholarships have a total value over a four-year period of $24,000 to $30,000. All seven are awarded through the UNO Distinguished Scholarship Competition. Academically talented high school seniors are invited to campus each spring to compete in the exam. Funds for the World-Herald Scholarships are provided by the Omaha World-Herald Foundation. Funds for the Distinguished Scholarships are provided by the Scottish Rite Foundation of Omaha, UNO Alumni Association, Isaacson Trust, Helen Hansen estate, and the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska. Chancellor’s Scholarship The Chancellor’s Scholarship ($1,500/academic year) is awarded to high school seniors graduating from Nebraska high schools that have a minimum ACT score (or SAT

GENERAL INFORMATION

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Stafford Student Loan The Federal Stafford Loan Program enables eligible students to borrow funds directly from a bank, credit union or other lender to help pay the expenses of their University education. Students with financial “need” are eligible for a Subsidized Stafford Loan. Students without financial “need” are eligible for an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Maximum subsidized Stafford Loan amounts yearly are $3,500 for freshmen, $4,500 for sophomores, $5,500 for juniors, seniors and fifth-year undergraduates, and $8,500 for graduate students. However, required adjustments frequently reduce the actual amount for which an individual applicant is eligible. The interest rate is capped at 6.8%. For Subsidized Stafford Loans, interest does not begin to accrue and repayment does not start until six months after the recipient graduates or drops to less than one-half time status. For Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, interest starts to accrue at the time the loan is disbursed. Submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid is required. Federal Perkins Loan This is a low-interest loan available primarily to full-time students. Interest accrual and loan repayment begin nine months after graduation. Annual awards range from $1000 to $3,000. PLUS The Federal PLUS program provides loan assistance to parents of dependent undergraduate students. The Federal PLUS interest rate varies from year to year. PLUS loan applications and information are available from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid. Short-Term Loan Funds Short-term loan assistance is made available by such donors as the faculty and staff of UNO, the Alumni Association, Faye L. Hickey, Ben Garman, Alpha Kappa Delta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Phi Delta Gamma, UNO Parents Association and Rotary International. Application and eligibility information may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid. Typical loan amounts range from $50-$300 with 30-60 days allowed for repayment. Return of Title IV Funds Policy The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 established new provisions that may require a certain percentage of Federal financial aid (Title IV funds) to be returned to the Department of Education or lender when a student completely withdraws from all classes. Federal funds that may have to be returned, in order of their required return are: Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal PLUS Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, and NSG Grant. When a student officially, or unofficially withdraws (i.e. quits attending class), during the first 60% of the semester, and has received or was eligible to receive federal Title IV funds, the Financial Aid Office is required to perform a Return of Title IV funds calculation as follows: Step One Determine how much Title IV aid was earned by the student. This is calculated by dividing the number of days a student attended by the total number

43

of days in the semester ( % of aid earned), and then multiplying that percentage by the total amount of Title IV aid disbursed, or that could have been disbursed. Step Two Determine the Title IV aid to be disbursed to student. If the student received less Title IV aid than earned from step one, a post-withdrawal disbursement will be made. This situation may occur in a case where federal aid was approved, or a loan certified, but not yet disbursed before the student withdrew. Step Three Determine the amount of unearned Title IV aid that must be returned by UNO. UNO must return the lessor of the amount of Title IV aid that the student does not earn, or the amount of tuition and fee charges that the student incurred for the semester multiplied by the percentage of Title IV aid not earned. Title IV funds that have to be returned by the school will result in a university obligation to the student. The student will receive a bill from the Cashiering/Student Accounts Office. Step Four Determine the amount of unearned Title IV aid to be returned by student. Any federal grant funds that are calculated to be returned by the student will be returned by the school so a federal overpayment situation does not result and will be included in the amount billed in step three. Any loan funds required to be returned by the student would be returned in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. An aid recipient should contact the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid prior to withdrawal from the University. Upon request, the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid will provide written examples of various return of funds calculations. Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress Federal regulations require that a student attending an educational institution maintain satisfactory progress in the degree program he/she is pursuing in order to receive federal financial assistance. The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that limited federal financial assistance is disbursed only to those students sincere about pursuing and obtaining their educational objectives. In order to comply with these regulations, the University of Nebraska at Omaha has established the following standards of satisfactory academic progress. All continuing and former students who apply for financial aid must meet these standards before federal assistance can be authorized. Entering freshman and transfer students may receive financial aid for their first semester of UNO coursework without meeting these standards. The standards for continuing and former students will be checked following the completion of each spring semester. Standards • A student must successfully complete (“D” grade or

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GENERAL INFORMATION

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
higher) at least two-thirds the total credit hours for which he/she has registered at UNO. Grades of Failing (F); No-Credit, Failing (NC); Unsatisfactory, Failing (U); Incomplete (I); Withdrew (W and WX); and Audit (AU), are considered unsuccessful completion of credit hours. A student must be in “good academic standing” at UNO at the completion of the Spring semester. This is defined as having an earned cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. A student pursuing an undergraduate degree program may not receive further financial aid if more than 188 undergraduate credit hours have been attempted. A student pursuing a graduate degree may not receive financial aid if more than 55 hours have been attempted. A student pursuing a doctoral degree may not receive financial aid if more than 110 hours have been attempted. students’ rights and responsibilities are contained herein, students are urged to become familiar with all documents pertinent to the University of Nebraska in general and to UNO in particular.

Reinstatement of Eligibility Failure to meet any of the standards will cause the student’s financial aid record to be “flagged” for review, and the student must submit a written appeal to request that he/she be permitted to continue receiving assistance. • The appeal must be typed or written clearly, and submitted to the Associate Director of Financial Aid (103 Eppley Administration Building). • The appeal must provide a full explanation why all standards were not originally met, and how the student will ensure that the standards will be met in the future, should his/her eligibility for continued federal assistance be restored. • The appeal should explain any special or extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control that may have prevented all standards from originally being met. Supporting documentation from a physician, counselor, academic adviser, or faculty member may be included with the written appeal, but is not required. The student will be notified by mail whether or not the appeal has been approved. An appeal denied by the Associate Director of Financial Aid may, at the student’s request, be forwarded to the Director for review. The Director’s decision will be final. Students can obtain additional information regarding financial aid by writing the Office of Financial Aid, EAB 103, Omaha, NE 68182; or calling (402) 554-2327; or visiting the Web site at www.ses.unomaha.edu/finaid/. The University of Nebraska and its campuses have promulgated various policies, regulations, statements of purpose and operation, while adhering to the principles deemed necessary for functioning as institutions of higher education. The University of Nebraska at Omaha, with the counsel and advice of students, faculty, and staff, has identified and compiled what are thought to be some of the most basic and important statements of policy especially as they relate to students. To create greater awareness among and for convenience to students, a number of basic policies have been compiled into a Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities. While most, but not necessarily all, policies pertaining to

GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Student Rights and Responsibilities in Board of Regents Bylaws
Students, like all members of the academic community, have the responsibility to create and support an educational environment. Each member of the community should be treated with respect and dignity. Each has the right to learn. This right imposes a duty not to infringe upon the rights of others. The academic community should assure its members those opportunities, protections, and privileges that provide the best climate for learning. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.0.) UNO shall publicize and keep current all rules, regulations, and policies concerning students, and insure that they are readily available to all students and other interested persons. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.1.) A. Admissions Criteria UNO shall publish the criteria for admission, academic progress, certificates, and degrees for all colleges and schools of the University. Admission to the University and the privileges of University students shall not be denied to any person because of age, gender, race, color, national origin, or religious or political beliefs. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.2.) B. Academic Evaluation Students shall be informed of the requirements, standards, objectives, and evaluation procedures at the beginning of each individual course. Each student shall be given a performance evaluation during the progress of the course if requested. Each college or school shall provide for a faculty-student appeals committee for students who believe that evaluation of their academic progress has been prejudiced or capricious. Such procedure shall provide for changing a student’s evaluation upon the committee’s finding that an academic evaluation by a member of the faculty has been improper. Procedures for appealing evaluation of academic progress are provided by each college or school unit. Generally, but not necessarily conclusively, the procedures are similar to the following: Students wanting to appeal a grade (evaluation that has been prejudiced or capricious), shall attempt to discuss the matter directly with the instructor. If the student and the instructor do not reach a satisfactory agreement, the student may submit an appeal in writing to the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered. If the student and chairperson do not reach a satisfactory agreement, the student may submit an appeal in writing to the Dean of the College in which the course was offered. The decision made at this level, which would include a hearing by a faculty-student appeals committee, will be final. Each college or school shall provide a mechanism by which students have an opportunity to report their perceptions of courses and the methods by which they are being taught, provided, however, that such mechanism shall protect members of the faculty from capricious and uninformed judgments. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.3) C. Public Information Regarding Students In compliance with the federally-enacted Privacy Act and as defined by the Board of Regents, public information regarding students attending UNO shall be the student’s

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name, current address, permanent address, year at the University, and academic major field of study. The names of students mentioned in some kinds of campus security reports concerning accidents and incidents may also be released to the public. UNO administrators shall define the kind of reports and information that may be released to the public. Information contained in personal files of the student is considered confidential and requires written authorization by the student for release to the public. Records with names and personal identification deleted may be made available for governmental or Universityapproved research and analysis. Public information will be released by the Registrar to anyone upon inquiry, unless the student has requested that specific items not be released. The student’s request to have public information withheld should be filed at the Office of the Registrar. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.6.) An explanation of this Act and its application at UNO is available to all students. Copies may be obtained at the Office of Student Organizations and Leadership Programs, the University Information Center, the Registrar’s Office and the Orientation Office. D. Disciplinary Records Information concerning students obtained as a result of counseling or disciplinary actions will not be made available to unauthorized persons within the University or to any person outside the University without the expressed written consent of the student involved except under legal compulsion or where the safety of others is involved. UNO may disclose to an alleged victim of any crime of violence the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted against the alleged perpetrator of such crime with respect to such crime. The University shall provide for the periodic destruction of noncurrent disciplinary records, upon a student’s graduation or after two years from the last date of attendance, unless under suspension or expulsion from the University. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Sections 5.6.1 and 5.7.) E. Student Communications Media Student publications and broadcasting stations shall be supervised in a manner such that editorial freedom will be maintained and that the corollary responsibilities will be governed by the canons of ethical journalism. Student publications financed in whole or in part by fees collected from all students at UNO shall be supervised by a Publications Committee. This Committee shall have full responsibility of a publisher and the power of decision on the proper application of the canons of ethical journalism. Students shall comprise a majority of the membership, but the committee shall also include members of the faculty and professional journalists from outside the University. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.9.) F. Eligibility for and Participation in Co-curricular Activities. UNO shall permit students to organize and join associations to promote their common interests and shall establish procedures for the official recognition of these organizations for use of campus facilities. Each such recognized student organization shall be required to comply with all applicable federal and state statutes and University regulations. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.10.)

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GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
bulletin, catalog or schedule is by way of announcement only and shall not be regarded as an offer of contract. The University expressly reserves the right to 1) add or delete courses from its offerings, 2) change times or locations of courses or programs, 3) change academic calendars without notice, 4) cancel any course for insufficient registrations, or 5) revise or change rules, charges, fees, schedules, courses, requirements for degrees, and any other policy or regulation affecting students, including, but not limited to, evaluation standards, whenever the same is considered to be in the best interests of the University. (Policies of the Board of Regents, Section 5.1.3) B. Right to Public Hearing It shall be the right of any individual member or group of members of the University (i.e., students, faculty, or administrators) to be granted, upon petition to the appropriate policy making body or office, a public hearing at which the policy indicated by the group of petitioners in their petition shall be discussed. The policy-making body or office petitioned shall schedule the hearing for some time convenient to the interested parties if possible, no later than two weeks after the petition is submitted during periods when the University is in session, and shall announce publicly in advance the time and place of the hearing. At the hearing, that body responsible for the policy indicated in the petition shall clarify said policy, offer the reasons which justify the policy in view of the objections or questions raised about it in the petition, and respond to any additional questions or criticisms of the policy or related policies raised at the hearing by any member of the University. It is expected that before such a petition is submitted, all other normal channels for raising questions about the policy have been exhausted. If, in the view of the policy-making body or office to whom the petition is submitted, the petition is merely a form of harassment or adequate answers are available through other normal channels, the petition may be referred to the relevant committee to determine whether the hearing must be held. A decision by the Committee not to hold a public hearing shall be overruled by the submission to that committee of a petition requesting such hearing and signed by at least 100 members of the University community. (Policies of the Board of Regents, Section 2.1.3)

Co-curricular activities are offered by the University to meet the needs and interests and to promote the development of special skills of its student population. To participate as a member in any recognized University organization, a student must be enrolled in at least one credit course, excluding audit hours. To participate as a member in any recognized co-curricular activity, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 1.75 for the first 45 hours attempted and at least 2.00 for 46 or more hours attempted, including all college level courses taken at the University of Nebraska. To be eligible to run for or hold an elected or appointed position in the Student Government/UNO, a student must be enrolled in at least six credit hours, maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and not be on disciplinary probation. These requirements supersede the membership rules, constitutions, and bylaws of all organizations. Sponsors and officers of all organizations shall establish and enforce membership requirements which may be more, but not less, stringent than the foregoing. Under all circumstances, however, University policy prohibits denial of University privileges to students on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, disability, age, national origin, or other factors, which, lawfully, cannot be taken into consideration. G. Campus Speakers The purpose of a speakers program is to advance the general educational purposes of the University by putting before the University community a broad range of ideas in a variety of contexts. The organizations administering speaker programs should make every attempt to provide balance on all subjects presented. Institutional procedures will insure the orderly and adequate preparation for the event. However, the control of campus facilities will not be used as a device of censorship. (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, Section 5.11.)

II. University of Nebraska Policies
A. Academic Degree Completion The requirements for graduation from a bachelor’s degree program shall be those listed in the Catalog effective at the time of matriculation provided continuous enrollment (excluding summer sessions) was maintained. However, the University reserves the right to withdraw and substitute courses, to reassign instructors, and to change the nature of instruction, as deemed necessary. In some cases, prerequisites for courses offered at the University are effective even if they are not listed in a given catalog. (See the current schedule of classes or your adviser for details.) A student may meet requirements listed in a subsequent Catalog if written approval is granted by the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled. Acceptance of registration by the University of Nebraska and admission to any educational program of the University does not constitute a contract or warranty that the University will continue indefinitely to offer the program in which a student is enrolled. The University expressly reserves the right to change, phase out, or discontinue any program. The listing of courses contained in any University

III. UNO Policies
A. Counseling/Medical Records. Information exchanged with and/or maintained by a professional counselor/psychologist or medical personnel about a student client will remain confidential, except under legal compulsion. B. Demonstrations The University acknowledges the rights of members to express their views by peaceful demonstration. UNO is an academic community founded upon a belief in rational dialogue and mutual respect among its members. The opportunities for communication within the University are many and varied, and the University welcomes suggestions for enlarging or improving them. The nature of the academic community demands that all

GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
members strive to maintain the rational dialogue which is the cornerstone of the University. There is no conceivable issue, be it a question of academic and administrative policy or of students rights and freedoms, that cannot be approached within the framework of free discussion. 1. Demonstration Procedures Members of the academic community, including the guests of the University, have the right of extensive latitude in making their opinions known. It is understood, however, that in exercising this right the rights of others must not be jeopardized. The public exploration and resolution of differing views can be successful only when groups and individuals discuss the issues in forums where the right to disagree and to speak freely and be heard is preserved. Within this context, the University community recognizes peaceful demonstration as a legitimate means of expressing one’s opinion. The preservation of freedom of speech and the recognition of the right to peaceful demonstration as part of that freedom, is possible only in an orderly environment in which individuals are not endangered by force or violence, and in which they are free from coercion and interference in the exercise of their rights or in carrying out their legitimate activities. Campus demonstration forms are available in the Administrative Office of the Milo Bail Student Center and must be submitted and approved with all necessary signatures at least 48 hours (two business days) before the proposed demonstration. 2. Response to Disruptive Behavior Board of Regents policy states that, in cases of disruption of normal University activities, the Chancellor or his/her designee will, in accordance with University policies and procedures, take necessary steps to restore the University to its normal function. The Chancellor or his/her designee may, in the event of refusal to disperse upon request, impose temporary action, including suspension of those persons disrupting the normal function of the University. The determination as to whether disciplinary action will be initiated for violations of University rules and regulations by students will be made by the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. The University community may impose behavioral restrictions which are necessary to preserve the orderly functioning of the University and the right of all to be heard. Such restrictions fall into two categories: a. Prevention of violence or the use of force: Demonstrations which coerce individuals or which constitute a hazard to the safety of any persons or which threaten destruction of property are not protected by freedom of speech provisions and will not be tolerated. Similarly, a hostile audience will not be allowed to interfere with a peaceful demonstration. b. Protection from interference with University operations: The University community may restrict conduct

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which interferes with the holding of classes, the carrying forward of University business, properly organized and scheduled University events, or the discharge of responsibility by any University officer, employee or student. Although the mere presence of demonstrators in public areas within buildings does not necessarily constitute interference, demonstrators cannot be allowed physically to obstruct access to University facilities. Noise and boisterous activity is objectionable when it prevents others from exercising their rights and duties. Persons engaging in disruptive action shall be subject to disciplinary measures, including separation from the University, and also to charges of violation of the law. 3. Institutional Response The response of the University to any disruptive behavior must ultimately depend on the judgment of the officials who are in charge. However, the following guidelines should be observed: a. Every effort will be made to end the disruption through reason and persuasion. These efforts shall include a clear indication of the willingness to discuss issues and to make clear the procedures for discussion and arbitration of the issues involved. Discussion of the issues will not be conducted under conditions of duress. b. If the discussion method fails, the individuals involved will be notified that they are in violation of University regulations and they will be asked to cease the activity. In the event the alleged violators do not cease the activity within a reasonable length of time, temporary sanctions, which may include conduct probation and if necessary, suspension, may be imposed on the scene. However, unless both the student and the University officials agree to a postponement, the University must hold disciplinary hearings within five (5) school days or the temporary sanctions will be dissolved. Such disciplinary hearing shall be held, as far as possible, in accordance with the established disciplinary procedures of the University. No temporary sanction shall be made part of a student’s permanent record. If a student is found innocent of the action for which temporary sanctions were imposed, no record of the temporary sanction or of the hearing shall become part of any of the student’s files or records, and the student shall be given the opportunity to make up work which was not completed because of the disciplinary action. c. If the use of institutional sanctions and discussion methods are not effective in ending the disruptions, or when alleged violators are not members of the University community, extrainstitutional methods (including the invoking of police force) may be used. Nonmembers of the University community who are engaged in disruptive behavior may be referred to civil authorities for appropriate action.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
2. Athletics. Women and men must be provided with equal opportunities in intercollegiate, club, or intramural athletics, and access to athletic facilities. Separate teams may be offered for members of each gender where selection for such teams is based upon competitive skill or activity involved is a contact sport. Women and men must have separate shower facilities and sports equipment. 3. Career and Counseling Services. Women and men may not be discriminated against on the basis of gender in the counseling and guidance of students. Gender -biased assessment or test materials may not be employed. The Career Center must be assured that employment is made available without gender discrimination and may not list and publicize employment opportunities which discriminate on the basis of gender . 4. Course Offerings. Classes must be offered to both women and men on an equal basis and must be open to both genders. This includes health, physical education, industrial, business, vocational, technical, home economics, music, and continuing education courses. Students may be separated by gender within physical education classes during participation in contact sports. 5. Financial Aid. Women and men must be given equal opportunities to receive financial aid, which includes scholarships, grants, loans, and participation in work/study programs. Gender restricted scholarships may be offered only as long as the total amount of money offered to both genders is equal. Reasonable opportunities must be provided for athletic scholarship for members of each gender in proportion to the number of each gender participating in athletics. 6. Health Services. Women and men must have equal access to health services. 7. Housing. The University may not offer different rules or regulations or other different services or benefits related to housing on the basis of gender. 8. Student Activities. Women and men may not be subject to separate or different rules of behavior, sanctions, or treatment in academic, co-curricular and research activities on the basis of gender. Membership requirements for student activities and organizations must be the same for women and men with the exception of social fraternities and sororities. As members of organizations, students must be allowed to participate equally and may not be assigned or denied office or benefits on the basis of gender. 9. Student Employment. Women and men must be allowed equal opportunities for and access to student employment and subsequent raises and promotions. Benefits for employment must be equally provided, regardless of gender. 10. Complaint Procedure. Any student having a complaint regarding discrimination is urged to bring the complaint to the attention of the Assistant to the Chancellor for Diversity and Equal Opportunity, Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-2872.

d. Evidence regarding the activity of nonstudent members of the University community who are alleged to have engaged in disruptive behavior may be referred to their supervisors for appropriate action. The University community abhors the use of force as a method for settling disagreement and will always make exhaustive attempts to deal with issues by rational methods. When, however, such rational efforts prove ineffective or when imminent danger to life or property exists, more forceful methods shall be used to protect the rights and property of members of the community. C. Distribution of Printed and Other Materials. Students are free to express their beliefs and concerns in a variety of ways. Printed and other materials offered free of charge may be distributed at any location on the campus as long as such distribution does not interfere with normal traffic or functions of the University. Such materials may be distributed by any UNO-affiliated person provided such is accomplished in an orderly manner within the framework of University policies and the law. If specific space for distribution of material is desired, a location may be reserved in a designated area of the Milo Bail Student Center, in accordance with existing policies and procedures governing space reservations. Special care is requested of any and all parties distributing literature to prevent littering of the campus and surrounding areas. Such activity shall be conducted so as not to interfere with the rights of others or the normal activities of the University. Any material offered for sale, solicitation of donations, or posting on University bulletin boards must comply with UNO policy concerning these matters. Contact the Director of the Milo Bail Student Center if more specific information is desired. D. Information Technology Services. The facilities of UNO Information Technology Services are available to students, faculty, and staff of this institution for the purpose of instruction, research, and other activities as defined by the Chancellor. The computer facilities are University property and their operation is part of University operations. Executive Memorandum No. 16 of the President of the University of Nebraska states the University policy on responsible use of University computers and information systems. Executive Memorandum No. 16 may be accessed on the Internet at: www.nebraska.edu/about/exec_memo16.pdf. The Student Code of Conduct addresses offenses related to the properties and operation of the University, and, therefore, also applies to computer use and facilities as it applies to all other University resources. E. Title IX. How Title IX Affects Your Educational Experience. 1. Admissions. Women and men must be given equal opportunities for admission to undergraduate public institutions, graduate, and professional programs. Applicants may not be ranked separately on the basis of gender nor may numerical limitations be applied on the number or preparation of students of either gender who may be admitted.

GENERAL INFORMATION

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
Student Code of Conduct
Preamble University students are both citizens and members of the academic community. As members of the academic community, students are subject to the responsibilities which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. As members of the larger community of which the University is a part, students are entitled to all the rights and protections enjoyed by other members of that community. By the same token, students are also subject to all civil and criminal laws, the enforcement of which is the responsibility of duly constituted civil authorities. It should be emphasized that, when a student’s violation of the law also adversely affects the University’s pursuit of its recognized educational objectives, the University may enforce its own regulations regardless of any civil or criminal proceedings or dispositions. When students violate a University regulation, they are subject to disciplinary action by the University whether or not their conduct violates civil or criminal law. If a student violates a housing regulation that also violates a University regulation, the student will be subject to University disciplinary action. If a person’s behavior simultaneously violates a University regulation and the civil law, the University may take disciplinary action independent of that taken by civil authorities. When students violate laws off campus, they may incur penalties prescribed by civil authorities. However, University discipline will be initiated only in instances of off-campus student misconduct which distinctly and adversely affects the University’s pursuit of its recognized educational purposes. An individual student may be disciplined for any act of misconduct provided in this Code. A student organization may be disciplined for any act of misconduct provided in this Code committed by any of its individual members where such act: (i) is mandated, sponsored, approved, or encouraged by one or more members of the organization, whether explicitly or implicitly; (ii) takes place in the context of a tradition, custom, or past practice of the organization; or (iii) is reasonably foreseeable as a result of an activity carried on by the organization. When a student organization is charged with misconduct, the presiding officer and, if appropriate, other student leaders thereof shall be required to participate in disciplinary proceedings conducted under this Code as representative(s) of the organization. The term “University premises” is used throughout this Code of Conduct and shall mean any building, facility or grounds owned or leased by the University and any building, facility or grounds located on real property owned by the University and leased or licensed to any person, firm or corporation for a University use, including, but not limited to, student housing facilities and business and technology development facilities.

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2.

3.

4.

5.

Sanctionable Misconduct by Individual Students or by Student Organizations
The following acts of misconduct under this code by an individual student or by a student organization shall result in University disciplinary review and/or action: 1. Physical and Verbal Aggressive or Abusive Behavior a. Physically abusing or threatening to physically abuse any person.

b. Any act occurring on the University campus which intentionally disturbs the peace and quiet of any person or group of persons. c. Conduct which is unreasonably dangerous to the health or safety of other persons or oneself. d. Verbal behavior that involves an express or implied threat to interfere with an individual’s personal safety, academic efforts, employment, or participation in University sponsored co-curricular activities or causes the person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to occur. e. Disorderly, lewd, indecent or obscene conduct, including the expression of such on Universityowned or controlled property or at Universitysponsored or supervised events. Discrimination, Harassment and Intimidation. a. Any form of discrimination because of race, color, age, disability, religion, gender (including sexual harassment), national origin, marital status, Vietnam-era veteran status, political affiliation, sexual orientation, or any unlawful reason. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other physical, verbal, or visual conduct based on sex constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to the conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of employment or academic standing, (2) submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as the basis for an employment or academic decision, or (3) the conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or academic environment. b. Intentionally and substantially interfering with the freedom of expression of others on University premises or at University-sponsored activities. Hazing Any act which endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or which damages or removes public or private property for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership of, a group or organization. Sexual Imposition Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, obscene phone calls, indecent exposure, sexual assault, date rape or other uninvited behavior of a sexually explicit nature which is considered offensive to a reasonable person. Alcohol and Drug Abuse1 a. Use, possession, manufacture, distribution or sale of illegal drugs or drug paraphernalia on University premises or while on University business or at University activities, or in University vehicles. b. Unauthorized use, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of a controlled substance as defined by the Federal Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S. C. Sections 801 et seq., or Nebraska Drug Control Laws, Neb. Rev. Stat. Sections 28-401 et seq., on University premises, or while engaged in University business or attending University activities, or in University-supplied vehicles.

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b. Accessing or attempting to access computing resources or computer-based information without proper authorization. c. Disrupting the intended use of computers or computer networks. d. Damaging or destroying computer equipment or computer-based information. e. Violating copyright laws or license restrictions with respect to the copying or use of computer programs, data, materials or information. f. Unauthorized use of another person’s password. g. Unauthorized lending or borrowing of an account number. h. Using the computer facilities for purposes other than those for which the account number was issued. i. Storing game programs on allocated disk space or private tape, except when authorized in writing by the Director of Information Technology Infrastructure. j. Copying, altering, or destroying the files or output of another individual without the express written permission of that individual. k. Intentionally abusing or misusing the computer facilities so as to cause damage, program disturbances or harassment to other persons. l. Using electronic communications to harass or threaten any person. m. Violation of University of Nebraska Executive Memorandum No.16, relating to use of computers, or violation of any state or federal law or regulation in connection with use of any information system.3 9. Deception, Falsification and Misrepresentation a. Forging, altering, or otherwise falsifying any University document, any University record, or any University instrument of identification, or assisting another in such misconduct. b. Borrowing, lending or the improper use or possession of any University access or identification card. c. Submitting false information to any member of the faculty or staff or to any University office. d. Falsely representing oneself as a University employee. 10. Disruption of University Business a. Material and substantial disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, or other University functions, operations or activities, including its public service functions on or off campus. b. Leading or inciting others to materially and substantially disrupt or obstruct teaching, research, administration, or other University functions, operations or activities, including its public service functions on or off campus. c. Obstruction of ingress to or egress from any University building, facility, or premises. d. Unauthorized occupation or use of or entry into any University building, facility or grounds. 11. Endangerment of Individuals or the Safety of Individuals a. Setting fire on any University premises. b. Setting off a fire alarm on any university premises

c. Unauthorized use, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of alcohol on University premises or at University activities, or in University supplied vehicles. d. Storing in a locker, desk, vehicle, or other place on University-owned or controlled property any unauthorized controlled substances, drug paraphernalia or alcohol. e. Use of alcohol off University premises that adversely affects student’s academic performance or safety or the safety of others. f. Possession, use, manufacture, distribution or sale of illegal drugs off University premises that adversely affects the student’s academic performance, safety or the safety of others. g. Violation of any state or federal law relating to the unauthorized use, possession, manufacture, distribution or sale of alcohol, controlled substances or drug paraphernalia. h. Manufacturing, distributing, selling, offering for sale, or possessing anabolic steroids (except under the supervision of a physician) or any illegal drug or narcotic including, but not limited to: barbiturates, hallucinogens, amphetamines, cocaine, opium, heroin or marijuana. i. Being under the influence of alcohol or any illegal drug or controlled substance on University premises or at University-sponsored events. 6. Misuse of University Procedures a. Intentionally filing a false complaint under this code or aiding or abetting any conduct described in this code. b. Abuse of the University judicial system including, but not limited to, failure to obey the summons of a judicial body or University official; falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a judicial body relating to a judicial procedure; disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of judicial proceedings; instituting a judicial proceeding without cause; attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in or use of the judicial system; attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body prior to and/or during the course of the judicial proceeding; failure to comply with sanctions imposed under this code; or influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the judicial system. 7. Financial Aid and Bad Debts a. Fraud or misrepresentation in making application for or in use of financial aid. b. Failure to pay a financial obligation owing to the University or to any department, division, or agency thereof.2 c. Failure to pay financial obligations owing to any student housing unit located on property owned by the University. 8. Computer Related Misconduct a. Unlawful or unauthorized access to or use of computers, computer networks and computer data, programs, materials or information.

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STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
for reasons other than an actual fire or emergency. c. Reporting a false fire alarm or a false bomb threat on or for any University premises or with regard to any University-sponsored event. d. Failure to evacuate any University premises upon the sounding of a fire alarm or upon receiving a lawful order to evacuate the premises. e. Tampering with safety or emergency equipment, signs or devices. f. Failure to report a fire or any other dangerous condition when known or recognized on the campus; g. Tampering with elevator controls and/or equipment on University premises; h. Failure to follow published University safety standards. Firearms, Explosives and Weapons Possessing, using or selling firearms or other dangerous weapons (including paint guns, pellet guns, BB guns and knives), explosives, fireworks, ammunition, or dangerous chemicals on University premises. Gambling Participation in gambling activity in violation of the laws of the State of Nebraska or of the United States. Obstruction of Law Enforcement Officers, Fire Fighters or University Officials. Obstructing or failing to comply with the directions of a law enforcement officer, fire fighter, University official or official of a student housing unit located on property owned by the University in the performance of duty on any University premises, or at any activity or event sponsored by the University or any recognized student organization. Unauthorized Use of University Property and Unauthorized Access to Confidential Information Unauthorized use of any University property, facilities, equipment or materials, or unauthorized access to any confidential information, in whatever form, maintained by the University or a University official or employee. Traffic Safety Serious traffic violations on any University premises, including operating any vehicle while intoxicated, speeding, reckless endangerment or reckless driving. Telephone Abuse Charging or causing to be charged any long distance or other toll telephone calls to University telephones without proper authorization. Unauthorized Presence in or Entry of University Premises a. Unauthorized presence in any University class, lecture, laboratory period, orientation session, examination, or other instructional session, or unauthorized entry of any room, office or laboratory or other University premises. b. Possessing, producing, reproducing, manufacturing, or having produced, reproduced or manufactured without proper authorization, any key or unlocking device for use on any University lock or on any University premises.

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12.

13.

19. Impermissible Commercial Distribution of Course Notes and Recordings Sale of course notes or course records or providing course notes or course records so the same may sold by any other person without the express written permission of the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs and the course instructor(s).4 20. Smoking Smoking in any University building or vehicle. 21. Violation of Municipal Ordinances or State or Federal Laws Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the State of Nebraska or of the United States on University premises or at any University-sponsored or supervised events. 22. Misconduct Relating to Theft and Destruction of Property, and Possession of Stolen Property a. Theft of, or intentional damage, destruction, or defacement of University property or property of any other person while on University premises. b. Receipt or possession of property known to be stolen. c. Possession, without permission, of property of the University or of a student, faculty member or staff member of the University.

14.

Disciplinary Procedures and Sanctions
The following procedures are designed to protect students’ rights as set forth by the Board of Regents. These disciplinary procedures have been drafted to apply to disciplinary proceedings for violation of the Code of Conduct by individual students. However, the Code of Conduct also applies to and may be enforced against student organizations charged with violation of the Code of Conduct. Accordingly, whenever a student organization is charged with violation of the Code of Conduct, the charged student organization shall have the same rights and obligations under these disciplinary procedures as an individual student, and shall be subject to imposition of the sanctions provided in these disciplinary procedures. 1. Allegations of student misconduct shall be forwarded in writing to the University Judicial Officer. The Judicial Officer shall investigate the charges and determine the facts applicable thereto. If allegations are found by the Judicial Officer to be unsubstantiated by the facts, the charges shall be dismissed without record in the file of the student. If facts substantiate the charges, the Judicial Officer may: 1) seek to resolve the matter via informal, oral remonstrance; 2) consult medical or other professional resources and refer the matter to appropriate professional officials or agencies, if it seems appropriate; or 3) determine that one or more of the following formal sanctions is appropriate: a. Written reprimand. A warning that behavior is inappropriate and continuance of such may lead to further disciplinary action, a copy to be placed in the student’s file with a copy to the student. b. Disciplinary probation. A written notice placing a student on probationary status for a specified period of time, including limitation on the student’s University privileges, limitation on participation in

15.

16.

17.

18.

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5. Both the student and the Judicial Officer: a. shall have the opportunity for advanced inspection of any documents which will be submitted at the hearing before the Judicial Board; b. shall have an opportunity to review a list of witnesses to be called to testify; and c. shall have the right to appear at the hearing before the Judicial Board with an adviser of their choice, who may be an attorney. The adviser will not be allowed to address the Board or otherwise participate in the hearing, but may provide private advice and counsel to the student during the hearing. d. Evidence which would not be admissible in a State Court criminal proceeding by reason of the method or manner in which it was acquired shall not be admitted. Questions regarding the admissibility of evidence may be referred to University legal counsel. 6. The Judicial Board shall determine which, if any, of the sanctions should be imposed and submit a written decision, including its finding of the facts, to the student and the Judicial Officer. The decision of the Judicial Board must be based solely upon evidence received at the hearing. The decision of the Judicial Board shall be final unless appealed, by either party, to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs within seven (7) working days. 7. A verbatim tape recording of the Judicial Board hearing shall be maintained. 8. Either the student or the Judicial Officer may appeal, in writing, the decision of the Judicial Board to the Associate Vice Chancellor within seven (7) working days following the date of the letter stating the decision of the Judicial Board. The written appeal must be sent to the Associate Vice Chancellor, and must include reasons for the appeal based upon one or more of the following grounds: a. That the student did not receive due process of law. b. That any sanction imposed by the Judicial Board or the failure of the Judicial Board to impose one or more sanctions is not supported by the evidence received by the Judicial Board at the hearing. If the appeal is by the student, the student shall provide a copy of his or her appeal to the Judicial Officer. If the appeal is by the Judicial Officer, the Judicial Officer shall provide a copy of the appeal to the student. 9. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs shall consider the appeal to determine whether or not it merits a review based upon the grounds stated in the appeal. If the Associate Vice Chancellor in the exercise of his or her sole discretion determines that the appeal does not merit review, a decision stating such shall be forwarded to the student and the Judicial Officer. If the Associate Vice Chancellor in the exercise of his or her sole discretion determines that the appeal merits review, he/she shall refer the appeal to a new Judicial Board. The new Judicial Board sitting as an appeals board shall consider the appeal without hearing and shall submit its written decision to

University-recognized activities or organizations, or limitation on holding elected or appointed offices in student government or student organizations. If the student repeats the violation or violates other University policies or regulations, the student shall be subject to further disciplinary action, including possible suspension or expulsion. c. Suspension. Involuntary separation from the University for a prescribed period of time, with the opportunity to petition the University for readmission.5 The petition must be submitted, in writing, to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, who shall determine eligibility for and date of (if applicable) readmission. d. Expulsion. Involuntary separation from the University.6 e. Restitution. Reimbursement for damage or loss of property or reimbursement for medical expenses incurred by another party as a direct result of the misconduct. f. Behavioral Requirement: Written conditions imposed which establish specified behavioral requirements for the student, including limitation on the student’s University privileges, limitation on participation in University-recognized activities or organizations, or limitation on holding elected or appointed offices in student government or student organizations. 2. If a decision is made to seek formal sanctions other than suspension or expulsion, the Judicial Officer shall notify the student, in writing, of the recommended sanction(s). If the student does not accept the recommended sanction(s), he or she may appeal the Judicial Officer’s recommended sanctions to a Judicial Board by submitting a letter, with reasons for the appeal, to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs within seven (7) working days of the date of the sanction(s) letter from the Judicial Officer. If the student fails to submit a timely appeal of the Judicial Officer’s recommended sanction(s) within such seven (7) working day period, the Judicial Officer’s recommended sanction(s) shall become final and be in full force and effect. Cases involving recommended suspension or expulsion must be heard by a Judicial Board. 3. Each Judicial Board: a. shall consist of four (4) students, two (2) faculty, and one (1) staff member; and b. will select its own chairperson, with all members possessing voting privileges. 4. The student: a. shall have at least ten (10) working days in advance of the hearing before the Judicial Board, the right to be informed of the specific charges against him or her and an opportunity to prepare his or her case; b. shall have the right to hear all evidence in support of the charge or charges and to hear and question witnesses; and c. shall have the opportunity to testify and present evidence.

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STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
the student and the Judicial Officer, including a decision of which sanctions, if any, are to be imposed. The appellate decision of the Judicial Board sitting as an appeals board shall be final. 10. The members of each Judicial Board shall be selected by lot from the Judicial Committee by the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs or his or her designee. This Committee shall be established by July 1 for each year, and shall be composed of the following: a. fifteen (15) students appointed by Student Government with the advice and consent of the Student Senate; b. eleven (11) faculty appointed by the Faculty Senate President and with the consent of the Faculty Senate; c. seven (7) staff with four (4) appointed by the Staff Advisory Council from employees in the Managerial/Professional and Office/Service categories, and three (3) appointed by the Chancellor from administrators in the Academic/Administrative category. d. If it is not possible to construct a full board, additional persons in the category with insufficient members available to serve may be selected in blocks of three (3) at a time by the same process as stated above in a., b., and c. 11. All Judicial Board hearings and deliberations, including deliberations of a Judicial Board sitting as an appeals board, shall be closed. 12. Any student charged with a violation(s) of the Code of Conduct has the right to maintain status as a student and to attend classes while the student’s case is pending final decision within the University system unless the student’s continued presence constitutes an immediate harm to the student charged, or others, as determined by the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs in the exercise of his or her reasonable discretion.
1. The illegal possession, use or distribution of drugs or alcohol by students is a violation of University rules as well as state and federal laws. The Board of Regents of the University has directed officers of the University to cooperate with state and federal agencies in the prevention of drug abuse. In satisfaction of this mandate and in order to fulfill its obligations under the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, the University has formulated standards of conduct for students which prohibit the acts of misconduct provided in this section both on campus or at University-sponsored events. 2. Not only may disciplinary action be taken for failure to pay financial obligations, but the student will be denied access to grade reports, future registrations, readmission, diplomas, and transcripts. 3. Additional information regarding University Executive Memorandum No. 16 and the Computer Usage Policy can be found at its.unomaha.edu 4. As part of the education and learning experience, students routinely take notes in the courses in which they are enrolled. With the permission of the instructor, an enrolled student may also make audio and/or visual records of a course presentation. These notes and records may be used for the purposes of individual or group study so long as such use is non-commercial. The University has the authority (1) to regulate the nature of the commercial activity which takes place on its premises and/or with the use of its resources,and (2) to protect its intellectual property, as well as that of its faculty and employees. 5. In the case of a student organization, suspension shall also include withdrawal of recognition by the University for a prescribed period of time, with the opportunity to petition the University for reinstatement of recognition. 6. In the case of a student organization, expulsion shall also include withdrawal of recognition by the University.

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Policy

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ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
academic honesty, the faculty member shall initiate the following procedures, starting at step 1, continuing only as necessary to steps 2 or 3. Step 1 The faculty member shall request a meeting with each student involved. At the meeting, the faculty member shall: • Attempt to ascertain the facts pertinent to the incident; • Explain to the student the basis for the suspicion of academic dishonesty; and • Give the student an opportunity to explain the matter satisfactorily. If the student offers an unsatisfactory explanation, the faculty member shall inform the student of the penalty for the offense, and shall explain to the student his or her rights to mediation, as described in step 2, and appeal as described in step 3. Any penalty imposed by the faculty member, such as retaking a test or rewriting a paper, or failure for the work involved or failure for the course, shall be limited to the course. If the student admits responsibility and accepts the penalty, the faculty member may consider the case closed, but will keep a confidential record of the action taken and retain any pertinent materials relating to the academic dishonesty until the end of the next regular semester following imposition of the penalty for academic dishonesty. A penalty of “F” for the course must be reported to the department chair and to the registrar. A faculty member who imposes a penalty for academic dishonesty may report the student and the penalty imposed to the department chair, the dean, and to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. If a faculty member reports any action taken to a department chair, a dean, the registrar, or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the faculty member shall inform the student. Step 2 If the faculty member and student cannot reach agreement as to the matter of an alleged incident of academic dishonesty, they may request the departmental chair to serve as a confidential mediator, exploring the student’s intentions, the gravity of the suspected offense, and the appropriateness of the penalty. If the matter is satisfactorily resolved among these three parties, a record of the resolution shall be retained by the chair. Violation of the policy may be reported to the Assistant Vice Chancellor. If reported, the student will be notified. Step 3 If the matter of an alleged incident of academic dishonesty cannot be mediated as provided in Step 2, or if either the faculty member or the student did not wish the departmental chair to mediate, either party may request the dean of the college convene an appropriate college standing committee with student representation or impanel a committee with student representation to consider the matter of the alleged academic dishonesty. The college committee will be drawn from the instructor’s college. The college committee will function in accordance with the procedural guarantees provided in Section 5.4 of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska. If the committee finds the student not responsible, the faculty member will award a grade for the student’s work and course without prejudice, and all records related to the incident will be destroyed in the absence of an appeal. If the committee finds that the student has violated the policy,

The maintenance of academic honesty and integrity is a vital concern of the University community. Any student found guilty of academic dishonesty shall be subject to both academic and disciplinary sanctions. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following: Cheating Copying or attempting to copy from an academic test or examination of another student; using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, notes, study aids or other devices for an academic test, examination or exercise; engaging or attempting to engage the assistance of another individual in misrepresenting the academic performance of a student; or communicating information in an unauthorized manner to another person for an academic test, examination or exercise. Fabrication and falsification Falsifying or fabricating any information or citation in any academic exercise, work, speech, test or examination. Falsification is the alteration of information, while fabrication is the invention or counterfeiting of information. Plagiarism Presenting the work of another as one’s own (i.e., without proper acknowledgment of the source) and submitting examinations, theses, reports, speeches, drawings, laboratory notes or other academic work in whole or in part as one’s own when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person. Abuse of academic materials and/or equipment Destroying, defacing, stealing, or making inaccessible library or other academic resource material. Complicity in academic dishonesty Helping or attempting to help another student to commit an act of academic dishonesty. Falsifying grade reports Changing or destroying grades, scores or markings on an examination or in an instructor’s records. Misrepresentation to avoid academic work Misrepresentation by fabricating an otherwise justifiable excuse such as illness, injury, accident, etc., in order to avoid or delay timely submission of academic work or to avoid or delay the taking of a test or examination. Other Academic units and members of the faculty may prescribe and give students prior notice of additional standards of conduct for academic honesty in a particular course, and violation of any such standard of conduct shall constitute misconduct under Sanctionable Conduct and the University Disciplinary Procedures. The Office of Academic and Student Affairs maintains a record of students who violate the policy on Academic Integrity. Repeat offenders may be subject to disciplinary action under the “UNO Student Code of Conduct”.

Procedures and Sanctions
Under the Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska [Sections 2.9 and 4.1(i)], the respective colleges of the University have jurisdiction over procedural matters concerning academic integrity. Just as the task of inculcating values of academic honesty reside with the faculty, the faculty are entrusted with the discretionary authority to decide how incidents of academic dishonesty are to be resolved. If a faculty member suspects that a student has intentionally violated the principles of

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ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
it will uphold the faculty member’s proposed penalty. The dean will: • Convey the committee’s decision to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; • Retain the evidence and records of the committee’s proceedings in accordance with the policies of the Board of Regent’s and UNO on the retention of disciplinary records; and • Inform the student and faculty member of the committee’s decision.

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DISCRIMINATION POLICIES
parties may compromise freedom of choice. The University of Nebraska at Omaha reaffirms the generally accepted ethical principle that situations in which one makes official evaluations of “intimates” should be avoided. If a close relationship with emotional ties develops, the faculty member or supervisor bears a special burden of accountability. That individual is advised to make suitable arrangements for the objective evaluation, for example, of the student, employee or the prospective student or employee.

UNO Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy
At its meeting on October 15, 1993, the Board of Regents adopted the following policies regarding Prohibited Discrimination and Sexual Harassment. Students on each campus of the University of Nebraska shall be admitted and enjoy the programs and privileges of the University without regard to individual characteristics other than qualifications for admission, academic performance and conduct in accord with University policies and rules and laws applicable to student conduct (University of Nebraska Policy Manual, RP 5.1.1, BRUN Minutes, 54, p. 145, May 12, 1989). Employees on each campus of the University of Nebraska shall be employed and equitably treated in regard to the terms and conditions of their employment without regard to individual characteristics other than qualifications for employment, quality of performance of duties and conduct in regard to their employment in accord with University policies and rules and applicable law (University of Nebraska Policy Manual, RP 3.1.1, BRUN Minutes, 54, p. 145, May 12, 1989). The University of Nebraska at Omaha is committed to maintaining an environment for all students, faculty, staff, and visitors that is fair and responsible - an environment which is based on one’s ability and performance. To that end, it is the policy of the University of Nebraska at Omaha that any form of discrimination because of race, color, age, disability, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), , political affiliation, national origin, marital status, Vietnamera veteran status, sexual orientation or any unlawful reason shall not be tolerated. In keeping with this commitment, the University also will not tolerate discrimination prohibited under this policy against students, faculty, staff, and visitors by anyone acting on behalf of the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Procedures for Resolution of Complaints
The University of Nebraska at Omaha declares and affirms a policy of equal education and employment opportunities, affirmative action in employment, and nondiscrimination in providing services to the public. Therefore, the University of Nebraska at Omaha shall not discriminate against anyone based upon race*, color, sex**, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability, national or ethnic origin, marital status, or Vietnam-era veteran status.
*Racial harassment is considered a form of racial discrimination. * *Sexual harassment is considered a form of sex discrimination.

Purpose
The purpose of these procedures is to secure, at the lowest possible level, equitable solutions to the problems which may affect students, faculty, staff, administrators, visitors, or other invitees, licensees, or university volunteers who believe they have been discriminated against within the university’s prohibited discrimination policy. Resolution of any concern or complaint is encouraged, but not required, at each step of the procedures. Any form of retaliation for filing or assisting with an investigation or charge is not permitted. The university reserves the right to take appropriate action in cases of alleged prohibited discrimination affecting the academic or work environment in the absence of a complaint from an individual.

Statement on Sexual Harassment
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other physical, verbal, or visual conduct based on sex constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to the conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of employment or academic standing, (2) submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as the basis for an employment or academic decision, or (3) the conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working/academic environment. This statement is in keeping with federal employment and educational opportunity guidelines.

Oversight and Information
The Assistant to the Chancellor for Diversity and Equal Opportunity (hereafter referred to as the Assistant to the Chancellor) is the established representative of the university on prohibited discrimination issues. The university’s nondiscrimination policy and complaint procedures will be widely disseminated through a variety of media and clearly posted in strategic locations throughout the university campus. Anyone seeking information about the nondiscrimination policy or complaint procedures should contact the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee.

Informal Resolution
If appropriate, persons are encouraged first to speak about their concerns with the party in question: relevant manager/supervisor, administrator or academic department chair/school director, or university ombudsperson to attempt to resolve the issue(s). A satisfactory resolution may be readily found.

Statement on Consensual Relationships
Although the University of Nebraska at Omaha does not prohibit romantic or sexual relationships between employees, it does discourage such consensual relationships between faculty and student or supervisor and employee. All faculty, supervisors and other employees should understand that there are substantial risks in even an apparently consensual relationship where a power differential exists. That is, one of the parties is likely to have influence over the other’s assignments, grades or terms of employment. The inherent power differential between the

Notification and Initial Investigation
Complainants who believe they have been discriminated against have thirty (30) working days after the occurrence of the alleged prohibited discrimination to informally resolve the issue(s) to their satisfaction or to contact the Assistant to the

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DISCRIMINATION POLICIES
Chancellor. This time deadline can be extended if there are extenuating circumstances that must be documented by the complainant and determined by the Assistant to the Chancellor to justify a delay.

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Informal Investigation
From the time the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee is made aware of a complaint, the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee will immediately notify the respondent, in writing, that a complaint has been received and will explain the nature of the complaint. The Assistant to the Chancellor or designee will have ten (10) working days to conduct an informal confidential investigation and determine whether or not the complaint merits further action. If it is determined by the Assistant to the Chancellor that further action is warranted, the formal procedures listed below will be begun within seven (7) working days of the decision. Both parties will be notified in writing as to the nature of this decision. If the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee deems that the complaint merits no further action, the Chancellor or Chancellor’s designee will appoint one individual, judged most qualified by the Chancellor or Chancellor’s designee, from among the three (3) university ombudspersons and the Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Business and Finance Vice Chancellors or their designated representatives to review the decision. The reviewer will have ten (10) working days to examine the case and respond to the Chancellor or designee and the Assistant to Chancellor or designee. If the reviewer agrees with the Assistant to the Chancellor’s decision of no further action, no further action will be taken by the university. If the reviewer disagrees with the Assistant to the Chancellor’ s decision of no further action, the formal procedures listed below will be begun within seven (7) working days of the reviewer’s decision.

requested, addressed to the most recent address listed in university records. Within five (5) working days of receiving the written complaint, the Assistant to Chancellor or designee will select and notify the Equal Opportunity Review Panel that a formal inquiry will be required. Equal Opportunity Review Panel Composition The Equal Opportunity Review Panel will consist of five members - two full-time faculty, two staff (administrative, managerial/professional, and office/service), and one student selected by the Assistant to the Chancellor from a pool of six faculty selected by the Faculty Senate, six staff selected by the Staff Advisory Council, and six students selected by Student Government. Students must be currently enrolled in at least 6 credit hours (undergraduate and/or graduate) and in good academic standing. The pool of names will be used until the beginning of the following academic year. If during the year, a nominated person becomes ineligible to be in the pool, the appropriate body, (i.e, Faculty Senate, Staff Advisory Council or Student Government) will nominate a replacement for that person in the pool. Selection of pool members and actual Panel members will be done in a manner that attempts to provide the widest possible diversity with respect to gender, ethnic background and other relevant socio/demographic traits. Should a selected member of the panel identify himself/herself as having a legitimate conflict of interest, the Assistant to the Chancellor shall select a different member from the pool of names so as to maintain the required representation. Formal Inquiry Upon selection and contact by the Assistant to the Chancellor, panel members will have ten (10) working days to convene, select a chair (student members are not eligible to chair), and schedule the start of the formal inquiry. The inquiry will be conducted as expeditiously as possible. During the inquiry the Panel will review the complaint in its entirety and conduct an impartial inquiry on the complaint. Documents and other information relevant to the complaint may be requested by the Panel, and witnesses may be called by the Panel. The complainant (and his/her representative[s], the respondent (and his/her representative[s]), and witnesses (if any) will only be present in the inquiry when their own testimony is being sought by the Panel. The inquiry will be audio taped. The Panel has five (5) working days after the inquiry to reach a preliminary recommendation. In the event that it concludes that the complaint should proceed further, both parties will have access to all evidence presented before the Panel, including the audio tape. When the Panel concludes no additional action is warranted, neither of the parties will have access to the evidence. In cases where the Panel concludes that the complaint should go forward, both parties will have five (5) working days to rebut the evidence. The Panel then will have ten (10) working days to consider rebuttals and present its advice in writing to the appropriate Vice Chancellor. This written advice should report any dissenting views or include a written minority statement if the minority on the Panel chooses to do so. The Panel’s advice will be forwarded to the Vice Chancellor

Formal Procedures
Formal Complaint Within seven (7) working days of the decision of the Assistant to the Chancellor or the reviewer determining further action is warranted, the complainant must meet with the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee to review/discuss the incident or situation, attempts at resolution (if any), as well as to learn about formal procedures. If the complainant wants to file a formal complaint, he or she must do so in writing directly to the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee within seven (7) working days following this consultation. If the complainant is unable to write the complaint, it will be related orally or via the appropriate medium, transcribed into written form, and verified for accuracy by the complainant. Notification of the Respondent and the Equal Opportunity Review Panel Within three (3) working days of receiving the written complaint, the Assistant to Chancellor or designee will notify the respondent that a formal written complaint has been filed, supply a copy of the written complaint to the respondent, and provide a description of the procedures to be followed. This notification will be made by certified or registered letter, postage prepaid, and return receipt

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GENERAL INFORMATION

DISCRIMINATION POLICIES
6. Failure by the complainant to pursue a complaint to the next step within the specified time limits at any step of the procedures, barring any extenuating circumstances which must be documented by the Assistant to the Chancellor to justify a delay, will be considered acceptance of the last decision rendered. 7. All documents, communications, and records dealing with a complaint and processing of a complaint (except for those materials allowed in personnel files by existing policies or agreements) will be kept confidential and secured in the Office of the Assistant to the Chancellor. The records will be retained for such time as may be legally required and/or deemed appropriate by the university; thereafter, all records will be destroyed. 8. All meetings and inquiries under this procedure will be conducted privately and will include only the parties specified in the procedure for that stage of the procedure. 9. If, as determined by the Panel, additional highly relevant facts that might alter the outcome of the decision are presented during the Panel’s proceedings, a recess of reasonable length as determined by the Panel may occur. 10. These are regarded as administrative, not legal procedures. However, in the formal stage(s) the complainant and/or the respondent have the right to legal representation in the form of an adviser at his/her own expense. 11. For hourly paid employees, time spent during scheduled working hours in meeting with the Assistant to the Chancellor or designee or in the formal steps of the procedure is treated as time worked for pay purposes. 12. For faculty respondents, any decision on the part of the Vice Chancellor that additional investigation is warranted that could lead to disciplinary action must be forwarded to the Professional Conduct Committee. (Such sanctions could include sensitivity training, formal or informal reprimands, and an oral or written apology.) 13. Inquiry panels will not include faculty members currently serving on the Professional Conduct or Academic Freedom and Tenure Committees. 14. Failure or lack of clarity of the audio tape will not compromise the proceedings. In order to avoid such circumstances, two separate recordings will be made.

of the administrative unit in which the respondent is assigned (i.e, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs for faculty respondents, Vice Chancellor of Business and Finance for staff respondents, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs for student respondents). Upon receipt of the Panel’s advice, the Vice Chancellor will have seven (7) working days in which to reach a conclusion whether or not this set of circumstances warrants additional investigation. The Vice Chancellor will communicate his/her decision in writing to the complainant and to the respondent and shall have the authority to implement such action as is deemed appropriate for nonfaculty respondents. If the Vice Chancellor’s conclusion is that no further action be taken, no further action will be taken by the university. If, on the other hand, for faculty respondents the conclusion is that additional investigation should be undertaken, it will be in accord with and/or follow procedures detailed in the Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska and policies promulgated pursuant thereto, and, in the case of faculty respondents who are members of the bargaining unit, in accord with the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska and the University of Nebraska at Omaha Chapter American Association of University Professors.

Guidelines/Clarification
1. Accusations of prohibited discrimination are of utmost seriousness and should not be made casually or without cause. This policy shall not be used to bring frivolous or malicious charges against students, faculty, staff, administrators, visitors or other invitees, licensees, or university volunteers. The university reserves the right to take appropriate action against individuals who are determined to have brought frivolous or malicious charges. However, this provision shall not be construed in any manner that might unreasonably deter any person from bringing forth a concern. No person shall be retaliated against for exercising his/her rights under these procedures. 2. In cases of alleged harassment, the protections of the First Amendment must be considered if issues of speech or expression are involved. Free speech rights apply in the classroom and in all other education programs and activities of the university. In addition, First Amendment rights apply to the speech of students and faculty. (Federal Register/Vol. 62, No. 49, March 13, 1997) 3. Working days are those days that the university offices are scheduled to be open. 4. Time limits can be extended by the Assistant to the Chancellor if there are extenuating circumstances which must be documented and determined by the Assistant to the Chancellor to justify a delay. 5. Failure by University representatives to communicate the decision on a complaint within the specified time limits at any step of these procedures will not prejudice the complaint.

GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL SERVICES
Information Center
The Information Center, located on the first floor of the Eppley Administration Building, provides general information and referrals to appropriate University Offices. Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday. The general information number is (402) 554-2800; after hours and on weekends and holidays a recorded message regarding campus activities and events will be heard. Student information telephones are located in each major building on campus for contacting Campus Security or placing other on-campus calls. Free notary service is available for students and staff during normal business hours. Persons outside the Omaha local calling area can reach the University of Nebraska at Omaha Information Operator during office hours from Nebraska and Iowa by calling 1800-858-8648.

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University Library
The University Library, centrally located on the UNO campus, offers many services to its users and contains materials and facilities for study and research. The collection encompasses over 800,000 volumes; 4,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions; 450,000 government documents; 1,800,000 microforms; plus audio and video cassettes and other media. Back issues of periodicals in bound volumes and in microform are maintained. As a partial government documents depository, the University Library collects federal and Nebraska state publications. Nearly all of the Library’s collection is on open shelves and is arranged according to the Library of Congress classification system. Most of the Library’s holdings are accessible through an online catalog, GENISYS (General Information System). GENISYS is available through terminals in the Library, via ethernet, by modem from remote locations and on the World Wide Web. UNO students, faculty and staff may check out library materials with their UNO ID card at any of the four University of Nebraska campuses. A reciprocal borrowing agreement also allows anyone with a UNO ID to check out materials from 30 other Nebraska college and university libraries. Community users may obtain a borrower’s card for a small annual fee. Assistance is available to help students and faculty use the collection. Reference librarians answer questions at the Reference Desk, assist individual students with their research, and give lectures to classes on the use of the Library in general and on the materials of specific subject areas as requested. Each librarian serves as liaison to one or more departments in his/her area of subject expertise. Access to full text and bibliography databases is available to assist in locating information. Assistance is available for government documents, reserve materials, and audiovisual and microform materials and equipment. When needed material is not available in the UNO collection, Interlibrary Loan can borrow it from other libraries for UNO students and faculty. Handouts with information about the Library’s collections and its many services are available on the main floor.

Assistance to students in becoming more independent, self-confident and efficient learners is available at the Learning Center. The Center is located in 117 Eppley Administration Building. Tutorial services, study skills workshops and tips for organizing study groups are provided by professional staff and trained peer tutors. Learning Center staff can recommend personal learning skills programs and appropriate materials to achieve individual learning goals. A quiet study area and a computer lab with Macintosh and PCs are available for student use; instructional software in a variety of subjects can be used. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9:00 a.m. to noon Saturday, phone (402) 554-2992, TDD (402) 554-2748. The University Library is open 95 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters. Slightly shorter hours are observed during the summer and intersessions. Study areas include tables, chairs and individual study carrels. Photocopiers are available on the lower level. For additional information see library.unomaha.edu

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (ITS) Customer Services
Eppley Administration Building Room 104 Hours: 8 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday (Fall & Spring Semesters) Phone: 554-HELP (4357)* 866-866-2721 (Distance Students) *Phone support is available after 5 pm and on weekends. E-mail: unohelpdesk@mail.unomaha.edu Internet: http://its.unomaha.edu

Administrative Offices
Eppley Administration Building Room 110 Hours: University business hours Phone: 554-HELP (4357) FAX: 554-3475

Operations
Eppley Administration Building Room 008 Phone: 554-3500 Hours: 7 am to 10:45 pm M-F, 7 am to 3 pm weekends IT services are provided at two levels on the UNO campus. Most campus-wide systems are managed by Information Technology Services. Many colleges and departments also provide complimentary services tailored to the needs of their organization.

Services available at ITS Customer Services
Via the phone/email - Help Desk for answers to many of your computer questions, including help with supported software and services, such as myUNO (Blackboard), myMail (Lotus Notes), software installation, campus wireless access, printing, and format conversion. Other services include: • Laptop Loan Program • Scanners available • FREE copy of Virus Protection Software (McAfee) – go to http://install.unomaha.edu and use your UNO Net ID to access • Order and pick-up audio/visual equipment. See

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GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL SERVICES

http://its.unomaha.edu Web site for more information. • Directing your technology questions to the appropriate person(s) or group(s).

UNO NetID
Every student, faculty and staff member has a UNO NetID. The UNO NetID is composed of a username and password which gives access to many UNO online services including: myUNO The online course delivery system powered by Blackboard. Check with your faculty each semester to see if they will be using this system. http://myuno.unomaha.edu myMail Web email via the Lotus Notes software. Information about registration times, checking grades, etc. are all sent to your myMail account. http://mymail.unomaha.edu myFolder A web file storage system providing a secure place to store files for all faculty, staff and students. Each person has 500 MB of storage space accessible from anywhere you have an Internet connection. http://myfolder.unomaha.edu myWeb A portion of the “myFolder” system. This is space on a UNO server where students, faculty, and staff can create and display personal web pages. Some conditions apply. http://myweb.unomaha.edu If problems or questions arise in regard to retrieving usernames, contact the ITS Customer Service Center at (402) 554-HELP, or click on the password reset link on the system home page for any of the services listed above. PIN number retrieval help can be accessed online at http://www.ses.unomaha.edu/registrar/pin.php.

Off Campus: • Omaha Housing Authority /UNO Community Technology Center in the Gateway Building at 4401 N. 21st Street • Offutt Air Force Base Lab in the Martin Bomber Building, 106 Peace Keeper Drive (Military and Dependents only) • Omaha Housing Authority/UNO South Omaha Technology Center in the LaFern Williams Center, 3010 R Street Due to frequent adjustments to lab hours, visit the ITS web site (http://its.unomaha.edu) for the latest, up-to-date information.

University Affairs
University Affairs, a unit of the Division of Administration, is UNO's news and public relations office. Its mission is to provide communications and marketing support services that enhance the educational, research and service activities of students, faculty, staff and the extended community. Service areas include advertising/marketing, media relations, internal communication and photography/video services. University Affairs also partners with Information Technology Services to maintain UNO's web presence at www.unomaha.edu. For more information, visit the Web at www.unomaha.edu, or call 402.554.2358. UNO What’s Up UNO What's Up is the official weekly electronic news source for students at UNO. During the fall and spring semesters, issues are published each Monday on the Web at http://www.unomaha.edu/whatsup.php. This site contains information and announcements about items of interest to UNO students. To subscribe to the UNO What’s Up headlines using any RSS capable application, point to the UNO What’s Up RSS feed at http://www.unomaha.edu/news/rss/whatsup.xml. For more information on RSS, visit the Web at http://www.unomaha.edu/rss.php. Registered student organizations that would like to post announcements in UNO Whats Up should e-mail unoenotes@unomaha.edu. Items must relate to university events, announcements or notices, and must contain the name and phone number of a contact person. The deadline for submission is two weeks in advance of the desired publication date. Any item submitted for publication may be edited for length or clarity. Receipt does not guarantee publication. For more information, call 402.554.2358.

NU ID
An NU ID is a new, internally generated ID specific to the University of Nebraska system, and is used for administrative functions such as web registration (EBRUNO), MavCard services, and Library services. It is an eight digit number which, when used with the E-BRUNO PIN, can be used to access UNO NetID information. The NU ID replaces social security numbers previously used for employee ID purposes. Computer User Rooms - ITS maintains several computer user rooms across campus and has built partnerships with the College of Business, the College of Education, the College of Information Science and Technology, and the College of Arts & Sciences to offer expanded computer user room availability. Locations are: On Campus: • Arts and Science Hall (ASH), Room 300 • Durham Science Center (DSC), Room 104 • Health, Physical Ed and Recreation (HPER), Room 211 • Milo Bail Student Center Elmwood Room (MBSC) • Peter Kiewit Institute (PKI), Room 158A • Roskens Hall (RH), Room 401

UNMC Printing Services
Members of the UNO community with printing, copying and graphics needs are able to access these services in Printing Services, located in 106 Eppley Administration Building. A professional, experienced staff offers an array of competitively priced products that are of the highest quality. The partnership between UNO and the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) aims to maintain seamless customer service. Printing Services is open 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday

GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL SERVICES
through Thursday and 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday. For more information, call (402) 554-3074 or (402) 554-3061, or send an e-mail to print4u@lists.unomaha.edu

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Environmental Health and Safety
It is the goal of the University to provide a safe, healthful environment in which to work and study. In order to achieve this goal, Environmental Health and Safety provides a number of training programs and consultation services for students, faculty and staff. Programs directed by Environmental Health and Safety include: employee safety training, hazardous waste management, emergency preparedness, fire protection and accident investigations. Material Safety Data Sheets and other information related to the safe handling and disposal of chemicals can be obtained from Environmental Health and Safety. Students can help maintain a safe environment at UNO by reporting unsafe conditions on campus. Environmental Health and Safety is located in 100 Eppley Administration Building, (402) 554-3596.

UNO Television
UNO Television provides television production, program distribution and educational services to a diverse group of users on a local, regional and national level. We operate the Omaha Production and Origination Center of the Nebraska ETC Network. Instructional, educational and public affairs programs are produced by UNO Television for broadcast on KYNE TV, Channel 26. The department provides unique educational opportunities to students through training and employment in a professional environment. UNO Television is the site coordinator for scheduling and facilitating distance education classes for UNO. The distance education delivery systems include the Lincoln/Omaha 2-way Fiber System connecting UNL, UNO and UNMC, as well as the statewide NEB*SAT interactive Network 3 and the new digital Network 2 systems. UNO Television is located in the Engineering Building.

KVNO 90.7 FM
KVNO 90.7 FM is a public radio station licensed to the University of Nebraska Board of Regents. KVNO serves the University and community through quality programming that enlightens, entertains and informs. The format is primarily classical music, with some jazz and other specialty programs featured on weekends. The station provides unique educational opportunities to students through training and employment in a professional environment. KVNO is committed to involving an increasing number of listeners, to advancing the excellence and growth of the arts and to assuming a national leadership role in public broadcasting. KVNO facilities are located in the Engineering Building.

Ombudsman
The Ombudsman’s job is to assist you when you have a grievance or a problem with offices or individuals at the University. Advice on how to solve a problem, referrals to persons or offices that have the expertise you may need and actions on your behalf by the Ombudsman are just some of the duties of this office. To contact an Ombudsman, call the University operator at (402) 554-2800. The service is confidential and free.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

CAMPUS SECURITY

Campus Security Department
Campus Security, located in the Eppley Administration Building, Room 100, provides service to the University community 24-hours a day. The number to call for information about any of its services is (402) 554-2648. The duties and responsibilities of the Campus Security Department are: to protect life and property; provide building and grounds patrol; enforce Traffic and Parking Rules & Regulations; enforce University regulations; control the University key system; and provide general safety for all persons on campus. Parking & Traffic All vehicles parked on the UNO campus must display a valid parking permit. To obtain a permit, present your UNO identification card or proof of class registration at the Campus Security Office, EAB 100. The “Parking & Traffic Rules and Regulations” booklet offers information on the fee schedule, parking lot designations and general information on traffic and safety. All accidents should be reported to Campus Security immediately. University Building Keys Campus Security is responsible for the control of the University key system. Eligible University employees should make requests for University keys through their department chairperson to Campus Security. Security Buildings are patrolled 24 hours daily. Anyone found in a UNO building after established closing hours, without a UNO identification card, will be asked to leave. Report items stolen or damaged to the Campus Security Department.

Lost and Found Campus Security maintains the lost and found system. Services The Campus Security Department provides assistance to motorists 24 hours daily, to jump-start your vehicle, open a locked vehicle, and change a tire in certain situations, for vehicles on campus only. Personal Escorts Escort persons at their request while on campus. Personal Safety Checks Individuals who may be working alone, outside normal working hours are encouraged to contact Campus Security. Security officers will periodically check on your safety while you are here. Operation I.D. Your stereo tape-deck or other personal belongings may be engraved to aid in finding lost or stolen property. Stop by the Campus Security Office and check out an engraver and instructions to engrave your property. Fingerprints The Campus Security Department provides a fingerprinting service for individuals who require finger prints for job applications and military needs. This service also applies for children of students, staff, faculty and alumni. It is strictly for the benefit of the parents should a child ever be missing; no record will be maintained by Campus Security. Contact Campus Security for times of service or an appointment.

For ON-CAMPUS EMERGENCIES dial ext. 4-2911.

GENERAL INFORMATION

GRADUATE STUDIES AND ALUMNI
Graduate Studies
Graduate Studies provides opportunities for more advanced education than the undergraduate work upon which all graduate programs are founded. Opportunities for advanced study and independent investigation are provided in a number of fields of learning to properly admitted students to do any of the following: 1. To work toward these degrees: Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Arts for Teachers of Mathematics, Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, Master of Music, Master of Accounting, Master of Public Administration, Master of Social Work, Master of Public Health, and Specialist in Education. 2. To earn graduate credit for the issuance or renewal of certificates for teachers, administrators and educational psychologists. 3. To provide for scholarly and professional advancement. The Graduate College promotes the spirit of free investigation of the various disciplines and, at the same time, serves to unite the various branches of the University in advancing human knowledge and providing intelligent, capable leadership for society. The Graduate Faculty offer graduate courses, workshops, institutes, seminars, research and special problems courses, and the supervision of theses or special projects. A student desiring admission to graduate studies must have earned a bachelor’s degree. An application must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies, together with two sets of official transcripts of all college work, undergraduate and graduate. The transcripts and other required credentials are then evaluated by the department/school in which the student wishes to do graduate work. The Dean for Graduate Studies makes the final admission decision and each applicant is notified by mail of acceptance or denial of the application.

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Nebraska System in addition to the courses necessary to complete their undergraduate work, provided that such credits are earned within the 12 months prior to receipt of their bachelor’s degrees. Forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies, EAB 202.

UNO Alumni Association
The University of Nebraska at Omaha Alumni Association is a non-profit organization of more than 55,000 men and women throughout the world. Membership in the organization is automatic upon graduation from the University. Governed by a 25-member board of directors and operated independently of the University, the association is the primary fund-raising organization for UNO alumni. The UNO Alumni Association staff maintains current addresses of all its members, coordinates alumni activities and prepares the organization’s publications and fund-raising programs. All alumni receive free the association’s UNO Alum, a magazine mailed four times a year. Alumni also are invited to association events, such as round tables with area business, political and social leaders; homecoming; the Chancellor’s Scholarship Swing; and reunions. The association owns and operates the William H. Thompson Alumni Center, a popular gathering place available to rent for weddings and receptions, business meetings, parties, and other events. The Alumni Center is located on the northwest corner of the campus. Members who contribute to the association’s UNO Alumni Fund receive a validated UNO Alumni Card, which is good for various discounts and benefits. These include: access to University Library check-out privileges; discounts at the UNO Bookstore and Durham Science Center Shop; registration in the UNO Child Care Center; reduced tuition at the UNO Aviation Institute; and discounts on rental fees at the William H. Thompson Alumni Center. Donors of $25 or more receive a free UNO calendar, while Century Club donors of $100 or more qualify for various other benefits.

Juniors Approval for Graduate Courses
Exceptional juniors at the University of Nebraska at Omaha who have obtained, in advance, the approval of their adviser, department chair, the course instructor of record, and the Dean for Graduate Studies may receive up to 12 hours of graduate credit for courses taken at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in addition to the courses necessary to complete their undergraduate work. Juniors are allowed to enroll only in courses designated 8- - -. The student must have at least a 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) average in the undergraduate major. Graduate coursework taken prior to receipt of the baccalaureate degree may not always be accepted for transfer to other institutions as graduate work or for completion of degree requirements. Forms are available in the Office of Graduate Studies, EAB 202.

Seniors Approval for Graduate Courses
Seniors at an accredited institution, including campuses of the University of Nebraska system, who have obtained in advance the approval of the appropriate campus Dean for Graduate Studies may receive up to twelve (12) hours of graduate credit taken at any campus of the University of

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GENERAL INFORMATION

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS
and communication skills. Students with TOEFL scores of 460 or higher may take university coursework along with English as a Second Language classes. For further information, please contact Merry Ellen Turner by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS
International Studies and Programs (IS&P) was established in 1973 to provide for the encouragement, development, and coordination of the University’s rapidly growing international dimensions. Current programs under IS&P include:

International Studies Major (INST)
The International Studies major provides a substantial foundation for professional careers in international management and business, teaching, government service, and with non-profit organizations. The program also prepares students for graduate study in a variety of disciplines, including business, international management, and law. For additional information, please see the “International Studies” section found in the “College of Arts and Sciences” portion of this catalog; or contact Dean Thomas E. Gouttierre by calling (402) 554-2376, by writing to him at Arts & Sciences Hall 238, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax (402) 554-3681.

Nebraska Semester Abroad
The Nebraska Semester Abroad offers UNO students the opportunity to study and live in Europe. Facilities for the program are located at Palacky University in the Czech Republic. Students stay in dormitories within walking distance of libraries, historical sites, parks and outdoor cafes frequented by the large student population of the city. English is the language of instruction and is understood by many of the local people. Students can practice other foreign languages and sightsee on weekend trips or an extended summer visit to other European cities, easily accessible via a Eurail pass. Students may earn 12 or more credit hours for the threemonth program, which is conducted from mid-March through the end of May. UNO financial aid may be applied toward the cost of the program. For further information, please contact Krista Cupich by telephoning (402) 5542293, by writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

UNO Study Abroad
UNO Study Abroad (UNOSA) offers a variety of information on study, work and travel abroad opportunities. UNOSA assists students in choosing a study abroad program, identifying sources of financial aid and obtaining visas and passports. For further information, please contact Krista Cupich by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

Faculty and Student Exchange Programs
Faculty and student exchanges with sister universities in China, Japan, the Philippines, Austria, the Czech Republic, Russia, Romania, Germany, Tajikistan and other countries are important components of UNO’s commitment to global education. For further information, please contact Krista Cupich by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

The Center for Afghanistan Studies
The Center for Afghanistan Studies serves as the only institutional base in the United States specifically and exclusively concerned with Afghan affairs. As such, it has unique resources to function in the following areas: research concerning Afghan culture and education; collecting, classifying and writing of materials on Afghanistan; disseminating information on Afghanistan to other institutions; providing language and cross-cultural training; publishing the Afghanistan Studies Journal; language translations; and providing consultation and expert advice on matters related to Afghanistan. The Center assisted in establishing the Arthur Paul Afghanistan Collection at the University Library. This collection is what many consider to be the finest collection of Afghan primary and secondary materials in North America. The Center serves as a base for Afghan educational projects with funding from the United States Department of State and other donors. For additional information, contact Raheem Yaseer by telephoning (402) 554-2376, by writing to him at Arts & Sciences Hall 220, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax (402) 554-3681.

International Admissions and Advising
IS&P has responsibility for the full range of admissions and advising for all UNO international students and scholars. Support services include orientation; airport pickup; housing assistance; immigration advising; issuing of visa and admissions documents; planning and conducting crosscultural activities; pre-academic advising; serving as liaison with volunteer community support groups; crisis counseling; and medical and health insurance referrals. For further information, please contact Merry Ellen Turner by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

The Bethsaida Excavations Project
This project was formed in 1991 to excavate the lost biblical city of Bethsaida, Israel. UNO, the lead institution of a worldwide consortium of universities involved in this project, holds a license from the Antiquities Authority of Israel to uncover the secrets of Bethsaida. At UNO, this project involves the departments of International Studies and Programs and Philosophy/Religion. Annually, faculty, staff and hundreds of students from the consortium institutions work at the site. The discoveries and their

Intensive Language Program
The Intensive Language Program (ILUNO) offers instruction in English as a Second Language to international students who plan to pursue academic degrees in the United States. This pre-academic program provides 25 hours of instruction per week over six eightweek sessions scheduled throughout the year. Classes are offered at six levels of proficiency, with emphasis on the development of writing, listening, pronunciation, reading

GENERAL INFORMATION

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS
impact have been presented and analyzed in scholarly journals and have obtained substantial coverage worldwide in the mass media. The Bethsaida Excavations Project has helped to establish UNO as a leader in biblical archaeology. For further information, please contact Rami Arav by telephoning (402) 554-4986, by writing to him at Arts and Sciences Hall 220, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-3681.

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Program for International Professional Development
The Program for International Professional Development (IPD) is designed for individuals who want to improve their English language skills for business purposes. Participants are typically sponsored by transnational corporations seeking to develop their global workforce. IPD offers classes in Global Business Communication, Business Management Practices, Business Writing, and Business Reading. The program also designs and conducts customized training for clients from around the world. For further information, please contact Merry Ellen Turner by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts and Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

International student groups are hosted by Nebraska communities for weekends under the innovative Nebraska Neighbors Program. International participants serve as ambassadors for UNO through representational efforts arranged by IS&P in local schools and service. For further information, please contact Merry Ellen Turner by telephoning (402) 554-2293, writing to her at Arts & Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax (402) 554-2949.

Check us out on the Web at
world.unomaha.edu

Japanese Studies Exchange Program
The Japanese Studies Exchange Program provides opportunities for students to study Japanese language and culture on the UNO campus or at one of UNO’s partner institutions in Japan. Language classes are offered at beginning and intermediate levels each academic year. The program also serves as a resource for campus and community groups with interest in Japan. For further information, please contact Reiko Take-Loukota by telephoning (402) 554-2376, by writing to her at Arts and Sciences Hall 220, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-3681.

Global Studies Conference
This annual gathering of scholars from around the world and across the United States meets early each October in Omaha to discuss issues concerning the nations of the Third World. For further information, please contact Anne Ludwig by telephoning (402) 554-2293, by writing to her at Arts and Sciences Hall 241, via email at world@unomaha.edu, or via fax at (402) 554-2949.

European Studies Conference
This academic conference convenes in Omaha each October to provide a forum for scholars from around the world and across the United States to present and discuss issues concerning European Studies. For further information, contact european@unomaha.edu.

Community Outreach
IS&P occupies a very visible community profile, primarily through its outreach/global education efforts and international student/participant activities. IS&P maintains a speakers’ bureau for international issues and events; the state of world affairs ensures a constant stream of requests from service clubs, elementary and secondary schools, community organizations, industry, etc. for UNO staff, faculty and international participants to serve as informed presenters at their meetings.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ALL COLLEGES

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

CORE CURRICULUM OF ALL COLLEGES
UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
To ensure that each graduate of UNO possesses certain academic skills, experiences the breadth of a liberal education and develops an appreciation for the cultural diversity that exists in the nation and the world, the faculties of the several colleges have adopted the University general education requirements indicated here. These requirements became effective with the beginning of the Fall Semester of 1990. They apply to all students who enter, re-enter, or transfer to UNO as of that semester or subsequently. These requirements, however, are not necessarily applicable to students in the UNL-administered Colleges of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Architecture, Education and Human Sciences, and Engineering. Students should contact these colleges to determine applicable requirements. Since colleges have the authority to prescribe additional requirements in the following areas, students should work closely with their advisers in selecting courses to meet all applicable degree requirements. Fundamental Academic Skills Total 15 Hours • English and Writing—nine hours, to include: English, six hours, including English 1160 or equivalent.

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(Students can “test out” of this University requirement; however, some colleges/departments require six hours of coursework in English as part of their requirements.)

One additional three-hour writing course relevant to the student’s college/major. • Mathematics 1310 or equivalent—three hours.
(Students can “test out” of this University requirement; however, some colleges/departments may require that a more advanced mathematics course be completed.)

• Public Speaking—three hours May be satisfied by Speech 1110, 2120, 3120, 3130 or 3140. Distribution Requirements Total 30 Hours • Natural and Physical Sciences—minimum eight hours, including one laboratory course. • Humanities and Fine Arts—minimum eight hours • Social and Behavioral Sciences—minimum eight hours Cultural Diversity Total Six Hours • U.S. racial or Hispanic minority groups—minimum three hours The remaining three hours of this requirement can be satisfied with another three hours in minority studies, coursework in women’s studies or coursework with an international or foreign focus. The cultural diversity requirement may be satisfied in whole or in part by coursework in the major, coursework taken to fulfill the University distribution requirement or by electives.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Second Year First Semester ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) ................3 PHYS 1110 General Physics ..........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Emphasis Electives***..................................................4-5 Humanities Elective .......................................................3 Semester Total ........................................................15-16 Second Semester ECON 2220 Principles of Economics (Macro)**** ...........3 MATH 1530 Intro to Applied Probability and Statistics...............................................................3-5 OR MATH 1930 Calculus for Managerial Students OR MATH 1950 Calculus I Emphasis Electives** ......................................................4 Arts Elective ...................................................................3 Race, Ethnicity and Gender Elective ..............................3 Semester Total ........................................................16-18 TOTAL HOURS .............................................................62-67
*Requirements for natural sciences vary among degree programs, and not all programs require biology, chemistry and physics (some minimally require courses from two of the three science areas). Please verify specific requirements with a CASNR adviser and/or the UNL Catalog before selecting natural sciences courses. **MATH 1320. Hours earned in MATH 1320 will not count toward the mathematics requirements for UNL CASNR. Students are encouraged to use MATH 1320 as a free elective for their UNL CASNR program of study if they have an algebra deficiency. Students should complete their mathematics sequence at UNO. Since certain majors require calculus, the student is encouraged to review the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin for requirements in specific majors of interest. ***EMPHASIS ELECTIVES. Students in the Pre-Agricultural Sciences Program may select from a variety of majors. Some emphasize the social sciences while others emphasize the physical and biological sciences in the first two years. The student is encouraged to review the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin to identify the appropriate “Emphasis Elective” for their majors of interest. ****ECONOMICS. Two semesters of economics (macro and micro) are not required in all agricultural sciences majors. For majors that require only one semester of economics, the second course will count as a social science elective.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) cooperates with the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) in providing four-semester pre-agricultural sciences, pre-natural resources, pre-food science and technology, and pre-horticulture transfer programs. A student enrolled in these programs may transfer all satisfactorily completed academic credits identified in the suggested program of study, and enter CASNR to study toward a major leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree in agricultural sciences or Bachelor of Science Degree in natural resources. The total program would require a minimum of four years or eight semesters (16 credit hours/semester or 128 credit hours). UNL CASNR faculty teach horticulture and food science and technology courses at UNO to assist an urban population in better understanding the food processing, horticulture, and landscape horticulture industries. For further information on these classes, see “Course Descriptions” on page 203 in this catalog. Contact Associate Professor Steven Rodie, PreHorticulture Program, University of Nebraska at Omaha (402/554-3752); and/or contact the Dean’s Office, CASNR, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1/800/742-8800; ext. 2541).

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS Pre-Agricultural Sciences Program
Students who successfully complete this program may enter the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources to study in a major of their choice that leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in agricultural sciences. Majors for four-year programs include agribusiness, agricultural economics, agricultural education, agricultural journalism, agronomy, animal science, biochemistry, plant protection sciences, diversified agricultural studies, mechanized systems management, veterinary science, and veterinary technologist. The following suggested program of study fulfills the minimum requirements for the first four semesters of any agricultural sciences major. First Year First Semester* BIOL 1450 Biology I ........................................................5 ENGL 1150 or 1160 English Composition ......................3 MATH 1320 Precalculus Algebra**..................................3 Historical Studies Elective ..............................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester CHEM 1180 General Chemistry I....................................3 CHEM 1184 General Chemistry I Lab.............................1 MATH 1330 Trigonometry ...............................................3 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals ..................3 Emphasis Electives***..................................................3-5 Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organization Elective ......................................................................3 Semester Total ........................................................16-18

Pre-Natural Resources Program
A student who successfully completes this program may enter the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) to study for a Bachelor of Science degree in natural resources. Majors for four-year programs in natural resources include fisheries and wildlife, natural resource and environmental economics, range science, soil science, water science and environmental studies. The following suggested program of study fulfills the minimum requirements for the first four semesters of any natural resources major. First Year First Semester* BIOL 1450 Biology I .......................................................5 ENGL 1150 English Composition ..................................3 GEOG 1030 Intro to Earth and Environ. Science............5 MATH 1320 Precalculus Algebra**..................................3 Semester Total .............................................................16 Second Semester BIOL 1750 Biology II ...................................................4-5 OR BIOL 2140 Genetics MATH 1330 Trigonometry ..............................................3 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals .................3 Arts or Humanities Elective.............................................3 Race, Ethnicity and Gender Elective ..............................3 Semester Total ........................................................16-17

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Second Year First Semester BIOL 1330 Environmental Biology .................................3 CHEM 1180 General Chemistry I ...................................3 CHEM 1184 General Chemistry I Lab ............................1 OR CHEM 1010 Chemistry in Environment & Society .....3 CHEM 1014 Chemistry in Environment & Society Lab.............................................................1 ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) ................3 MATH 1530 Intro to Applied Probability and Statistics ..3 Historical Studies Elective .............................................3 Semester Total .............................................................16 Second Semester CHEM 1190 General Chemistry II ..................................3 CHEM 1194 General Chemistry II Lab ...........................1 GEOL 1170 Intro to Physical Geology ............................4 PHYS 1110 General Physics ..........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organization Elective ......................................................................3 Semester Total .............................................................16 TOTAL HOURS .............................................................64-65
*Requirements for natural sciences vary among degree programs, and not all programs require biology, chemistry and physics (some minimally require courses from two of the three science areas). Please verify specific requirements with a CASNR adviser and/or the UNL Catalog before selecting natural sciences courses. **MATH 1320. Hours earned in MATH 1320 will not count toward the mathematics requirements for UNL CASNR. Students are encouraged to use MATH 1320 as a free elective for their UNL CASNR program of study if they have an algebra deficiency. Students should complete their mathematics sequence at UNO. Since certain majors require calculus the student is encouraged to review the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin for requirements in specific majors of interest.

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Chemistry CHEM 1180 General Chemistry I ...................................3 CHEM 1184 General Chemistry I Lab ............................1 CHEM 1190 General Chemistry II ..................................3 CHEM 1194 General Chemistry II Lab ...........................1 CHEM 2210 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry .........4 CHEM 2214 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry Lab ................................................................1 Total ..............................................................................13 Economics ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) .................3 Total ................................................................................3 English Composition ENGL 1160 English Composition ..................................3 Total ................................................................................3 Mathematics MATH 1320 Precalculus Algebra* ..................................3 MATH 1330 Trigonometry ...............................................3 MATH 1530 Intro to Applied Probability and Statistics ..3 MATH 1930 Calculus for Managerial Students** ............3 OR MATH 1950 Calculus I ............................................5 Total ...........................................................................9-11 Physics PHYS 1110 General Physics .........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Total ................................................................................5 Speech Communications SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals .................3 Total ................................................................................3 Arts Elective ....................................................................3 Historical Studies Elective .............................................3 Humanities Elective .......................................................3 Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organization Elective.......................................................................3 Additional Electives (including Race, Ethnicity and Gender), Required or Recommended Courses .........4 TOTAL HOURS .............................................................69-71
*MATH 1320. Hours earned in MATH 1320 will not count toward the mathematics requirements for UNL CASNR. Students are encouraged to use MATH 1320 as a free elective for their UNL CASNR program of study if they have an algebra deficiency. Students should complete their mathematics sequence at UNO. Since certain majors require calculus, the student is encouraged to review the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin for requirements in specific majors of interest. ** See adviser.

Pre-Food Science & Technology Program
Food science and technology majors find career opportunities with food processing firms, government agencies, and educational institutions. Positions available to food science and technology graduates include new product development, quality assurance, food plant management, food research, food marketing and sales, food inspection, education, and extension. The curriculum includes a balance of courses in food science, biological sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, social sciences and humanities. Food science courses include food processing, food engineering, food analysis, food chemistry, food microbiology, nutrition and quality assurance. Five options are offered: science, technology, business, food service/nutrition, and international. Students may participate in an internship program that provides summer employment in the food industry.

The following list of courses are recommended for the first four semesters of a food science and technology transfer program.
Food Science and Technology FSCI 1310 Science of Food ...........................................3 Total ................................................................................3 Biology BIOL 1020 Principles of Biology ....................................5 BIOL 4640 Microbial Physiology.....................................4 BIOL 1450 Biology I OR BIOL 1750 Biology II ...............5 Total ..............................................................................14

Pre-Horticulture Program
Horticulture majors find exciting career opportunities as managers or owners of horticultural businesses in retail or wholesale nurseries, floral shops and greenhouses, landscape contracting businesses, fruit and vegetable enterprises, and in golf courses and sportsturf management. Graduates in horticulture may also enter the horticulture industry in horticultural journalism, extension, teaching and research. The major curriculum allows for specialization in the following options: business, plant science, production, landscape management, landscape design and turf grass science. The curriculum includes a

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES
HORT 2660 Intro to Landscape Design & HORT 2670 Intro to Landscape Design Studio .............4 CHEM 1190 General Chemistry I....................................3 CHEM 1194 General Chemistry II Lab............................1 Semester Total ........................................................15-19 TOTAL HOURS ............................................................65-73
*Additional courses (in areas such as business and science) are available at UNO that will transfer for specific options at UNL. Required and elective courses vary with option, so students should consult with their UNO adviser and the UNL Undergraduate Catalog to carefully plan their course selections while at UNO. **Required elective courses correlate to UNL Essential Studies Program categories; selected UNO courses in these categories should be verified for transfer approval prior to registration. ***MATH 1310 or 1320. Hours earned in MATH 1310 or 1320 will not count toward the mathematics requirements for UNL CASNR. Students are encouraged to use MATH 1310 or 1320 as a free elective for their UNL CASNR program of study if they have an algebra deficiency. Students should complete their mathematics sequence at UNO. Since certain options require calculus, students are encouraged to review the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin for requirements in specific majors of interest.

balance of courses in horticulture, biological and physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. Students may participate in an internship program that provides employment in various horticultural enterprises. The following list of courses are recommended for the first four semesters of a horticulture transfer program*. First Year First Semester Arts Elective**..................................................................3 BIOL 1020 Principles of Biology ....................................5 ENGL 1150 or ENGL 1154 English Composition ...........3 HORT 1300 Introduction to Horticulture Sciences .........3 HORT 1310 Horticulture Sciences Lab ..........................1 MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra OR MATH 1320 College Algebra*** .............................3 Semester Total ........................................................15-18 Second Semester BIOL 1450 Biology I ........................................................5 CHEM 1010 Chemistry in Environment & Society ..........3 CHEM 1014 Chemistry in Environment & Society Lab ...1 HORT 2210 Plant Propagation .......................................3 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals .................3 Historical Studies Elective**............................................3 Elective courses (option dependent) Semester Total .............................................................21 Second Year First Semester Physics - select from PHYS 1050 Introduction to Physics ..........................4 PHYS 1054 Introduction to Physics Lab (not required for landscape design or management options) ........1 OR PHYS 1110 General Physics ............................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I (not required for landscape design or management options) ..............1 Math - select from MATH 1950 Calculus .................................................5 OR MATH 1930 Calculus for the Managerial, Life and Social Sciences + MATH 1530 Intro. Stat......6 OR MATH 1330 Trigonometry ................................3 OR MATH 1530 Intro. Statistics ..............................3 OR PHIL 2010 Logic ...............................................3 Additional Communications Requirement .....................t3 (ENGL 1160 or 1164 English Composition or SPCH 3130 Speech/Comm. in Business and the Professions Required/elective courses (option dependent) HORT 2000 Landscape/Environmental Appreciation 3 HORT 2120 Landscape Plants I.................................3 BIOL 2140 Genetics ..................................................4 HORT 2610 Floral Design I (alt. year) ........................3 Semester Total ........................................................17-18 Second Semester ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) .................3 Humanities Elective** .....................................................3 Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organization Elective** .........................................................................3 Race, Ethnicity and Gender Elective** ............................3 Required/elective courses (option dependent) HORT 2130 Landscape Plants I......................................3

Minor in Horticulture
A minor in horticulture consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of horticulture coursework, including 5-8 hours at the 3000 level or above. Required courses are as follows: Core...............................................................10-13 hours Select from: HORT 1300 Introduction to Horticulture Sciences ....3 PLUS HORT 1310 Horticulture Sciences Laboratory 1 HORT 2000 Landscape & Environmental Appreciation ..............................................................3 HORT 2660 Introduction to Landscape Design .........3 OR HORT 2610 Intro to Floral Design ....................3 HORT 2120 Landscape Plants I.................................3 HORT 2210 Plant Propagation .......................................3 Electives ............................................................5-8 hours Select from: HORT 3990 Independent Study .............................3-5 HORT 3960 Current Projects and Topics in Horticulture ..........................................................1-5 HORT 3950 Career Experience..................................3 Advising for the horticulture minor is coordinated through the UNO Pre-Horticulture Program Coordinator, as assigned by the Head of the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, UNL. The minor applies to UNO students completing their primary Bachelor’s degree at UNO; transfer of the minor to a Bachelor’s degree at UNL is subject to review by the Curriculum Committee in the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture.

For more information…
Contact Associate Professor Steven Rodie, PreHorticulture Program, University of Nebraska at Omaha (402/554-3752); and/or contact the Dean’s Office, CASNR, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1/800/742-8800; ext. 2541).

Web sites
http://hort.unl.edu/unohort/preprog.htm and http://hort.unl.edu/unohort/

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARCHITECTURE
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Architecture at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers pre-professional programs in architecture and interior design along with graduate studies in community and regional planning through a number of courses at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Students interested in a comprehensive description of the College’s programs should refer to the undergraduate and graduate bulletins of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The College of Architecture consists of three academic programs: architecture, interior design and community and regional planning. The accredited professional degree in architecture at the University of Nebraska is a six-year course of study divided into two segments. The first segment is a two-year pre-professional program referred to as pre-architecture. Upon completion of this segment, a student applies for admittance to the four-year professional program of study. The professional program in architecture commences with the student’s junior year, awards the bachelor of science in design at the end of the senior year, and culminates with the first professional degree, the master of architecture degree, after an additional two years of study. The master of architecture degree is accredited by the National Architecture Accreditation Board (NAAB) and is the only accredited professional architecture program in the state of Nebraska. Only the first segment, pre-architecture, is offered at UNO. The interior design program includes the two-year preinterior design program and the subsequent two-year interior design program. Completion of the program results in the award of the bachelor of science in design. This interior design program of study is accredited by the Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research (FIDER) and is the only accredited program in the state of Nebraska. After completing the prescribed pre-interior design program, students may apply for admission to the third year of study in the interior design program at UNL. Only the first segment, pre-interior design, is offered at UNO. The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with the College of Architecture at UNL by providing a four-semester pre-professional transfer program in pre-interior design and pre-architecture. Only the first two years of study can be completed at UNO. Transfer and third year admissions assistance is provided to help in the transition to UNL, where students complete their studies. The community and regional planning program offers the two-year professional Master of Community and Regional Planning degree which is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board (PAB). A limited number of courses are available at UNO, all of which will apply toward the MCRP degree at UNL.

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In addition to the UNO admission requirements, the College of Architecture has established supplemental admission requirements for undergraduate students. In addition to the specific requirements for interior design and architecture, the College has established the following general College requirements for undergraduate students. New freshmen students must: • graduate in the upper quartile of their high school class, or • have an Enhanced ACT composite score of 22, or • have a combined Enhanced SAT verbal and math total of at least 1030. New foreign freshmen students must: • meet UNO entrance requirements for new foreign freshmen students, and • have an English proficiency test score of at least 80 or a minimum TOEFL score of 550. New transfer students must: • have a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA (for PreArchitecture) or 2.6 cumulative GPA (for Pre-Interior Design) and be in good academic standing.
NOTE: New transfer students must comply with new freshman student entrance requirements for ACT, SAT or high school quartile rather than cumulative grade point average if they have completed less than 12 credit hours of college study.

Students transferring from UNK and UNL are included in this new transfer student category. New foreign transfer students must: • meet UNO entrance requirements for foreign transfer students, and • have an English proficiency test score of at least 80 or a minimum TOEFL score of 550 • have a minimum 3.0 GPA (for Pre-Architecture) or 3.0 GPA (for Pre-Interior Design) and be in good scholastic standing. Students who transfer into the College of Architecture from other colleges at UNO must: • have a minimum 3.0 GPA and be in good scholastic standing. Students who apply for readmission into the college of Architecture must: • have a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA and be in good scholastic standing.

PRE-INTERIOR DESIGN ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Prospective students interested in the interior design program are eligible for admission to the pre-interior design program if their high school records meet the following standards: • Four units in mathematics consisting of Algebra I, II, geometry and one additional unit that builds on a knowledge of algebra. • Four units of English, consisting of intensive reading and writing. • Three units of social sciences consisting of one unit of American and/or world history and one additional unit of history, American government and/or geography. • Three units of natural sciences consisting of two units from biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. One of the units must include a laboratory. • Two units of foreign language.

ADMISSION AND ACADEMIC POLICIES
General Requirements The College of Architecture and its programs reserve the right to change the rules governing admission to, instruction in and graduation from the College or its various departments and programs.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARCHITECTURE

PRE-ARCHITECTURE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Prospective students interested in the architecture option are eligible for admission to the pre-architecture program if their high school records meet the following standards: • Four units in mathematics consisting of Algebra I, II, geometry, one-half unit of trigonometry, and one additional unit that builds on a knowledge of algebra or precalculus. • Four units of English, consisting of intensive reading and writing. • Three units of social sciences consisting of one unit of American and/or world history and one additional unit of history, American government and/or geography. • Three units of natural sciences consisting of two units from biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. One of the units must include a laboratory • Two units of foreign language. Students with more than three pre-college deficiencies will not be admitted to the College of Architecture.

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Pre-Interior Design Program This four-semester pre-professional program is for the student interested in becoming a professional interior designer. The professional interior designer is a person qualified by education, experience and examination to: • identify, research and creatively solve problems pertaining to the function and quality of the interior environment; • perform services relative to interior spaces, including programming, design analysis, space planning and aesthetics, using specialized knowledge of interior construction, building systems and components, building codes, equipment, materials and furnishings; and • prepare all drawings and documents relative to the design of interior spaces in order to enhance and protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. A minimum of 64 semester hours and the completion of the pre-interior design program is required for admission to the UNL interior design program. Preparations for the bachelor of science in design degree program can best be achieved by completing the following UNO courses as a pre-interior design student enrolled in the College of Architecture. First Year First Semester IDSG 1404 ......................................................................4 IDSG 1400 ......................................................................1 IDSG 2230 ......................................................................3 ENGL 1150 .....................................................................3 Art History 2050 ..............................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Second Semester IDSG 1414 ......................................................................4 IDSG 1410 ......................................................................1 ENGL 1160 .....................................................................3 IDSG 1060 ......................................................................3 MATH 1530 .....................................................................3 Essential Studies - C.......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17
*See Architecture College adviser to coordinate University of NebraskaLincoln Essential Studies Comprehensive Education requirements. ES-C courses: Anthropology 1050, Family Consumer Science 1600, Geography 1020, Political Science 1100, Psychology 1010, Sociology 1010, Speech 2010, 2410. ES-F courses: Philosophy 1010, 1210, 2030, 2110. ES-G courses (Pre-Arch majors only): Art History 2050, 2060, Arch/ID 1060, Art 1100, Dramatic Arts 1010, Horticulture 2000, Music 1090, Textiles Clothing & Design 1210. ES-H courses (see adviser for course list).

Scholastic Standards for Pre-Architecture and PreInterior Design Students
The following scholastic standards have been established for students in the pre-architecture and preinterior design programs: • First year pre-architecture and pre-interior design students who receive a semester grade point average of less than 2.0 or with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. The student will remain on probation until a semester is completed with both a semester and cumulative GPA at or above 2.0 or until the student is academically dismissed. After two consecutive semesters on academic probation, pre-architecture and pre-interior design students will be transferred out of the College of Architecture. • Second year pre-architecture and pre-interior design students who receive a semester grade point average of less than 2.6 or with a cumulative GPA below 2.6 will be placed on academic probation. The student will remain on probation until a semester is completed with both a semester and cumulative GPA at or above 2.6. After two consecutive semesters on academic probation, prearchitecture and pre-interior design students will be transferred out of the College of Architecture. • Pre-architecture and pre-interior design students who are placed on academic probation will not be allowed to take any new architecture and/or interior design courses without the permission of the department chairperson. However, students may retake architecture and interior design courses in which they received a “D” or “F”. Students may take any one architecture or interior design course a maximum of three times. Students who register for new architecture and interior design courses while on probation will be administratively dropped from those courses.

Second Year First Semester IDSG 2100 ......................................................................3 IDSG 2200 ......................................................................2 ART 3770 ........................................................................3 Natural Science/w lab.....................................................4 Essential Studies - C.......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARCHITECURE
Second Semester IDSG 2110 ......................................................................3 IDSG 2210 ......................................................................2 Essential Studies - H.......................................................3 Open Elective..................................................................3 SPCH 1110 .....................................................................3 Essential Studies - F .......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17 Upon successful completion of two years of the preprofessional pre-interior design studies and admission to the College of Architecture, students may apply for admission to the third year of study in interior design and transfer to the UNL campus at the end of their second year.

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Second Year First Semester ARCH 2100 .....................................................................3 ARCH 2200 .....................................................................2 ART 3770 ........................................................................3 GET 2120 ........................................................................3 Essential Studies - C.......................................................3 Essential Studies - G ......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17 Second Semester ARCH 2110 .....................................................................3 ARCH 2210 .....................................................................2 Essential Studies - F .......................................................3 GET 2130 ........................................................................3 Speech 1110...................................................................3 Essential Studies - H.......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17

Pre-Architecture Program
This four-semester pre-professional transfer program is for the student interested in becoming a professional architect. The primary responsibility of the architectural profession is the design of efficient and emotionally satisfying environments for human occupation and use. Architects, therefore, must be able to analyze the functional and psychological needs of the people who will utilize their creations and then effectively synthesize the complex structural, mechanical and aesthetic components that form their buildings. The study of architecture at UNO is limited to the foursemester pre-architecture program because of the highly structured nature of the professional program in architecture at the UNL campus. The required courses for the third through sixth years of the professional program are not available on the UNO campus. For this reason, students wishing to pursue the Professional Program in Architecture must apply for admission to the third year of study in architecture and transfer to the UNL campus at the end of their second year. A minimum of 65 semester hours and the completion of the pre-architecture program is required for admission to the UNL department of architecture. First Year First Semester ARCH 1404 .....................................................................4 ARCH 1400 .....................................................................1 PHYS 1050 .....................................................................4 ENGL 1150 .....................................................................3 ARCH 2230 .....................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester ARCH 1414 .....................................................................4 ARCH 1410 .....................................................................1 MATH 1950 .....................................................................5 ENGL 1160 .....................................................................3 Essential Studies - C.......................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16
*See Architecture College adviser to coordinate University of Nebraska-Lincoln Essential Studies Comprehensive Education requirements. ES-C courses: Anthropology 1050, Family Consumer Science 1600, Geography 1020, Political Science 1100, Psychology 1010, Sociology 1010, Speech 2010, 2410. ES-F courses: Philosophy 1010, 1210, 2030, 2110. ES-G courses (Pre-Arch majors only): Art History 2050, 2060, Arch/ID 1060, Art 1100, Dramatic Arts 1010, Horticulture 2000, Music 1090, Textiles Clothing & Design 1210. ES-H courses (see adviser for course list).

Eligibility for College of Architecture Courses
ARCH/IDSG 1060 is open to all university students. All other architecture courses are open only to pre-architecture and pre-interior design majors. Students must follow the prerequisites listed in the architecture course descriptions. For more information on pre-architecture and pre-interior design, contact the College of Architecture Department Office at (402) 472-4065 or 1-888-650-3729 toll free. English Courses It is of vital importance that architects and interior designers be able to express themselves clearly and concisely. As a matter of routine, architects and interior designers are called upon to prepare reports, papers or specifications in which clarity and precision are essential. For this reason a student in the College of Architecture must demonstrate an acceptable skill in the use of effective English in daily oral and written work. English as a Second Language 1090 and English as a Second Language 1100 may not be used to satisfy the freshman English composition requirement.

Math Courses
College algebra, college trigonometry and basic math courses cannot be applied to the bachelor of science in design degree for math requirements or open elective credit.

Military Science, Naval Science, Aerospace Studies and/or Physical Education
A maximum combination of military science, naval science, aerospace studies and/or physical education totaling six credit hours can be applied toward the bachelor of science in design degree as open elective credit.

Pass/No Pass Policy
A student may apply a maximum of 12 pass/no pass credit hours to the bachelor of science in design degree. However, pass/no pass credit shall be limited to electives in the ES-C, F, G and H categories. Pass/no pass credit cannot be used to fulfill the professional elective requirements in architecture or interior design. No student shall enroll in more than six pass/no pass credit hours during any one semester.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARCHITECTURE

Incompletes
College of Architecture students will be allowed a maximum of two weeks to remove incompletes from courses that are prerequisites to classes in which they are currently enrolled.

Course Substitutions
Students wishing to modify their course requirements or elective requirements must petition the Professional Program Committee of the UNL architecture program by completing a substitution form. Substitution forms, available online at archweb.unl.edu, must be reviewed by the college adviser before being submitted to the Professional Program Committee. Students are advised to have substitutions approved by the Professional Program Committee before enrolling in a substitute course.

Minors and Area of Emphasis
The College of Architecture does not offer a minor in architecture or in interior design in conjunction with any bachelors degree. An area of emphasis in architecture or an area of emphasis in interior design is not allowed in conjunction with any bachelors degree.

For more information…
Visit the UNL College of Architecture Student Guide on the Web for information on program flowcharts, third year portfolio review requirements and computer policy at archweb.unl.edu or call us at (402) 472-4065.

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING
The College of Architecture, through its department of community and regional planning, offers a number of undergraduate courses at UNO to serve the area’s professional planners, governmental officials, interested citizens and students in related programs. These are evening courses intended primarily for people who wish to pursue their studies while employed full time. These courses are not part of an undergraduate degree program. The program does offer a Masters of Community and Regional Planning (MCRP) degree at UNL. Some graduate courses may be taken at UNO as partial completion of these degree requirements. Please refer to the graduate catalog for more information. Planning is an interdisciplinary problem-solving profession that influences a broad range of future-oriented decision making. Planners work with individuals, groups and organizations to formulate plans, policies and strategies through which desired change can be achieved. Planners utilize a wide variety of methods and techniques to identify problems and needs and to formulate plans of action that effectively address those needs. Planners often need to accommodate differing viewpoints in the process of formulating desirable and compatible plan and policy recommendations.

For more information…
The program does offer a Masters of Community and Regional Planning (MCRP) degree at UNL. Some graduate courses may be taken at UNO as partial completion of these degree requirements. Please refer to the graduate catalog for more information.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Arts and Sciences offers work toward the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science, as well as pre-professional programs for such fields as medicine and law. The College is organized into 14 departments grouped under three large divisions: humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Freshman and sophomore courses in the college carry numbers between 1000 and 2999; these are sometimes called “lower division” courses. They address general education with emphasis on breadth rather than depth. Subjects required or recommended for freshmen and sophomores include English, foreign languages, world civilizations, oral communication, mathematics, and basic courses in each of the three subject-matter divisions. A somewhat less flexible program is prescribed for some professional and pre-professional students. Courses in the last two years of the liberal arts program are numbered 3000 through 4999, and are sometimes called “upper division” courses. While essentially a continuation of the lower division work, the last two years in the college provide for specialization in one or two subject areas. At present, academic majors are available in the following fields: biology, biotechnology, bioinformatics, black studies, chemistry, economics, environmental studies, engineering physics, English, French, general science, geography, geology, German, history, interdisciplinary studies, international studies, Latino/Latin American studies, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, and women’s studies. The pre-professional programs of study are determined largely by the requirements of the graduate or professional schools which students intend to enter. If arranged carefully, they provide a sufficient variety of courses so that their objectives are virtually the same as those of the fouryear course leading to the B.A. or B.S. degrees. These programs are not academic majors and a student seeking a degree must complete the requirements of a major as well.

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have their schedules checked in the Dean’s Office each semester until graduation. Assuming satisfactory completion of all approved courses, this process will assure the student’s graduation date. Should this procedure not be followed, responsibility for meeting graduation requirements falls on the student; if errors are made they can prevent graduation at the anticipated date.

Total Hours
Candidates must present a minimum of 125 hours of college credit.

Quality of Work
Candidates for the degree must attain an average grade of at least “C” (2.0) in all college work, including work transferred from other institutions. They must earn a grade of at least “C-” (1.67) in all departmental courses presented in satisfaction of a major and/or minor, and in all courses presented in satisfaction of the “enhancement of fundamental competencies” requirement, the “general understanding” requirement, the “cultural diversity” requirement and the “distribution” requirements. To qualify for a grade of “CR” in any course in the College of Arts and Sciences, a student must qualify for a grade of at least “C-” (1.67) in that course. All grades reported by the faculty to the registrar become part of the students’ permanent records, and are included in the computation of their grade point averages even though some of these grades may be for work done in excess of the 125 hours required for graduation. In order to graduate, students must attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 (“C”). The only exception to this rule is provided in the section of these requirements entitled “Amnesty Clause.”

Residence
Thirty of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and carried at the UNO.

Enhancement of Fundamental Competencies
(A grade of “C-” or better is required for all coursework in the Enhancement of Fundamental Competencies area.)

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
All students who have not yet earned any college credit and who are eligible to enter the university are accepted for admission to the college. However, admission of transfer students or students who have previously been enrolled at UNO is evaluated on an individual basis. A 2.0 grade point average in previous coursework in the college is required. Application deadline for admission: August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester.

English and Writing Nine credit hours including English 1160 or equivalent and one additional writing course specified by the student’s major. Students placing above English 1150 and/or English 1160 by the English Proficiency Placement Exam need only complete six or three credit hours in writing courses, respectively. Oral Communication Each student must complete three credit hours in one of the following courses: Speech 1110, 2120, 3120, 3130 or 3140. The course that is used to satisfy this requirement may not be used to satisfy a distribution requirement. Mathematics and Quantitative Literacy Each student must complete three credit hours in mathematics other than Mathematics 1430, 1530 or 2000. Students who, by virtue of ACT score, place higher than Mathematics 1310 will be considered to have met the minimum college mathematics requirement. In addition, each student must meet a quantitative literacy requirement by completing a three credit hour course in mathematics, computer science, statistics, or other quantitative topic as

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
The requirements specified below became effective the fall of 2005. All students entering the university during or after this semester are subject to the requirements below. Students entering prior to this time are subject to those requirements in effect at the time of their initial admission, as long as they have maintained continuous enrollment. If there is doubt as to which graduation requirements apply, consult the Office of the Dean.

Senior Check
After completing 91 hours of coursework, students must

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specified by the student’s major and approved by the college.

General Understanding
(A grade of “C-” or better is required for all coursework in the General Understanding area.)

hours of coursework; students who fail to meet this stipulation will not be permitted to defer their enrollment in those courses needed to fill the requirement.

Cultural Diversity
Six hours of coursework designed to enhance cultural diversity are required. An approved three-hour course in United States racial or Hispanic minority groups must be completed by all students. The second three hours of the cultural diversity requirement must be met by a three-hour course approved to have an international focus, an approved course in women’s studies, an approved course addressing gay, lesbian, or transgender issues, an approved course addressing issues related to human aging or by another course dealing with U.S. minorities. The required World Civilization courses may not be used to meet this requirement.

History Each student must complete a six-hour, two-semester 1000-level sequence of courses in world civilizations. Transfer students who have taken two semesters of Western Civilization may count three hours toward the World Civilizations II requirement (History 1010) and then take three hours of History 1000 to complete their World Civilizations requirement, or they may take one of the following: History 2190, 2470, 2480, 2810, 2820. Second Language The student must present two years (16 credit hours) of college work in one foreign language, American sign language, or the equivalent thereof. Successful completion of four years of a single language in high school or four college semesters will satisfy this requirement. For unusual circumstances, please see the Department of Foreign Languages. A student fulfilling the foreign language requirement through a combination of high school and college work must complete the chosen language through the fourth semester college course. The Department of Foreign Languages will grant retroactive credit for French, German, Russian, or Spanish 1110, 1120, 2110, or 2120 subject to the following conditions: • a student who completes any French, German, Russian, or Spanish course in the 1120-2120 sequence with a grade of “C-” (1.67) or better at UNO without having completed the previous courses may be granted credit for those previous courses; • a student who completes a 3000-level course in French, German, Russian, or Spanish with a grade of “C-” (1.67) or better at UNO without having completed the 1110-2120 sequence may be granted credit for any of the courses 1110, 1120, 2110, and 2120 for which credit has not already been earned. To enroll in any French, German, Russian or Spanish course beyond 1110, a student who has not successfully completed the prerequisite courses at UNO must take the appropriate placement exam and qualify for the desired course. All students are subject to this requirement including transfer students. UNK/UNL students are not exempt from this requirement. The Department of Foreign Languages reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student who has not met the prerequisites for a course. Transfer courses at the 3000/4000 level are subject to the approval of a departmental adviser and the department chair. All foreign language courses must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better to continue to the next course.

Distribution Requirements
The distribution requirements of the college are designed to ensure that all students complete a broad variety of courses in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Students may apply up to four credit hours of coursework from their departmental major toward satisfaction of the appropriate distribution requirement. Appropriate courses may be used to satisfy both cultural diversity and distribution requirements. No course used to satisfy an “enhancement of fundamental competencies” requirement or a “general understanding” requirement may be applied toward a distribution requirement. Humanities A student must complete four approved humanities courses for a total of at least 12 credit hours, each course selected from a different one of the seven categories listed below. • Fine Arts (excluding studio or performance courses) • Foreign Language • History • Interdisciplinary humanities courses • Literature • Philosophy • Religion Social Sciences A student must complete four approved social science courses for a total of at least 12 credit hours, each course selected from a different one of the seven categories listed below. • Communication • Economics • Geography • Interdisciplinary social science courses • Political Science • Psychology • Sociology or Anthropology Natural Sciences A student must complete three approved natural science courses for a total of at least 11 credit hours, each course selected from a different one of the five categories listed below. Two of the courses must be laboratory courses. • Life Sciences

Requirements for Early Completion
The requirements in English, oral communication, mathematics and history must be completed by the end of the semester in which a student successfully completes 60

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
• • • • Physical Geography and Geology Chemistry Physics Interdisciplinary natural science courses Religion: Black Studies: 2730 Religion: All courses Women’s Studies: 3120, 4040

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Approved distribution courses in humanities
Fine Arts: Art: 1010, 2040, 2050, 2060, 2070, 2080, 3150, 4700, 4710, 4720, 4730, 4750, 4770, 4780, 4810, 4830, 4850, 4860, 4870, 4880, 4890 Black Studies: 1050, 3920 Broadcasting: 2310, 4380 Music: 1070, 1080, 1090, 1100, 2550, 2560, 2570, 4090, 4530 Speech: 1710, 4110 Theatre: 1010, 1050, 1090, 2810, 2820, 4710, 4720, 4730, 4830 Writer’s Workshop: 1010 Foreign Languages: For BA: All courses above 3000 level except 3030, 3040, 4610, 4900 For BS: All courses except 3030, 3040, 4610, 4900 History: Black Studies: 1050, 2120, 2410, 2420, 2430, 2900, 3000 Broadcasting: 4340 History: All courses except 1000 and 1010 Journalism: 4010, 4410, 4420 Women’s Studies: 3580, 4060 Interdisciplinary Humanities: Black Studies: 2100, 3980, 3990, 4000 Goodrich: 1110 Humanities: 1010, 1020 Latino/Latin American Studies: 1020 Native American Studies: 1100 Women’s Studies: 2020 Literature: Black Studies: 1260, 2260, 2350, 2360, 2830, 3750, 4260 English: All courses except 1050, 1090, 1100, 1150, 1154, 1160, 1164, 2000 (writing topic), 2160, 2400, 2410, 2420, 3000 (writing topic), 3980 (writing topic), 4960 (writing topic), 4980 Women’s Studies: 4250, 4260, 4270 Philosophy: Black Studies: 3950, 4500, 4700 Philosophy: All courses Women’s Studies: 3250, 3490

Approved distribution courses in social sciences
Communication: Black Studies: 3850, 4090 Broadcasting: 4310, 4350 Journalism: 1500, 4430, 4500, 4900, 4910 Speech: 2010, 2410, 3520, 3750, 4140, 4170, 4190, 4510, 4520, 4530, 4540, 4550 Women’s Studies: 3750 Economics: Economics: All courses Geography: Black Studies: 3030, 3500 Geography: 1000, 1020, 2000, 3030, 3060, 3070, 3080, 3130, 3230, 3240, 3330, 3930, 4010, 4020, 4120, 4140, 4150, 4160, 4230, 4530, 4900 Horticulture: 2000 Women’s Studies: 4150 Interdisciplinary Social Sciences: Black Studies; 1000, 1220, 1340, 1400, 1950, 2000, 3140, 3200, 3650, 4880 Goodrich: 2110, 2120 International Studies: 2130, 4140 Latino/Latin American Studies: 1000, 1010 Social Sciences: 2000, 2100 Women’s Studies: 1950, 2010 Political Science: Black Studies: 2130, 3120 Political Science: All courses Women’s Studies: 3130 Psychology: Psychology: All courses Sociology/Anthropology: Anthropology: All courses except ANTH 3910 Black Studies: 2210 Sociology: All courses except SOC 2130

Approved distribution courses in natural sciences
Chemistry: Chemistry: All courses Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences: Natural Sciences: 2010, 2020 Life Sciences: Anthropology: 3910

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Food Sciences: 1310 Horticulture: 1300, 1310, 2120, 2210

Biology: All courses except 1000, 1010, 1040

Physical Geography and Geology: Geography: 1030, 1060, 1070, 2620, 3510, 3530, 3540, 3550, 4030, 4050, 4100, 4250, 4260, 4320, 4610, 4630 Geology: All courses Physics: Physics: All courses Writing Courses Students should contact their departments for the approved advanced writing course for their majors. Approved courses include Biology 3150; English 2400, 2430, 3980, 4860; Foreign Languages: French 4040, German 4040; Spanish 4040; Geology 4950; History 3930; Journalism 2100, 2150, 3220, 3400, 4220; Natural Science 2500, 3354, 3930, 4960; Philosophy 3130; Political Science 4950; Psychology 3140 with one of the lab courses (4024, 4074, 4214,4234, 4280); Religion 4010; Sociology 4900; Women’s Studies 4010. English 1160 (or proficiency) is a prerequisite for these courses. Quantitative Literacy Courses Students should contact their department for the approved quantitative literacy course for their major. Approved courses include Statistics 3000, Psychology 3130, Sociology 2130, Political Science 2000, Mathematics 1320 or higher, Philosophy 2010, Computer Science 1400, or Accounting 2010. Cultural Diversity Courses Aging Gerontology 2000e, 4350e, 4420e, 4460e, 4470e, 4480e, 4500e, 4550e, 4590e, 4690e; Goodrich 2110s; Health Education 3070e, 4550e; Psychology 2500s, 4460s, 4470s; Recreation and Leisure Studies 4420e; Women’s Studies 4550e. International Focus Anthropology 3210s, 3260s; Black Studies 1050h, 1340s, 2120s, 2130s, 2900s, 3030s, 3140s, 3500s, 4700h; French 3150h, 3160h, 3370h, 4150h, 4160h, 4170h, 4200h, 4860h, 4900h; German 3150h, 3250h, 3370h, 3500h, 4310h, 4320h, 4380h, 4400h, 4440h, 4500h, 4960h; Geography 1020s, 3030s, 3060s, 3070s, 3080s, 3090s, 3230s, 3240s; History 1000h, 1010h, 1050h, 2190h, 2470h, 2480h, 2510h, 2520h, 2560h, 2580h, 2610h, 2620h, 2660h, 2710h, 2720h, 2810h, 2820h, 2900h, 2920h, 3530h, 3640h, 3710h, 4560h, 4610h, 4780h; Journalism 4430s; Philosophy 2110h; Political Science 2500s, 2560s, 3220s, 3500s, 3560s, 3580s, 3640s, 3660s, 3680s, 4200s, 4210s, 4280s, 4360s, 4370s, 4500s, 4520s; Religion 1010h, 2190h, 3050h, 3060h, 3200h, 4020h, 4150h; Russian 3055h 3150h, 3370h, 4940h; Sociology 2190s; Spanish 3170h, 3180h, 3210h, 3220h, 3410h, 3420h, 4090h, 4160h, 4240h, 4350h, 4440h, 4550h, 4560h, 4960h; Speech 4530s. Gender Art 4860h; Black Studies 1950s, 4260h; Criminal Justice

3390e; English 4250h, 4260h, 4270h, 4710h; French 4860h; Geography 4150s; Health Education 3080e, 4700e; History 3580h, 4060h; Philosophy 3490h; Political Science 3130s; Religion 3130h, 3250h, 4040h; Russian 3055h; Social Work 4860e; Sociology 2150s, 4300s, 4700s; Speech 3750s; Women’s Studies 1950s, 2010s, 2020h, 2990h, 3000h, 3120h, 3250h, 3580h, 3600h, 4040h, 4060h, 4250h, 4260h, 4270h, 4470h, 4910h, 4960h. United States Racial or Hispanic Minority Anthropology 3220s, 4220s, 4230s; Black Studies 1000s, 1220s, 1260h, 1400s, 1950s, 2000s, 2100h, 2210s, 2260h, 2360h, 2410s, 2420s, 2430h, 2510h, 2730h, 2830h, 3000s, 3120s, 3200s, 3650s, 3850h, 3920h, 3950h, 4090s, 4500h; English: 2230h, 2260h, 2350h, 2360h, 2470h, 3100h, 4230h; Goodrich 1110h; History: 4400h; Latino/Latin American Studies 1010s, 1020h; Music 4090h; Native American Studies 1100h; Political Science 3120s, 3140s; Religion 3020h; Sociology 3900s, 4250s; Spanish 4050h, 4180h.
e = approved elective h = approved humanities course s = approved social science course

Major Field
Each candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree must present a major including at least 18 credit hours of upper division work, i.e., 3000 and/or 4000-level courses, designated as appropriate by the faculty in one of the following fields: biology, black studies, chemistry, economics, English, French, general science, geography, geology, German, history, interdisciplinary studies, international studies, Latino/Latin American studies, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, and women’s studies. A candidate meeting the requirements in each of two fields may present a double major in these fields.

Minor Field
Although not required for graduation, a student may elect a minor in addition to the major. The minor must contain at least 12 hours of upper division work. See the respective departments for details. Minors are offered in the following fields: anthropology, black studies, chemistry, Chicano-Latino/a studies, English, environmental studies, foreign languages (French, German, Russian, Spanish), geography, geology, history, mathematics, medieval/renaissance studies, Native American studies, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, speech and women’s studies.

Maximum Hour Limits
No candidate may count more than 45 credits in any one discipline in which a major is offered, toward the minimum 125 credits required for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees.

Other Limitations on Credit Granted; Nine-Hour Rule
Courses in other colleges of the university not specifically approved by the Arts and Sciences faculty are not accepted as part of a degree program except as provided under the “nine-hour rule” and other circumstances listed below. The “nine-hour rule” states that, in general, an Arts and Sciences student may apply toward the degree a total of up to nine credit hours in

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
approved courses offered outside of the College of Arts and Sciences (or an equivalent college in another institution). Exceptions to this limitation are the following: • All credits in aerospace studies and military science departments. • A maximum of four out of 125 credits in physical education activity courses. • Completion of the sequence of courses in the College of Education required for the Nebraska Secondary School Certificate. • Honors Colloquia. • Courses necessary for a second major, minor or teaching field, provided the student also completes a major in the College of Arts and Sciences. • Courses a department chairperson may wish to recommend for inclusion in an Arts and Sciences major or cognate area (e.g. business for an economics major). • All economics courses. • All fine arts courses. • All Goodrich courses. • All computer science courses and CIST 1100, 1400, 1404.

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OTHER INFORMATION Grade Appeals
If a student believes that a grade has been assigned erroneously, the instructor of the course should be contacted immediately. If the problem cannot be resolved with the instructor, and if the student believes that the instructor’s grading reflected prejudice or capriciousness, then he/she should contact the chairperson of the department in which the course was taught. If a solution satisfactory to both student and instructor cannot be reached at the department level, either one may petition the Educational Policy Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences for a final hearing. Such a petition must be made in writing. It must state explicitly the basis for the appeal and must include supporting data. Appeals to the college committee must be filed no later than the end of the next regular semester following receipt of the grade. All course materials relevant to student evaluation must be retained by the faculty member for this time period or returned to the students; students are responsible for custody of any materials returned to them. The chairperson of the department in which the student wishes to file the grade appeal should be contacted for additional information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
The Bachelor of Science degree provides greater opportunity for concentrated and specialized study in a particular field, generally in the natural or social sciences. The requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree are the same as those for the Bachelor of Arts degree except as follows: Major Field Each degree candidate must present a major including at least 18 credit-hours of upper division work (3000 or 4000-level) designated as appropriate by the faculty in one of the following fields: biology, bioinformatics, biotechnology, chemistry, economics, engineering physics, environmental studies, geography, geology, history, interdisciplinary studies, mathematics, organizational sociology, physics, political science and psychology. Foreign Language The inclusion of a foreign language is at departmental option. A B.S. candidate who presents two years of college work (16 hours) in one foreign language in order to fulfill a departmental requirement may apply three hours of that language credit to the humanities distribution requirement. The applied three hours must be from language courses 2110, 2120 or above. Currently, psychology requires a foreign language for a B.S. degree. Cognate Courses Each department or program shall designate a minimum of 15 credit hours from cognate fields outside the student’s major department. These courses must support the student’s work within the major. Each department shall determine criteria and procedures for the selection of courses for each student; these criteria and procedures shall be approved by the Educational Policy Committee of the College.

Honors Program
The Arts and Sciences General Honors Program provides highly motivated students an exceptional educational opportunity, enabling them to challenge and expand their intellectual capacities through a special program of multidisciplinary seminars, close working relationships with distinguished faculty, and participation at an academic level not generally possible in the usual curricular offerings. Students in good standing may be considered for admission to Arts and Sciences General Honors Program. For further information contact the Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office.

Dean’s List
Students may earn a position on the Dean’s List by fulfilling the following criteria: 1. The student must earn a GPA of 3.5 or better for courses taken at UNO during the semester provided 12 or more semester hours were completed. 2. The part-time student must earn a GPA of 3.5 or better for courses taken at UNO on a continuous part-time basis. These students may be placed on the Dean’s List when they complete coursework in 12 semester hour blocks at UNO, i.e., 12, 24, 36, 48, etc. Continuous part-time basis is defined as taking one or more courses totaling 1-11 semester hours during each fall and spring semester each academic year.

Academic Amnesty
Students, after 24 consecutive credit hours of successful work at UNO, UNL or UNK (with at least a 2.5 grade point average), may petition the Educational Policy Committee to have either or both of their first two semesters’ grades removed from their cumulative grade point average. No other semesters may be considered. With concurrence of the committee, those courses in which

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a minimum grade of “C-” (1.67) is earned may continue to count as hours toward graduation. This petition is subject to the following stipulations: • The student shall be at least four years removed from the semester or year to be deleted. • The student is responsible for initiation of the petition. • This petition must come through the student’s counselor or academic adviser to the Dean of the college. • The student has to complete at least 24 semester hours of successful work at any of the University of Nebraska system universities (UNO, UNL and UNK) for the period in which amnesty is being requested. The grade average for all courses taken since the amnesty period at the University of Nebraska system (UNO, UNL and UNK) shall be at least a 2.5. • The period of time considered for amnesty is the first two semesters of college work which are included in the UNO GPA. • Only the first two semesters can be used for academic amnesty – and those first two semesters must have been taken at the University of Nebraska (UNO, UNL or UNK). • The Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office will make the calculations based on college rules and simply list amnesty cases as a report item on the Educational Policy Committee agenda unless there is some reason for the committee to examine a case more closely. • Individuals who apply under this rule may not be considered for degrees with honors at graduation. • There shall be no physical obliteration of any part of the student’s record. Therefore, students may petition to have grades from courses in either or both semesters of their University of Nebraska freshman year removed from their cumulative grade point averages, but may count courses in which they earn at least a “C” toward graduation requirements. Academic amnesty is not allowed after a student has graduated.

1154, 2120-1164. In addition to the college mathematics fundamental competency requirement, one approved course in mathematics (beyond MATH 1310), statistics, or computer science is required. To fulfill this requirement, a course in statistics is strongly recommended. One laboratory course in geology or physical geography is also strongly recommended. A Bachelor of Science degree in biology consists of 3645 hours of biology courses of which 18 hours must be 3000- 4000-level courses. With the approval of the department chairperson, certain advanced courses in related fields may be included in the major. A foreign language is not required. A student must take a statistics course and 6 additional hours of approved courses in mathematics/computer science/statistics. The required courses are Biology 1450, 1750, 2140, 3020, 3340; a selection of one course from Block I (Biology 4140, 4440, 4640, 4740, or 4850); a minimum of three credits from Block II (Biology 3230, 3240, 3830, 4100, 4120, 4130, 4140, 4180, 4210, 4220, 4230, 4450, 4540, 4640, 4650, 4660, 4850 and 4960); a minimum of three credits from Block III (Biology 3530, 3630, 4350, 4370, 4380, 4390, 4430, 4440, and 4570); and a minimum of three credits from Block IV (Biology 3100, 3104, 3730, 3740, 4270, 4280, 4340, 4720, 4730, 4740, 4780, 4790, 4840, 4880, 4910, 4920, 4940, 4950 and 4980). Students may not use any course to satisfy more than one Block. Also required are either Chemistry 1140-1144, 2210-2214, 3650-3654, or 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2250, 2260-2274; and Physics 1050-1054, or 1110-1154, 11201164, or 2110-1154, 2120-1164. One laboratory course in geology or physical geography is strongly recommended. All courses in biology have both lecture and laboratory unless otherwise indicated in the Course Description section of this catalog. Biology 1020, 1330, 1730, 2440, 2740, 2840 are usually not part of a biology major’s program. BIOL 3150 is recommended as the advanced writing course for biology majors, but students may select any advanced writing course approved by the College of Arts and Sciences. Students interested in a teaching field in biology should contact the College of Education. Beta Beta Beta (Tri-Beta) Biological Society Active membership in the national biology honor society Beta Beta Beta (Tri-Beta) is open to students with at least a 3.0 grade point average in all biology courses (with a minimum of three courses completed, one of which is a 2000 level or above) and overall GPA of 2.5. Associate membership requires at least a 2.5 GPA in all biology courses (with a minimum of 10 hours completed) and an overall GPA of 2.0.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH THE SECONDARY TEACHING CERTIFICATE
Students who plan to teach can meet the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science as well as the requirements for the Secondary Teaching Certificate. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are considering the possibility of teaching careers should consult the Dean’s Office.

BIOINFORMATICS
A bachelor of science degree in bioinformatics is offered within the biology department at UNO. The bioinformatics degree is also available from the College of Information Science and Technology. This cross-disciplinary degree requires bioinformatics courses offered jointly by the biology department in the College of Arts and Sciences and the computer science department in the College of Information Science and Technology, as well as courses in mathematics and chemistry from the College of Arts and Sciences. The bioinformatics degree requires a minimum of 132 credit hours for its completion. Required courses are BIOI

BIOLOGY
A Bachelor of Arts degree in biology consists of 36-45 hours of biology courses of which 18 hours must be 30004000-level courses. The required courses are biology 1450 and 1750. The remaining elective hours in biology must be scheduled and approved by the department advisers. Also required are either Chemistry 1140-1144, 2210-2214, 36503654, or 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2250, 2260-2274; and Physics 1050-1054, or 1110-1154, 1120-1164, or 2110-

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
1000, 3000, 4860, 4960, 4970; BIOL 1450, 2140, 3020, 4130 or 4140; CHEM 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2250, 22602274, 4650-4654; CIST 1400; CSCI 1620, 2710, 3320, 4830, 4850, 4890 or 4150; MATH 1950, 1960, 1970, 2040; STAT 3800. BIOL 3150 is recommended as the advanced writing course for bioinformatics majors, but students may select any advanced writing course approved by the College of Arts and Sciences.

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be obtained in one of two ways: African-American studies emphasis or African studies emphasis. African-American Studies The African-American studies major and minor may be earned by completing the following requirements. Core Requirements BLST 1000 Introduction to Black Studies BLST 2100 Black American Culture BLST 1260 Survey of Black Literature BLST 1950 Black Women in America BLST 2120 History of Modern Africa BLST 2410 Afro-American History to 1865 or BLST 2420 Afro-American History Since 1865 BLST 3120 The Black Experience in American Politics or BLST 1340 Introduction to Contemporary Africa BLST 3990 Community Study Project BLST 4000 Special Topics Seminars: Humanities and the Black Experience At least 15 hours must be completed at the 3000-4000 level. The remainder of the required hours may be selected from the following: Humanities BLST 2260 Black Short Story BLST 2510 Music and the Black Experience BLST 2730 Religion and Theology in Afro-America BLST 3850 Black Rhetoric BLST 3980 Special Topics in Black Studies BLST 4260 Women of Color Writers BLST 4500 Philosophy and Theology of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X BLST 4900 Independent Study Social Sciences BLST 1400 Issues in Black Communities BLST 2000 The Black Experience in Society BLST 2210 The Black Family in the United States BLST 2430 Afro-American History since 1954 BLST 3000 Survey of Black Education BLST 3140 Southern Africa BLST 3200 Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism BLST 3650 Slavery and Race Relations in the Americas BLST 4090/8096 Black Studies Oral History BLST 4900 Independent Study African Studies The African studies major may be earned by completing the following requirements BLST 1340 Introduction to Contemporary Africa BLST 2120 History of Modern Africa BLST 2130 Patterns of African Government BLST 3030 Geography of Africa BLST 3500 Economic Development in Africa ANTH 3210 Cultures of African People

BIOTECHNOLOGY
A Bachelor of Science degree in biotechnology is offered within the department of biology at UNO. A cooperative agreement with UNMC allows students to participate in a biotechnology internship program in laboratories on the UNMC campus. A Bachelor of Science degree in biotechnology consists of 36-45 hours of biology courses of which 18 hours must be 3000-4000 level courses. A foreign language is not required. The required courses are Biology 1450, 1750, 2140, 3020, 3240, 4550; Biochemistry I (Biology 4650/4654 or Chemistry 4650/4654); and three courses selected from the following: Biology 4130, 4140, 4450, 4640, 4850; Biochemistry II (Biology 4660/4664 or Chemistry 4660/4664). Also required are Chemistry 1180-1184, 11901194, 2250, 2260, 2274; Physics 1110-1150 and 11201164 or 2110-1154 and 2120-1164. Biochemistry I (Biology 4650/4654 or Chemistry 4650/4654) also is required. Nine hours in mathematics are required and must include Mathematics 1930 or equivalent. Biology 3150 is recommended as the advanced writing course for biotechnology majors, but students may select any advanced writing course approved by the College of Arts and Sciences. The biotechnology internship (Biology 4550) provides practical laboratory experience in molecular biology by allowing students to join a research laboratory for one semester. The internship should be taken during the senior year and enrollment will be limited. Adviser: Dr. Elaine Lahue and Dr. Mark Swanson.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2641 or visit the web at www.unomaha.edu/biology.

BLACK STUDIES
The Black Studies department at UNO was established in 1971. One of the oldest departments in the country, the Black Studies department is a vital component of UNO’s College of Arts and Sciences. It contributes to the University’s metropolitan mission by offering a liberal arts education which provides an interdisciplinary sequence of courses that cover the history, social, and cultural heritage of Africans and African-descended people in the diaspora.

Bachelor of Arts in Black Studies
The Black studies department offers a B.A. degree with either a humanities emphasis or a social sciences emphasis; the student may also take a minor. Black Studies majors must complete 30 hours of coursework in the discipline. BLST 3980 and BLST 4900 may each be selected twice and applied to the appropriate focus. At least 18 hours must be taken at the upper division level. It is strongly recommended that students majoring in Black Studies minor in another field. A Black Studies major may

Black Studies Minor
A Black Studies minor may be obtained in one of two ways: African-American studies emphasis or African emphasis. Fifteen hours or more are required for the minor; 9 hours from upper division (3000-4000 level) courses are required.

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CHEMISTRY

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2412. The department of chemistry, which is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS), offers both the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees. The B.S. degree in chemistry is designed for majors planning to be industrial or government chemists, planning to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry or biochemistry, or considering research in an allied field such as pharmacy, forensics, toxicology, or medicine. The B.A. degree is designed for chemical technologists and pre-professional students, including high school chemistry teachers. High school students who have had advanced level courses in chemistry should consult with the department chairperson about a modified course of study. Students can start undergraduate research with CHEM 4950 as soon as a faculty supervisor deems their background sufficient to support the work. The department urges students to include research in their programs before their last year. Calculus III (MATH 1970) is recommended. Completion of NSCI 3940 satisfies the third writing course requirement for chemistry degrees. It should be taken more than one year before intended graduation. Students working toward a degree in chemistry must earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses used to fulfill chemistry requirements.

Medicinal chemistry option A B.S. degree in chemistry with a concentration in medicinal chemistry requires coursework in both chemistry and biology. The required 38 credit hours of chemistry include: CHEM 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, 2250, 2260, 2274, 2400, 2404, 2500, 3350, 3354, 3710, 4650, 4654, on additional lecture from CHEM 4230, 4240, 4660 and one additional lab from CHEM 3250, 3424, 4664. The required nine credit hours of biology coursework are BIOL 1450 and 2140. Four additional credit hours must come from CHEM 3250, 3360 (3364), 3414, 3424, 3514, 4230, 4240, 4400 (4404), 4500, 4660-4664, 4810, 4930, 4950, 4960 or BIOL 3020, 3240, 830, 4130, 4140, 4450, 4640, 4720 (4730), 4850, 4960. Required cognates are MATH 1950, 1960; and PHYS 2110, 1154, 2120, 1164. No separate area of enrichment is required. Graduates meeting ACS requirements will be certified. These courses can also be applied to pre-professional curricula. For example, with care to the selection of electives and sequencing of requirements, pre-pharmacy students who stay at UNO can complete a B.S. in chemistry with a concentration in medicinal chemistry in four years. A sample program for this can be found at www.unomaha.edu/chemistry/programs.php.

Bachelor of Arts
A B.A. degree in chemistry requires a minimum of 36 credit hours of approved chemistry courses. The required core content of 33 credit hours is shared with the B.S. chemistry option: CHEM 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, 2250, 2260, 2274, 2400, 2404, 2500, 3350, 3354, 3360, 3364, 3414, and 3514. The remaining three credit hours must be an approved advanced course in chemistry. The required cognates are MATH 1950, 1960, and a year sequence of general physics with laboratories: PHYS 1110 and 1120 or 2110 and 2120. The remaining three credit hours must be an approved, advanced course in chemistry. For a B.A. the college requires completion of a foreign language through the intermediate level. The department does not require an area of enrichment.

Bachelor of Science
Students choose one of two B.S. degree options: chemistry or medicinal chemistry. Chemistry option A B.S. degree in chemistry requires a minimum of 42 credit hours of approved chemistry courses. The college requires a minimum of 125 credit hours, more if a student takes more than 45 credit hours in chemistry. The required 33 credit hours of core chemistry courses are: CHEM 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, 2250, 2260, 2274, 2400, 2404, 2500, 3350, 3354, 3360, 3364, 3414, and 3514. The cognate courses: MATH 1950, 1960, PHYS 2110, 2120 and the associated physics labs are also required. Advanced courses are based on the core, which must be essentially finished first. Advanced courses exist in four areas: organic (CHEM 4230, 4240); analytical (CHEM 4400, 4404); inorganic (CHEM 4500, 4510); and biochemistry (CHEM 4610, 4650, 4654, 4660, 4664). Students must take at least nine credit hours from such approved advanced courses and research. Graduates whose B.S. programs include biochemistry (CHEM 4650 or 4610) and ten credit hours of lab are ACS certified. Each student must complete an area of enrichment consisting of a minimum of twelve credit hours of coherent courses outside chemistry chosen by the student and approved by the department. At least six hours must be above or at the 2000-level and in addition to courses used to satisfy cognate and distribution requirements. The area should reflect and support the student’s life interests and goals. See the department Web site for guidelines in choosing area courses.

Chemistry Minor
A minor in chemistry requires a minimum of 20 credit hours. All courses counted toward a minor must be taken from the core and advanced classes approved for chemistry majors, and must include courses from at least two different areas of chemistry. Transfer students seeking a minor must take UNO chemistry courses above the 1000level in at least two areas.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2651.

ECONOMICS
Economics is concerned with how resources are allocated in production, prices are determined, incomes are distributed and growth occurs. Economists examine such issues as how fiscal and monetary policies affect prices and employment, the effect on international trade of international trade agreements and the international price of the dollar, the size and future composition of the labor force,the effects of government regulations on the price, quantity and quality of goods and services, and costs and

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
benefits of environmental policies. Economists are employed by private businesses, utilities, railroads, government at all levels, educational institutions, labor unions, trade associations and non-profit organizations. In businesses, economists’ duties include analyzing and forecasting industry market conditions, and making recommendations and decisions relative to capital investments, marketing new products, employee compensation, and the impact of government regulation. In addition, economics is superb preparation for graduate work in areas such as business, law, political science, international relations, gerontology, and public administration. Economics also is an excellent dual major or minor with these other areas of study.

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Bachelor of Arts
A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may take a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics by meeting the Arts and Sciences general requirements and by completing the following minimum program in the economics department of the College of Business Administration. A Bachelor of Arts in economics consists of a minimum of 30 credit hours. The following specific courses are required: Principles of Economics: Micro and Macro (ECON 2200 and 2220), Economic Theory: Micro (ECON 3200), Economic Theory: Macro (ECON 3220), a three-hour course in statistics, nine hours of economics electives from 30004000 level courses, and six hours of economics electives from 4000 level courses. A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is necessary in each required and elective course. Economics courses are listed in the “College of Business Administration” section of this catalog. Students are encouraged to take Computer Literacy with Applications (CSCI 1000), Calculus for Managerial, Life and Social Science (MATH 1930), Econometrics (ECON 3300) or an additional business statistics course.. Students are encouraged to meet with the undergraduate adviser within the economics department to design a program that will include economics and related courses.

Managerial, Life and Social Science (MATH 1930) or Calculus I (MATH 1950). Students are encouraged to take Econometrics (ECON 3300) or an additional business statistics course. These courses may be used to partially fulfill the requirement to take 15 hours of related (cognate) courses. Students are encouraged to meet with an economics adviser to design a program to include economics courses and additional related (cognate) courses. The cognate courses may be drawn from the following fields: business administration, computer science, geography, history, international studies, mathematics, political science, public administration, sociology, statistics and urban studies. Cognate courses from other fields must be approved by the economics undergraduate adviser.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2570.

Minor in Economics
A minor in economics may be secured by completing Principles of Economics: Micro and Macro (ECON 2200 and 2220), plus 12 hours of upper division courses in economics. Any course that may be used for the major may be used for the minor. A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course counting toward the minor.

ENGLISH
The Department of English offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with a concentration in American Literature, British Literature, or Writing and Linguistics. Students who elect to major in English must pass with a grade of “C” or above a core of 15 hours, including a three hour capstone course taken during the senior year, ENGL 4990, and an additional 27 hours from courses counting toward one of the three plans of concentration. Students entering the program before fall 2005 may use ENGL 4990 to satisfy any three hours beyond the core within a concentration with the exception of ENGL 4610 and 4620. Students should declare their areas of concentration at the time they declare the English major. Students are highly encouraged to complete the core requirements and ENGL 2410 or ENGL 2420 before attempting 4000- level classes. English majors can satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences quantitative literacy requirement by taking one of the following courses approved by the English department: MATH 1200, Quantitative Literacy; MATH 1320, College Algebra; MATH 1530, Introduction to Applied Probability and Statistics; MATH 1950, Calculus I (or a higher level calculus); or SOC 2130, Basic Statistics. Core requirements for all concentrations ................15 hours Three hours from the following British Literature survey classes: ENGL 2310 Introduction to English Literature (I) ENGL 2320 Introduction to English Literature (II) AND Three hours from the following American Literature survey classes: ENGL 2450 American Literature (I) ENGL 2460 American Literature (II) AND Three hours from the following literature survey classes

Bachelor of Science
Students may pursue a bachelor of science degree with a major in economics by meeting the Arts and Sciences general requirements, except for the foreign language requirement, and by completing the following program in the economics department of the College of Business Administration. A bachelor of science in economics consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including the following: Principles of Economics: Micro and Macro (ECON 2200 and 2220), Economic Theory: Micro (ECON 3200), Economic Theory: Macro (ECON 3220), a three-hour course in statistics, 15 hours of economics electives from 3000- or 4000-level courses and six hours of economics electives from 4000-level courses. A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is necessary in each required course. Economics courses are listed in the “College of Business Administration” section of this catalog. Students are required to take Computer Literacy with Applications (CSCI 1000) and either Calculus for

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

Introduction to English Literature (I) Introduction to English Literature (II) American Literature (I) American Literature (II) Native American Literature Literature of Western Civilization: The Ancient World ENGL 2510 Literature of Western Civilization: Middle Ages to Age of Enlightenment ENGL 2520 Literature of Western Civilization: The Modern World AND Three hours of the following classes: ENGL 4340 Shakespeare AND Three hours of the following classes: ENGL 4990 Senior Capstone Seminar Concentration in American Literature ......................27 hours Three hours from the following writing classes: ENGL 2410 Critical Approaches to Literature (preferred course for this concentration) ENGL 2420 Critical Theory and Writing (acceptable with permission when 2410 is not offered) AND Twelve hours from the following American Literature classes: ENGL 4020 American Poetry ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4060 The American Novel ENGL 4080 The American Drama ENGL 4140 American Literary Realism and Naturalism ENGL 4160 Topics in American Regionalism ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4230 Latino Literature ENGL 4250 Introduction to Women’s Studies in Literature ENGL 4260 Women of Color Writers ENGL 4270 Women Writers of the West ENGL 4920 Great Characters ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is American Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is American Lit.) AND Three hours from the following pre-1800 British Literature classes: ENGL 4310 Middle English Literature ENGL 4320 Chaucer ENGL 4330 Sixteenth Century Literature ENGL 4350 Shakespeare’s Contemporaries ENGL 4360 Seventeenth Century Literature ENGL 4370 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature ENGL 4380 The Eighteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is pre-1800 British Lit.)

ENGL 2310 ENGL 2320 ENGL 2450 ENGL 2460 ENGL 2470 ENGL 2500

ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is pre-1800 British Lit.) AND Three hours from the following post-1800 British Literature classes: ENGL 3430 Irish Literature ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4410 Literature of the Romantic Period ENGL 4420 Literature of the Victorian Period ENGL 4430 The Nineteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4460 The Twentieth Century English Novel ENGL 4480 Twentieth Century English Literature ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is post-1800 British Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is post-1800 British Lit.) AND Three hours from the following Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural AND Three hours from the following Writing and Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural ENGL 4730 Rhetoric ENGL 4750 Composition Theory and Practice ENGL 4810 Digital Literacies for Technical Communication ENGL 4820 Autobiography ENGL 4830 Technical Communication ENGL 4840 Travel Writing ENGL 4850 Information Design for Technical Communicators ENGL 4860 Modern Familiar Essay ENGL 4870 Technical Editing ENGL 4880 Community Service Writing ENGL 4890 Technical Communication Capstone Course ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is writing) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is writing) Concentration in British Literature ...........................27 hours Three hours from the following writing classes: ENGL 2410 Critical Approaches to Literature (preferred course for this concentration) ENGL 2420 Critical Theory and Writing (acceptable with permission when 2410 is not offered)

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
AND Six hours from the following pre-1800 British Literature classes: ENGL 4310 Middle English Literature ENGL 4320 Chaucer ENGL 4330 Sixteenth Century Literature ENGL 4350 Shakespeare’s Contemporaries ENGL 4360 Seventeenth Century Literature ENGL 4370 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature ENGL 4380 The Eighteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is pre-1800 British Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is pre-1800 British Lit.) AND Six hours from the following post-1800 British Literature classes: ENGL 3430 Irish Literature ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4410 Literature of the Romantic Period ENGL 4420 Literature of the Victorian Period ENGL 4430 The Nineteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4460 The Twentieth Century English Novel ENGL 4480 Twentieth Century English Literature ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is post-1800 British Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is post-1800 British Lit.) AND Six hours from the following American Literature classes: ENGL 4020 American Poetry ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4060 The American Novel ENGL 4080 The American Drama ENGL 4140 American Literary Realism and Naturalism ENGL 4160 Topics in American Regionalism ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4230 Latino Literature ENGL 4250 Introduction to Women’s Studies in Literature ENGL 4260 Women of Color Writers ENGL 4270 Women Writers of the West ENGL 4920 Great Characters ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is American Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is American Lit.) AND Three hours from the following Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English

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ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural AND Three hours from the following Writing and Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural ENGL 4730 Rhetoric ENGL 4750 Composition Theory and Practice ENGL 4810 Digital Literacies for Technical Communication ENGL 4820 Autobiography ENGL 4830 Technical Communication ENGL 4840 Travel Writing ENGL 4850 Information Design for Technical Communicators ENGL 4860 Modern Familiar Essay ENGL 4870 Technical Editing ENGL 4880 Community Service Writing ENGL 4890 Technical Communication Capstone Course ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is writing) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is writing) Concentration in Writing and Linguistics.................27 hours Three hours from the following writing classes: ENGL 2410 Critical Approaches to Literature (acceptable with permission when 2420 is not offered) ENGL 2420 Critical Theory and Writing (preferred course for this concentration) AND Fifteen hours from the following Writing and Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural ENGL 4730 Rhetoric ENGL 4750 Composition Theory and Practice ENGL 4810 Digital Literacies for Technical Communication ENGL 4820 Autobiography ENGL 4830 Technical Communication ENGL 4840 Travel Writing ENGL 4850 Information Design for Technical Communicators ENGL 4860 Modern Familiar Essay ENGL 4870 Technical Editing ENGL 4880 Community Service Writing ENGL 4890 Technical Communication Capstone Course

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is writing) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is writing) AND Three hours from the following Linguistics classes: ENGL 4610 Introduction to Linguistics ENGL 4620 History of English ENGL 4650 Structure of English ENGL 4670 Sociolinguistics ENGL 4690 Topics in Linguistics ENGL 4710 Communication/Intercultural AND Three hours from the following British Literature classes: ENGL 3430 Irish Literature ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4310 Middle English Literature ENGL 4320 Chaucer ENGL 4330 Sixteenth Century Literature ENGL 4350 Shakespeare’s Contemporaries ENGL 4360 Seventeenth Century Literature ENGL 4370 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature ENGL 4380 The Eighteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4410 Literature of the Romantic Period ENGL 4420 Literature of the Victorian Period ENGL 4430 The Nineteenth Century English Novel ENGL 4460 The Twentieth Century English Novel ENGL 4480 Twentieth Century English Literature ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (When topic is British Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is British Lit.) AND Three hours from the following American Literature classes: ENGL 4020 American Poetry ENGL 4040 Contemporary Poetry of England and America ENGL 4060 The American Novel ENGL 4080 The American Drama ENGL 4140 American Literary Realism and Naturalism ENGL 4160 Topics in American Regionalism ENGL 4180 Major Movements in Contemporary Literature ENGL 4230 Latino Literature ENGL 4250 Introduction to Women’s Studies in Literature ENGL 4260 Women of Color Writers ENGL 4270 Women Writers of the West ENGL 4920 Great Characters ENGL 4940 The History of Literary Criticism ENGL 4960 Topics in Language and Literature (when topic is American Lit.) ENGL 4980 Independent Study (only with permission and when topic is American Lit.)
Note on core and all three concentrations: *Although certain courses can apply in different categories, no one specific course

can be used to satisfy more than one category. Note to graduating seniors: *In order to graduate, majors must complete outcomes assessment measures designated by the department.

Minor in English
Students who elect to minor in English must pass with a grade of “C” or above a minimum of 18 hours in English with the following distribution: - 3 hours of either English 2410 or 2420 - 6 hours of English 2310, 2320, 2450, 2460, 2470, 2500, 2510, 2520 - 9 hours of English courses at the 4000 level (one 3000-level course can be substituted for a 4000level course).
*Those minoring in English who entered the program before fall semester 1998 may substitute English 2430 for English 2410 or 2420. Students can request permission to use English 2410 in place of English 2420 in a semester when 2420 is not offered.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL): Certificate in Course
The English Department offers students the opportunity to obtain a “certificate in course” in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL). Completion of these requirements does not certify a graduate to teach in Nebraska public schools. Instead, it is an academic credential meant for teachers who are already certified in other areas, for people who plan to teach in venues other than public schools, and for anyone who works in some capacity with nonnative speakers of English. Students who wish to receive the certificate must complete the following requirements: 1. Completion of the following five courses (undergraduates must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in three and a minimum grade of “B” in one; graduate students must achieve grades in accordance with Graduate College policies): ENGL 4610/8616; ENGL 4650/8656; ENGL 4690/8696; TED 4000/8006; ENGL 4670/8676 or ENGL 4710/8716 (also offered as SPCH 4530/8536). 2. Completion of a bachelor’s degree in one of the following areas: a major or minor in teaching field in English or a foreign language (College of Education — Secondary); an academic concentration in English or a foreign language (College of Education — Elementary); or a major in English or a foreign language (College of Arts and Sciences). Students can also fulfill this requirement with a completion of an M.A. in English or foreign language. 3. Students from other disciplines wanting to enroll in the TESOL certification program must obtain permission from the TESOL certificate faculty. 4. All students whose language of nurture is not English must demonstrate oral and written mastery of English as certified by the Department of English. The Linguistics Faculty strongly recommends that all TESOL certificate students achieve oral and written proficiency in a second language.

Major in English for Secondary Teaching
Students who elect English as their major field for secondary teaching must pass with a grade of “C” or above courses from each of the following groups:

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
18 hours from English 2230, 2300, 2410, 4610, 4750, and 4860, (9 hours from TED 3750, 4610, and 4660 also required); • 9 hours from English 2310, 2320, 2450 and 2460; • 6 hours from English 4020, 4040, 4060, 4080, 4140, 4160, 4180, 4310, 4320, 4330, 4340, 4350, 4360, 4370, 4380, 4410, 4420, 4430, 4460, 4480 and 4920. Students who elect English as their major field for secondary teaching may select either • a major in the College of Education, • a major in the College of Arts and or Sciences*
*Students must satisfy the requirements for both English as a major field for secondary teaching and for a major in English. Students wishing secondary school certification in English must also satisfactorily complete a sequence of courses in the College of Education.

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For more information…
please call (402) 554-2635.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
The environmental studies major is designed so that a student specializes in one of the following areas of emphasis or options: analytic, earth sciences, geography and planning, life science, or physics. Each option is designed for the student to develop enough depth in that discipline to continue on to graduate school in that discipline. The courses required in each option, however, are also chosen with the intent that a student with a Bachelor’s degree is competitive in the environmental job market. Only a B.S. degree is offered. Analytic Option. The analytic option is designed to produce chemists who are particularly interested in the chemical pollutants that are being released into the air, earth and water environments of our planet. They may find jobs with local and state health departments, state and national environmental protection agencies, local testing laboratories, as well as in the private chemical-producing industries. Typically graduates work as laboratory and field technicians who sample and analyze chemical pollutants. Adviser: Dr. Frederic Laquer. Earth Sciences Option. The earth sciences option is designed to prepare students for a career in environmental geology. Today many environmental problems are associated with the earth and our use of it. Thus, contamination of surface and underground waters, pollution of the soil and construction of dams and other large structures all require earth science environmental specialists to either help alleviate the problem created by misuse, or avoid environmental problems during project development. Many public and private agencies, including engineering and construction firms, have jobs for people trained in this area. Advisers: Dr. Harmon Maher or Dr. Bob Shuster. Geography and Planning Option. The geography and planning option is primarily designed to produce local and regional planning specialists who have a good understanding of environmental problems. Anytime humans change the nature of the landscape by constructing new housing developments, highways, shopping centers, etc. a potentially negative environmental impact to the natural landscape exists. Today planners who are environmentally sensitive are in great demand to help avoid the common confrontations that arise between developers and those

groups that are affected by the project. Advisers: Dr. Charles Gildersleeve or Dr. Jeff Peake. Life Science Option. The life science option is designed to prepare a student for jobs in environmental biology which have something to do with the impact of modern technology and change on life forms. These include working as pollution monitoring technicians for various public agencies such as county and state health departments, as well as state and national environmental protection agencies; students may also find themselves attracted to jobs with local, regional and national nature conservation agencies, both public and private. These jobs may involve monitoring endangered species, evaluating habitat, making inventories of wildlife, or interpreting nature as a ranger in a public or private environmental education center. Adviser: Dr. John McCarty. Physics Option. The physics environmental option combines the skills of a trained physicist, namely understanding of a broad range of instruments and measurements together with the ability to apply a variety of mathematical techniques toward simulating and evaluating environmental systems. Physicists, in conjunction with many other professionals, work on monitoring the environment for conservation, safety and economic utilization. Industry and governments employ such persons for the study of various pollutants, including noise, heat, light (infrared, visible, ultraviolet) and radioactivity. Advisers: Dr. Robert Graham or Dr. Dan Wilkins.

Environmental Studies - The Core Curriculum
All environmental studies majors complete a core of courses which provide breadth, environmental values, and a fundamental understanding of our social/legal processes. Some of the courses in the core curriculum may be used to fulfill divisional requirements. Note that some required course areas in the core curriculum may be fulfilled by several options. Students who are unsure about which option to choose should contact any of the advisers listed above. Courses needed to fulfill the core curriculum include BIOL 1330*; CHEM 1010**; CHEM 1014**; GEOL 1010; ECON 2200; GEOG 1030 or GEOG 1060 or GEOG 1070; LAWS 3910 or PA 2170 or ECON 3320 or BIOL 4820/GEOG4820; PHIL 2030 or PHIL 3180; SOC 3840 or SOC 3850 or an approved course in sociology; An approved course in statistics; BIOL/GEOG/GEOL 4610;BIOL/GEOG/GEOL 4800.
*not required in life science option **not required in analytic and physics options.

Environmental Studies - Option Curricula
To fulfill the Analytic Option the following is required: CHEM 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2210-2214 or 2250/22602274, plus 2400-2404, 2500, 3350-3354, 3414, 3650-3654 and 3030. Plus the following cognate courses: BIOL 2440, an approved course in computer science, GEOG 4010, MATH 1950/1960, PHYS 2110, 2120, 1154, 1164 and one course from the following: GEOG 2620, 3510, 4630, GEOL 1170, 2600, 4540. The Earth Science Option follows: GEOL 1170, 4260, and GEOG 4330 are required. An additional 26 hours are required and may be chosen from the following courses: GEOL 1180, 2500, 2600, 2750-2754, 2760-2764, 3300,

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

3310, 3400, 4400, 4540, and GEOG 3510, 4010, 4100, 4320, or 4630 (or other courses as approved by an adviser). Plus one of the following chemistry sequences: CHEM 1140-1144, 2210-2214, 3650-3654 or 1180-1184, 11901194, 2210-2214. Plus one of the following physics sequences: PHYS 1050-1054 or 1110-1154 or 2110. The geography and planning option requires GEOG 1000 or 1020 plus UBNS 1010, GEOG 4120, and GEOG 3530, 3540. Three courses are to be selected from the following: GEOG 3440, 3510, 4100, 4260, 4320, 4330, or 4340. Two courses are to be selected from GEOG 3130, 3440, 3930, 4010, 4120, or 4820. Two courses should be chosen from the following: GEOG 4020, 4030, 4050, 4610, 4630 or 4660. Two courses must be taken from the following: BIOL 1450, 3340, 3530, 4120, 4180, or 4210. Two computer science courses must be taken (to be approved by an adviser). CHEM 1140/1144 and PHYS 1050/1054 must be taken. The Life Science Option requires BIOL 1450, 1750, 2140, 2440, 3340, 3530, 4120, plus two additional upper division courses in biology: one of the following chemistry sequences; CHEM 1140-1144, 2210-2214, 3650-3654; or CHEM 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2210-2214, 3650-3654; or CHEM 1180-1184, 1190-1194, 2250, 2260-2274: one of the following physics sequences; PHYS 1050-1054 or 11101154, 1120-1164. The Physics Option requires the introductory courses (PHYS 1110-2150 or 2110 and 1120-2160 or 2120, 1154, 1164, 3250 and 3260), the physics core courses (PHYS 3020, 3450, 3750, 3850 and 4200), two advanced laboratory courses chosen from among PHYS 3504, 3524, 3544 or 3564, CHEM 1180-1184, 1190-1194. The calculus courses MATH 1950, 1960 and 1970. In addition, the environmental physics courses PHYS 2030 (Energy and Fuels), PHYS 2040 (Radiation Fundamentals) and PHYS 4800 (Internship).

Italian. In addition, it participates in such interdisciplinary programs as Latin American Studies, International Studies and English as a Second Language, and also offers summer courses in Germany, Mexico, Quebec, and Russia. French 4040, German 4040, and Spanish 4040 are the approved university third writing courses for French, German and Spanish majors and minors respectively. Students must have completed English 1160 in order to take their third writing course (of the university core curriculum) in a foreign language. There is a laboratory fee for all foreign language courses at the 1000 and 2000 levels. The Department of Foreign Languages does not accept transfer credits from any institution for its 1000/2000 level courses except for those as allowed by the College of Arts and Sciences. To enroll in any French, German, Russian or Spanish course beyond 1110, a student who has not successfully completed the prerequisite courses at UNO must take the appropriate placement exam and qualify for the desired course. All students are subject to this requirement including transfer students. UNK/UNL students are not exempt from this requirement. The Department of Foreign Languages reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student who has not met the prerequisites for a course. Transfer courses at the 3000/4000 level are subject to the approval of a departmental adviser and the department chair. All foreign language courses must be completed with a grade of C or better to continue to the next course.

Major in Foreign Languages
Thirty credit hours at the 3000 and 4000 level are required for a major in French, German or Spanish as follows. Requirements for a major in French are 3030, Conversation; 3040, Grammar and Composition; 3150, Introduction to Literature I; 3160, Introduction to Literature II; 3370, French Civilization; 4030, Advanced Conversation; 4040, Advanced Composition and Stylistics; and 9 credit hours of electives in French at the 3000 or 4000 level other than “Introduction to Linguistics” and “Applied Linguistics.” Requirements for a major in German are 3030, Conversation; 3040, Grammar and Composition; 3150, Introduction to Literature; 3370, Civilization; 4030, Advanced Conversation; 4040, Advanced Composition and Stylistics; and 12 credit hours of electives in German at the 3000 or 4000 level other than “Introduction to Linguistics” and “Applied Linguistics.” Requirements for a major in Spanish are 3030, Conversation; 3040, Grammar and Composition; 4030, Advanced Conversation; and 4040, Advanced Composition and Stylistics. Six hours from 3170, Survey of Spanish Literature I; 3180, Survey of Spanish Literature II; 3210, Survey of Latin American Literature I; and 3220, Survey of Latin American Literature II. Three hours from Spanish 3410, Spanish Civilization or 3420, Latin American Civilization. Nine credit hours of electives in Spanish at the 3000 or 4000 level other than “Introduction to Linguistics” and “Applied Linguistics.” Native speakers of Spanish should see a departmental adviser regarding major requirements.

Minor in Environmental Studies
Environmental Biology, 3 credit hours Chemistry in the Environment and Society or CHEM 3030 Environmental Chemistry, 3 credit hours GEOL 1010 Environmental Geology, 3 credit hours PHIL 3180 Environmental Ethics, 3 credit hours Plus 9 credit hours chosen from the following list, provided that those courses are not in the student’s major field of study: Biology 3340, 3530, 3730, 4100, 4120, 4210, 4220, 4230, 4270, 4340, 4350, 4370, 4540, 4610, 4780, 4790, 4800, 4820, 4840, 4880, 4910, 4920, 4940, 4980; Chemistry 3030, 3414, 3650/3654; Geography 3130, 3510, 3530, 3540, 3930, 4010, 4020, 4030, 4050, 4100, 4120, 4250, 4260, 4320, 4330, 4340, 4610, 4630, 4820; Geology 2600, 3300, 3310, 3400, 4540. Exceptions must be approved by the Environmental Studies Coordinating Committee. BIOL 1330 CHEM 1010

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2849.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE
The department offers undergraduate majors and minors in French, German, and Spanish as well as courses through the intermediate level in Hebrew, Russian, Japanese, and

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
All foreign language majors must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours in their major language at the 3000 and 4000 level in residence at UNO. It is strongly recommended that all foreign language majors include a study abroad component of at least one month during the second half of their program of study. All courses credited to a major or minor in a foreign language must be passed with a grade of “C-” or better. Courses in the 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120 sequences may not be taken out of order. Students must pass the prerequisite course with a grade of “C” or better before taking the next course in the sequence, and may not take an earlier course in any sequence for credit once they have received credit in a later course in any sequence. All 3000 and 4000 courses may be taken for honors credit in cooperation with the honors program.

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3030, 3060, 3070, 3080, 3230, 3240, or 4900; b. US regional (choose one of the following) 3330, 4230 or 4530. Group 3 a. 3530 and 3540 are required. b. choose one of the following: 2620, 4020, 4030, 4050, 4610, 4630, 4660 or 4800.

Additional upper division courses to meet the required 36 credit hour minimum for the major may be taken in any area. Bachelor of Science
Requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in geography are the same as for the B.A. except that in lieu of a foreign language the following courses are required: • Computer Science: six credit hours of approved courses; • Mathematics 1530 (or other approved statistics course) Advanced Writing Course English 2400 has been approved as the advanced writing course for geography majors (Both B.S. and B.A.).

Minor in Foreign Languages
All foreign language minors must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours in their minor language at the 3000 or 4000 level in residence at UNO. A minimum of 15 credit hours in courses at the 3000 and 4000 level are required for a minor in French, German, Russian or Spanish. Native speakers of any of these languages should see a departmental adviser regarding minor requirements.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-4841.

Minor
A minor in geography requires a minimum of 22-24 credit hours including 1000 or 1020, 1060, 1070, plus an additional four upper level courses under specific faculty advisement.

GENERAL SCIENCE
In addition to college requirements, a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in general science consists of 49-50 credit hours of natural science courses as follows: Chemistry 1180-1184 and 1190-1194; Physics 1110-1154 and 1120-1164 or Physics 2110-1154 and 2120-1164; Mathematics 1950 or Mathematics 1530 and 1930; Biology 1450 and 1750; Geology 1170; plus 12 credit hours of natural science courses at the 2000 level or higher from at least two departments, chosen in consultation with your adviser. Only a B.A. degree is offered.

Concentrations
For students who wish more concentrated applications in geography, the department also offers undergraduate concentrations in geographic information systems as well as travel and tourism. The specific course requirements for these concentrations may also be used to satisfy the major requirements. Concentration in Geographic Information Systems a. Computer Science: 9 credit hours of approved coursework b. Mathematics 1530 (or other approved statistics course) c. MATH 1320, 1330 d. Geography 3530, 3540, and either 4050 or 4030 Concentration in Travel and Tourism a. GEOG 1000 and 1020 b. GEOG 3000 c. Two courses from the following GEOG 3060, 3130, 3230, 3240, 3330, 4230 d. GEOG 3530 and 3540 e. RLS 2440 and 2920 or 4000 (when taught as travel and tourism) NOTE: A geography major is also available through the Colleges of Education and the Division of Continuing Studies. Courses 1030, 1060, 1070, 2620, 3510, 3530, 3540, 4030, 4050, 4100, 4250, 4260, 4320, 4630 and 4660 offer credit in the Natural Science Division. All other geography courses offer credit in the Social Science Division in the University.

GEOGRAPHY Bachelor of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in geography consists of 36 credit hours plus two years of college work in one foreign language or the equivalent as determined by the Department of Foreign Languages. Lower division requirements: 1000 or 1020; 1060 and 1070. If Geography 1030 is taken prior to a major declaration, then Geography 1070 and Geography 3510 must be taken to satisfy the core in physical geography. Geography 3510 in this case then also counts toward upper division physical requirements (Group 1). Courses from the following upper division groups are required: Group 1 a. Physical (choose one of the following): 3510, 4040, 4100, 4260, 4320, 4330 or 4340. b. Human (choose two of the following): 3130, 3440, 3930, 4010, 4120, 4150, 4160 or 4900. Group 2 a. World regional (choose one of the following) 3000,

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

GEOLOGY Bachelor of Science
All majors must take the following Geology courses: 1170, 1174, 2300, 2750, 2754, 3400, 4620, and 4950, which serve as a core. Majors also choose from one of the following three options: a graduate school track, industry track, and education track. It is critical that students consult with a geology adviser when choosing which option to pursue. The different options are directed toward different career paths. Geology courses required for the graduate school track are 1180, 1184, 2760, 2764, 3300, 3310, 4260. In addition, the student must complete one of the following Geology courses: 3100 & 3104, 4040, 4400, 4540. Cognate courses required by the graduate school track include Chemistry 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, Math 1950 and 1960, Physics 2110, 2120, and one of the following: Statistical Methods 3000, Geography 4050, 4630. Courses required for the industry track are Geology 3300, 3310, 4540 and Geography 4330. In addition, the major must complete two of the following Geology courses: 2600, 2760 & 2764, 3100 & 3104, 4040, 4260, 4400. Cognate courses required by the industry track are Math 1930, Physics 2110, 2120, Chemistry 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, and three courses from the following selection: Statistical Methods 3000, 3010, Geography 4030, 4050, 4630, Computer Science 1610, 1620. Geology courses required for the education track are 1180, 1184, 3300. In addition, the student must take two additional geology courses that should be chosen after consultation with an adviser. Cognate courses required are Physics 1110 and 1120, Chemistry 1140, and a Statistics course. In addition, after consultation with an adviser, three additional cognate courses in Education, or Computer Science, or Computer Mapping and GIS courses (3540, 4030, 4050, 4630) are required.

For more information…
about geography or geology, please call (402) 554-2662 or visit maps.unomaha.edu/geo/.

HISTORY Bachelor of Arts
In addition to Arts and Sciences college requirements, including the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, students who elect a major in history and seek the B.A. degree must pass, with at least a “C-” grade, History 1000 and 1010; nine hours from among History 1020-2990 (no more than three hours of History 2990 may be taken to fulfill the nine hour requirement); and 21 hours of history or the equivalents from courses in the 3000 and 4000 levels. The 21 hours must include History 3930 (Historical Research). No upper-division courses offered toward a degree in history may be taken on a Credit/No Credit basis. Students wishing to substitute any course in partial fulfillment of the history major must petition the Executive Committee of the department of history. In so doing they must demonstrate that the proposed substitute is germane to their particular historical field of interest. Such petition must be made and approved before enrollment. There will be no credit by examination for history courses except through CLEP, and only for History 1110/1120.

Bachelor of Science
Students who plan to undertake graduate study in history are advised that the B.A. degree is preferred to the B.S. degree by most graduate admissions committees and that knowledge of one or more foreign languages is necessary in most fields of historical research and writing. Students who elect a major in history and seek the B.S. degree must meet the same history requirements and follow the course of study outlined for the B.A. degree with two important exceptions. First, students working toward the B.S. degree are exempt from the foreign language requirement of College of Arts and Sciences. Second, all candidates for the B.S. degree must successfully complete 15 credit hours in cognate courses, including one 3-hour course in logic ( Philosophy 2010) or statistics (Mathematics 1530 or Psychology 3130 or Sociology 2130) or any one of the “Writing Courses” approved by the College of Arts and Sciences (in addition to HIST 3930). The balance of the hours must include twelve hours from 3000/4000 level courses selected to complement the student’s interests in history. None of the foregoing courses may be used to fulfill the “Enhancement of Fundamental Competencies” requirements or any “Distribution Requirements” of the College of Arts and Sciences. Approval for the 15 hours of cognate courses for the B.S. in history shall be in the form of a written contract to be signed by the student’s history faculty adviser and placed in the student’s file.

Bachelor of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts degree in geology consists of a minimum of 44 credit hours. The following geology courses are required: 1170, 1174, 1180, 1184, 2750, 2754, 2760, 2764, 3100, 3104, 3300, 3310, 3400, 4950, geology summer field camp 4620, one course from 4250, 4260, or GEOG 4330, and one geology course from 2600, 4400, 4540, or another course approved by an adviser. A Bachelor of Arts degree also requires a program of: Chemistry 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194; Physics 2110, 2120; Math 1930 or 1950 and 1960 (consult adviser when choosing); and any two of statistical methods 3000 or 3010, or GEOG 4050 or GEOG 4630. In addition, a student must complete two years of college work in one foreign language or the equivalent as determined by the department of foreign languages.

Minor
The requirements for a minor in geology are 1170 and 1180 (8 credit hours) plus an additional 15 hours (including at least 12 hours of 3000- and/or 4000-level courses) from selected optional courses under specific faculty advisement. Students wishing to emphasize geology beyond the minor may wish to enroll in the interdisciplinary studies major.
*All geology courses offer credit in the Natural Science Division of the University.

Bachelor of General Studies
Students who wish to complete a B.G.S. degree with a concentration in history should talk to an adviser in the Division of Continuing Studies. This degree requires 30 credit hours in history, of which nine hours must be at the 3000/4000 level. History 3930 is recommended for every student who plans to pursue a graduate degree in history.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
Advanced Writing Course
History 3930 is the advanced writing course for history majors (English 1160 is a prerequisite). Students must obtain the written permission of the department chairperson in order to enroll.

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Minor in History
Students may take a minor in history by completing 15 hours in history at the 2000-4990 levels, with at least 12 hours in 3000-4000 level courses. All courses must be completed with a grade of “C-” or above.

Pre-Law
Students majoring in history, who also with to undertake professional training in law, are encouraged to complete all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Pre-law advisers for history majors will assist each student in the selection of a program that will enable that student to attain a broad general education while progressing toward the bachelor’s degree.

Education Subject Endorsement
Those students seeking a subject endorsement for a degree in the College of Education must take History 1000/1010 and 1110/1120; 6 hours of coursework at the 2000 level; 18 hours of coursework at the 3000/4000 level; and 6 hours of work in cognate courses. For advice, please check with Student Services in the College of Education (KH 326).

Western Civilization/World Civilizations
Transfer students who have taken two semesters of Western Civilizations may count 3 hours toward the World Civilizations II requirement and then take 3 hours of History 1000 to complete their World Civilizations requirement or they may take one of the following: History 2190, 2470, 2480, 2810, 2820.

cultures. Many INST majors have a double major or a minor in a foreign language. At a minimum, in order to satisfy the INST foreign language requirement, majors must complete the equivalent of three years of university-level foreign language study, or two years each of two foreign languages. INST majors must also complete a minimum of 45 credit hours in the approved International Studies core curriculum: INST 2130 and 4140 (International Studies I and Topics in International Studies), Geography 1020 (Introduction to Human Geography), PSCI 2210 (International Relations), and Economics 2200 (Principles of Micro Economics). A major in International Studies must meet or exceed the requirements for a major as specified by the College of Arts and Sciences, including at least 18 upper division credit hours. Beyond the core courses and foreign language classes, the curriculum for INST majors is constructed of those courses that have an international focus in disciplines such as history, political science, geography/geology, sociology, economics, philosophy and religion, English and related courses in the fine arts and humanities. Each INST major must choose at least one Specialization from among the six options listed below. One should be either an Area Studies Specialization or the Global Strategic Studies Specialization. Most INST majors combine two Specializations. Examples: Area Studies Specialization with Global Strategic Studies; International Management and Business with an Area Studies; two Areas of preference; International Nonprofit Management and an Area Studies preference. The INST Specializations: Area Studies (AS) This Specialization offers the opportunity to focus on one or more areas of regional interest. Examples are: Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe and Russia , Western Europe, East Asia , and Third World Development. It may be possible to work out other areas of concentration, depending on the availability of relevant courses at a given time. Individuals opting for an Area Studies Specialization must complete at least 15 hours of upper division courses on the region they select. At least one foreign language studied by those selecting this Specialization must be associated with the area chosen. Global Strategic Studies (GSS) This Specialization is designed for individuals interested in careers in government and international security, and in teaching in secondary and higher education. In addition to the INST core courses, students will complete at least 15 hours of coursework from the following choices: Economic Geography (ECON or GEOG 3130); International Trade (ECON 4610); International Monetary Economics (ECON 4620); International Economic Development (ECON 4660); Political Geography (GEOG 3930); American Diplomatic History (HIST 4350); Europe and America in the Two World Wars (HIST 4710); International Organizations (PSCI 3220); United States Foreign Policy (PSCI 3260); International Political Economy (PSCI 3920); International Political Development (PSCI 3920).

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2593.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
As an alternative to the departmental major, the interdisciplinary studies program enables the student whose interests follow area or topic lines to undertake an interdisciplinary, integrated program of studies. Each student’s interdisciplinary major is structured to fit his or her particular interest area; however, all college requirements must be satisfied. Students interested in the program should contact the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences no later than the first semester of the junior year. Either the B.A. or B.S. degree is offered.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
The International Studies (INST) Major at UNO provides a substantial foundation for professional careers in international management and business, teaching, government service, and with non-profit organizations. The program also prepares students for graduate study in a variety of disciplines, including business, international management, and law. The International Studies Faculty encourage students majoring in International Studies to place significant emphasis on foreign language and the study of other

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

International Management and Business (IMB) This Specialization is recommended for individuals interested in careers in government, international private organizations and foundations, and international business and commerce. Students choosing this Specialization may take courses from the areas of International Finance, International Marketing, and International Economics, as well as related courses in Political Science, Geography, History, et alia. Students choosing to specialize in International Management and Business must add the following to their core courses: ACCT 2010, 2020 (Principles of Accounting I and II), and Economics 2220 (Principles of Macro Economics), and must complete at least 15 hours of upper division business courses. International Nonprofit Management (INM) The International Nonprofit Management option is recommended for individuals interested in careers with international non-profit organizations, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), or Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs). Students may obtain American Humanics (AH) certification through a cooperative arrangement with the AH program. This requires a 300-hour internship/practicum in a nonprofit agency, active involvement in the AH Student Association, and attendance at one AH Management Institute. T he following coursework must also be completed: ACCT 2010, ECON 2220, MGMT 3490, MGMT 3510, MKT 3310, PA 3500, PA 4500, and INST 3000. Choice of one of the following: SPCH 2010, 2410, 4510 or 4530. Choice of one of the following: FMCS 1600, SOWK 1000, or PSYC 2500. Six Options are available for a student to pursue these Specializations to satisfy the requirements for a major in International Studies: 1. International Studies with an Area Studies Specialization. 2. International Studies with a Global Strategic Studies Specialization. 3. International Studies with an International Management and Business Specialization. 4. International Studies with an International Nonprofit Management Specialization. 5. International Studies with a combination of the Specializations in 1, 2, 3, and/or 4. 6. Double Major: International Studies as in 1, 2, 3, 4 and/or 5 plus a major in another discipline.

societies in the United States and throughout the Americas. Coursework in the Latino/Latin American Studies major prepares undergraduate students for a wide variety of career options. A major in Latino/Latin American Studies (LLS) or a minor in Chicano/Latino Studies (CLS) may be particularly useful to those students planning a career in which Latino and Latin American issues are central: public service, education, law, health, counseling, and business are but a few examples. Moreover, the major and minor serve more than just a specific Latino constituency as the impact of demographic and social trends are reflected in the lives of non-Latinos. We encourage students to declare Latino/Latin American Studies as a double major as well.

Major
A major in Latino/Latin American Studies requires 30 credit hours. Six of those hours must be earned through the completion of LLS 1000 and LLS 1010 or 1020. Three hours are earned through the completion of a senior level or capstone course selected from courses pre-approved by the OLLAS director which include: SOC 4900, PSCI 4950, LLS 3900 or LLS 4900. Any of these courses also fulfill the college’s third writing course requirement. The remaining 21 hours are earned through the completion of approved Latino/Latin American Studies courses and a Research Methods course (see the lists below). The following Research Methods courses also fulfill the college’s quantitative literacy requirement: CJUS 2510, SOC 2130, SOC 2510, PSCI 2000, PSCI 3000, PSYC 3130 and PSYC 3140 (or other courses approved by the academic adviser or director). A maximum of nine hours taken within a single department may be counted toward the major. All students must complete sixteen hours of Spanish (or equivalent) to fulfill the college language requirement for the B.A. degree. All LLS approved courses meet the college’s diversity requirements.

Minor
A minor in Chicano/Latino Studies (CLS) requires 18 hours. The minor may be secured by completing one of the CLS introductory courses LLS 1010 or 1020. Twelve of the 18 hours must also be taken at the 3000-4000 level among the approved courses. A maximum of nine hours taken within a single department may be counted toward the minor. Successful completion of at least the first-year introductory Spanish courses is strongly recommended. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course counted by the student toward this minor.

For information about the International Studies Major:
International Studies and Programs Arts and Sciences Hall, Room 238 University of Nebraska at Omaha Omaha, NE 68182-0227 Phone: (402) 554-2376 Fax (402) 554-3681 Email: world@unomaha.edu Web site: world.unomaha.edu

Approved courses for Latino/Latin American Studies:
Core Courses LLS 1000 – Intro to Latino/Latin American Studies ........3 LLS 1010 – Intro to Chicano/Latino Studies: Social Sciences ...................................................................3 LLS 1020 – Intro to Chicano/Latino Studies: Humanities .................................................................3 Research Methods Courses CJUS 2510 – Research Methods....................................3 SOC 2510 – Research Methods .....................................3 SOC 2130 – Basic Statistics...........................................3 PSCI 2000 – Political Inquiry...........................................3

LATINO/LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (LLS)
The Latino/Latin American Studies major offers a transnational, interdisciplinary and comparative program of study of the social, economic, political and cultural forces shaping the experience of Latino and Latin American

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
PSCI 3000 – Applied Statistics or Data Processing ......3 PSYC 3130 – Statistics for Behavioral Sciences ............3 PSYC 3140 – Methods of Psychological Inquiry ............3 Or another course that fulfills the quantitative literacy requirement from another major with the approval of the OLLAS director. Senior Seminar/Capstone Courses LLS 3900 – Special Topics: Senior Capstone Project ....3 LLS 4900 – Independent Study ......................................3 Or another course that fulfills the third writing requirement from another major with the approval of the OLLAS director. Latin American Studies Courses ANTH 4230 – Ethno-medicines of the Americas ............3 ART 2040 – Cross-cultural Survey of Art ........................3 ART 4000/8006 – Special Studies: Art Ed. In Mexico.....3 ART 4700/8706 - Cross Cultural Art History for Teachers ...............................................................3 ENGL 4960/8966 - Special Topics: New World Contact & Lit. .............................................................3 GEOG 3060 – Geography of Middle America.................3 HIST 2470 – Latin American History: Mexico and the Caribbean ..................................................................3 HIST 2480 – Latin American History: South America ....3 HIST 4910 – Special Topics: Modern Mexico; Latina/Latin American Women; Spanish Speaking Caribbean .................................................................3 LLS 2900 - Special Topics in LLS: Social Sciences .......3 LLS 3800 - Special Topics in LLS: Humanities ...............3 LLS 3900 – Special Topics in LLS...................................3 LLS 4900 – Independent Study ......................................3 PSCI 3680 – Latin American Politics ..............................3 PSCI 3960 – Special Topics: Cuba at the Crossroads....3 PSCI 4280/8286 – Inter-American Politics .....................3 SOC 3950 – Sociology of Latin America ........................3 SOC 4250/8256 – Latino Migration in the World Economy ....................................................................3 SOWK 4890 – Special Studies: Nicaragua .....................3 SPAN 3210 – Survey of Latin American Literature I........3 SPAN 3220 – Survey of Latin American Literature II.......3 SPAN 3420 – Latin American Civilization........................3 SPAN 4050 – Seminar in Mexican Culture and Civilization ..................................................................3 SPAN 4160 – Latin American Literature of the 20th Century ......................................................................3 SPAN 4180 – Latino Literature and Culture ....................3 SPAN 4350 – Latin American Short Story.......................3 SPAN 4440 – Spanish American Theater........................3 SPAN 4900 – Independent Study (Cuernavaca Trip) ......3 SPAN 4960 – Pro-seminar (Cuernavaca Trip) .................3 Chicano/Latino Studies Courses ANTH 4230 – Topics: Ethno-medicines of the Americas 3 ART 2040 – Cross-Cultural Survey of Art .......................3 ART 4700/8706 - Cross Cultural Art History for Teachers ...............................................................3 ENGL 4960/8966 - Special Topics: New World Contact & Lit. .............................................................3 FMSC 4930 - Immigrant Families ...................................3 ENGL 2000 – Topics: Language in the Minority..............1

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ENGL 4160 – Topics in Amer Regionalism: Southwest Literature ....................................................................3 ENGL 4230 – Latino Literature........................................3 HIST 4910 – Special Topics: Latinos in the U.S.; Latina/Latin American Women ..................................3 LLS 2900 - Special Topics in LLS: Social Sciences .......3 LLS 3800 - Special Topics in LLS: Humanities ...............3 LLS 3900 – Special Topics in LLS...................................3 LLS 4900 – Independent Study ......................................3 PSCI 3140 – Latino/a Politics .........................................3 PSCI 4280/8286 – Inter-American Politics .....................3 SOC 2800 – Major Social Issues: Women of Color; Cultural Groups and Equity; Mexican American Identity .......................................................................3 SOC 4250/8256 – Latino/a Migration in the World Economy ....................................................................3 SOC 4700 –Women’s Health and Issues of Diversity .....3 SOWK 4030/8036 – Social Work with Hispanics............3 SPAN 4050 – Seminar in Mexican Culture and Civilization ..................................................................3 SPAN 4180 – Latino Literature and Culture ....................3 Students seeking a major in Latino/Latin American Studies or a minor in Chicano/Latino Studies and/or information about the Office of Latino/Latin American Studies (OLLAS) and its programs can stop by the office in ASH 106. You may also contact Lucy Garza, OLLAS Project Coordinator and academic adviser at (402) 554-3835 or lgarza@mail.unomaha.edu.

For more information…
about student opportunities and OLLAS events, visit the OLLAS Web site at www.unomaha.edu/ollas.

MATHEMATICS Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science with a Major in Mathematical Sciences
Students wishing to specialize in mathematics and intending to do either graduate work in mathematics or work in business and industry will be interested in this degree. The degree with a major in the mathematical sciences consists of 47 hours of required courses in mathematics and computer science, combined with either (1) for the Bachelor of Science degree, 18 hours in related cognate courses outside the department (which must be developed with an adviser and specifically approved by the Mathematics and Statistics Curriculum Committee of the department of mathematics) or (2) for the Bachelor of Arts degree, 16 hours in a foreign language. Specifically, the requirements are as follows: • Required mathematics courses - 1950, 1960, 1970; 2230; 2050; 3100; 3230; 3350; 4740 and three upper division (courses numbered 3000 or above) mathematics electives (nine hours) including two 4000-level courses. • Two 3-hour courses in computing from the following: CIST 1400, CSCI 1620, MATH 2200, or MATH 3200. • For the Bachelor of Science degree, 18 hours in cognate courses outside the department and approved by the department as a cohesive group of courses.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

• • • •

For the Bachelor of Arts degree, 16 hours in a foreign language. There are five suggested alternatives for the upper division mathematics electives: applied mathematics, computer science, operations research, statistics, and traditional mathematics. Further information is available in the degree brochure which can be obtained in DSC 203. The MFAT national exam must be taken in one of the two semesters prior to graduation. Completion of the required computer algebra competency typically in MATH 2050. All courses required for the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance philosophy); Religion 3170, 3200, 3500 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance religion)

For more information
see Professor Robert Darcy, Program Coordinator, or visit the Web at arts.unomaha.edu/art/med-ren/index.html

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (Minor Only)
Native American Studies (NAS) currently offers an interdisciplinary minor. The NAS minor requires 18 credit hours, of which 12 must be 3000 and/or 4000 level. All minors are required to complete NAMS 1100 (Introduction to Native American Studies). The other 15 hours may be taken in any course approved for credit in the Native American Studies program. A grade of “C”or better is required for all classes. Students may also elect an interdisciplinary major with an emphasis in Native American Studies (through the College of Arts and Sciences). The program should be initiated by the beginning of the junior year. Native American Studies at UNO offers students an opportunity to learn about Native American cultures, literature, history, arts, values, lifeways, spirituality, and social and political institutions. Our program has a longstanding tradition of activism on contemporary issues and includes a focus on urban Indian issues, providing students with the opportunity to engage in meaningful communitybased research. Course Offerings Include: NAMS 1100 Introduction to Native American Studies ANTH 3220 Peoples & Cultures of Native North America ANTH 4230 Ethnomedicines of the Americas ANTH 4220/8226 North American Archaeology ANTH 4920/8926 Topics: Asphalt Rez ANTH 4920/8926 Topics: Sacred Existence ANTH 4920/8926 Topics: Native Americans & Health ANTH 4920/8926 Topics: Indians & Anthropologists ENGL 2000 Topics: Language in the Minority (1 cr. hour) ENGL 2470 Native American Literature ENGL 3100 Major Figures in Native American Literature ENGL 4960/8966 Topics: Creative Spirit ENGL 4960/8966 Topics: 20th Century Dialogues w/ Dominant Culture ENGL 4160/8166: Topics: Southwest Literature ENGL 8100: Seminar in Native American Non-Fiction HIST 4400/8406 History of North American Indians HIST 4910/8916 Topics: Sioux History HIST 4910/8916 Topics: Native American Environmentalism HIST 4910/8916 Topics: Indian Education MUS 4090 Native American Music PSCI 3920 Topics: Federal Indian Law PSCI 3920 Topics: Tribal Government RELI 3020 Native American Religion RELI 3030 Shamanism SOWK 4010/8016 Social Work with American Indians

Third Writing Course
To satisfy the third writing course required by the College of Arts and Sciences, the department recommends either GET 2140 - Technical Writing or English 3980-Special Topics in Composition/Technical Writing. English 2400 Advanced Composition will also be accepted. The student may petition the department to meet this requirement with some other course for which English 1160 is a prerequisite.

Minor in Mathematics
A minor in mathematics may be obtained by successful completion of 26 hours in mathematics courses consisting of MATH 1950, 1960, 1970, 2230 or 2030, 2050, and two mathematics courses at the 3000 or 4000 level (including STAT 3800). Students earning a minor in mathematics must obtain the appropriate form from the mathematics department (DSC 203). The completed and signed form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3430.

MEDIEVAL/RENAISSANCE STUDIES Minor
The minor in Medieval/ Renaissance Studies requires the completion of 18 credit hours of approved courses, with a grade of “C” or above. Courses must be taken in at least three of the four subject categories below. In addition, students must present two years of college work, or the equivalent, in one of the following foreign languages: French, German, Italian, Latin (Classical or Medieval), Russian, or Spanish. Subject Categories and Approved Courses: A. Literature: English 4310, 4320, 4330, 4340, 4350, 4360, 4960 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance literature); French 3150; Spanish 3170, 4090, 4960 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance literature) B. Fine Arts: Art 3760 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance art), 3770, 4720, 4750, 4770, 4780, 4810, 4830, 4930 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance literature); Music 4540. C. History: History 4530, 4540, 4610, 4910 (when the topic pertains to medieval or Renaissance history) D. Philosophy and Religion: Philosophy 3500 (when

For more information…
Students seeking advising or information about Native American Studies at UNO should see Dr. Beth R. Ritter (Director of Academic Programs), ASH 383K, (402) 554-

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
3376 or (402) 554-2626. Current semester course offerings and further program information may be found at: www.unomaha.edu/nas/

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PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION
The department offers a major in either philosophy or religion.

Philosophy Major
In addition to the general requirements for the B.A. degree, a major in philosophy may be secured by successfully completing 33 credit hours in philosophy, of which at least 21 hours must be in upper division courses. The department requires the following courses for all philosophy majors: Critical Reasoning (1210) or Logic (2010); Introduction to Ethics (2030) or Contemporary Moral Problems (1020); and History of Ancient Philosophy (2110). Logic (2010) is strongly recommended for students who wish to be recommended for graduate school. The following upper division courses are required: History of Modern Philosophy (3130); Theory of Knowledge (3600); Metaphysics (3700); and Contemporary Ethical Philosophy (3050). One of the following is strongly recommended: Philosophy of Natural Science (3400) or Philosophy of Social Sciences (3410). One of the following is also strongly recommended: Social Philosophy (3210) or History of Modern Philosophy (3130) or Philosophy of Religion (3200) or Philosophy of Art (3220).

the field, of which at least 18 hours must be in upper division courses. The department requires of all religion majors the following courses: Introduction to World Religions (RELI 1010); Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (RELI 2150); New Testament (RELI 2160); and Senior Seminar in Religion (RELI 4010), which is the third writing course. In addition, one of the following is also required: Native American Religions (3020), Shamanism (3030), Religions of the East (3050), Islam (3200), or The Buddhist Tradition (4020).

Religion Minor
An undergraduate minor in religion will consist of at least 18 hours in religion, of which at least nine must be upper division (3000-level or above). RELI 1010 is strongly recommended for the minor in religion. The three-hour Summer Biblical Archaeology Dig (RELI 3500) may be combined with Readings in Religion (RELI 3960) for three additional hours in religion, or it may be combined with International Studies 3000 to earn three hours in international studies. If taken as religion credits, these credits will count toward either the major or the minor in religion.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2628.

PHYSICS
Physics concerns itself with the laws governing energy and the structure of matter. The study of physics will develop effective problem-solving skills which can be applied advantageously to many other disciplines, especially those where quantitative methods are important. Undergraduate training emphasizes the basics and is usually very general. Specialization mostly takes place in graduate studies. A significant fraction of the physics bachelors - about one-third - go on to graduate school with the goal of becoming research scientists or professors. However, we are mindful that a majority of the majors will be seeking employment directly after graduating from college. For that reason, our curriculum is flexible and provides students with a number of options to better prepare them for a job. We offer Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees for the student who intends to go on to graduate school in physics; we offer a degree with a strong engineering component for persons who expect to work with engineers in technical projects; we also offer the option of a degree enhanced by a second discipline. To help the prospective physics majors make optimal decisions, they are encouraged to speak with a departmental adviser as early as possible. A B.A. degree requires a foreign language, a B.S. degree does not. Students with a serious interest in physics should consult the departmental Chairperson as early as possible in order to determine which program best fits their needs. The minimum departmental requirements for all physics majors can be summarized as follows: certain introductory courses (Physics 2110-2120, 1154, 1164, 3250 and 3260); Calculus I, II and III; the core courses (Physics 3020, 3450, 3750, 3850 and 4200); three advanced laboratories; and a senior project. Students taking a number of advanced

Philosophy Minor
An undergraduate minor in philosophy may be secured by completing 12 hours of upper division courses in Philosophy and Critical Reasoning (1210) or Logic (2010) and Contemporary Moral Problems (1020) or Introduction to Ethics (2030).

Pre-Law
A major or minor in philosophy can be excellent preparation for law school. Philosophy courses emphasize the skills in argument analysis and writing which are essential to the study and practice of law. Please consult the description of the pre-law curriculum under the “PreProfessional Programs” heading in the degree requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences section for further information and coursework suggestion.

Religion Major
To major in religion means to pursue the academic study of religion from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Religion is deeply implicated in history, culture, and literature and its role is evident in the world today. One does not have to be “religious” to study religion, nor is the study of religion directed toward establishing the truth of one religion over another. Although each student brings his or her own perspective to the study of religion, one may use a major in religion in many different ways. In addition to a number of professional options, the basic intellectual purpose of religious studies is to develop an appreciation for, an understanding of, and a critical insight into the rich variety of the world’s religious traditions. Beyond the general requirements for the B.A. degree, a major in religion consists of a minimum of 30 credit hours in

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

mathematics courses may be permitted to waive Physics 3250. Physics 1030, 1050, 1350 and 1750 and associated laboratories do not count toward a major in physics. The core courses contain the classical materials with which all physicists should be acquainted. In addition, physics majors should strive to take as many of the courses in modern physics (4210, 4220, 4230) and electronics (3010) as their program will permit. A grade of D+ or lower in a core course is not acceptable toward the fulfillment of the requirements for a degree in physics. The senior project must be approved and the department chair notified at least eight months prior to graduation as a physics major and the student must register for either Physics 4950 or 4960. Upper division courses (3000-level or higher) will assume that students have at least some experience with, and ability to use, computers for solving physics problems. The requirement of a third writing course may be satisfied by: GET 2140 (Technical Report Writing), ENGL 3980 (Technical Writing) or with special approval by the physics department, courses in other disciplines identified as writing courses.

graduate will have a large number of options. He/she could go on to graduate school in physics or could enter various other graduate programs such as oceanography, mechanics, aerospace, or electrical engineering. His/her immediate usefulness to industry should be enhanced by the engineering content. The physics requirement is essentially the same as the requirement for the Bachelor of Arts in physics but with the additional requirement of 20 hours from an engineering discipline. There are two possibilities, depending on the interests of the student: one can take a mixture of mechanical (ME) and civil engineering (CE) courses, or a student may elect to take the courses in the Department of Computer and Electronics Engineering (CEEN). The engineering content will be determined by a faculty member in the specific engineering discipline. In cases where the course content of the engineering and physics courses is similar, the student may substitute engineering for some core physics courses with departmental consent. Students should maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.4 or they may be prevented from enrolling in engineering courses.

B.G.S. Degree
Those interested in a physics concentration with a B.G.S. degree through the Division of Continuing Studies must satisfy essentially the same requirements as for the Bachelor of Arts degree. However, actual programs of coursework are somewhat flexible and are individually arranged with the approval of the physics department.

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Physics
Students who desire a broad education with a minimum amount of specialization and who do not want to forsake the option of doing graduate work in physics will be interested in this degree. They must satisfy the minimum requirements stated above.

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics
Option 1 This degree leads to a strong specialization and preparation for graduate school. The student must take 44 hours of physics including 3760 and 4210. Option 2 This option will reflect the student’s interest in areas complementary to physics. The content will be a modification of the physics requirements for a B.A. together with concentrations taken from a coherent set of courses in another discipline, as agreed upon by the student and his/her adviser. Examples are pre-medicine, secondary teaching, concentrations from technology, business, computer science, geology, etc. In some cases, enhancement-courses can also be used to satisfy college distribution requirements. Option 3 Students who elect physics as their major field for secondary teaching must complete the introductory courses and 15 credits from core courses, where substitutions may be made with approval of the physics counselors. The degree may be taken through the College of Arts and Sciences or via the College of Education. In any case, Secondary School Certification in Physics Teaching requires the satisfactory completion of a series of education courses.

Minor in Physics
A minor in physics shall consist of a minimum of 18 hours of physics courses with at least 15 hours chosen from among those courses normally counted toward the B.A. in physics. These 15 hours could typically consist of the introductory courses listed above under the minimal departmental requirements. Education majors should consult the physics chairperson about exceptions.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2511.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees with a major in political science are offered by the department of political science. Both degree programs are flexible and are designed to meet a wide variety of student needs and interests. A student may wish to concentrate in a specific subfield of political science or take as diverse a range of courses as possible. Whatever the case, each student’s program must be carefully planned with a departmental adviser to meet his/her needs and interests.

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Political Science
The major consists of a minimum of 27 credit hours in political science. In addition, 12 credit hours from cognate fields outside the department of political science are required. B.A. requirements are as follows: • Political Science 1000 and 1100 (unless one is waived by the department), 2000, and 4950. • At least one three-hour course in each of the following subfields: political theory, American

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Engineering Physics
This degree is intended for persons who have an interest in physics as well as in engineering applications. The

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
• politics, comparative politics, and international politics. Remaining hours in political science shall be elected by students in accordance with their interests. At least 18 hours of political science courses must be taken at the 3000 and 4000 levels. Students shall take a minimum of 12 credit hours of courses in other fields (e.g. history, economics) regarded by their departmental advisers as cognate to each student’s primary interests in political science. A foreign language is required. (The requirement is the same as that of the College of Arts and Sciences.)

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can be made with departmental permission. No course may be used to satisfy more than one departmental requirement.

Graduate Studies in Political Science
The political science major who intends to pursue graduate studies in the field is advised to take Political Science 4000 and at least one of the following courses: Political Science 3340, 4310, 4320, 4330, or 4340.

• •

Pre-Law
Political science continues to be the single most popular major among students who apply to law school. Law schools emphasize the importance of a course of study that develops the following skills: an understanding of human nature and human institutions, clarity in written and oral communication, and creative and critical thinking. Political science offers such an education. The study of politics includes the study of human nature and institutions. Moreover, the political science department’s emphasis on critical thinking in class participation and analytical writing, especially in upper level classes, serves to hone the skills necessary to becoming a skilled attorney. The department of political science offers a number of courses that provide undergraduates with a rigorous introduction to legal concepts and arguments, as well as to the operation of the American legal system. Among these are the following: PSCI 1100 (Introduction to American National Government), PSCI 3170 (Interest Groups), PSCI 4040 (Legislative Process), PSCI 4050 (Judicial Process), PSCI 4170 (Constitutional Law: Foundations), PSCI 4180 (Constitutional Law: The Federal System), and PSCI 4190 (Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties). Students who are interested in majoring in political science as preparation for law school are invited to consult with the department’s pre-law adviser.

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Political Science
The major consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours in political science. In addition, 15 credit hours from cognate fields outside the department of political science are required. B.S. requirements are as follows: • Political Science 1000 and 1100 (unless one is waived by the department), 2000, and 4950. • At least one three-hour course in each of the following subfields: political theory, American politics, comparative politics, and international politics. • Remaining hours in political science shall be elected by students in accordance with their interests. • At least 18 hours of political science courses must be taken at the 3000 and 4000 levels. • A minimum of 15 credit hours of cognate coursework that support the student’s work in the major must be taken in other disciplines. Three hours of an approved course in statistics must be part of these 15 credit hours. Students must consult with departmental advisers on approved cognate courses.

Public Service
A political science major interested in a career in public service is encouraged to include in his or her academic program courses selected from but not limited to the following: Political Science 2010, 2100, 2110, 4030, 4040, 4170 and 4180; Public Administration 4410 and 4430; History 1110, 1120; Economics 2200, 2220; Accounting 2010, 2020; Geography 4120; Urban Studies 1010; and Computer Science 1610, 1620.

Quality of Work and Subfields
A political science major must earn at least a “C-” in all political science and cognate courses presented in satisfaction of the major. While a minimum of 27 (B.A.) or 36 (B.S.) hours of political science is required of a major, up to 45 hours may be applied toward either the B.A. or B.S. degree. The subfields of political science and the courses they include are as follows: American Politics - 2010, 2100, 2180, 2110, 3020, 3040, 3100, 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3170, 3180, 4030, 4040, 4050, 4120, 4170, 4180, 4190 Comparative Politics - 2500, 2560, 2660, 3230, 3500, 3560, 3580, 3640, 3660, 3680, 4350, 4360, 4370, 4500, 4520 International Politics - 2210, 3220, 3230, 3260, 4200, 4280 Political Theory - 2310, 3340, 4000, 4310, 4320, 4330, 4340 Political Science 3920, 4900, 4910, 4920 and 4950 normally will not satisfy the subfield distribution requirement; however, in extraordinary cases, exceptions

Minor in Political Science
An undergraduate minor in political science may be secured by completing 18 hours of political science, 12 of which must be at the 3000 to 4000 level. All of these courses must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2624.

PSYCHOLOGY
The psychology department offers two avenues by which a student may complete an undergraduate major. The first leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree. It is intended for the student who is seeking a broad, liberal arts education. The second path leads to a Bachelor of Science degree, a more rigorous, challenging program of study.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

More mathematics and natural science as well as more laboratory work in psychology are required. Both programs prepare the student for admission to graduate programs in psychology. Students are advised to pay particular attention to the prerequisites for each course. Students should begin taking courses early in their college years that are the prerequisites for more advanced coursework in the major or minor in psychology. Specifically, PSYC 3130, is a prerequisite for PSYC 3140, and PSYC 3140 is a prerequisite for PSYC 4024, 4074, 4214, 4234, and 4280. A grade of “C-” or better must be earned in all courses required for the B.A. and B.S. degrees in psychology. Permission of the department must be obtained to substitute another course for one in which a grade of less than “C-” is earned. One of the required non-psychology courses for the B.S. degree may be taken CR/NC. Advanced Writing Requirement PSYC 3140 and one of the following courses is required to satisfy the advanced writing course requirement for all psychology majors: PSYC 4024, 4074, 4214, 4234, 4280, 4960, 4990.

• • •

• •

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Psychology
An undergraduate major in the B.A. program may be earned by completing the following courses: • Psychology 1010, 1020, 1024, 2000, 3130, 3140. • One of the following lecture/lab pairs: 4020/4024, 4070/4074, 4210/4214, 4230/4234, 4270/4280, 3520 or 3540/4920 (laboratory in Psychology: Development). • A minimum of 24 hours of upper division psychology (3000- and 4000- level). Election of the B.A. degree does not preclude admission to graduate school, but it does not provide as thorough a preparation as does the B.S. program.

language courses may count toward meeting the College’s Humanities Distribution Requirement. One course from the following is required: Philosophy of Natural Science (PHIL 3400), Philosophy of the Social Sciences (PHIL 3410), History of Psychology (PSYC 4010) or Limits of Consciousness (PSYC 4250). Six hours of sociology or anthropology. Two courses in biology are required, at least one of which must include a laboratory section. Students are required to complete one of the following pairs of natural science courses or equivalent courses at a higher level: 1. General Physics I (1110/1154) and General Physics II (1120/1164). 2. Fundamentals of College Chemistry (1140/1144) and Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (2210/2214). Either MATH 1930 or MATH 1950 is required. Students are required to complete one course in computer science having a programming component. Computer Literacy with Programming (CSCI 1500) or another computer science course at or above the 1500 level will satisfy this requirement.

Minor in Psychology
An undergraduate minor in psychology may be earned by completing 12 hours of upper division courses in psychology. All coursework satisfying the minor in psychology must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better.

For more information...
Please call (402) 554-2581.

SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY
The Sociology/Anthropology department offers a B.A. and B.S. in sociology, as well as minors in both anthropology and sociology. Sociology and anthropology are the broadest of the social sciences. These disciplines are particularly useful to graduates entering the 21st century labor force. Our rapidly changing and increasingly diverse world offers both opportunities and monumental challenges. Sociology and anthropology give you the analytical skills to understand such challenges and the tools to improve our societies at all levels – from the neighborhood to the world community. Through the study of sociology and anthropology, students gain access to concrete skills relevant to a broad range of careers, such as education, public service, law, business, health, and nonprofit organizations. Graduates of our department receive the quality education necessary to pursue graduate work in a variety of fields.

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Psychology
An undergraduate major in the B.S. program may be earned by completing the courses listed below: Required Psychology Courses for B.S. Degree • Psychology 1010, 1020, 1024, 2000, 3130, 3140 • A minimum of 24 hours of upper division psychology (3000- and 4000- level). • Two of the following lecture/lab pairs: 4020/4024, 4070/4074, 4210/4214, 4230/4234, 4270/4280, 3520 or 3540/4920 (laboratory in Psychology: Development). In place of a second lab from this list, a student may take Research Problems in Psychology (4960) or Senior Thesis (4990) with the approval of the student’s adviser. • One of the following courses in applied psychology: 3410, 3510, 4590, 4610, 4630, 4640. • One of the following courses in social/personality/ developmental psychology: 3430, 3450, 3520, 3540, 4440, 4450. Other Required Courses for B.S. Degree • Two years of a foreign language is required for both the B.A. and the B.S. degrees. However, for the B.S. degree, the six hours of second-year foreign

Department Offerings
• • • • Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) Bachelor of Sciences degree (B.S.) Minor in anthropology Minor in sociology

Required Core Courses
All majors in the B.A. and B.S. degree programs must complete the following required core courses with a grade of “C” or higher.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
Introduction (6 hours) SOC 1010 Introductory Sociology ANTH 1050 Introduction to Anthropology Research (6 hours) SOC 2130 Basic Statistics SOC 2510 Research Methods Theory (3 hours) SOC 4710 Development of Sociological Theory Advanced Writing Course (3 hours) SOC 4900 Senior Thesis language is required.

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B.S with No Concentration Students must complete the core courses plus 9 hours of upper division (3000 and 4000 level) sociology courses and one 3 hour upper division anthropology course. Anthropology Concentration Required (6 hours) ANTH 3910 Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 4210 Cultural Anthropology Electives (6 hours in any of the following courses) ANTH 3210 Cultures of African People ANTH 3220 People and Cultures of Native North America ANTH 3260 World Cultures and Peoples ANTH 4200 Urban Anthropology ANTH 4220 North American Archaeology ANTH 4230 Ethnomedicines of the Americas ANTH 4260 Topics in Ethnology ANTH 4520 Psycholinguistics ANTH 4920 Seminar in Anthropological Problems GEOL 4040 Geoarchaeology Organizational Sociology Concentration Required (12 hours) SOC 3610 Social Organization SOC 3800 Work and Society SOC 4620 Sociology of Formal Organization ANTH 4210 Cultural Anthropology One of the following (3 hours) SOC 3180 Occupations and Careers SOC 4550 Social Diversity in Organization Two of the following (6 hours) SOC 3690 Social Stratification SOC 3900 Race and Ethnic Relations SOC 4100 The Community SOC 4250 Latino/a Migration in the World Economy SOC 4300 Sociology of Gender SOC 4500 Law, Family and Public Policy SOC 4750 Social Change and Globalization SOC 4990 Independent Study Cognate Areas (15 hrs) Organizational sociology students in the B.S. program are required to complete 15 hours in a field of specialization based on their interests and/or career aspirations. Other options may be designed by the student in consultation with the undergraduate adviser. Appropriate courses in the following areas are listed in the department’s B.S. program brochure. • Business Management • Marketing Management • Public Administration • Diversity Planning and Management • Organizational Communication • Native American Community Organizations

Bachelor of Arts Degree (B.A.)
The Bachelor of Arts degree may be obtained with or without a concentration. The department has two optional concentrations: Anthropology and Organizational Sociology. B.A. with No Concentration (12 hours) Students are required to take at least 12 hours (six hours must be taken in the department) at the 3000 level or above of sociology/anthropology courses, with at least three hours of upper division anthropology. Anthropology Concentration (12 hours) Required (6 hours) ANTH 3910 Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 4210 Cultural Anthropology Electives (6 hours in any of the following courses) ANTH 3210 Cultures of African People ANTH 3220 People and Cultures of Native North America ANTH 3260 World Cultures and Peoples ANTH 4200 Urban Anthropology ANTH 4220 North American Archaeology ANTH 4230 Ethnomedicines of the Americas ANTH 4260 Topics in Ethnology ANTH 4520 Psycholinguistics ANTH 4920 Seminar in Anthropological Problems GEOL 4040 Geoarchaeology Organizational Sociology Concentration (12 hours) Required (9 hours) SOC 3610 Social Organization SOC 3800 Work and Society ANTH 4210 Cultural Anthropology Electives (3 hours in any of the following courses) SOC 3180 Occupations and Careers SOC 4100 The Community SOC 4550 Social Diversity in Organizations SOC 4620 Sociology of Formal Organization

Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)
The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained with or without a concentration. The department has two optional concentrations: Anthropology and Organizational Sociology. All concentrations, including the B.S. with no concentration, require the core courses plus a cognate area. Before beginning the B.S. option, students must file an approved plan of 15 credit hours of cognate coursework developed with an undergraduate adviser. No foreign

Minor in Sociology
A minor in sociology requires 18 hours, of which no more than nine hours will be accepted as transfer credit. Twelve of the 18 hours must be upper division. All

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES

coursework satisfying the minor must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or better.

Minor in Anthropology
A minor in anthropology requires ANTH 1050 (Introduction to Anthropology), and at least 12 additional hours of upper division anthropology courses. No more than nine hours will be accepted as transfer credit. [The anthropology offerings are listed just ahead of the sociology course in the Course Description Section.]

be upper level independent study; pursuit of a special topic through independent study is a worthwhile option. Women’s Studies includes courses regularly offered by departments (see list, below), as well as special topics courses offered on an occasional basis (contact the Women’s Studies office, (402) 554-3834, for information). All courses presented for Women’s Studies credit must be taught by Women’s Studies faculty. The student must earn a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) in courses presented for credit in the program.

For more information…
about Sociology/Anthropology majors or minors please call (402) 554-2626 or visit our Web page at www.unomaha.edu/socanth

Major
Required courses (minor): WMST 2010 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences WMST 2020 Introduction to Women’s Studies: The Humanities Required courses (major): In addition to WMST 2010 and WMST 2020 WMST 4010 Senior Seminar SOC 2130 Basic Statistics Electives: ART 4000/8006 ART/WMST 4930 BIOL 4030 BLST/WMST 1950 BLST 2210 BLST 4010 CJUS 3390 CJUS 4800 ENGL/WMST 2000 ENGL/WMST 2230 ENGL/WMST 3000 ENGL/WMST 3000 ENGL/WMST 3000 ENGL/WMST 4250 ENGL/WMST 4260 Exploring Women’s Issues in Art Gender and Art History Special Topic: Biology of Women Black Women in America The Black Family in the U.S. The Black Woman: A Historical Perspective Women, Crime, and Justice Special Topics: Family Violence Topics in Gender, Language and Literature Ethnic Literature: Cultures of Resistance Survey of Literature by Women Contemporary Short Story Writing by Women Reading a Woman’s Life Introduction to Women’s Studies in Literature Women of Color Writers: African, African-American, Caribbean, and Indian Afro-American Women’s Novels: Female Identity and History Commonwealth Writers Jane Austen in the Female Literary Tradition American Environmental Literature 19th Century American Women Writers Contemporary Family Issues

WOMEN’S STUDIES
Women’s Studies offers all students a program in which the study of gender relations, and especially the knowledge and history that arises from women’s lives, is the focus. coursework in Women’s Studies prepares students for a wide variety of career paths. A minor or major in Women’s Studies may be particularly useful to those planning careers in which gender issues are central: non-profit organizations, counseling, and business are examples.

Major
In addition to the general requirements for the B.A. degree, a major in women’s studies requires 30 credit hours. Six of those consist of the hours earned through completion of WMST 2010 and Women’s Studies 2020. Three of the hours are earned through completion of WMST 4010: Senior Seminar. In addition, SOC 2130: Basic Statistics fulfills the quantitative literacy general education requirement for Women’s Studies majors. The remaining courses should be selected from designated elective classes available from academic departments (see list below). Fifteen credit hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. Up to six hours may be independent study, and this is a worthwhile option. Approximately fifty courses are available for credit toward a women’s studies major or minor; for a list of courses offered during the current or coming term, contact the Women’s Studies office (554-3834) or visit the Web at www.unomaha.edu/Uno/wmst. All courses presented for credit in the program must be taught by Women’s Studies faculty. The student must earn a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) in courses presented for credit in the program. Third Writing Course: WMST 4010: Senior Seminar satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a third writing course. Quantitative Literacy: SOC 2130: Basic Statistics satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for quantitative literacy.

ENGL/WMST 4940 ENGL/WMST 4940 ENGL/WMST 4940 ENGL/WMST 4940 ENGL/WMST 4960

Minor
A minor in Women’s Studies requires 18 credit hours. Six of those hours consist of two interdisciplinary core courses: Women’s Studies 2010 and Women’s Studies 2020. The remaining courses should be selected from designated Women’s Studies courses available in the various departments (see list, below). Twelve credit hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. Six hours toward the minor may

FMCS 4850 FREN 4960/8966 – WMST 4970/8976 Exiles, Madwomen and Witches in 20th Century French Literature GEOG 4150/8156 Geography, Gender, and Work GDRH 2120 Women’s Issues in Contemporary American Society

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
GDRH 3010 HED/WMST 3080 HED/WMST 4550 HED/SOC 4700 HIST/WMST 2990 HIST/WMST 3580 HIST/WMST 4060 HIST/WMST 4470 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HIST/WMST 4910 HONR 3000 HONR 3502 PHIL/WMST 3490 PSCI 3130/ WMST 8135 PSCI 3920 PSYC 4920 RELI 3130/ WMST 3120 RELI/WMST 3250 RELI/WMST 3500 RELI/WMST 3500 RELI/WMST 3500 RELI/WMST 4040 RUSS/WMST 3055 Men in Feminism Seminar Health Concepts in Sexual Development Health Aspects of Aging Women’s Health and Issues of Diversity 20th Century U.S. and Russian Women Topics: Queens and Mistresses in Early Modern Europe History of Women in the U.S. History of American Medicine and Public Health Topics in History: Asian Women Topics in History: Gender and Spirituality in the Middle Ages Topics in History: Gender and Work in 19th Century America Topics in History: Latin American Women Topics in History: The Roman Family Topics in History: Gender and Spirituality in the Middle Ages Topics in History: Women of the American West Honors Colloquium: Feminism and the Family Women and Islam Philosophy of Feminism Women and Politics Gender and Global Politics Psychology of Native American Women

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PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Admission to most professional schools is very competitive. Because professional schools may change their requirements at any time, the College cannot guarantee the accuracy of admission requirements in this section. Students are urged to contact professional schools that they are interested in to verify course requirements for admission, application procedures, and deadlines.

Pre-Chiropractic Curriculum
Following is a recommended course of study for students planning to enter a chiropractic college. A minimum of 90 credit hours are required of which the following preprofessional credits must be earned with a grade of “C” or above: Biological Sciences...............................8 hours minimum BIOL 1450 Biology I BIOL 1750 Biology II AND/OR BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall, summer) BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring, summer) Chemistry*...........................................15 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab Physics................................................10 hours minimum PHYS 1110-1154 General Physics and Lab PHYS 1120-1164 General Physics and Lab OR PHYS 2110-1154 General Physics Calculus Level and Lab PHYS 2120-1164 General Physics Calculus Level and Lab Mathematics**.......................................3 hours minimum MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra English** ................................................6 hours minimum ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition Psychology............................................3 hours minimum PSYC 1010 Introduction to Psychology I Social Sciences and Humanities.........18 hours minimum Recommended: HIST 1000 World Civilizations I HIST 1010 World Civilizations II SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184. **Math and English placement determined by examination.

Women and the Bible The Feminine in Mythology Martyrs, Monks, and Mystics Women and Islam women Mystics Religion and Homosexuality Women in Russian Society and Culture SOC 2150 Marriage and the Family SOC 3630 Comparative Social Institutions SOC 4150 American Family Problems SOC 4300 Sociology of Gender SOC 4500 Law, the Family and Public Policy SOWK/WMST 4880 Women’s Issues in Social work SOWK 8060 Institutional Racism and Sexism SPAN 4490/8496 Spanish Literature and Film SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication WMST 4990 Independent Study WRWS 3000 New Poetry by American Women WRWS 4000 Women of Fiction

For more information…
visit www.amerchiro.org

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3834.

Pre-Clinical Laboratory Science Curriculum
The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with the Clinical Laboratory Science program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in providing a pre-clinical

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ARTS AND SCIENCES

laboratory curriculum. Admission to the senior year of the medical technology program requires the applicant to successfully complete at least 86 semester hours. Students who have completed at least 60 credit hours should submit an application by November 1 to be considered for the class beginning the following summer. Clinical positions are available at the three participating programs of Medical Technology (Nebraska Methodist Hospital and University of Nebraska Hospital). Students are selected to fill the positions on a competitive basis. Past experience has shown that students should have maintained an overall grade point average of at least 2.5 and a science grade point average of at least 2.5 in order to be competitive for selection for one of the positions in the program. Biological Sciences.............................16 hours minimum Must include microbiology, genetics and immunology. BIOL 1020 Principles of Biology BIOL 2440 Biology of Microorganisms BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall, summer) BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring, summer) BIOL 2140 Genetics BIOL 3240 Immunology (fall) BIOL 3830 Biology of Pathogenic Microorganisms (spring) MEDT 302* Intro to Hematology (spring at UNMC) Chemistry** .........................................16 hours minimum Must include: CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab OR CHEM 2210-2214 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry and Lab CHEM 3650/3654 Fundamentals of Biochemistry and Lab OR CHEM 4650-4654 Biochemistry I and Lab Mathematics .........................................................3 hours One semester minimum, additional recommended MATH 1320 College Algebra Statistics ...............................................................3 hours PSYC 3130 Stats for the Behavior Sciences SOC 2130 Basic Statistics STAT 3000 Statistical Methods English Composition.............................................6 hours ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition ENGL 2400 Advanced Composition Speech Communication .......................................3 hours SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals Recommended Electives Students should select electives to achieve a total of 86 semester hours including a broad general educational background. Strongly recommended

subjects include: molecular biology, cell biology, parasitology, plus any additional biology, chemistry and physics.
*Register intercampus for this UNMC course during the spring semester of the junior year. *MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

Pre-Dental Curriculum
Students must choose a major and follow the requirements for that major while completing the necessary pre-dentistry courses. A student should maintain a grade point average of B or better. The undergraduate program must include courses from the following list. Biological Sciences.............................10 hours minimum BIOL 1450 Biology I BIOL 1750 Biology II Recommended Electives: BIOL 2140 Genetics BIOL 2440 Biology of Microorganisms BIOL 3020 Molecular Biology of the Cell BIOL 4950 Vertebrate Embryology and Anatomy Chemistry*...........................................16 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 3650-3654 Fundamentals of Biochemistry and Lab (Recommended) Physics................................................................10 hours PHYS 1110-1154 General Physics and Lab PHYS 1120-1164 General Physics and Lab OR PHYS 2110-1154 General Physics and Lab PHYS 2120-1164 General Physics and Lab English Composition** ..........................................6 hours ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition ENGL 2400 Advanced Composition Mathematics .........................................................3 hours MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra Statistics ...............................................................3 hours PSYC 3130 Statistics for the Behavior Sciences SOC 2130 Basic Statistics STAT 3000 Statistical Methods Humanities and Social Sciences Students should complete the distribution requirements in humanities and social sciences in this catalog. Suggested courses include SPCH 2010, PSYC 1010, SOC 1010, PHIL 1210, ANTH 1050, ECON 2200, 2220, as well as courses in English literature and political science. Business electives such as business law and accounting would also be helpful.
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

Pre-Dental Hygiene Curriculum
The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry at Lincoln by offering the non-professional courses which satisfy needed college hours for the Baccalaureate program. Adviser: Dean’s Office. Applicants must have successfully completed the necessary coursework which should also include a twelve credit hour concentration in an area of interest. Applications should be submitted by December 1. Applicants should have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 grading scale. Science content requirements: Biology (and labs)..................................8 hours minimum BIOL 1020 Principles of Biology BIOL 2440 Biology of Microorganisms Anatomy and Physiology ......................8 hours minimum BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall/summer) BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring/summer) Chemistry (and labs)* ............................8 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab OR CHEM 1140-1144 Fundamentals of College Chemistry and Lab CHEM 2210-2214 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry and Lab
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

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and Sciences Dean’s Office at (402) 554-2458. For more information about UNMC College of Dentistry/Dental Hygiene, call (402) 472-1433.

Pre-Law Curriculum
No particular undergraduate major or course of study is required for admission to law school or even recommended as the best preparation for the study of law. Rather, law schools typically emphasize the need for pre-law students to cultivate certain skills — such as clarity in written and oral communication, an understanding of human institutions and human nature, and creative and critical thinking — that can be developed in the context of a variety of majors offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Prelaw students are therefore encouraged to choose a major on the basis of their intellectual interests and to design, in consultation with the college’s pre-law advisers, an additional program of courses that will help them develop these relevant skills and introduce them to legal concepts and arguments. While virtually any course in the Arts and Sciences can serve as an occasion to develop the skills essential to success in law school and beyond, the following might be particularly useful: SPCH 1120 (Argumentation and Debate), SPCH 3120 (Persuasive Speaking), PHIL 1210 (Critical Reasoning), PHIL 2010 (Symbolic Logic), PSCI 1100 (Introduction to American National Government), PSCI 3170 (Interest Groups), ECON 2200 (Microeconomics), ECON 2220 (Macroeconomics), and ENGL 2400 (Advanced Composition). And while a wide variety of courses, particularly in the social sciences and humanities, will make reference to legal concepts and arguments, the following may be mentioned for the specificity of their concern with such issues: PSCI 4170 (Constitutional Law: Foundations), PSCI 4180 (Constitutional Law: The Federal System), PSCI 4190 (Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties), PSCI 4050 (The Judicial Process), PHIL 1020 (Contemporary Moral Problems), PHIL 3010 (Philosophy of Justice), HIST 4330 (U.S. Constitutional History to 1860), HIST 4340 (U.S. Constitutional History to 1860), HIST 4600 (Anglo-American Legal History), BLST 1220 (Law in the Black Community), JOUR 4410 (Communications Law), JOUR 4420 (Theories of the First Amendment: Free Speech and Press), GEOG 4820/BIOL 4820 (Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation), and SOC 4500 (Law, Family, and Public Policy). Undergraduate courses primarily concerned with the law are not a necessary preparation for law school, nor do they necessarily render one better prepared for law school than another student who has taken no such courses. Such courses might be useful, however, to those students who are unsure of their interest in law school or, on the other hand, those who are certain of their interest and who already have a sense of the particular field of law in which they are primarily interested. Generally, the pre-law student’s program of study should provide a balanced set of courses from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities that challenge the student to develop keen analytical skills and clarity and persuasiveness in a variety of forms of written and oral communication.

Mathematics 3 credit hours minimum MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra General Education Requirements: English Composition: ............................6 hours minimum ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition Speech Communication .......................3 hours minimum SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals Nutrition ................................................3 hours minimum HPER 3090 Applied Nutrition Psychology and Sociology ...................................3 hours PSYC 1010 Intro to Psychology SOC 1010 Intro to Sociology Electives Elective courses to complete the required 60 credits may be chosen from the humanities (English literature, philosophy, art history, music history, theater arts), the social sciences (psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, history, geography), business education, computer science, mathematics, or the basic sciences (anatomy, botany, chemistry, biochemistry, nutrition, physics, physiology, and zoology). At least twelve credit hours must be concentrated in an area of interest. Six hours are required in the humanities; three hours are required in the social sciences. For more information on courses at UNO, call the Arts

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ARTS AND SCIENCES

Students should begin the process of applying to law school at least a year in advance of the time of their desired enrollment. Consequently, those who intend to enroll immediately after the completion of their undergraduate degree should begin the application process near the end of their junior year and should take the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) in the June after that year or in October of their senior year. Information on how to apply for the LSAT and for the Law School Data Assembly Service, which compiles supporting materials for applications and supplies them to the law schools for which you have applied is available from the college’s pre-law advisers.

**Students with a calculus background should take General Physics-Calculus Level (PHYS 2110, 2120). ***Mathematics requirements vary from one medical school to another. The student should contact the appropriate schools in order to make certain these requirements are fulfilled. In general, mathematics through calculus I is preferred. An alternative course of study would include algebra, trigonometry, statistics and computer science courses.

Pre-Nursing Curriculum
Many Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs require the following courses. For information about these courses, contact the advisers in the Dean’s Office, (402) 554-2458. English Composition.............................................6 hours ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition ENGL 2400 Advanced Composition Psychology ...........................................................3 hours PSYC 1010 Intro to Psychology Sociology ..............................................................3 hours SOC 1010 Intro to Sociology Human Development and the Family ...................3 hours PSYC 2500 Life Span Psychology OR FMCS 1600 Human Development and the Family Anatomy and Physiology ......................................8 hours BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall/summer) BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring/summer) Chemistry ..........................................................3-5 hours CHEM 1140-1144 Fundamentals of College Chemistry and Lab (Prereq: MATH 1310) Mathematics .........................................................3 hours MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra Nutrition ................................................................3 hours HPER 3090 Applied nutrition Ethics ....................................................................3 hours PHIL 2030 Intro to Ethics Microbiology .........................................................4 hours BIOL 2440 Biol. of Microorganisms Statistics ...............................................................3 hours (Prereq: MATH 1310) SOC 2130 Basic Statistics PSYC 3130 Stats for Behavioral Sciences Other Requirements Other non-nursing courses are required in addition to the above requirements. Contact the advisers in the Dean’s office or the school of choice for information about specific additional requirements and application deadlines. For more information about the UNMC College of Nursing call (402) 559-4110. For more information about Clarkson College of Nursing call (402) 552-3100 or 1-800647-5500. For more information about Nebraska Methodist College call (402) 534-7205.

Pre-Medicine Curriculum
Medical colleges give preference to students who have received a baccalaureate degree. Specific requirements may vary among medical colleges but, in general, the premedical program must include courses from the following list. Students should choose a major and follow the requirements for that major while completing the necessary pre-medical courses. Suggested pre-medicine program: Biological Sciences.............................12 hours minimum Suggested Courses: BIOL 1450 Biology I BIOL 1750 Biology II BIOL 2140 Genetics Chemistry*...........................................20 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 4610 Biochemistry of Metabolism OR CHEM 4650-4654 Biochem I and Lab PLUS CHEM 4660-4664 Biochem II and Lab Physics** .............................................................10 hours PHYS 1110-1154 General Physics and Lab PHYS 1120-1164 General Physics and Lab OR PHYS 2110-1154 General Physics Calculus Level and Lab PHYS 2120-1164 General Physics Calculus Level and Lab Mathematics*** .....................................................3 hours MATH 1930 Calculus for Managerial, Life and Social Sciences OR MATH 1950 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I Statistics*****.........................................................3 hours PSYC 3130 Stats for the Behavioral Sciences SOC 2130 Basic Statistics STAT 3000 Statistical Methods English Composition .....................................3 hours min. ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

Pre-Occupational Therapy Curriculum
Although a minimum of 60 semester hours must be

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
completed prior to entering Creighton University’s occupational therapy program, students are encouraged to complete three or four years of undergraduate coursework. For more information about Creighton University call (402) 280-2662, or visit their Web site at http://ot.creighton.edu.

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Pre-Optometry Curriculum
UNO administers an optometry contract program on behalf of the State of Nebraska. A limited number of seats are available at each of the following contract schools: University of Houston, Indiana University, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Northeastern State University, Pacific University, Pennsylvania College of Optometry, and Southern College of Optometry. Information on each school can be found at www.nebraska.edu/about/acad_opt.asp. Students must take six hours of both humanities and social sciences in addition to the below courses. Students must complete three to four years of college-level work before admission, with the third and fourth years fulfilling the requirements for an undergraduate major. Adviser: Dr. James Fawcett. First Year First Semester ENGL 1150-1154 ............................................................3 CHEM 1180-1184*..........................................................4 PHYS 1110-1154 ............................................................5 PSYC 1010 .....................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester MATH 1320 .....................................................................3 CHEM 1190-1194 ...........................................................4 PHYS 1120-1164 ............................................................5 ENGL 1160-1164 ............................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Year First Semester BIOL 1450 (Biology I) ......................................................5 CHEM 2250 ....................................................................3 MATH 1330 .....................................................................3 HIST 1000 .......................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Second Semester BIOL 1750 (Biology II) .....................................................5 CHEM 2260, 2274...........................................................5 MATH 1950 .....................................................................5 Humanities or social science elective.............................3 Semester Total ..............................................................18
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

progress toward a UNO degree while working on prepharmacy requirements to avoid unnecessary delay in graduation. One two-year set of courses to do this is listed in the “Chemistry” section of this catalog. For more information about the UNMC College of Pharmacy, visit the Web at www.unmc.edu/pharmacy. Adviser: Dr. Douglas Stack. Oral and Written Communication 6 hours minimum ENGL 1150 English Composition ENGL 1160 English Composition
Replace above with ENGL 2400, ENGL 3980 or SPCH 1110 if placed above ENGL 1150.

Biological Sciences 8 hours minimum BIOL 1450 Biology I ........................................................5 and BIOL 2140 Genetics ..............................................4 or BIOL 1750 Biology II .......................................................5 Chemical Sciences 16 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab ............4 CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab ...........4 CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I....................................3 CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab ...........4 Analytical Sciences 9 hours minimum Calculus 3 hours minimum MATH 1950 Calculus I................................................5 or MATH 1930 Calculus for the Managerial/Life and Social Sciences.....................................................3 Statistics 3 hours minimum STAT 3000 Statistical Methods ..................................3 or PSYC 3130* Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences................................................................3 or SOC 2130* Basic Statistics ...................................3
*Require additional hours if completing UNO degree in Arts and Sciences

Physical Sciences CHEM 2400-2404 Quantitative Analysis and Lab......4 or PHYS 1110 ............................................................4 or PHYS 2110 ............................................................4 Administrative Sciences 6 hours minimum ACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting .............................3 ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) .................3 Behavior and Social Sciences 6 hours minimum PSYC 1010 Introduction to Psychology .........................3 and SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology....................3 or GERO 2000 Gerontology............................................3 Humanities electives 6 hours minimum Two courses from different academic areas including fine arts, foreign language, history, humanities, literature, philosophy, political science and humanities offerings of Black Studies, Lain American Studies, Native American Studies.

Pre-Pharmacy Curriculum
Students interested in a career in community, hospital or industrial pharmacy can earn at UNO the 60-plus semester hours of pre-pharmacy education required to support application to an accredited college of pharmacy, where they would complete undergraduate and professional education. The minimum requirements for admission to the first professional year at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) College of Pharmacy are below. Prerequisites vary among colleges of pharmacy, and admission is highly competitive. Students should seek to

Pre-Physical Therapy Curriculum
The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with the Division of Physical Therapy in the School of Allied Health Professions at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha in offering courses and a pre-physical therapy curriculum which satisfies needed college hours for admission into the physical therapy program. A “B” average

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ARTS AND SCIENCES

in required courses is necessary for acceptance at the Medical Center. Adviser: Dean’s Office. The UNMC Physical Therapy Program requires that students complete a minimum of 90 credit hours and the GRE before beginning the three-year professional phase at UNMC. One-third of students admitted have a degree. Human Anatomy and Physiology .........................8 hours minimum BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II Chemistry..................8 credit hours minimum lecture/lab CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab
*MATH 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184.

and microbiology; immunology strongly recommended. BIOL 1450 Biology I BIOL 1750 Biology II BIOL 2440 Biology of Microorganisms BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall/summer) BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring/summer) Psychology ...........................................................9 hours PSYC 1010 Introduction to Psychology PSYC 4440 Abnormal Psychology Strongly recommended: PSYC 2500 Life Span Psychology PSYC 3230 Physiological Psychology PSYC 3520 Child Psychology PSYC 3540 Adolescent Psychology Chemistry............................................16 hours minimum CHEM 1180-1184 General Chemistry I and Lab CHEM 1190-1194 General Chemistry II and Lab CHEM 2210-2214 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry and Lab OR CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 2260-2274 Organic Chemistry II and Lab recommended CHEM 3650-3654 Fundamentals of Biochemistry and Lab Plus approved chemistry elective. Electives Electives should be chosen from the humanities or social sciences in areas such as psychology, sociology, critical reasoning and statistics.
*Math 1310 and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test are prerequisites for CHEM 11801184

Physics.......................8 to 10 hours minimum lecture/lab PHYS 1110-1154 General Physics and Lab PHYS 1120-1164 General Physics and Lab Electives Students are urged to select electives from the humanities and social sciences. Additionally, electives might include an introductory computer course or advanced coursework in the aforementioned requirements, i.e., genetics, exercise science or social science. For more information on courses at UNO, call the Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office at (402) 554-2458. For more information on the UNMC Physical Therapy Program, call (402) 559-4259.

Pre-Physician Assistant Curriculum
The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with the University of Nebraska School of Allied Health Professions at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in offering the pre-physician assistant curriculum which satisfies needed college hours for the Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree. Applicants must have successfully completed an undergraduate degree and should have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 with a minimum grade of “C” in the following required courses. A personal interview and the GRE are required before final acceptance. The following is a suggested course of study for UNO students. English Composition.............................................6 hours ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition ENGL 2400 Advanced Composition Mathematics .........................................................3 hours MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra Statistics ...............................................................3 hours PSYC 3130 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences SOC 2130 Basic Statistics STAT 3000 Statistical Methods Biological Sciences.............................16 hours minimum Must include human physiology, human anatomy,

For more information on the Physician Assistant program at UNMC, call (402) 559-7954.

Pre-Radiation Science Technology Curriculum
The University of Nebraska at Omaha cooperates with the University of Nebraska Medical Center School of Allied Health Professions in providing prerequisite courses for programs in nuclear medicine technology, radiography, radiation therapy technology and diagnostic medical sonography. The following courses are required for a B.S. degree. No grades lower than “C” will transfer to UNMC for credit. Adviser: Dean’s office. English Composition.......................................................6 ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition ENGL 2400 Advanced Composition Speech Communication .................................................3 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals Mathematics ...................................................................3 MATH 1320 College Algebra or higher required Statistics .........................................................................3

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ARTS AND SCIENCES
PSYC 3130 SOC 2130 STAT 3000 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Basic Statistics Statistics Methods

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Medical Terminology ...............................2-3 credit hours See Metropolitan Community College Basic Sciences ..........................................................8-15 Recommended and/or required courses: *BIOL 1020 Principles of Biology **CHEM 1140/1144 Fundamentals of College Chemistry and Lab **PHYS 1110-1154 Introduction to Physics and Lab
*Note: Anatomy and Physiology may be substituted for Biology. BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I (fall and summer) and BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II (spring and summer). **More advanced two-semester courses may be substituted.

Humanities or Social Sciences .......................................6 Psychology and Sociology recommended Electives ......................................................................3-5 (May include one of the previously listed Basic Sciences.) For information about UNO courses, call the dean’s office at (402) 554-2458. For information on programs in Radiation Science Technology Education at UNMC, please call (402) 559-1029. Their programs include radiography, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, and sonography.

Pre-Respiratory Care Curriculum
Courses listed below are to be taken at UNO as part of the Associate of Science degree in respiratory care at Nebraska Methodist College. Students should contact Nebraska Methodist College at (402) 354-7200 or 1-800335-5510 about admission into their program. English Composition and Speech ........................3 hours ENGL 1150/1154 English Composition ENGL 1160/1164 English Composition SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Psychology* ..........................................................9 hours PSYC 1010 Intro to Psychology Mathematics .........................................................3 hours MATH 1310 Intermediate Algebra Chemistry..............................................................5 hours CHEM 1140/1144 Fundamentals of College Chemistry and Lab Physics..................................................................5 hours PHYS 1050/1054 Intro Physics and Lab Biology ..................................................................8 hours BIOL 2440 Biology of Microorganisms BIOL 2740 Human Physiology and Anatomy I BIOL 2840 Human Physiology and Anatomy II Nutrition ................................................................3 hours HPER 3090 Applied Nutrition Social Sciences and Humanities ..........................6 hours HIST 1000 World Civilizations I HIST 1010 World Civilizations II PHIL 2030 Intro to Ethics

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Business Administration aspires to be a leading urban-regional college of business, providing an exceptional educational experience, conducting quality research relevant to business and the economy and providing service relating to the disciplines of the college. Shared Values: • Instruction at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. • Basic and applied research relative to business and the economy. • Instructional innovations and advancement of curriculum development and pedagogical research. • Service to the university and professions. • Enhancement of academic reputation among business schools.

Students interested in Alegent Health School of Respiratory Therapy should contact them at (402) 5722312. In addition to courses listed, Immanuel requires one semester of biology and recommends a second semester of anatomy/physiology, and a second semester of chemistry and computer science.

Pre-Technical Sciences Curriculum
Students who have not met the high school prerequisites for entrance into the Engineering College may be admitted into the pre-technical sciences program in the College of Arts and Sciences. High school prerequisites needed for entrance into the College of Engineering are three and one-half years of math (including one year of geometry and at least one-half year of trigonometry), one year of chemistry, one year of physics and an ACT score of 23 or higher in the engineering section. Students lacking the math prerequisites should take the Math Placement Exam to determine which math course to take. Students lacking the high school chemistry courses should take Chemistry 1140-1144. Students lacking one year of physics should enroll in Physics 1050. If the student’s ACT score is below 23 in the engineering section of the exam, a 2.5 or better GPA will be required in all pre-technical courses. The remainder of the class schedule may include Speech 1110 and courses from the humanities and social sciences electives. Adviser: Dean’s Office.

Mission and Objectives of the Undergraduate Degree Program
The mission of UNO’s College of Business Administration BSBA degree program is to provide an exceptional educational experience for students preparing for challenging careers in business. Our goal is to produce graduates who exemplify several distinctive qualities, including: • Effective problem-solving and decision-making skills. • Competence in communication and interpersonal relations. • Awareness and application of technological trends. • Awareness and understanding of ethical reasoning. • A strong foundation on which to build a career path. The College of Business undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by AACSB - the International Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Dedicated faculty members provide students with a strong and enriching academic experience. Faculty, administration and staff serve the University and the Omaha-area community in leadership and volunteer positions. Through these partnerships, our deans and faculty, in cooperation with business and corporate leaders, have created a dynamic and popular internship program. Students move from class lectures and discussion to immediate, practical experience in the workplace.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Curriculum
Pre-veterinary students are strongly encouraged to select a major and pursue a degree in an academic specialty of special interest. Most colleges of veterinary medicine in the U.S. require applicants to complete 60-70 credit-hours of undergraduate coursework. Applicants who complete a four-year college degree are generally given preference. Many schools require admission test results; the specific test varies from school to school, some require the GRE, others the MCAT. A contract between Nebraska and Iowa State University supports veterinary training for residents of Nebraska. Advisers: Dean’s Office and Dr. William deGraw in the biology department. The following courses or their equivalents meet the specific requirements for most veterinary schools in the Midwest and must be taken regardless of major chosen: English Composition ............................................6 hours To be selected from English 1150, 1160, 2400, 2430, 3980 (technical writing). Chemistry............................................................23 hours 1180, 1184, 1190, 1194, 2250, 2260, 2274, 3650 and 3654. Physics................................................................10 hours 1110, 1154, 1120 and 1164. Biology ................................................................22 hours 1450, 1750, 2140, 2440 or 4640, and 4950.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BSBA)
• • A minimum of 125 semester hours is required. 55 semester hours must be earned in upper division courses (3000-4000/junior-senior level). Students earn 25-28 upper division hours in the business core curriculum and 18-24 hours in their specializations. The last 30 consecutive semester hours for a degree must be earned following admission to the College of Business. A minimum of one-half of the required business hours and one-half of the required specialization hours must be completed at UNO. Remedial courses and orientation courses at other institutions will not apply to the 125 minimum semester hours. No more than 12 semester hours may be taken in any one department outside the College of

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Business. Students who have completed a declared minor from a department outside of Business Administration can apply more than 12 hours. Students completing an additional major in French, German or Spanish may apply all foreign language credit toward a degree. Otherwise, no more than 16 semester hours in any one foreign language may be applied toward a degree. More than one foreign language is allowed. A maximum of eight semester hours in music laboratory courses such as band, chorus or orchestra may be applied toward the degree. The College of Business does not require any physical activity courses. A total of four hours of activity courses may be applied toward the degree. English 1150 (or proficiency) English 1160 (or proficiency) The requirement in English is a minimum of six semester hours. All entering freshman students are required to take the English Placement and Proficiency Exam (EPPE). Transfer students who have completed English courses should check with an adviser to determine if they are exempt from taking the EPPE. MATH 1320: College Algebra or MATH 1930 or MATH 1950 SPCH 1110: Public Speaking Choose one of the following to fulfill the upper division speech requirement (must complete with a “C” (2.0) or better): SPCH 3120: Persuasive Speaking SPCH 3130: Speech Communication in Business SPCH 3140: Advanced Public Speaking SPCH 3150/3160: Intercollegiate Forensic Activity SPCH 3520: Interviewing SPCH 4170: Organizational Communication SPCH 4700: Interpersonal Conflict Distribution Requirement (total of 30 hours). Consult with an academic adviser or visit the CBA Web site for additional course choices. - Natural and physical sciences (eight hours minimum, including one laboratory course): this requirement may be fulfilled by courses from any level in biology, chemistry, physics and any of the following courses: GEOG 1030, 1060, 1070, 3510, 4250, 4320, 4630; or GEOL 1010, 1170, 1180, 2750, 2760, 3700, 4260; FSCI 1310; HORT 1300, 2210. [Upper division natural science generally require prerequisite(s)] - Humanities and fine arts (eight hours minimum): This requirement may be fulfilled by courses from any level in art, English, foreign languages, history, music (other than laboratory courses), philosophy, theatre, religion, LLS 1020, WMST 2020, NAMS 1100, and speech (other than SPCH 1110 and 1120). - Social and behavioral sciences (eight hours minimum): This requirement may be fulfilled by

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SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
• •

courses from any level in anthropology, geography (except those geography courses listed in natural and physical sciences), international studies, political science, psychology, sociology, LLS 1010 and WMST 2010. • Cultural Diversity (six hours) Three hours must come from the United States racial or minority groups. The remaining three hours may be satisfied with a women’s studies or international dimension course. • International dimension (nine hours) Students’ general education requirement must include at least nine hours of coursework with a global perspective (i.e., history, political science, literature or geography of foreign countries, foreign languages, etc.). Students may apply these hours toward satisfaction of the humanities, social sciences and cultural diversity requirements (for selected courses) or apply the credits as nonbusiness electives. A list of cultural diversity and international dimension courses is available in the advising office or on the CBA Web site.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
Effective Fall 2002, a student may only attempt each required business core course three times. A course that is dropped on or before Friday of the first week of the fall and spring semesters is not considered an attempt. Any withdrawal after that first Friday counts as one of the three attempts. During the summer sessions, a withdrawal after the second day of the class counts as an attempt. If a student does not successfully complete the core course with a grade of “C” (2.0) or better in two attempts, the student can either take the course at a college or university approved by UNO CBA, or may attempt the course at UNO CBA for a third and last time after a mandatory one semester (fall or spring) waiting period. During the waiting period, the student cannot enroll in any CBA course for which the required core course is a prerequisite. If the student does not earn a “C” (2.0) or better on the third attempt of that required core course, the student is no longer eligible to pursue a business degree at UNO. The Undergraduate Program Council will only consider appeals of the three-attempt rule when the circumstances for the appeal can be documented and the reason for the appeal is extraordinary. This policy applies to the following courses: ACCT 2010, 2020, BSAD 3100, 3160, 3500, ECON 2200, 2220, FNBK 3250, LAWS 3910, MGMT 3200, 3490, 4480, MKT 3310. To meet requirements for the degree, students must earn a minimum of 125 credit hours in courses acceptable to the College of Business Administration, with the following grade point average requirements: • Business GPA of 2.5 or above • Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above • Specialization GPA of 2.5 or above for all accounting majors

• •

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
and MGMT 3490 with a “C” (2.0) or better or who have a GPA below 2.5 will be administratively withdrawn. The college reserves the right to institute and make effective, after due notice, during the course of a student’s work toward a degree, any new ruling which may be necessary for the general good of the college, and to substitute courses currently offered for those no longer offered. Each student admitted to the college is responsible for becoming familiar with the procedures and regulations in the undergraduate catalog.

To proceed to the upper division core of the business administration program, students must complete an application to declare a specialization and have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Students must declare a specialization before accumulating 58 credit hours. To declare a specialization, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. If these conditions are not met, a hold will be placed on the student’s registration for the next semester. This hold will not be removed until the requirements are met or the student chooses a major outside the College of Business Administration. Any students earning below a 2.5 cumulative GPA for any semester while enrolled in the B.S.B.A. degree program will be placed on a “warning status.” No grade below a “C” (2.0) will be counted as satisfactory completion of CBA courses. No business course may be taken on a Credit/No Credit basis. Upper division accounting courses may be taken only twice.

Specialization Curriculum
Specific requirements for each specialization are identified in the following section of this catalog. Prerequisites for specialization courses are identified in the back of this catalog under “Course Descriptions.” Credits not required under general requirements, prebusiness program, B.S.B.A. core curriculum or specialization can be taken as electives in business and/or non-business areas to complete the required 125 hours for the B.S.B.A. degree.

CURRICULUM Required Pre-Business Program. Must complete with a “C” (2.0) or better.
ENGL 1150 ENGL 1160 MATH 1320 SPCH SPCH (or proficiency) (or proficiency) College Algebra 1110 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3520, 4170 or 4700 Principles of Economics (Micro) Principles of Economics (Macro) Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II

THE BSBA AS A SECOND BACHELOR’S DEGREE
A student who has already earned a bachelor’s degree (other than a business degree) may earn the B.S.B.A. by completing the following requirements: • The student must complete a minimum of 30 hours in residence in the College of Business Administration. Typically 61-67 hours are required for students who have no business courses completed. • The student must complete the following course requirements: - MATH 1320 - pre-business core courses ECON 2200 and 2220, ACCT 2010 & 2020, and the B.S.B.A. core curriculum; - specialization requirements. Courses taken as part of the first bachelor’s degree will be evaluated regarding satisfaction of these requirements. Students who have previously earned a business degree cannot earn a second business degree. These individuals may complete a second specialization in business by completing all of the requirements listed under their new specialization as well as all necessary prerequisites for those courses.

2.3 GPA Required
ECON 2200 ECON 2220 ACCT 2010 ACCT 2020

Required Core Curriculum 2.5 GPA Required
MGMT BSAD MKT MGMT LAWS FNBK BSAD BSAD MGMT 3200 3160 3310 3490 3910 3250 3100 3500 4480 Managerial Communications Managerial Statistics for Business Principles of Marketing Management Introduction to Business Law and Ethics Principles of Financial Management Management Information Systems Operations Management Corporate and Business Strategy*

*adviser permit required for enrollment

Prerequisites for Upper Division Core Courses MGMT 3200 ENGL 1160 and SPCH 1110 BSAD 3160 MATH 1320 LAWS 3910 ENGL 1160, SPCH 1110, MATH 1310 and ECON 2200 FNBK 3250 ACCT 2020, ECON 2200, ECON 2220, MATH 1320, BSAD 3160 MKT 3310 ECON 2200, ENGL 1160, MATH 1310 MGMT 3490 ENGL 1160 BSAD 3100 ACCT 2020 and MGMT 3490 BSAD 3500 BSAD 3160 MGMT 4480 FNBK 3250, MKT 3310, MGMT 3490, and 99 earned hours. Students who have not completed FNBK 3250, MKT 3310

ACCOUNTING
The objectives of the accounting program are to provide quality educational experiences for graduate and undergraduate students pursuing careers in accounting, to contribute to the expanding body of knowledge through faculty research and publication, and to enhance the relationships between the accounting program and the various constituencies it serves through professional and community service activities. Providing a contemporary accounting education for students requires that faculty in the program seek appropriate teaching methodologies and strive to incorporate the most recent developments in their

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
discipline into the curriculum. The faculty of the accounting program are dedicated to providing students with the opportunity to acquire an excellent accounting education. They therefore try to create an environment which maximizes the development of critical skills such as problem solving, analysis, communication and teamwork. After successfully completing the professional accounting program, many individuals find it challenging and rewarding to continue their development by seeking one or more professional certification designations. Several certification programs exist, including the Certified Public Accountant (CPA), the Certified Management Accountant (CMA), the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) and, the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA). Applicants for the CPA Exam are required to have taken 150 or more college semester credit hours. The accounting department offers an integrated undergraduate-graduate 152 hour program, which qualifies the student to take the CPA examination while earning both undergraduate and graduate (MAcc) degrees. Students pursuing this option should apply for admission into the program early in their junior year. There is also a separate MAcc program. Students who want to satisfy the requirement by obtaining a Master of Accounting degree (MAcc) should refer to the UNO Graduate Catalog. Additional information about the requirements of these certification programs or the MAcc program can be obtained by contacting members of the accounting faculty. Students pursuing an accounting specialization that complete ACCT 3080, Accounting Information Systems, with a grade of “C” or better are not required to take the business core course BSAD 3100, Management Information Systems. The accounting department recommends that students use the additional three hours of electives to take additional accounting, technology, or business courses. A student may enroll only twice in any upper division accounting course. You are enrolled in a course if your name appears on the final class list published immediately after drop/add week. Therefore, you may drop a course only one time (excluding drops during drop/add week). If you drop the same course twice (or receive a “C-”, “D” and/or “F” twice), you will not be permitted to enroll in this course a third time. To enroll in any upper-division course or to graduate with a major in accounting, a student must have earned at least a 2.5 overall GPA, as well as at least a 2.5 GPA in all accounting courses taken to date. This policy will be enforced each semester a student enrolls in an upper-division accounting course. Prerequisites for non-business students taking upper division accounting courses are: a 2.5 cumulative GPA and a 2.5 GPA in all accounting courses completed; junior standing; and a “C” (2.0) or better in ACCT 2020 and in ECON 2200. Students who wish to contract to take upperdivision accounting courses as “honors” courses should contact the course instructor. For a specialization in accounting, students must complete a total of 24 credit hours, including 18 credit hours in required courses and six (6) credit hours in specialization electives. Required courses ACCT 3020 Basic Federal Income Taxation ACCT 3030 ACCT 3040 ACCT 3050 ACCT 3080 ACCT 4080

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Intermediate Financial Accounting I Intermediate Financial Accounting II Intermediate Managerial Accounting Accounting Information Systems Principles of Auditing

To complete his or her specialization requirement, the student must select any two of the following courses: ACCT 4010 Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT 4040 Advanced Federal Income Taxation ACCT 4060 Advanced Managerial Accounting ACCT 4070 Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting and Auditing ACCT 4090 Advanced Auditing Students who wish to pursue the MAcc degree should consult with their adviser before registering for any of these courses. To aid the student in selecting the six hours of specialization electives, the following descriptions of four distinct areas of accounting practice are presented. The descriptions are for informational purposes only.

SUGGESTED AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION Auditing and Information Systems
The auditing and information systems specialty is designed for those individuals who want an in-depth understanding of auditing or information systems. A number of approaches for conducting financial and performance audits are addressed. We recommend the ISQA courses below because understanding the design of information systems is fundamental to controlling them. The knowledge acquired in the auditing or information systems specialties is useful in career positions such as financial auditor, internal auditor, governmental auditor, and information systems auditor. In addition, those in management positions in an organization, especially in the accounting and finance areas, will benefit from understanding the information resource and auditing. Suggested Specialization Electives ACCT 4070 Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting and Auditing ACCT 4090 Advanced Auditing Recommended Electives ISQA 3310 Managing the Data Base Environment ISQA 4110 Information Systems Analysis ISQA 4120 System Design and Implementation

Financial
The financial specialty is designed for those individuals wishing to pursue one of several different career paths. The field of financial reporting deals with reporting to interested parties outside the organization, other than taxing authorities. It includes such career paths as: financial accountant, controller and chief financial officer. Additionally, a strong grounding in financial accounting is necessary to be an effective auditor. Suggested Specialization Electives ACCT 4010 Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT 4070 Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting and Auditing ACCT 4090 Advanced Auditing

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Secondary Specialization in Accounting
A secondary specialization in accounting, as a supplement to a specialization in another business area, may be obtained by completing ACCT 3020, ACCT 3030, ACCT 3040, and ACCT 3050. Students must meet all prerequisites to enroll in any accounting course. The student must earn an average GPA of at least 2.5 in all accounting courses taken in order to be awarded the secondary specialization. Students wishing to substitute another upper-division accounting course for one of the four listed above may do so with the permission of the department chairman.

Recommended Electives FNBK 3400 Investment Principles and Practices FNBK 3700 International Financial Management

Managerial
The managerial accounting specialty is designed for those individuals who see their career directed toward being the controller or chief financial officer of an organization or a management services consultant for a CPA firm. The organization may be a private or public forprofit business, or a not-for-profit entity such as a hospital, charity or governmental unit. The managerial accounting specialty concentrates on developing and reporting accounting information to assist management in determining and achieving the organization’s objectives. The management accountant is an integral part of the management team and, as such, must understand the operations of an organization to assess which financial and non-financial information is necessary to assist management decision-making. Suggested Specialization Electives ACCT 4040 Advanced Federal Income Taxation ACCT 4060 Advanced Managerial Accounting Recommended Electives ISQA 3150 Principles of Quantitative Analysis ISQA 4730 Decision Support Systems ECON 3800 Managerial Economics MGMT 4340 Management of Teams FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Managers

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3650.

FINANCE AND BANKING
Three specializations are available: Business Finance and Banking and Financial Markets, and Investment Science and Portfolio Management.

Business Finance
The objective of the business finance specialization is to prepare students for careers in such areas as financial management, investments and security analysis, and international financial management. The focus is on the functions of finance in the firm, financial and investment analysis and planning, sources of financing, the financial system and securities markets. For this specialization students complete a total of 18 credit hours, including 15 credit hours in required courses, and three (3) credit hours in specialization electives. The completion of specified courses in business finance, banking, and investment science and portfolio management may be applied toward specialization requirements in all three areas. Required courses FNBK 3000 FNBK 3400 FNBK 3500 FNBK 3700 FNBK 4150 Financial Reporting and Analysis Investment Principles and Practices Financial Markets International Financial Management Intermediate Financial Management

Tax
The field of taxation is one of the most complex and demanding areas in business. Tax laws are continuously being rewritten and reinterpreted by Congress, the IRS, the Treasury Department and the judicial system. The tax specialty will provide individuals with the technical knowledge of taxation which, along with a solid background in business principles, is needed to be a skilled tax professional. The knowledge acquired will be useful in career positions such as tax specialist in a CPA firm or in private industry, IRS auditor, and state department or revenue auditor. Additionally, those in managerial positions will find that the increased tax knowledge will improve their business decisions. Suggested Specialization Electives ACCT 4010 Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT 4040 Advanced Income Tax Accounting RELU 2410 Real Estate Principles and Practices OR RELU 3410 Real Estate Concepts and Processes

Specialization electives FNBK 3550 Public Finance FNBK 3650 Commercial Bank Management FNBK 4500 Special Problems in Finance FNBK 4510 Finance and Banking Internship FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Managers FNBK 4600 Investment Risk Management FNBK 4610 Portfolio Management Recommended electives ACCT 3020 Basic Federal Income Taxation ACCT 3030 Intermediate Financial Accounting I ACCT 3040 Intermediate Financial Accounting II ACCT 3050 Intermediate Managerial Accounting RELU 4400 Real Estate Finance

Recommended Electives Regardless of Area of Specialization
SPCH 3130 ECON 3200 ECON 3220 MGMT 4040 ISQA 4150 LAWS 3920 ACCT 4500 ACCT 4510 Speech-Communication in Business and the Professions Economic Theory: Micro Economic Theory: Macro Managerial Leadership Advanced Statistical Methods Advanced Business Law Special Problems in Accounting Accounting Internship

Banking and Financial Markets
The objective of the banking and financial markets program is to provide additional study in the areas of financial management of commercial banks including the organization, operation, financing and functions of banks

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
and certain related financial institutions. This program is specifically designed for those students interested in pursuing careers in banking, bank regulatory agencies, or in related financial institutions, such as savings and loan associations, credit unions, sales and consumer finance companies, and government agencies. For this specialization students complete a total of 18 credit hours, including 15 credit hours in required courses, and three (3) credit hours in specialization electives. The completion of specified courses in business finance, banking, and investment science and portfolio management may be applied toward specialization requirements in all three areas. Required courses FNBK 3400 FNBK 3500 FNBK 3650 FNBK 3700 FNBK 4150 Investment Principles and Practices Financial Markets Commercial Banking Management International Financial Management Intermediate Financial Management

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Specialization Electives FNBK 3650 Commercial Financial Management FNBK 4150 Intermediate Financial Management FNBK 4500 Special Problems FNBK 4510 Finance and Banking Internship FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Majors

Secondary Specialization in Business Finance
A secondary specialization in business finance, as a supplement to a specialization in another business area, may be obtained by completing 12 credit hours of finance and banking courses beyond FNBK 3250. Of the 12 hours, six (6) must be completed in FNBK 4150 and FNBK 3400.

For more information...
please call (402) 554-2418.

ECONOMICS
Economics is concerned with how resources are allocated in production, prices are determined, incomes are distributed and growth occurs. Economists examine such issues as how fiscal and monetary policies affect price and employment, the effect on international trade of international trade agreements and the international price of the dollar, the size and future composition of the labor force, the effects of government regulations on the price, quantity and quality of goods and services, and costs and benefits of environmental policies. Economists are employed by private businesses, utilities, railroads, government at all levels, educational institutions, labor unions, trade associations and non-profit organizations. In businesses, economists’ duties include analyzing and forecasting industry and market conditions, and making recommendations and decisions relative to capital investments, marketing new products, employee compensation, and the impact of government regulation. In addition, economics is superb preparation for graduate work in areas such as business law, political science, international relations, gerontology, and public administration. Economics also is an excellent dual major or minor for areas of study. For this specialization students must complete a total of 18 credit hours of economics courses beyond principles. Required courses ECON 3200 Economic Theory: Micro ECON 3220 Economic Theory: Macro Specialization electives: Students must select a minimum of 12 credit hours beyond the required courses from economics department courses at the 3000 or 4000 level, of which at least six credit hours must be at the 4000 level.

Specialization electives FNBK 3000 Financial Reporting and Analysis FNBK 3550 Public Finance FNBK 4500 Special Problems in Finance FNBK 4510 Finance and Banking Internship FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Managers FNBK 4600 Investment Risk Management FNBK 4610 Portfolio Management Recommended electives ACCT 3020 Basic Federal Income Taxation ACCT 3030 Intermediate Financial Accounting I ACCT 3040 Intermediate Financial Accounting II ACCT 3050 Intermediate Managerial Accounting RELU 4400 Real Estate Finance

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2418.

Investment Science and Portfolio Management
The Investment science and portfolio management specialization provides theoretical and practical application of security analysis, asset pricing, and dynamic portfolio management for students interested in the investment management field. Students will have the opportunity to apply theoretical models discussed in class by managing funds in the student managed investment club. Students are encouraged to actively participate in the club early in their academic career. For this specialization, students complete a total of 18 credit hours including 15 credit hours in required courses and three (3) credit hours in specialization electives. The completion of specified courses in business finance, banking, and investment science and portfolio management may be applied toward specialization requirements in all three areas. Required Courses FNBK 3000 Financial Reporting and Analysis FNBK 3400 Investment Principles and Practices FNBK 3500 Financial Markets FNBK 3700 International Financial Management FNBK 4610 Portfolio Management

Business Economics
The specialization in business economics is designed for the student who intends to pursue a career in the private sector or in regulated industries. The specialization emphasizes the application of economic tools to such problems as forecasting the future environment of the firm, giving advice on capital investments, marketing of new products, and understanding antitrust laws. Business economists are found in industries and areas such as financial institutions, transportation, utilities, real estate, agribusiness, petroleum, and non-profit organizations,

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
For this specialization students complete a total of 18 credit hours, including 12 hours in required courses, and six hours in real estate electives. Electives may also be selected from the list of recommended directed electives. Required courses RELU 2410 OR RELU 3410 RELU 3460 RELU 4400 OR RELU 4460 RELU 4410 OR RELU 4420 Real Estate Principles and Practices Real Estate Concepts and Processes Real Estate Law Residential Real Estate Finance Commercial Real Estate Finance Residential Real Estate Appraisal Income Property Appraisal

among others. The work of economists in business is supported by the National Association for Business Economics and its affiliated local chapters, including the Omaha Association for Business Economics. For this specialization students must complete a total of 18 credit hours beyond principles in economics or approved courses. Required courses All of the following: ECON 3200 Economic Theory: Micro OR ECON 3800 Managerial Economics ECON 3250 Business Conditions Analysis ECON 3300 Intro to Econometrics At least one of the following: ECON 3200 Economic Theory: Micro ECON 3220 Economic Theory: Macro ECON 3600 Introduction to International Economics ECON 3800 Managerial Economics ECON 4210 Industrial Organization ECON 4300 Quantitative Applications ECON 4450 Monetary Theory and Policy Specialization electives Any of the courses from the economics program. Of the 18 credit hours required for a business economics specialization, six credit hours must be at the 4000 level.

Real estate electives RELU 3430 Real Estate Brokerage and Sales RELU 3450 Real Estate Management RELU 4390 Real Estate Investments RELU 4410 Residential Real Estate Appraisal OR RELU 4420 Income Property Appraisal RELU 4460 Commercial Real Estate Finance RELU 4510 Real Estate Internship Directed electives This is a partial list of specialization electives. Other business courses may be acceptable, based on their relevance to the major. ECON 3350 Comparative Economic Systems ECON 3550 Public Finance ECON 3800 Managerial Economics FNBK 3500 Financial Markets FNBK 4560 State and Local Finance MKT 3360 Advertising MKT 4320 Sales Management

Secondary Specialization in Economics
A secondary specialization in economics, as a supplement to a specialization in another area, may be obtained by completing Principles of Economics: Micro and Macro (ECON 2200 and 2220), plus nine hours of upper division courses in economics. Any course that may be used for specializing in economics may also be used for the secondary specialization, provided that at least one of the courses is Economics 3200 (Economic Theory: Micro), 3220 (Economic Theory: Macro), or 3800 (Managerial Economics). A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course applied toward the secondary specialization.

Secondary Specialization in Real Estate and Land Use Economics
A secondary specialization in real estate and land use economics may be accomplished by completing RELU 2410 plus nine (9) hours of upper division courses in real estate and land use economics which consists of RELU 3460 (Real Estate Law), RELU 4400 (Residential Real Estate Finance) or RELU 4460 (Commercial Real Estate Finance), and RELU 4420 (Income Property Appraisal). A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course counted in the secondary specialization.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2570.

REAL ESTATE AND LAND USE ECONOMICS
Professional training in the fields of real estate and land use economics is offered to prepare students for participation in the rewarding opportunities available in both the public and private sectors of our society. Every public agency dealing with human problems found in a real estate environment needs trained people to help find solutions. Urban and suburban community design agencies, including planning and zoning, environmental controls, housing standards, United States Park Service, Corps of Engineers, highway and road departments and others, want and need trained personnel for their operations. Similarly, major corporations diversifying into real estate investments, brokerage companies, managers, appraisers, railroads, banks, savings and loans, insurance companies, land developers and others require trained and talented people. The program prepares the student for important roles in these activities.

Certificate in Real Estate and Land Use Economics
A certificate in real estate can be earned by taking the following 15 credit hour sequence: RELU 2410, RELU 3460, RELU 4400, RELU 4420 and RELU 4390. A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course.

Commercial Real Estate Finance Track
Commercial mortgage lenders are responsible for loan origination, underwriting, loan servicing or packaging, and sale on the secondary mortgage market, among other possibilities. They may work in the agricultural, commercial, multifamily or other market segments. They may become involved in financing new development, construction or

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
existing investment property. This career area requires an understanding of the technicalities of finance, evaluating appraisals, understanding economic and demographic information, serving as credit analyst, and to be a skillful negotiator. The commercial real estate finance track requires a total of 18 hours of real estate. This includes 12 hours of required courses and an additional 6 hours of electives as shown below: Required courses RELU 4390 RELU 4420 RELU 4460 FNBK 4610 Real Estate Investments Income Property Appraisal Commercial Real Estate Finance Portfolio Management

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becoming an effective leader, and improving organizational performance by focusing on quality and continuous improvement. The management core has been designed to include courses to prepare students to more effectively face these challenges as managers in the twenty-first century. Students will select three (3) of the following courses (for a total of 9 credit hours): MGMT 3510 Human Resource Management MGMT 4040 Managerial Leadership MGMT 4050 Managerial Decision Making MGMT 4100 Organizational Theory and Practice MGMT 4150 International Management MGMT 4440 Management of Quality and Process Improvement

Electives (choose two) RELU 3430 Real Estate Brokerage and Sales RELU 3450 Real Estate Management RELU 3460 Real Estate Law RELU 4510 Real Estate Internship FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Managers FNBK 4600 Investment Risk Management MKT 4420 Business Demographics

General Management Option
The general management option provides students with opportunities to develop the technical, interpersonal, conceptual, diagnostic, communication and decisionmaking skills to effectively carry out the management function. The general management option is designed with the flexibility to permit students to select management courses to meet their specific interests and needs as managers of the future. Courses for the general management option Students will select three (3) of the following courses (for a total of 9 credit hours): MGMT 4000 Special Topics in Management MGMT 4010 Compensation and Benefits MGMT 4020 Seminar in Human Resource Management MGMT 4220 Legal Issues in Management MGMT 3710 Entrepreneurial Foundations MGMT 3720 Entrepreneurial Planning Procedure MGMT 4340 Management of Teams MGMT 4510 Management Internships MGMT 4500 Special Problems in Management MKT 4420 Business Demographics Students may choose to take additional courses from the management core in fulfillment of the general management option. Courses counted as satisfying the core requirements may not be utilized to fulfill the general management option requirements.

Real Estate Certificate
Commercial Real Estate Finance Track A real estate certificate emphasizing commercial real estate finance can be earned by taking the following designated 18 credit hour sequence: RELU 3460 Real Estate Law RELU 4390 Real Estate Investments RELU 4460 Commercial Real Estate Finance RELU 4420 Income Property Appraisal FNBK 4610 Portfolio Management FNBK 4590 Risk Management for Business Managers

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2570.

MARKETING/MANAGEMENT Management Program
Managers combine human and material resources to accomplish organizational objectives. Such results are achieved through the managerial processes of planning, leading, organizing and controlling. A firm’s existence is based on how well managers perform these functions in an environment of risk, uncertainty and ambiguity. For this specialization, the student completes nine hours in the management core and an additional nine hours from the chosen option. Students must complete MGMT 3490 with a “C+” or above in order to take additional management courses. The options are general management, entrepreneurship and human resource management. A student may choose more than one option with a resulting increase in number of hours required.

Entrepreneurship Option
The entrepreneurship option is for students who are interested in owning and/or operating a business venture. Students who are interested in serving entrepreneurial ventures in capacities such as consultants, bankers, accountants, marketing professionals, or real estate specialists may also have an interest in this option. The entrepreneurship option has a practical emphasis designed to assist students in developing and operating their new and/or small ventures. Courses in this option lead students through the different processes of getting into business, addresses important operating issues relevant to the running of day-to-day activities of a venture, and discusses the important topic of planning for business growth and development. Students selecting the entrepreneurship option are encouraged to use their elective hours to develop important competencies that will assist them in developing and operating their business ventures.

Management Core
Today’s competitive, global business environment presents many interesting challenges to managers. These challenges include managing change and innovation, managing diversity, developing a global perspective,

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Students often ask which courses they should take for a career in marketing. There is no single answer. All students specializing in marketing are required to take marketing management and marketing research. Additionally, all marketing students are encouraged to apply for a marketing internship to gain relevant business experience. Both the internship (MKT 4510) and special problems (MKT 4500) will apply as marketing electives. To guide students in the selection of the remaining marketing electives, the following course groupings may be useful:

Students must complete the following two course: MGMT 3710 Entrepreneurial Foundations (prerequisite for MGMT 3720) MGMT 3720 Entrepreneurial Planning Students will select one (1) of the following courses: MGMT 4040 Leadership MGMT 4050 Managerial Decision Making MGMT 4220 Legal Issues in Management MGMT 4340 Management of Teams MGMT 4510 Management Internship

Human Resource Management Option
The human resource management emphasis is for students who desire an educational experience focusing on the human resource management functions of an organization. These functions include personnel recruitment and selection, training and development, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, health and safety issues, and labor-management relations, including collective bargaining. Students will select three (3) of the following courses: MGMT 4010 Compensation and Benefits (offered Fall Semester only) MGMT 4020 Seminar in Human Resource Management (offered Spring Semester only) MGMT 4220 Legal Issues in Management MGMT 4510 Management Internship MGMT 4500 Special Problems in Management MKT 4420 Business Demographics ECON 3180 Collective Bargaining

Marketing Management
Marketing strategies and the design of effective programs are the emphasis of this specialization. Many career opportunities exist in management, purchasing and product planning. Frequently, business executives are selected from employees who have experience as a marketing manager. Required marketing courses MKT 4300 Marketing Management MKT 4340 Marketing Research Recommended courses MKT 3320 Consumer Behavior MKT 3610 Business to Business Marketing MKT 3380 International Marketing MKT 4360 e-Marketing

Advertising Management
Students who want a professional career in advertising find this program excellent preparation. Career opportunities include advertising agencies, advertising department of manufacturers and retailers, television and radio sales departments, as well as the advertising departments of banks, insurance companies, stock brokerages, and transportation companies. Required courses MKT 4300 Marketing Management MKT 4340 Marketing Research Recommended courses MKT 3320 Consumer Behavior MKT 3360 Advertising MKT 4320 Sales Management MKT Elective

Secondary Specialization in Management
A secondary specialization in management, as a supplement to a specialization in another business area, may be obtained by completing MGMT 3490 plus nine (9) hours of upper division courses in management. Students must meet all prerequisites to enroll in MGMT 3490. Any course that may be used for specialization in management may also be used for the secondary specialization, with the exception of MGMT 4500. At least one of the courses must be MGMT 4040 (Managerial Leadership) or MGMT 4100 (Organizational Theory and Practice). A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course to apply to the secondary specialization.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2525.

Business Marketing
Manufacturers, transportation companies, distribution firms, and businesses that supply other businesses have excellent opportunities for these students. The emphasis is on how products and services are sold to businesses (rather than to consumers). Required courses MKT 4300 Marketing Management MKT 4340 Marketing Research Recommended courses (choose four) MKT 3610 Business to Business Marketing MKT 3340 Channels of Distribution MKT 3380 International Marketing MKT 4320 Sales Management MKT 4360 e-Marketing

Marketing Program
Marketing program students learn how marketing decisions and strategies are affected by the character of the market, the desires of the business, and the influence of competitors. Each student develops skills in advertising designs, pricing decisions, building distribution networks, and even in the creation and changes of products. Career opportunities are increasing and are in just about any industry: banking, healthcare, manufacturing, retailing, railroad and trucking, even zoos and politics. Students majoring in marketing complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in marketing courses after the Principles of Marketing course is completed with a “C+” or above. Within these 18 credit hours all marketing students must complete Marketing Research and Marketing Management.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Sales and Sales Management
Many businesses employ sales staffs and managers of those staffs. Students are prepared for careers in the area of professional sales and the management of professional sales people. Many “first positions” in marketing are through sales. Required courses MKT 4300 Marketing Management MKT 4340 Marketing Research Recommended courses MKT 3320 Consumer Behavior MKT 3360 Advertising MKT 3610 Business to Business Marketing MKT 4320 Sales Management

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an option that provides students with a focus in international business and complements each primary specialization offered. Students complete 12 credit hours of coursework from three separate areas, as follows: Required Courses (choose 4 from at least 3 areas) BSAD 4000 International Business Study Abroad ECON 3600 Introduction to International Economics ECON 4610 International Trade ECON 4620 International Monetary Economics ECON 4660 International Economic Development FNBK 3700 International Financial Management LAWS 4930 International Business Law MGMT 4150 International Management MKT 3380 International Marketing

Marketing Research
Many companies are looking for students who know how to gather information and make reports about customers, product sales performance, and even reports about competitors. These careers are very involved in marketing departments when decisions and plans are made, as many times these professionals are the most knowledgeable about the markets. Required courses MKT 4300 Marketing Management MKT 4340 Marketing Research Recommended courses MKT 3320 Consumer Behavior MKT 3380 International Marketing MKT 4360 e-Marketing MKT Elective

OTHER INFORMATION Dean’s List
Students who complete 12 or more hours of graded coursework and achieve a GPA of 3.5 or above are placed on the Dean’s List. Part-time students will be placed on the Dean’s List with each accrual of 12 hours with a GPA of 3.5 or above.

Degree with Distinction
Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.75 to 3.89 who has at least 60 hours of credit in residence may graduate with distinction. Any student with a cumulative GPA of 3.9 to 4.0 who has at least 60 hours of credit in residence may graduate with high distinction.

Honors Program
The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide dedicated students an opportunity to express their excellence. This is achieved through a 30-hour program of elective and required courses. All students entering or enrolled in good standing in the College of Business Administration may be considered for membership in the Honors Program. The admission requirements and procedures are: • For entering freshmen: A composite ACT score of 26 or above. • For transfer and current students: A cumulative GPA of 3.25 or above for at least 12 credit hours at UNO. Applications will be submitted to ASH 105. After a review of the application, the College of Business Administration Honors Program Coordinator will invite to membership those individuals who meet the admission criteria.

Secondary Specialization in Marketing
A secondary specialization in marketing, as a supplement to a specialization in another business area, may be obtained by completing MKT 3310 plus nine hours of upper division courses in marketing. Students must meet all prerequisites to enroll in MKT 3310. Any course that may be used for specializing in marketing may also be used for the secondary specialization, with the exception of MKT 4500. At least one of the courses must be MKT 4300 (Marketing Management) or MKT 4340 (Marketing Research). A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course to apply to the secondary specialization.

Minor in Marketing
A minor in marketing is offered for students who are outside the College of Business, and may be obtained by completing MKT 3310 plus nine hours of upper division courses in marketing. Students must meet all prerequisites to enroll in MKT 3310. Any course that may be used for a specialization in marketing may also be used for the minor, with the exception of MKT 4500. At least one of the courses must be MKT 4300 (Marketing Management) or MKT 4340 (Marketing Research). A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in each course to apply to the minor.

Beta Gamma Sigma
Beta Gamma Sigma is the national scholastic honor society in the field of business. Election to membership is available to both undergraduate and graduate students in business. Selection is based upon outstanding scholastic achievement.

Academic Advising
The aim and purpose of academic advising is to assist students in meeting the requirements of the degree program and to interpret College policy regarding academic requirements. In the College of Business Administration, academic advising is carried out through the office of the

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3986.

Secondary Specialization in International Business
A secondary specialization in international business is

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
student must complete an additional upper-division course from an AACSB international accredited school within the same department to validate the transfer course. Courses must be completed with a grade of "C" (2.0) or better.

Dean with primary responsibility for this function assigned to the Associate Dean and the undergraduate advisers. Students should see an adviser whenever questions arise concerning their academic programs, but especially prior to registering for freshman year, choosing a specialization, and registering for senior year. Informal academic advising is an ongoing faculty responsibility. Business students must file an Application to Declare a Specialization in the B.S.B.A. Degree Program in the advising office of the College of Business Administration when they have completed 58 hours. Every business student should file a Senior Check form in the advising office of the College of Business Administration at the end of the junior year (or upon the completion of 90 hours). An audit of the prospective graduate’s academic record is then completed and the student is provided with an official list of the remaining degree requirements. If a student fails to file the form, the responsibility for meeting the requirements for graduation is his/hers and, if in error, will prevent graduation at the intended time. All students graduating from UNO must file, using EBRUNO, an Application for Degree at the beginning of their final semester. This simple and most important procedure confirms that the prospective graduate is a degree candidate and assures the issuing of a diploma upon satisfaction of the degree requirements. All students registering for their final semester should be alerted to the deadline for the filing of their Application for Degree. Failure to file the Application by the posted deadline could postpone a student’s graduation date. Final responsibility for scheduling courses and satisfactorily completing curriculum requirements for any degree rests with the student.

Credit Options
In addition to course credit earned at UNO and credit earned in residence at other institutions, students may apply toward the degree credit earned in the following ways: Professional Development Course Credit: a maximum of six hours of professional development course credit may be taken from any educational body if evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE) as equivalent to collegiate credit, and then may be applied toward the degree. Such credit may be used for non-business electives. The department chair must give written approval if the course(s) is to be used as specialization elective hours or as substitution for required specialization courses. Business core requirements taken by professional development course are not applicable to the BSBA degree. Also note the maximums in the section “Limit on Credit Options” below. Credit by examination: students interested in attempting credit by examination are referred to the section “Credit by Examination at UNO” in the General Information section of this catalog, and to the section “Limit on Credit Options” below. Credit/No Credit: students may select the Credit/No Credit option in non-required, non-business courses, according to the guidelines established in the “Credit/No Credit Privilege” section of this catalog, and the limits on credit options given below. Limits on credit options: a maximum of 24 hours of combined Credit/No Credit, credit by examination, College Level Examination (CLEP) and professional development course credit may be applied.

Choice of Catalog
A student registering in the College of Business Administration of UNO for the first time may, except for the following limitations, complete work for the degree according to: • the requirements of the catalog of the year in which you last entered the College and have since been in continuous (i.e., no enrollment gap of more than two consecutive semesters) enrollment or the catalog current at the time you applied for your degree. • the catalog current at the time the student applied for their degree. For students continuously enrolled a seven-year rule applies. This means that for students who have been continuously enrolled their catalog year can only extend back seven years. Students enrolled more than seven years will be moved up one catalog year at a time. For example, from 2000-01 to 2001-02. The earliest catalog available to an intra-University transfer will be that applicable at the time the student transfers to the College of Business Administration.

Grade Appeal
Students who wish to appeal a grade which they feel was capriciously or prejudicially given shall first discuss the matter with the instructor and/or the department chairperson. If a satisfactory agreement cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the Office of the Dean within 30 days of grade posting. The Academic Evaluation Appeals Committee of the College of Business will hold a hearing to make a final determination based on the facts presented.

Academic Amnesty
A student may remove one or two semester’s grades from their cumulative GPA and degree consideration by petitioning for academic amnesty in the Advising Office, RH 310. Removal shall be by entire semester(s). Petitioning students must have completed 24 consecutive hours with a minimum GPA of 2.50. (Part-time students must have completed 12 consecutive hours with a minimum GPA of 2.50.) Students who are granted academic amnesty will not be eligible for degree with academic honors. The petition for academic amnesty is submitted to the

Transfer Credit
CBA will accept upper-division core courses completed at AACSB institutions. In order for upper-division core courses to be accepted from non-AACSB institutions, the

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
academic adviser. The adviser will submit the petition to the Undergraduate Program Council for final approval.

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Business Administration Graduate Programs
The College of Business Administration, in cooperation with the Graduate College, offers coursework leading to the following degrees: Master of Business Administration (MBA), the Master of Science (MS) in Economics, the Master of Arts (MA) in Economics, and the Master of Accounting (MAcc). The College also has an Executive Master of Business Administration program. For a description of the degree requirements and courses in these graduate programs, please refer to the graduate bulletin.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Art Studio and Creative Writing) or the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. Students must maintain close contact with an adviser each semester to insure progress toward fulfillment of their course of study.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media (CFAM) includes the Departments of Art & Art History, Music, Theatre, Writer’s Workshop, and the School of Communication, offering the following degree programs: • Bachelor of Arts - Communication - Studio Art (K-12 certification available) - Art History - Theatre • Bachelor of Fine Arts - Studio Art - Creative Writing • Bachelor of Music - Music Education - Music Performance • Bachelor of Science - Communication • Graduate degrees (offered through Graduate Studies) - Master of Arts in Communication - Master of Arts in Theatre - Master of Music Performance - Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing As part of a metropolitan university, the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media strives to provide innovation and leadership through programs designed to meet student needs, and appeal to a wide range of people. Cooperative programs with existing organizations in the community and region, utilizing the talents of local professionals, give the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media its special character and vitality. Featuring a wide variety of exhibitions, broadcasts, performances, concerts and readings, the combination of theory and practice within the College provides students with enriching experiences that make the difference between obtaining a degree and getting an education, between knowing and understanding.

Maximum Hour Limits
No student may count more than 87 semester hours of credit in any one discipline toward graduation. Actual limits are determined by faculty in the various disciplines.

Transfer Hours
Students may apply no more than 96 quarter hours (64 semester hours), transferred from a two year institution, towards a UNO bachelor’s degree. Academic advisers retain the right to accept or reject courses based on their transferability and validity to fulfill major requirements.

Quality of Work
All students must maintain a minimum 2.0 grade point average (GPA) in all coursework, including work transferred from other institutions, to remain in good standing in the college. The School of Communication requires students maintain a minimum of “C-” in all major and general education coursework. Furthermore, students who take sophomore level or above journalism or broadcasting courses, or junior level or above speech communication courses must maintain at least a 2.25 cumulative GPA. The Department of Art and Art History requires students maintain a cumulative 2.5 GPA in all art courses. Studio majors must maintain a 3.0 GPA in their concentration studio areas. The Department of Music requires a 2.5 GPA in all music courses. Performance majors must maintain a 3.0 average in their major applied field. All grades reported by the faculty to the Registrar become a part of the student’s permanent record and are included in computation of the cumulative grade point average, regardless of the total number required for the degree.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
Admission to programs in the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media follow regular admission procedures of the University outlined in the current undergraduate catalog. The application deadline for admission to a degree seeking program is August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester. Students who wish to transfer into CFAM from another college within the University must obtain written permission from and meet with a CFAM Dean’s Office adviser. A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required to transfer into the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media.

Unacceptable Credits
Credits in any courses classified as “remedial” or courses in other colleges of the University not approved by the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media faculty may not be applied toward degrees offered by CFAM.

Grade Appeals & Grievance Procedure
Students in the College wanting to appeal either a grade or a charge of academic dishonesty or plagiarism should first discuss the matter directly with the instructor. If a satisfactory agreement is not reached, the student may submit an appeal in writing to the chair of the department/school in which the course is offered.* If the student and chair of the department do not reach a satisfactory agreement the student may submit an appeal in writing to the Dean of the College, at which point the appeal may be referred to the Educational Policy Committee of the College for review. A decision at the College level is normally final. Under extenuating circumstances, a written appeal may be submitted to the University Committee on Academic Standards for a hearing and final adjudication. *Some CFAM academic units may require grade appeals

GENERAL COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS AND POLICIES Total Minimum Hours
Each student must complete a total minimum of 125 semester hours of college credit toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Communication, Bachelor of Arts in Communication, Bachelor of Arts in Art History, Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art or Bachelor of Music (minimum credit hour requirement variable dependent on music concentration). Each student must complete a total minimum of at least 130 semester hours of college credit toward the degree of

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
to go through their own Educational Policy Committees. Refer to individual Department/School guidelines for information.

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Completion of an Incomplete Grade
Students have one semester after an incomplete is awarded to complete the coursework. After this, the grade changes to a withdrawal. Students who complete the required coursework outside of the allotted time frame may still receive credit by re-enrolling and paying tuition for the course. Exceptions are made when a student has been working in good faith continuously to complete the coursework, with no breaks in work submitted, or within contracted terms determined by the faculty member.

See specific school requirements. History...........................................................................6 hrs. (Communication majors only) See specific school requirements. Social Sciences .......................................................9-12 hrs. See specific departmental/school requirements. Cultural Diversity...........................................................6 hrs. (Courses may be double counted from fine arts, humanities, social sciences or, in some cases, from within the major..) U.S. racial or Hispanic minority...........................3 hrs. International, gender, or aging focus ..................3 hrs.

OTHER INFORMATION Advising
Each student enrolled in a College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media degree program is encouraged to review requirements for their intended degree with an assigned academic adviser. Information on assigned advisers is available in the student’s relevant department/school offices. Review of specific degree requirements should be conducted with an adviser at scheduled times each semester in preparation for and prior to each enrollment-registration period.

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
General education coursework in the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media follows the University of Nebraska at Omaha requirements. Some academic units require additional hours beyond the stated general education minimum, and may have specific GPA requirements. See individual descriptions of majors for specific requirements.

FUNDAMENTAL ACADEMIC SKILLS
English and Writing ......................................................9 hrs. Each student must complete nine credit hours including English 1150, 1160 or equivalent and one additional writing course specified by the student’s major. Students placing above ENGL 1150 and/or ENGL1160 by the English Proficiency Placement Exam (EPPE) need only complete six or three credit hours in writing courses, respectively. Mathematics .................................................................3 hrs. Three (3) hours from MATH 1310, Intermediate Algebra or 1530, Introduction to Applied Probability & Statistics. Students who earn a Math ACT score of 23 or higher OR a Math Placement Exam score of 3 or higher will be considered to have met math proficiency. Oral Communication.....................................................3 hrs. Each student must complete three credit hours in one of the following courses: SPCH 1110, 2120, 3120, 3130 or 3410.

Senior Check
Students who have completed 90 credit hours toward their chosen degree program are required to have a senior check completed by the Dean’s office representative Coordinator of Students Services (Fine Arts) or Assistant Coordinator of Student Services (Communication). This process will assure the student’s graduation date, assuming satisfactory completion of all approved courses. All substitutions and/or changes to a student’s degree requirements must be noted in writing during the senior check process. Should this procedure not be followed, responsibility for meeting graduation requirements falls on the student. Errors made could prevent timely graduation.

Honors Program
The purpose of the UNO Honors Program is to provide gifted students with challenges and opportunities to keep pace with their evolving abilities. Students entering or enrolled in good standing in the College may apply for admission to the Program, either on their own initiative or by invitation from the Program coordinator. Application may be made at any time during a student’s undergraduate career, but preferably before the end of the first semester of the junior year. Admission requirements are as follows for the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media: Entering freshmen: SAT score of 1125 or above or ACT score of 26 or above; or departmental recommendation on the basis of creative ability. Current UNO students: A cumulative grade point average of 3.30 or above for at least fifteen credit hours at UNO and an average of 3.30 or above in all courses taken in the student’s major department. Transfer students: A cumulative grade point average of 3.30 or above for the two previous semesters at their former college. All students must take at least sixty (60) semester hours

DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
Distribution requirements are designed to ensure that all students complete a broad variety of courses in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Appropriate courses may be used to satisfy both distribution and cultural diversity requirements. Natural and Physical Sciences .....................................8 hrs. At LEAST one course must include a lab. See specific departmental/school requirements. Humanities ..............................................................9-12 hrs. See specific departmental/school requirements. Fine Arts Outside the Major.....................................6-12 hrs. (Fine arts majors only) Coursework to be taken from outside the student’s major area of study See specific departmental requirements. Quantitative Literacy .....................................................3 hrs. (Communication majors only)

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
the third writing course. All students who take sophomorelevel or above (2000-, 3000- or 4000-level) broadcasting or journalism courses, or junior-level or above (3000- or 4000level) speech courses are required to have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.25. Any exceptions will be by written permission of the school. Students will receive a worksheet listing requirements to keep track of their progress toward a degree.

as a member of the Honors Program. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or above to maintain membership in the Program. College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media Honors Coordinators are available to assist students interested in, and those currently participating in the Honors Program. For more information, please call (402) 554-2238 (fine arts majors) or (402) 554-3244 (communication majors).

Amnesty Clause
For a copy of the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media’s Academic Amnesty Clause please contact the Office of the Dean.

Specific Communication General Education Requirements
Quantitative Literacy .....................................................3 hrs. BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research PSYC 3130 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences SOC 2130 Basic Statistics SOC 2510 Research Methods STAT 3000 Statistical Methods CIST 1400 Introduction to Comp. Programming History ..........................................................................6 hrs. Two courses required. Choose History 1000 (World Civilizations I) or History 1010 (World Civilizations II) and one additional History course. Students may take both HIST 1000/1010 to fulfill requirement. Humanities..................................................................12 hrs. Each course must be from a different subject area. A second course in the same subject area at the 3000 or 4000 level may satisfy the Humanities requirement. This exception may be used only once. Social Sciences ............................................................9 hrs. Each course must be from a different subject area. A second course in the same subject area at the 3000 or 4000 level may satisfy the Social Sciences requirement. This exception may be used only once. Natural Science ............................................................8 hrs. Each course must be from a different subject area and at least one of the courses must include a lab. A second course in the same subject area at the 2000 level or above may satisfy the Natural Science requirement. General Electives As needed to meet 125 credit hour minimum requirement

Residency
Thirty (30) of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and completed at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Students pursuing a studio art major in cooperative agreement with Metropolitan Community College are exempt from the residency rule.

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION
The School of Communication offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree programs with majors in broadcasting, journalism and speech communication. Broadcasting majors may choose from sequences in broadcast news and new media; journalism majors may choose from sequences in news editorial (print journalism), public relations/advertising and media studies. Speech communication majors may choose from clusters focusing on public and political communication, organizational communication and employee relations, communication training and instructional development, interpersonal and intercultural communication, or create their own focus in consultation with a faculty adviser. The B.A. degree includes a foreign language requirement (16 hours or equivalent), while the B.S. degree substitutes a minimum of 15 hours in a second field for the foreign language requirement. A second field is defined as courses within a single department of the university or as courses that all relate to a single subject area or topic. The second field must include at least six hours of upper-level courses except as specifically exempted in writing by a school adviser or the school director. Students must earn at least a “C-” in all courses taken in the second field. New media students must complete a second field of study in media technology approved courses. A total of 125 hours is required for graduation for all communication majors (broadcasting, journalism and speech communication). Students majoring in the School of Communication may not take more than 45 hours in broadcasting and journalism courses combined or more than 45 hours in speech communication courses within the 125 hours required for graduation. Courses that have been applied toward general education requirements may not be applied to the major or second-field requirements. Courses taken to fulfill the general-education requirements for cultural diversity and quantitative literacy may be exceptions, with the approval of an adviser. JOUR 2100/2104, 2150, 3220, 3400 or 4220 qualifies as

BROADCASTING
Beginning with the Fall 2006 semester, students registering for Media Writing must register for both JOUR 2100 (Media Writing Lab) and JOUR 2104 (Media Writing Lecture). Beginning with the Fall 2007 semester, both JOUR 2100 and JOUR 2104 will be prerequisites for any class previously having JOUR 2100 as a prerequisite. A major in broadcasting consists of a minimum of 41 hours (48 for new media) to include the following:

Broadcasting-Broadcast News
Broadcasting/Journalism Core ...................................16 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture BRCT 2320 Television Production I BRCT 2370 Radio Production I BRCT 3330 Television News Video BRCT 3030 Radio and Television News Writing Law ...............................................................................3 hrs.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Choose one course: BRCT 4340 Telecommunication Regulation JOUR 4410 Communication Law Critical Thinking ............................................................3 hrs. Choose one course: JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication JOUR 4400 Mass Media Ethics JOUR 4500 Mass Communication and Public Opinion BRCT 4310 Political Broadcasting Research Application....................................................3 hrs. Choose one course: BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research BRCT 4390 Electronic Media Management Internship ......................................................................2 hrs. Choose one course: JOUR 3970 Applied Journalism/Broadcasting (2 semesters) JOUR 4970 Journalism/Broadcasting Internship Capstone Applications .................................................6 hrs. BRCT 4450 Broadcast Journalism BRCT 4460 Advanced Broadcast Journalism -TV Newscast Journalism/Broadcasting Electives .........................2-10 hrs. (adviser approved) Speech Communication ...............................................6 hrs. (adviser approved)

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majors may not complete more than a total of four hours of credit in internships, applied journalism/broadcasting, independent study and advanced practicum.

JOURNALISM
Beginning with the Fall 2006 semester, students registering for Media Writing must register for both JOUR 2100 (Media Writing Lab) and JOUR 2104 (Media Writing Lecture). Beginning with the Fall 2007 semester, both JOUR 2100 and JOUR 2104 will be prerequisites for any class previously having JOUR 2100 as a prerequisite. A major in journalism consists of a minimum of 43 hours to include the following:

News Editorial
Required Journalism Core ............................................8 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture JOUR 2150 News Writing and Reporting JOUR 2160 News Editing JOUR 3110 Photography JOUR 3270 Public Affairs Reporting JOUR 3970 Applied Journalism/Broadcasting (2 semesters) OR JOUR 4970 Journalism/Broadcasting Internship OR JOUR 4960 Public Relations/Organizational Communication/Advertising Internship Advanced Writing and Editing .....................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: JOUR 3220 Critical Writing for the Mass Media JOUR 3400 Magazine Article Writing JOUR 3410 Magazine Editing JOUR 4220 Literary Journalism JOUR 4370 Communication Workshop (writing, reporting, or editing-related) Advanced Critical-Thinking ..........................................9 hrs. Choose three courses: JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication JOUR 4420 Theories of the First Amendment JOUR 4400 Mass Media Ethics JOUR 4410 Communication Law JOUR 4500 Mass Communication and Public Opinion BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research Journalism/Broadcasting Electives .........................4-11 hrs. (adviser approved) Speech Communication ...............................................6 hrs. (adviser approved)

New Media
Writing...........................................................................7 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture BRCT 3030 Radio and Television News Writing Production ....................................................................9 hrs. BRCT 2320 Television Production I BRCT 2370 Radio Production I BRCT 3320 Television Production II OR BRCT 3370 Radio Production II: Multimedia Audio Multimedia ....................................................................9 hrs. BRCT 3330 Television News Video JOUR 3500 Publication Design and Graphics JOUR 3110 Photography Critical-Thinking..........................................................12 hrs. Choose four courses: BRCT 4390 Electronic Media Management JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication JOUR 4400 Mass Media Ethics BRCT 4340 Telecommunication Regulation OR JOUR 4410 Communication Law BRCT 4380 Film Theory & Criticism Capstone ......................................................................5 hrs. BRCT 4100 Video Media Projects OR BRCT 4460 Advanced Broadcast Journalism-TV Newscast JOUR 4970 Journalism/Broadcasting Internship Speech Communication ...............................................6 hrs. SPCH 4190 Computer-Mediated Comm. Speech elective (adviser approved) Journalism/Broadcasting Electives ...........................0-7 hrs. The broadcasting major must earn at least a “C-“ in all communication courses (BRCT, JOUR and SPCH) presented in satisfaction of the major. Broadcasting

Public Relations/Advertising
Journalism Core............................................................5 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture JOUR 3500 Publication Design and Graphics JOUR 3620 Principles of Creative Advertising JOUR 4230 Principles of Public Relations JOUR 3970 Applied Journalism/Broadcasting (2 semesters) OR JOUR 4970 Journalism/Broadcasting Internship OR JOUR 4960 Public Relations/Organizational Communication/Advertising Internship

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
SPCH 4530 Intercultural Communication SPCH 4xxx Senior Seminar in Communication SPCH 4xxx Topics in Political Communication The journalism major must earn at least a “C-” in all communication courses (BRCT, JOUR and SPCH) presented in satisfaction of the major. Journalism majors may not complete more than a total of four hours of credit in internships, applied journalism/broadcasting, independent study and advanced practicum.

Advanced Skills Courses ..............................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: JOUR 3630 Advanced Creative Advertising JOUR 4240 Public Relations Case Studies JOUR 4250 Public Relations Writing JOUR 4370 Communication Workshop (public relations or advertising-related) Advanced Writing and Editing ......................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: JOUR 2150 News Writing and Reporting JOUR 2160 News Editing JOUR 3400 Magazine Article Writing JOUR 3410 Magazine Editing Advanced Critical Thinking ...........................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication JOUR 4420 Theories of the First Amendment JOUR 4400 Mass Media Ethics JOUR 4410 Communication Law JOUR 4500 Mass Communication and Public Opinion BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research Journalism/Broadcasting Electives .........................4-11 hrs. (adviser approved) Speech Communication ...............................................6 hrs. (adviser approved)

SPEECH COMMUNICATION
A major in speech communication consists of a minimum of 45 hours to include: Speech communication core courses ........................17 hrs. SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communication SPCH 2410 Small Group Communication SPCH 3520 Interviewing SPCH 4510 Persuasion Capstone course (approved by adviser) OR SPCH 4980 Independent Study SPCH 4990 Advanced Communication Practicum OR JOUR 4960/4970 Internship Speech Communication Cluster ................................18 hrs. Cluster and courses are chosen in consultation with a School of Communication faculty adviser; additional options available if approved.

Media Studies
Writing, Speech Communication & Research Core....10 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture SOC 2130 Basic Statistics SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communication OR SPCH 2410 Small Group Communication and Leadership Social Theory ................................................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: BRCT 4310 Political Broadcasting JOUR 4430 International Communication JOUR 4500 Mass Communication and Public Opinion Normative Theory .........................................................9 hrs. Choose three courses: JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication BRCT 4340 Telecommunication Regulation BRCT 4390 Electronic Media Management JOUR 4400 Mass Media Ethics JOUR 4410 Communication Law JOUR 4420 Theories of the First Amendment Capstone and Research Courses...............................12 hrs. SPCH 4110 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism JOUR 4900 Seminar in Mass Communication JOUR 4910 Seminar in Mass CommunicationSenior Thesis BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research Journalism/Broadcasting Electives .........................0-18 hrs. Speech Communication ...............................................6 hrs. Choose two courses: SPCH 4600 Communication Theory SPCH 4190 Computer-Mediated Communication SPCH 4510 Persuasion SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication

Public & Political Communication
(choose six courses) SPCH 2120 Argumentation and Debate SPCH 3120 Persuasive Speaking SPCH 3130 Speech Communication in Business and the Professions SPCH 3140 Advanced Public Speaking SPCH 3150/3160 Intercollegiate Forensics Activities SPCH 3600 Special Topics in Speech Communication SPCH 4110 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism SPCH 4150 Communication Training and Development SPCH 4160 Communication for Instructional Settings BRCT 4310 Political Broadcasting JOUR 4500 Mass Communication and Public Opinion SPCH 4550 Nonverbal Communication SPCH 4600 Communication Theory SPCH 4800 Conflict Mediation

Organizational Communication & Employee Relations
(choose six courses) SPCH 3120 Persuasive Speaking SPCH 3130 Speech Communication in Business and the Professions SPCH 3140 Advanced Public Speaking SPCH 3600 Special Topics in Speech Communication SPCH 3700 Interpersonal Conflict SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication SPCH 4110 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism SPCH 4130 Communication Leadership and Power in Organizations SPCH 4140 Communication and Human Relationships

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
SPCH 4150 Communication Training and Development Skills SPCH 4170 Organizational Communication SPCH 4190 Computer-Mediated Communication JOUR 4230 Principles of Public Relations SPCH 4530 Cross-Cultural Communication SPCH 4550 Nonverbal Communication SPCH 4600 Communication Theory SPCH 4800 Conflict Mediation

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Journalism, Speech and Speech/Theatre Education
Students who wish to teach journalism, speech, or speech/theatre in secondary schools should contact the College of Education for specific requirements.

Minor in Speech or Mass Communication
Students may earn a minor in mass communication (courses to be chosen from journalism and/or broadcasting) or speech communication by completing 18 hours in the chosen area, including 12 hours of upper level work. All courses must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better.

Communication Training & Instructional Development
(choose six courses) SPCH 3120 Persuasive Speaking SPCH 3130 Speech Communication in Business and the Professions SPCH 3140 Advanced Public Speaking SPCH 3600 Special Topics in Speech Communication SPCH 3700 Interpersonal Conflict SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication SPCH 4110 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism SPCH 4130 Communication Leadership and Power in Organizations SPCH 4140 Communication and Human Relationships SPCH 4150 Communication Training and Development Skills SPCH 4160 Communication for Instructional Settings SPCH 4170 Organizational Communication SPCH 4190 Computer-Mediated Communication JOUR 4230 Principles of Public Relations SPCH 4530 Cross-Cultural Communication SPCH 4550 Nonverbal Communication

For more information…
contact the School of Communication at (402) 554-2600.

DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART HISTORY
The mission of the Department of Art and Art History is to prepare artists, art historians and art educators to enter into their respective fields with the skills necessary to make significant contributions to the education, practice and study of art. The Department offers various curricular options designed to engage individuals in an intense understanding of their practice and a broad critical understanding of the visual facets of culture. Via rigorous study, Art and Art History students acquire the requisite knowledge for entry into careers in the arts and/or pursuit of higher degrees. Three degree options exist for art majors: Bachelor of Arts in art history, a Bachelor of Arts in studio art (also available with K-12 certification option), or Bachelor of Fine Arts.

Interpersonal & Intercultural Communication
(choose six courses) SPCH 3600 Special Topics in Speech Communication SPCH 3700 Interpersonal Conflict SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication SPCH 4140 Communication and Human Relationships SPCH 4150 Communication Training and Development Skills SPCH 4530 Cross-Cultural Communication SPCH 4550 Nonverbal Communication SPCH 4600 Communication Theory SPCH 4800 Conflict Mediation Broadcasting/Journalism Courses ...............................7 hrs. JOUR 2100 Media Writing Lab JOUR 2104 Media Writing Lecture BRCT/JOUR Elective (adviser approved) Research Methods or Statistics....................................3 hrs. BRCT 4350 Mass Communication Research OR PSYC 3130 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences OR SOC 2310 Basic Statistics OR SOC 2510 Research Methods OR adviser approved course The speech communication major must earn a “C-” in all courses presented in satisfaction of the major. Speech communication majors may not complete more than a total of three hours of credit for forensics activities (SPCH 31503160) or more than a total of four hours of credit for professional internships, applied journalism/broadcasting, and advanced practicum.

ART HISTORY
The Bachelor of Arts in art history provides a thorough investigation of the history of art as a humanistic discipline. The program provides two paths of study in art history. Option A prepares students for graduate study in art history while Option B prepares students for careers in the fields of Museum Studies and Arts Administration. The Bachelor of Arts in art history requires a minimum of 125 credit hours of coursework.

Specific Art History General Education Requirements:
Humanities..................................................................12 hrs. Including PHIL 1010 & RELI 1010 highly recommended Social Sciences ..........................................................12 hrs. Must include 6 hours of history Fine Arts Outside Major ................................................6 hrs. Areas other than studio art or art history Foreign Languages................................................16-20 hrs. Minimum of two academic years of the same college level foreign language. (If student is interested in graduate study in art history, additional coursework is advised.) General Electives As needed to meet 125 credit hour minimum requirement.

Art History Major Requirements
Art History/Studio Art Core Requirements..................18 hrs. ART 1100 Foundations Design & Drawing I: Two Dimensional Applications ART 1110 Foundations Design & Drawing II: Three Dimensional Applications

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Art History requirement............................................3 hrs. Art 4530 Internship (to be taken upon completion of PA 3500 with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA) American Humanics Coursework ............................9 hrs. PA 3500 Non-profit Organizations and Management (spring semester) PA 4500 Non-profit Resource Development (fall semester) Choose one of the following: MGMT 3200 Managerial Communications MGMT 3490 Management PA 4100 Marketing in Public, Non-profit, & Aviation Organizations PA 4200 Community Organizing & Social Change PA 4590 Techniques/Topics in Non-profit Management Minor in Art History...................................................18 hrs. Art History Core .......................................................6 hrs. ART 2050 Survey of Western Art History I ART 2060 Survey of Western Art History II Art History Electives...............................................12 hrs. Select no more than one course from four (4) of the following categories: Ancient/Classical ART 4710 Ancient ART 4720 Women in Ancient/Medieval Art ART 4730 Classical Art Medieval ART 4720 Women in Ancient/Medieval Art ART 4750 Late Roman and Byzantine ART 4770 Early Medieval Art ART 4780 Late Medieval Renaissance/Baroque ART 4810 Northern European Renaissance ART 4830 Italian Renaissance ART 4850 Baroque and Rococo 19th Century/American ART 4860 Art and Feminism Since 1800 ART 4870 North American Art to 1913 ART 4880 Modern Art I (1850-1913) Modern/Contemporary Art ART 4890 Modern Art II (1913 -1968) ART 4900 Contemporary Art (1968 - present) Architecture ART 3770 History of Architecture to 1850 ART 4780 History of Architecture from 1850 Non-Western Art ART 2040 Cross Cultural Art ART 2070 Art of India and Southwest Asia ART 2080 Art of China and Japan Theory/Criticism ART 4920 Art in Theory & Practice Since 1900 ART 4930 Special Topics in Art History (Students may substitute for any of the above courses upon adviser approval) Exceptions to the Art History program may be granted by the Departmental or College adviser in consultation with the Art History faculty.

ART 2050 Survey of Western Art History I ART 2060 Survey of Western Art History II ART 3760 Art History Seminar ART 4940 Introduction to Methodology in Art History Art History Electives....................................................18 hrs. Select no more than one course from six (6) of the following categories: Ancient/Classical ART 4710 Ancient ART 4720 Women in Ancient/Medieval Art ART 4730 Classical Art Medieval ART 4720 Women in Ancient/Medieval Art ART 4750 Late Roman and Byzantine ART 4770 Early Medieval Art ART 4780 Late Medieval Renaissance/Baroque ART 4810 Northern European Renaissance ART 4830 Italian Renaissance ART 4850 Baroque and Rococo 19th Century/American ART 4860 Art and Feminism Since 1800 ART 4870 North American Art to 1913 ART 4880 Modern Art I (1850-1913) Modern/Contemporary Art ART 4890 Modern Art II (1913 -1968) ART 4900 Contemporary Art (1968 - present) Architecture ART 3770 History of Architecture to 1850 ART 4780 History of Architecture from 1850 Non-Western Art ART 2040 Cross Cultural Art ART 2070 Art of India and Southwest Asia ART 2080 Art of China and Japan Theory/Criticism ART 4920 Art in Theory & Practice Since 1900 ART 4930 Special Topics in Art History (Students may substitute for any of the above courses upon adviser approval).

Art History Focus Options:
Art History majors follow one of two options below.

Option A: Graduate Study Path
In addition to the Art and Art History Core and Art History Electives, students complete: Studio Art OR Art History Electives .........................9 hrs. May include ART 4910 Ind. Study Art History, and/or ART 4930 Special Topics in Art History Art History Thesis.......................................................1 hr. ART 4990 Art History Thesis The Art History Thesis involves the completion of a 20-page research paper and an illustrated public lecture.

Option B: Museum Studies/Arts Administration
In addition to the Art and Art History Core and Art History Electives, students complete coursework offered through the American Humanics Certificate Program (College of Public Administration) and a directed internship at a regional arts institution or museum.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Foreign Language Requirement .........................8-10 hrs. Two semesters of college level foreign language (or the high school equivalent as determined by the Department of Foreign Languages (which may also fulfill humanities requirement). History Requirement ................................................3 hrs. Any history course. (may also fulfill Social Sciences requirement)

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STUDIO ART Bachelor of Arts In Studio Arts
The Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art requires a minimum of 125 credit hours of coursework.

Specific Studio Arts General Education Requirements
Humanities....................................................................9 hrs. Social Sciences ..........................................................12 hrs. Fine Arts Outside Major ................................................6 hrs. Areas other than art or art history General Electives As needed to meet 125 credit hour minimum requirement

Art/Art History Core Requirements
Art History Core ..........................................................15 hrs. ART 2050 Survey of Western Art History I ART 2060 Survey of Western Art History II ART 4890 Modern Art History OR ART 4900 Contemporary Art History Art History Electives......................................................6 hrs. (not required for Visual Technology students) Studio Art Core I .........................................................15 hrs. ART 1100 Foundations Design & Drawing I: Two Dimensional Applications ART 1110 Foundations Design & Drawing II: Three Dimensional Applications ART 1210 Foundations Theory & Practice: Alternative Media ART 1220 Foundations Theory & Practice: Intermedia ART 2100 Life Drawing I Studio Art Core II ........................................................15 hrs. ART 3000 Digital Media Production (not required for visual technology students) ART 3310 Elementary Sculpture ART 3410 Elementary Painting ART 3510 Elementary Printmaking OR ART 3520 Photographic/Digital Printmaking ART 3610 Elementary Ceramics Studio Art Electives ......................................................9 hrs. (not required for visual technology students) Studio Art Concentration ..............................................6 hrs. Students take the intermediate and advanced courses in their area of concentration. Available concentration areas are book arts, ceramics, drawing, intermedia, painting, printmaking, or sculpture. Visual Technology concentrations include Graphic Communication Arts, Electronic Imaging, Still Photography or Digital Cinema (see below).

concentration in one of the following areas: Graphic Communication Art & Design, Electronic Imaging Graphics, Still Photography or Digital Cinema. Students pursuing a VT concentration will take between 37-45 hours of coursework at MCC (Hours vary depending on concentration area). Independent Study .......................................................6 hrs. ART 4100 A+B Visual Technology Independent Study I ART 4110 A+B Visual Technology Independent Study II (two semesters total) Students must fulfill the requirements for their concentration area at Metropolitan Community College (MCC). Some programs require prerequisite courses not included in the concentration. Following completion of MCC requirements, students must enroll in two courses (6 hours, completed over two semesters) of Independent Study at UNO as a final project. The total number of hours transferred to the Bachelor of Arts in Studio Arts degree program from MCC may not exceed a total of 64 semester hours (approximately 96 MCC hours). It is recommended that students pursuing these concentrations seek advisement from staff at MCC and UNO to complete individual program assessment. A student may choose to pursue the MCC studio concentrations in one of two ways: 1. Satisfactorily complete an Associate of Arts degree at Metropolitan Community College, as described in the MCC catalog, and meet the current admission requirements of UNO to pursue the Bachelor of Arts in studio arts program (Students must complete all postassociate coursework at UNO in accordance with the academic Standards of Progress defined in the UNO catalog) OR 2. Enroll in MCC and UNO concurrently. Upon successful completion of the degree requirements, students are awarded a Bachelor of Arts in studio art degree from UNO.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts with studio emphasis
The Bachelor of Fine Arts with studio emphasis provides an extensive, well-rounded, performance-oriented background in book arts, ceramics, drawing, intermedia, painting, printmaking or sculpture. The degree prepares students for a professional life in fine arts and post graduate study. To achieve candidacy into the BFA program, students must meet the following requirements: 1. Must have made significant progress toward completion of general education courses including completion of English, Writing and Math requirements. 2. Successfully complete ART 2050 - Survey of Western Art History I and ART 2060 - Survey of Western Art History II and required courses in Art Studio Core I & II. 3. Successfully complete the intermediate and advanced courses in their chosen concentration 4. Achieve a grade point average of 2.5 in all art courses and a 3.0 GPA in all courses in the chosen area of concentration In addition, students seeking candidacy must prepare the following: 1. Authorization for Registration form: available from the

MCC Visual Technology (VT) Concentration (UNO/MCC Cooperative Program)
This cooperative program with Metropolitan Community College (MCC) allows students to declare a studio

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
BFA Independent Study III (if required by mid-term review) ART 4420 BFA Thesis ART 4920 Art in Theory and Practice General Electives As needed to meet 130 credit hour minimum requirement ART 4340

faculty member coordinating an independent study/thesis coursework. The form must contain the student’s name, the student’s ID number, the student’s chosen area of concentration and the student’s signature. 2. Representative sample of studio work in the chosen area of concentration and any related work which demonstrates technical and conceptual abilities. This may be in the form of actual work, slides, photographs, video and/or CD-ROM. All materials submitted must be adequately labeled. All slides and/or photographs must be labeled with medium, size, and date of work. 3. Written statement which addresses the following: a) Technical and historical influences b) The primary aesthetic and critical concerns of student’s work c) The reason for pursuing the BFA degree d) Student’s name and mailing address. Deadlines for submission of these materials will be posted in the Department of Art and Art History. Faculty will review the portfolios and provide written confirmation of the results within two weeks of the review. A student who has not been accepted into the BFA program may reapply after successful completion of additional studio courses as determined by reviewing faculty. The Bachelor of Fine Arts with studio emphasis requires a minimum of 130 credit hours of coursework. Art History Core ..........................................................18 hrs. ART 2050 Survey of Western Art History I ART 2060 Survey of Western Art History II ART 4890 Modern Art History OR ART 4900 Contemporary Art History Art History Electives......................................................9 hrs. Studio Art Core I .........................................................15 hrs. ART 1100 Foundations Design & Drawing I: Two Dimensional Applications ART 1110 Foundations Design & Drawing II: Three Dimensional Applications ART 1210 Foundations Theory & Practice: Alternative Media ART 1220 Foundations Theory & Practice: Intermedia ART 2100 Life Drawing I Studio Art Core II ........................................................15 hrs. ART 3000 Digital Media Production (not required for Visual Technology students) ART 3310 Elementary Sculpture ART 3410 Elementary Painting ART 3510 Elementary Printmaking OR ART 3520 Photographic/Digital Printmaking ART 3610 Elementary Ceramics Studio Art Electives ....................................................12 hrs. (not required for Visual Technology students) Studio Art Concentration ............................................. 6 hrs. The studio concentration requires a total of six hours of coursework through the advanced level. Students may concentrate in book arts, ceramics, drawing, intermedia, painting, printmaking OR sculpture. For Visual Technology requirements see above. BFA Sequence.......................................................12-15 hrs. ART 4320 BFA Independent Study I ART 4330 BFA Independent Study II

The Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art With K-12 Certification
This option gives students the opportunity to teach K-12 art or the capacity to pursue graduate level work in an M.A. or M.Ed. program in art education. The B.A.S.A. with K-12 certification requires a minimum of 125 credit hours.

Specific Studio Art With K-12 Certificate General Education Requirements
Humanities....................................................................9 hrs. PHIL 3220 Philosophy of Art (recommended) OR other Philosophy course ENGL 2300 Introduction to Literature Social Sciences ..........................................................12 hrs. To include EDUC 2010 Human Growth & Development Fine Arts Outside Major ................................................6 hrs. Physical/Mental Health .................................................3 hrs. HED 2310 Healthful Living OR PE 1800 Fitness for Living General Electives As needed to meet 125 credit hour minimum requirement Art & Art History Major Requirements ....60 hrs. minimum Art History Core .....................................................15 hrs. ART 2050 Survey of Western Art History I ART 2060 Survey of Western Art History II ART 2040 Cross Cultural Survey (or ART 4700) ART 4890 Modern Art History OR ART 4900 Contemporary Art History Art History Electives.................................................3 hrs. Studio Art Core I ....................................................15 hrs. ART 1100 Foundations Design & Drawing I: Two Dimensional Applications ART 1110 Foundations Design & Drawing II: Three Dimensional Applications ART 1210 Foundations Theory & Practice: Alternative Media ART 1220 Foundations Theory & Practice: Intermedia ART 2100 Life Drawing I Studio Art Core II ...................................................15 hrs. ART 3000 Digital Media Production ART 3310 Elementary Sculpture ART 3410 Elementary Painting ART 3510 Elementary Printmaking OR ART 3520 Photographic/ Digital Printmaking ART 3610 Elementary Ceramics Studio Art Electives ..............................................12 hrs.* ART 1810 Watercolor I ART 3300 Introduction to Art Education ART 4300 Art in Secondary School JOUR 3110 Photography It is highly recommended that ART 3300 and ART 4300 be taken in the year just prior to student teaching.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Strongly recommended electives from Metropolitan Community College are: GCAD 1020 Introduction to Computer Methods GCAD 2210 Computer Graphic Design I Studio Art Concentration .........................................6 hrs. The studio concentration requires a total of six hours of courses through the advanced level. Students may concentrate in book arts, ceramics, drawing, intermedia, painting, printmaking, or sculpture. K-12 Education Certificate.................................... 33 hrs. EDUC 2010 Human Growth and Learning EDUC 2020 Educational Foundations EDUC 2030 Human Relations EDUC 2510 Applied Special Ed./Field Experience EDUC 2520 Instructional Systems/Lab TED 3550 Art & Science of Teaching TED 3690 Reading for Secondary Teachers TED 4640 K-12 Student Teaching Requires admission to the Teacher Preparatory Program through the College of Education. Consult with an adviser in the College of Education for application procedure, (402) 554-2717. Students must successfully complete the PPST (Pre-Professional Skills Test) prior to admission to the Teacher Preparatory Program.

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realizing their own original projects. In addition, two seminars in the history of books, one for manuscript and the other printed books, endeavor to elicit the traditions upon which an intelligent evaluation of book design may be based.

For more information…
contact the Department of Art and Art History at (402) 554-2420.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
The department of music has programs that fall into two general areas under the Bachelor of Music degree: • Music Education • Professional degree programs Students enrolled in the music education tracks are trained to teach music at the elementary, middle school/junior high school, and secondary levels. Within each program there are components designed to help the student develop expertise in performance, music theory, music history, and music education/pedagogy. Students who graduate with degrees in the professional programs receive training that places strong emphasis on the performance aspect (including composition for those in the theory/composition curriculum). Regardless of the degree program, the department’s goal is to provide a basic foundation in the knowledge and skill in the performance of music, to provide the basic tools for a career in teaching, performing, composing, or writing about music. Since an undergraduate degree in music is not a terminal one, the department does not emphasize specialization in any one of these areas, but rather, offers an intense overview of the various aspects of music leading toward either a career specialization or graduate studies. The Bachelor of Music with education emphasis leads to K-12 certification enabling the graduate to teach general, choral, and instrumental music at any level. The Bachelor of Music with performance emphasis leads to a concentration in composition, instrumental/keyboard/vocal performance, or music technology. All students must pass an entrance audition on their major instrument or voice and take a keyboard placement test before being admitted as a music major. Regardless of their program emphasis, all students are required to take a common core of courses and meet a set of other requirements as a basis for their specific concentrations.

The Bachelor Fine Arts With K-12 Endorsement Certification
Students wishing to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with K-12 endorsement certification must fulfill the following in addition to the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art with K-12 certification. Art History additional requirement ................................3 hrs. Selected from elective courses BFA Sequence.......................................................12-15 hrs. ART 4320 BFA Independent Study I ART 4330 BFA Independent Study II ART 4340 BFA Independent Study III (if required by mid-term review) ART 4420 BFA Thesis ART 4920 Art in Theory and Practice

THE FINE ARTS PRESS (Book Arts Concentration)
The Fine Arts Press has two reciprocal pursuits. One of these is to produce limited first editions of new literature, mostly verse, from foundry type hand printed on fine papers in the traditional way. The books are issued under the imprint “Abattoir Editions,” and have won international recognition for both literary and typographic excellence. Its coordinate concern is to educate students in the rudiments of this kind of book production. Students majoring in studio art may elect a book arts area of concentration in the department of art and art history. The book arts concentration requires a minimum of 6 hours in the B.S.A. degree track and 15 credit hours in the B.F.A. degree track. Introductory courses in book arts are also available to other students who may wish to enroll for their personal enjoyment. These courses make available to them the facilities of the pressroom fonts of type, hand printing presses, and elementary hand bookbinding gear for

Specific Music General Education requirements
Fine Arts Outside Major ................................................6 hrs. Areas other than music Humanities....................................................................9 hrs. SPCH 1110 or 2120 ENGL 2300 Introduction to Literature (performance majors may take any English literature course) Philosophy elective (music education majors only) Social Sciences ............................................................9 hrs. Cultural Diversity International Focus ..................................................3 hrs. (MUS 1080: Music of the People: The World is required) Music Core Requirements.....................................44-47 hrs. (for ALL music majors)

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Bachelor of Music with K-12 Education Endorsement
Music requirements ........................................... 28 hrs. min. MUS 115(x) – 415(x) lessons (12 cr. hrs.) Applied Instrument/Voice MUS 1600 Introduction to Music Education MUS 3600 Music Education Core I includes woodwind pedagogy, elementary instrumental literature & conducting, general music methods & materials, & elementary choral music & conducting applications of music technology for elementary schools) MUS 3610 Music Education Core II (includes percussion & brass pedagogy, middle school instrumental & choral literature, general music methods, fretted instruments, and music technology for middle schools) MUS 3630 Music Education Core III (includes string pedagogy, organization, instruction & administration of high school instrumental & choral programs, instrumental & choral conducting & literature, music technology and accompanying) Education Coursework ...............................................30 hrs. EDUC 2010 Human Growth & Learning EDUC 2020 Educational Foundations EDUC 2030 Human Relations EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education EDUC 2520 Instructional Systems TED 3690 Applying Reading & Writing in Content Areas TED 4640 Student Teaching

Music Core Curriculum I Music Core Curriculum II Music Core Curriculum III Music Core Curriculum IV (Music Core I-IV includes Theory, Ear Training, Sight Singing, Keyboard Technology & Conducting) MUS 3400 Music Core Curriculum V (not required for Technology concentration) (includes Structural Analysis, Orchestration & Counterpoint) MUS 1690 Keyboard Skills I MUS 2690 Keyboard Skills II MUS 2550 History of Music I MUS 2560 History of Music II MUS 2570 History of Music III MUS 1080 Music of the People MUS 167C Class Applied Voice (instrumental majors only) MUS 4190 Recital MUS 1000 Music Lab/Masterclass (8 semesters) (4 semesters for Technology concentration) Ensembles .................................................... 7-8 semesters* The ensemble must correspond to the student’s major instrument for credit to count toward the completion of the degree. Music Education Ensemble............................... 7 semesters Students in music education are required to complete seven (7) semesters of an ensemble that corresponds to their major instrument. A minimum of five (5) must be major ensembles (Symphonic Wind Ensemble, University Band, Heartland Philharmonic, Concert Choir, University Chorus). The other two can be from the following: jazz ensemble, percussion ensemble, chamber orchestra, or other small chamber groups arranged by faculty members. Additionally, students majoring in wind and percussion instruments must complete four (4) semesters of marching band. Students majoring in strings must complete two (2) semesters of marching band. Music Composition, Performance & Technology Ensemble Requirement...................8 semesters Students in composition, performance, and technology concentrations are required to complete eight (8) semesters of an ensemble that corresponds to their major instrument. A minimum of five (5) must be major ensembles (Symphonic Wind Ensemble, University Band, Heartland Philharmonic, Concert Choir, University Chorus). The other three can be from the following: jazz ensemble, percussion ensemble, chamber orchestra, or other small chamber groups arranged by faculty members. Keyboard and guitar majors may select any major ensemble. Keyboard majors may substitute accompanying projects for ensemble credit. This accompaniment option is at the discretion of the keyboard area coordinator.
*See music department handbook for specific requirements.

MUS 1410 MUS 1420 MUS 2410 MUS 2420

Bachelor of Music – Performance
Music Performance requirements.......................16 hrs. min. Music Theory...........................................................6-12 hrs. To be selected from: MUS 3440 Composition MUS 4400 Advanced Composition MUS 4420 Jazz Improvisation MUS 4430 Arranging for Jazz Ensemble MUS 4440 Music Since 1945 MUS 4450 Orchestration MUS 4470 Counterpoint Music Literature (listed under area of concentration) Specific Concentration Areas Voice Performance Concentration ........................ 44-48 hrs MUS 4740 Voice Literature MUS 4610 Voice Pedagogy MUS 115T Applied Voice MUS 1640 Diction for Singers (two semesters) MUS 3170 Introduction to Music Technology MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 MUS 4190 Recital (2 cr. hrs) Foreign Language Music Literature Elective Keyboard Performance Concentration ...................... 38 hrs. MUS 2790 Accompanying (two semesters) MUS 4730 Keyboard Literature

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
MUS 4600 Piano Pedagogy MUS 115L-145L Applied Piano MUS 3170 Introduction to Music Technology MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 MUS 4190 Recital (2 cr. hrs) Elective Music Literature Instrumental Performance Concentration.................. 36 hrs. MUS 115(x)– 415(x) Applied Instrument/Voice lessons (12 cr. hrs.) MUS 3170 Introduction to Music Technology MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 MUS 4600 Instrumental Pedagogy MUS 4190 Recital (2 cr. hrs) Music Literature Elective Composition Concentration ................................. 38-40 hrs. MUS 3440 Composition MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 MUS 4440 Music Since 1945 MUS 3180 Digital Music Synthesis MUS 3170 Introduction to Music Technology MUS 4190 Recital (2 cr. hrs) MUS 115(x) – 415(x) Applied Instrument/Voice lessons (12 cr. hrs.) Music Literature Elective Technology Concentration ................................... 33-36 hrs. MUS 3170 Introduction to Music Technology MUS 3180 Digital Synthesis MUS 4000 Recording Techniques General Music Elective Technology Electives Music Technology Projects

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MUS 2550 Music History I MUS 2560 Music History II MUS 2570 Music History III Choose three (3) from the following: MUS 4540 Renaissance Music Literature MUS 4550 Baroque Music Literature MUS 4560 Classical Music Literature MUS 4570 Romantic Music Literature MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 Minor in Jazz Studies................................................. 26 hrs. MUS 1410 Music Core Curriculum I MUS 1420 Music Core Curriculum II MUS 1100 Survey of Jazz MUS 4420 Jazz Improvisation MUS 2770 Jazz Ensemble MUS4430 Arranging for Jazz Band Applied Music Minor in Performance .................................................28 hrs. MUS 1410 Music Core Curriculum I MUS 1420 Music Core Curriculum II MUS 4190 Recitals, Junior & Senior Applied Music: Six (6) lower division and Four (4) upper division Ensembles: Three (3) lower division and Three (3) upper division

For more information…
contact the Department of Music at (402) 554-2251.

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
The purpose of the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre degree is to provide students with a general education in all aspects of theatre and the wider liberal arts. Through the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre, the department offers the student a broad-based liberal arts foundation in combination with rigorous and disciplined professional training. Because theatre practice occurs within a social, political and cultural milieu that requires the practitioner to be intimately familiar with such areas as history, foreign languages, and the sciences, the department requires that all students examine the broad area of human knowledge. On the other hand, because theatre practice occurs by means of disciplined processes, the department strives to approach all training and production work with professional attitudes. The combination of these two approaches gives the department the opportunity to offer the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre, a truly rigorous approach to the study of dramatic arts in a unique and exciting educational setting. The general areas studied as a theatre student are acting, directing, design, dramatic literature, history of the theatre, and theatre technologies including stagecraft, stage lighting, scene design, costume, and makeup. Beyond the general theatre core students are encouraged to pursue an interest in a specialized area such as acting/directing, design/theatre technology, or theatre scholarship. In addition to the formal course requirements a student major is required to participate actively and consistently in productions sponsored by the department. The department stages a minimum of four major productions during the academic year. These productions encompass the representative periods of theatre history, including musical theatre. A variety of production opportunities are also offered in the Directing Lab, and Student Showcase.

Music Minors
The minor in music program consists of a number of curricular options having a total of 22-29 semester hours in music. Each of these programs is designed to address a particular vocational or professional area that students have traditionally found of interest. Minor in Composition ................................................29 hrs. MUS 1410 Music Core Curriculum I MUS 1420 Music Core Curriculum II MUS 2410 Music Core Curriculum III MUS 2420 Music Core Curriculum IV MUS 3440 Composition I MUS 4400 Advanced Composition I Minor in Music History ...............................................22 hrs. MUS 1410 Music Core Curriculum I MUS 1420 Music Core Curriculum II MUS 1070 Music of the People: Pop & Rock MUS 1080 Music of the People: The World Choose three (3) from the following: MUS 4540 Renaissance Music Literature MUS 4550 Baroque Music Literature MUS 4560 Classical Music Literature MUS 4570 Romantic Music Literature MUS 4580 Music from 1900-1945 Minor in Humanities (music) ...................................... 24 hrs. MUS 1090 Music Appreciation MUS 1070 Music of the People: Pop & Rock OR MUS 1080 Music of the People: The World MUS 1100 Survey of Jazz

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
Summer Theatre Workshop Advanced Projects in Theatre NSF Internship Introduction to Dramatic Activities in the Classroom THEA 4060 Children’s Theatre Production THEA 4070 Youth Theatre Production THEA 4310 Advanced Acting: Post Realism THEA 4320 Advanced Acting: Greeks to Restoration THEA 4330 Advanced Acting: Ensemble THEA 4340 Advanced Acting: Auditioning THEA 4440 Directing II THEA 4500 Costume Design I THEA 4510 Costume Design II THEA 4550 History of Costume THEA 4610 Scene Design THEA 4730 Seminar in Theatre History THEA 4750 Community Based Theatre THEA 4830 Seminar in Dramatic Literature FOCUSED Theatre Major requirements ............................21 hrs. Students seeking a focused theatre major must apply, via the faculty adviser, for admission to either an acting/directing or design/technical focus upon completion of the following: ENGL 1150, 1160, WRWS 1500 or ENGL 2400, SPCH 1110 or 1120, MATH 1310 (or above), six (6) credit hours of social science, four (4) credit hours of natural science, six (6) credit hours of fine arts outside the major, and THEA 1000 (four semesters), 1510, 1550, 1630, 2310, 2320, 2810, 2820, and 3660. To remain in good standing in the focused major, a student must complete, 1) all required focused courses with a grade of “B” (3.0) or above; 2) a resume/portfolio review each semester with the faculty adviser Acting/Directing Theatre Focus Each of the following: THEA 1210 Voice for the Actor THEA 1220 Movement for the Actor OR THEA 2290 Dance for the Actor II THEA 4340 Advanced Acting: Auditioning Two (2) of the following: THEA 4310 Advanced Acting: Post Realism THEA 4320 Advanced Acting: Greeks to Restoration THEA 4330 Advanced Acting: Ensemble THEA 3910 Theatre for Social Change THEA 4440 Directing II: Rehearsal & Performance 3000/4000 level theatre electives 6 hrs. Design/Technical Theatre Focus THEA 2630 Drafting for the Theatre Two (2) of the following THEA 4500 Costume Design THEA 4610 Scene Design THEA 4010 Advanced Projects in Theatre: Lighting Two (2) of the following: THEA 4550 History of Costume THEA 3610 Rendering & Scene Painting THEA 4010 Advanced Projects in Theatre 3000/4000 level theatre electives .................................6 hrs. THEA 4000 THEA 4010/ 4020 THEA 4030 THEA 4040

The Department of Theatre does not discourage students from participating in production activities sponsored outside the department, however all students are required through the Theatre Lab requirement to make their commitment to the UNO program their first priority. Credit may be earned in off-campus activities in rare and exceptional circumstances, but only if approved in advance by the theatre faculty. The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre requires a minimum of 130 credit hours of coursework.

Specific Theatre General Education Requirements
Humanities..................................................................12 hrs. ENGL 2310 English Literature I ENGL 2320 English Literature II ENGL 4600 Shakespeare PHIL 1210 Critical Reasoning (recomm.) Social Science ............................................................12 hrs. HIST 1000 & 1010 World Civilization I & II (highly recommended) Fine Arts Outside the Major ........................................12 hrs. Areas other than theatre General Electives As needed to meet 130 cr. hr. minimum Theatre Core Requirements........................................41 hrs. THEA 1000 Theatre Lab* (up to 8 semesters) THEA 1510 Stage Costume THEA 1550 Stage Makeup THEA 1630 Stagecraft THEA 2310 Acting I THEA 2320 Acting II THEA 3660 Stage & TV Lighting THEA 4430 Directing I THEA 3760 Theatre History/Literature: Modern THEA 3770 Theatre History/Literature: Contemporary THEA 4780 Theatre History/Literature: Greek/Classical1500 THEA 4790 Theatre History/Literature: Renaissance/1500-1850
* Theatre Lab (THEA 1000) is a one hour course required each semester for a maximum total of 8 semesters. Students who transfer into the program may request up to 3 hours of this requirement be waived, but those who transfer in with fewer than 5 semesters anticipated residency will need to enroll in more than one hour of Lab in some semesters to meet requirements. Students may elect to pursue either a GENERAL major, OR a FOCUSED major in Acting/Directing or Design/Theatre Technology.

GENERAL Theatre Major requirements ..................... 6 hrs. min. Students will choose six to twenty-one (6-21) credit hours of elective theatre coursework, selected in consultation with the faculty adviser, from the following: THEA 1010 Introduction to Theatre THEA 1050 Film History & Appreciation THEA 1090 Oral Interpretation of Literature THEA 1210 Voice for the Actor THEA 1220 Movement for the Actor THEA 1610 Scenic Production Laboratory THEA 2000 Summer Theatre Workshop THEA 2280 Dance for the Theatre I THEA 2030 NSF Internship THEA 2290 Dance for the Theatre II THEA 2630 Drafting for the Theatre THEA 3020 Theatre Production Practicum THEA 3250 Stage Dialects THEA 3610 Rendering and Scene Painting

MINOR IN THEATRE
A minor in theatre requires 21 credit hours of

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
coursework to be completed under one of five different focus areas: general, acting, directing, design/theatre technology, or scholarship. General Minor Focus ......................................... 21 hrs. total THEA 1000 Theatre Lab (three semesters) THEA 1510 Stage Costume OR THEA 1630 Stagecraft THEA 2310 Acting I Theatre Electives ........................................................12 hrs. Must include at least nine hours of upper division (3000/4000) coursework Acting Minor Focus............................................ 21 hrs. total THEA 1000 Theatre Lab (three semesters) THEA 2310 Acting I Acting choice ..............................................................15 hrs. (Must include at least nine hours of 3000/4000 level coursework) THEA 1210 Voice for the Actor THEA 1220 Movement for the Actor THEA 1550 Stage Makeup THEA 2280 Dance for the Theatre I THEA 2290 Dance for the Theatre II THEA 2320 Acting II THEA 3250 Stage Dialects THEA 4310 Advanced Acting: Post Realism THEA 4320 Adv. Acting: Greeks-Restoration THEA 4330 Advanced Acting: Ensemble THEA 4340 Advanced Acting: Auditioning THEA 4030 Internship: NE Shakespeare Festival OR other adviser approved courses Design/Technical Minor Focus........................... 21 hrs. total THEA 1000 Theatre Lab (three semesters) THEA 1510 Stage Costume OR THEA 1630 Stagecraft Design/Technical choice .............................................15 hrs. (Must include at least nine hours of 3000/4000 level coursework) THEA 1510 Stage Costume THEA 1610 Scenic Production Lab THEA 1630 Stagecraft THEA 2630 Drafting for the Theatre THEA 3610 Rendering & Scene Painting THEA 3660 Stage & TV Lighting THEA 4030 Internship: NE Shakespeare Festival THEA 4500 Costume Design THEA 4510 Costume Design THEA 4550 History of Costume THEA 4610 Scene Design OR other adviser approved courses Directing Minor Focus ....................................... 21 hrs. total THEA 1000 Theatre Lab (three semesters) THEA 1510 Stage Costume OR THEA 1630 Stagecraft THEA 2310 Acting I THEA 4430 Directing I Directing choice.........................................................3-6 hrs. (Must include at least nine hours of 3000/4000 level coursework) THEA 2320 Acting II OR THEA 1220 THEA 3660 THEA 1220

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Movement for the Actor Stage & TV Lighting OR Movement for the Actor Theatre OR other adviser approved courses History/Literature choice.......................................min. 3 hrs. THEA 3760 Theatre History Literature: Modern THEA 3770 Theatre History Lit.: Contemporary THEA 4760 Theatre History Lit.: Greeks/Classical THEA 4770 Theatre History Lit.: Renaissance Scholarship Minor Focus................................... 21 hrs. total THEA 1000 Theatre Lab (three semesters) THEA 3760 Theatre History Literature: Modern THEA 3770 Theatre History Lit.: Contemporary THEA 4760 Theatre History Lit.: Greeks/Classical THEA 4770 Theatre History Lit.: Renaissance Additional Dramatic Literature ......................................3 hrs. Choose one of the following: ENGL 4080 The American Drama ENGL 4340 Shakespeare ENGL 4350 Shakespeare’s Contemporaries FREN 4160 French Theatre of the 17th-19th Centuries FREN 4170 Contemporary French Theatre GERM 4440 German Drama SPAN 4440 Spanish-American Theatre SPAN 4550 Modern Drama of Spain OR other adviser approved courses Theatre Electives ..........................................................3 hrs.

Teacher Certification
Students interested in earning a Nebraska certification to teach in theatre at the high school level must enter the College of Education and pursue a bachelor of science in secondary education with in speech communication and theatre as teaching subjects.

Advising
New theatre students are required to meet with the Coordinator of Student Services for advisement, while existing students are required to visit with the faculty adviser each semester to plan appropriate coursework.

For more information…
contact the Department of Theatre at (402) 554-2406.

DEPARTMENT OF WRITER’S WORKSHOP
The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in creative writing, offered by the Writer’s Workshop, is a program of intensive study in the making of poetry, fiction or non-fiction. The B.F.A. in writing requires a minimum of 72 semester hours of major coursework designated by the candidate’s area of emphasis in consultation with the student’s program adviser. Students must successfully complete all major courses with a grade of “C” (2.0) or better. A Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in creative writing required 130 credit hours of coursework. Candidates for the degree must meet the following requirements:

Specific Writer’s Workshop General Education Requirements
Humanities................................................................... 9 hrs.

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COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
JOUR 4250 Public Relations Writing ENGL 4820 Autobiography ENGL 4860 Modern Familiar Essay SENIOR THESIS OPTION .......................................... 6 hrs. Students whose work is above average and who are considering doing graduate work in creative writing may apply after their Intermediate Studio to pursue the B.F.A. with Senior Thesis. To earn this special designation on their official transcripts, candidates for the degree must take two semesters of WRWS 4990 Senior Thesis. The senior thesis is a book-length manuscript of original work prepared during a student’s last year of study in his or her area of concentration (e.g., a collection of poems, a collection of short stories, a novel, a collection of essays). The work will be judged on the basis of artistic maturity and technical control. The level of excellence of the thesis should be commensurate with that expected by graduate programs; therefore, it should represent work of the highest quality the candidate has been able to achieve in the program. Students approved for thesis work need to consult regularly with their major adviser regarding their selection of courses in their degree program. Students may apply for senior thesis by submitting samples of their work after they’ve completed their Intermediate Studio course in genre. At that time, the student may be Approved, Provisionally Approved or Not Approved for this option. The progress of a student who is Provisionally Approved will be reviewed again after his/her first Advanced Studio for final approval to enroll for senior thesis course credit. To remain with the thesis option, a student must receive a grade of “S” for the six hours of thesis work.

Social Science ..............................................................9 hrs. Fine Arts Outside the Major ..........................................9 hrs. At least six (6) hours must be fulfilled from courses in art, art history, music or theatre. Up to three (3) hours may be fulfilled with Writer’s Workshop courses not required for the major. Foreign Language....................................................8-10 hrs. (minimum of one academic year of the same college level foreign language)

Writer’s Workshop Core Requirements
Literature and Theory Core ..........................................15 hrs WRWS 1010 Contemporary Writers THEA 1090/ SPCH 1710 Oral Interpretation of Literature WRWS 3010 Literary Magazine WRWS 4000 Form & Theory (repeatable for literature credit under different topic) Three additional hours of coursework to be determined by department Historical Literature.......................................................9 hrs. Choose three courses: ENGL 2310 Introduction to English Lit. ENGL 2320 Introduction to English Lit. II ENGL 2450 American Literature ENGL 2460 American Literature ENGL 2xxx Literature Electives (adviser approved) Upper Division Literature ............................................18 hrs. Select six 3000-4000 level literature courses from English, foreign languages, Writer’s Workshop, or other appropriate departments (in consultation with faculty adviser).

Fiction & Poetry Track
Writing Core ................................................................18 hrs. WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction WRWS 2060 Fundamentals of Poetry WRWS 2100 Basic Fiction Studio WRWS 2200 Basic Poetry Studio WRWS 2300 Creative Non-fiction Studio Concentration Area.....................................................12 hrs. Fiction Studio sequence WRWS 3100, 4100, 4110 OR Poetry Studio sequence WRWS 3200, 4200, 4210

Minor in Creative Writing
A minor in creative writing requires a minimum of 27 credit hours of coursework to be completed under one of four different emphasis areas: fiction, poetry, nonfiction, or combined genres. Prerequisite Courses: English Composition 1150 & 1160 Fiction .........................................................................27 hrs. WRWS 1010 Contemporary Writers WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction WRWS 2060 Fundamentals of Poetry WRWS 2100 Basic Fiction Studio WRWS 3100 Intermediate Fiction Studio WRWS 4110 Advanced Fiction Studio Six hours of upper division (3000+) literature courses in genre Poetry .........................................................................27 hrs. WRWS 1010 Contemporary Writers WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction WRWS 2060 Fundamentals of Poetry WRWS 2200 Basic Poetry Studio WRWS 3200 Intermediate Poetry Studio WRWS 4200 Advanced Poetry Studio Six hours of upper division (3000+) literature courses in genre Creative Non-fiction....................................................27 hrs. WRWS 1010 Contemporary Writers WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction

Creative Nonfiction Track
Writing Core ..................................................................7 hrs. WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction WRWS 2100 Basic Fiction Studio OR WRWS 2060 Fundamentals of Poetry WRWS 2200 Basic Poetry Studio Concentration Area.....................................................12 hrs. WRWS 2300 Basic Creative Nonfiction Studio WRWS 3300 Creative Nonfiction Studio WRWS 4300 Creative Nonfiction Studio Choose four (4) from the following..............................12 hrs. JOUR 3400 Magazine Article Writing JOUR 3500 Publication Design & Graphics JOUR 4220 Literary Journalism

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

COMMUNICATION, FINE ARTS AND MEDIA
WRWS 2300 Basic Non-fiction Studio WRWS 3300 Intermediate Non-fiction Studio WRWS 4300 Advanced Non-fiction Studio ENGL 4860 Modern Familiar Essay OR JOUR 3400 Magazine Article Writing Six hours of upper division (3000+) literature courses in genre Combined Genres: Fiction & Poetry ...........................31 hrs. WRWS 1010 Contemporary Writers WRWS 2050 Fundamentals of Fiction WRWS 2060 Fundamentals of Poetry WRWS 2100 Basic Fiction Studio WRWS 2200 Basic Poetry Studio WRWS 3100 Intermediate Fiction Studio WRWS 3200 Intermediate Poetry Studio Six hours of upper division (3000+) literature courses

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EDUCATION

GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Education is comprised of five academic units: the Departments of Counseling; Educational Administration and Supervision; Special Education and Communication Disorders; Teacher Education; and the School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Through its departments and school the college seeks to prepare individuals for careers in a variety of fields including teaching, educational administration, counseling, community health, athletic training, exercise science, recreation and leisure, library science, special education, and speech language pathology. The college offers programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. This catalog describes only those programs at the undergraduate level. All programs lead to a Bachelor of Science in Education degree. Some programs must be completed in conjunction with one (or more) other programs and most programs also lead to state certification. Additionally, the college offers a number of special course sequences which do not result in a degree but which result in added teaching endorsements. For additional information visit the Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu.

ADMISSION TO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Prospective students may apply for admission to the college by indicating their preference on the University Application for Admission (Section B). Only students with “Assured” admission status will be eligible for entrance into the college (see the admission requirements outlined in the General Information section of this catalog). Application deadlines for admission to the College of Education are: • August 1 for the fall semester • December 1 for the spring semester • June 1 for the summer sessions Admission to the College of Education does not guarantee admission to a specific program. Certain programs, including teacher preparation, require a separate application and admission process.

attended whether credit was earned or not. Hand-carried or student submitted transcripts are not acceptable. Only credits earned at accredited institutions will be accepted by the college. The college will accept, for transfer, grades of “C-” or better. Credits earned at an institution which is part of the Nebraska Network of Community Colleges will be accepted by the college provided the grades are the equivalent of a “C-” or better. Credits from institutions seeking regional accreditation (but not yet accredited) may be accepted after 30 hours of work are satisfactorily completed at UNO. Acceptance of any transfer credits by the college does not ensure their application to a particular program or endorsement. Determination of applicability is the responsibility of the specific department/school. Professional education courses will be accepted only from institutions which are accredited for teacher education by the state and/or regional accrediting agency. Education courses will not be accepted from junior colleges or twoyear institutions unless the college has a specific articulation agreement with that institution. Individuals with degrees in education, transferring to the College of Education for teacher certification only, must successfully complete all program requirements prior to student teaching. (The program coursework for any endorsement must total a minimum of 12 hours, six of which are in the major area.)

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
The following quality of work standards apply to all individuals in the college. • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher (Computation of grade point average is based on all coursework attempted [UNO and transfer hours]). • Earn no grade below a “C-” in courses in the Fundamental Skill Areas (English, mathematics, public speaking). • Earn no grade below “C-” in all courses in the major program, endorsement/specialization area(s), and minor.
NOTE: Please see departments’/school’s sections for information on programs, lists of courses, and additional academic performance requirements.

Transfer Admission from Other Colleges and Universities
Students may transfer into the college from other institutions by completing the application process described above and meeting the minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale).

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE
A Bachelor of Science in Education degree requires a minimum of 125 credit hours; 30 of the last 36 hours must be taken in residence. General education requirements apply to all programs. Candidates in teacher preparation programs must also complete all requirements in the professional education sequence, and the requirements for their teaching certificate and endorsement/specialization area(s). Students in non-teacher preparation programs must complete all the requirements of the particular program. Program specifications and expectations are noted in the departments’/school’s sections of this catalog or on the college Web site, http://coe.unomaha.edu.

Transfer Admission by Change of College/Major
Students transferring from another college on the UNO campus to the College of Education must meet the minimum cumulative GPA requirement of 2.5. In addition, individuals interested in teacher preparation must also pass all sections of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) in order to transfer into the college.

Transfer Credit Policy
Although UNO does not transfer grade point averages from institutions outside of the University of Nebraska system, the College of Education does require that the computation of the grade point average be based on all coursework attempted (UNO and transfer hours). Official transcripts must be sent to the UNO Office of Admissions from each previous college or university

Correspondence Credit/Credit by Exam
An individual may count toward graduation no more than 15 hours of credit taken by correspondence, television, and/or extension. The College of Education will

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION
accept toward a degree program those courses for which credit by examination is given (up to 30 hours) and recommended by the respective departments within the colleges of the University. Up to eight credit hours of elective credit may be allowed for military service.

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GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Courses in this component pertain to liberal arts education. A minimum of forty-five credit hours of general education courses are required by the college. Individuals should consult with their advisers prior to each registration about the applicability of courses toward the general education requirements. The distribution of hours is as follows: Fundamental Academic Skills - Total 15 hours (A grade of “C-” or better is required for all coursework in the fundamental academic skills area.) English (equivalent to ENGL 1150 and 1160) .................6 All incoming freshman and those transfer students who have not completed six hours of English composition with a grade of “C-” or better at other accredited institutions are required to take the English Placement Examination or an additional composition course. One Advanced Writing Course .......................................3 Public Speaking ..............................................................3 May be satisfied by SPCH 1110 or 2120. Mathematics 1310 or equivalent.....................................3 Distribution Requirements - Total 30 hours Natural and Physical Sciences ...................minimum of 8 Minimum of eight hours including one laboratory course. Humanities and Fine Arts............................minimum of 8 Social and Behavioral Sciences..................minimum of 8 Cultural Diversity.............................................................6 Should include U.S. racial or Hispanic minority groups (3 hours). The remaining three hours of this distribution can be satisfied with another three hours of coursework in minority studies, coursework in women’s studies, or coursework with an international or foreign focus. Certain majors in the College of Education require specific coursework to satisfy the above general education distribution. For further information and details, see the requirements for particular majors.

The petition for academic amnesty is submitted in accordance with the following guidelines: 1. After consultation with an adviser, the individual is responsible for initiating the petition. 2. The petition should be addressed to the dean of the college. It should include the individual’s name, identification number, and address, as well as identification of the specific semesters for which removal is being requested. 3. The petition should be submitted to the adviser who will, in turn, forward it to the dean. 4. The individual is advised in writing regarding the dean’s decision. Copies of the decision are sent to the individual’s adviser and the registrar.
Note: Application of the College of Education’s amnesty policy for students in other colleges at UNO is possible under the following circumstances:

1. The individual meets the cumulative hour and GPA requirements of the College of Education’s amnesty policy. 2. The individual must have “assured” admission status. (See general information section of the undergraduate catalog for description of the admission categories.) 3. The application of the College of Education policy will raise the cumulative GPA to the required 2.5 overall average.

Academic Advising
Majors are encouraged to establish and keep close contact with their academic advisers. In this way, one’s progress through a program may be facilitated and serious mistakes can be avoided. The college maintains an undergraduate advising office which is open at regularly scheduled hours and is located in Kayser Hall 330. Nonteaching majors in Health, Physical Education and Recreation are advised in HPER 207. Speech Pathology majors are advised in Kayser Hall 115. Undergraduate advisers can provide direct assistance to students or can refer them to the appropriate faculty members for special advice. Individuals should consult with an adviser for schedule approval prior to each registration.

Application for Degree
All students graduating from UNO must file an “Application for Degree” with the Registrar’s Office and pay the required fee at the beginning of the semester in which they will graduate and not later than the date listed in the University Calendar. Failure to file for the degree by this deadline may postpone a student’s graduation date. Applications are available online via E-BRUNO. After applying for the degree, students should visit the UNO Bookstore as soon as possible to order the cap and gown and graduation announcements.

OTHER INFORMATION Academic Amnesty
Individuals who are currently enrolled in the College of Education, and who have successfully completed one full year of coursework at UNO, may petition to have all coursework taken during all or part of their first two years removed for the purpose of computing grade point average. One full year of successful coursework at UNO shall be defined as 24 consecutive hours with a grade point average of at least 2.50. Deletion of previous coursework shall be by entire semester(s)‚ or year(s) as the case may be and the student must be at least four years removed from the semester or year to be deleted. Individuals who apply under this rule may not be considered for degrees with honors at graduation.

Dean’s List
First time undergraduate, degree seeking students enrolled in the College of Education who maintain a grade point average of 3.5 or better while carrying 12 or more graded hours will earn the distinction of being placed on the Dean’s Honor List at the end of the semester.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION

Grade Appeals
Individuals who believe that their grade in a particular course does not properly reflect their performance or that the instructor acted in an arbitrary or capricious manner in determining the grade should first contact the instructor to determine the rationale for the grade or if there was an error in reporting. Consultation with the instructor should take place before taking any formal action in regard to a grade appeal. After the instructor has provided the rationale for the grade in question and has indicated that no error in reporting was made, the individual may then wish to petition the department/school for reconsideration. In such instances, the student should contact the department chair/school director to obtain information on the procedures to follow in requesting an appeal at the department/school level. If an individual believes that the department/school action did not comply with the due process procedures or did not provide legitimate relief, he/she may petition the Student Affairs Committee of the College of Education. The Student Affairs Committee is the appellate body for grade appeals after a student has received a decision at the department/school level. Students wishing to appeal a grade to the Student Affairs Committee should contact the Dean’s Office (KH 334) to obtain the procedures to follow in filing an appeal.

education are offered through the College of Communication, Fine Arts and Media. Students seeking preparation to be teachers may apply for admission to the programs upon meeting the following criteria: • Admission to UNO. • Completion of the General Education Fundamental Skills requirements (ENGL 1150, ENGL 1160, SPCH 1110) with a grade of "C-" or better in each course. • Completion of EDUC 2020, Educational Foundations, and EDUC 2030, Human Relations with a grade of “C-” or better. (NOTE: Students may apply for admission during the semester in which they are enrolled in EDUC 2020/EDUC 2030). • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better (includes UNO and transfer credit from other institutions). • Passing scores on all sections of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) (scores are maintained in the College of Education Office of Student Services for seven years).

Application for Admission to Teacher Preparation Program
Students meeting the above criteria must formally apply for admission to the teacher preparation program. Formal admission policies can be found on the college Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/PreEdadmissions.php. (Deadlines for applying are October 1, March 1, and June 1.) Admission is selective. Meeting the criteria for applying does not ensure admission to the teacher preparation program. Students planning to transfer to a teacher preparation program in the College of Education from another college within UNO must meet all of the above conditions and formally apply for admission to the teacher preparation program.

Program Progress
Individuals are expected to progress steadily toward the degree. Majors enrolled in the College of Education will complete work for the degree according to the requirements of the catalog of the year in which they entered the college. For interruptions in enrollment of more than one semester, individuals will be held to the requirements of the catalog of the year when they re-enter the college.

Probation/Disenrollment
If an individual’s cumulative GPA falls below 2.5, he/she will be given one semester of probation to raise his/her grade point average. Disenrollment from the college will occur at the end of the probationary semester if the minimum, cumulative GPA requirement (2.5) is not attained.

Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST)
All individuals completing teacher certification programs in the state of Nebraska must pass all sections of the PreProfessional Skills Test (PPST). The exam includes testing in Reading, Mathematics, and Writing. The test is designed to provide information about basic proficiency in communication and computation. Minimum passing scores for the test are: Reading - 170; Writing - 172, Mathematics 171. With the exception of EDUC 2030 Human Relations, EDUC 2020 Educational Foundations, and certain HPER courses, no professional education courses may be taken until all sections of the PPST have been passed. Registration packets for the written version of the PPST are available at the Testing Center in the Eppley Administration Building, Room 113 (554-4800). Registration for PPST must be received by ETS before the registration date deadline. The computer-based version of the PPST may be taken at UNO, Testing Center, EAB 113 (554-4800) or the Sylvan Learning Center which is located at 2730 South 140th Street (334-2403). There is a fee, payable in advance, for taking either the written or computer-based version of the test (http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/ppstinfo.php).

Repeating Courses
A College of Education student who receives a grade below “C-”, an “I” (Incomplete), or a “W” (Withdraw) in any undergraduate course with a department prefix of EDUC, HED, HPER, PE, RLS, SPED, or TED may re-enroll in that course for one additional time for a total of two attempts. Special Note: A candidate who is removed from or withdraws from any field, clinical, practicum, or student teaching experience, regardless of reason for the removal/withdrawal, must appeal to be allowed to repeat the experience. If the appeal is granted, the candidate must reapply for a placement. A candidate may repeat such experiences only once.

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
The college offers teacher preparation programs in the following areas: elementary education, middle grades education, secondary education, physical education, health education, special education. Art education and music

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION
Elementary Education: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Test (EECIA)
Graduates seeking endorsements in elementary education and/or elementary special education must take the Elementary Education: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (EECIA) test in order to be recommended for certification by the College of Education. The EECIA is a test in the Praxis II series offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Students are recommended to take the exam immediately before or during the semester in which they complete student teaching. A score of 159 is needed to be considered No Child Left Behind (NCLB) qualified by the Nebraska Department of Education. Test registration information, dates, and locations can be found on the ETS Web site at www.ets.org.

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Professional Dispositions
Teaching is a profession that requires its potential candidates be individuals of integrity. Prospective teachers must demonstrate that they are individuals of strong moral character who can make mature decisions for themselves and for the students they will teach. Teachers are responsible for the education, safety, and well-being of anyone in their charge. The College of Education prepares future teachers who show a high degree of moral character and the ability to act responsibly inside and outside of the classroom. These individuals serve as representatives of the college and the University, and must demonstrate the personal and professional dispositions of the teaching profession. Inappropriate behaviors on the part of candidates which, in the college's reasonable judgement, violate the university's Student Code of Conduct, establish a lack of integrity or moral/ethical character, or demonstrate conduct and patterns of behavior inconsistent with the personal and professional dispositions expected in the teaching profession are not tolerated. Such behavior shall be sufficient grounds for 1) denial of admission to or enrollment in and 2) dismissal from or removal from programs, courses, observations, field experiences, practica, student teaching, and similar field-based experiences that lead to certification. Displays or patterns of behaviors may be established by any credible means including, but not limited to, the facts surrounding a record of arrests or convictions. Candidates who exhibit inappropriate behaviors may be referred for a conference of concern. The purpose of this conference is to formally identify the unsuitable behaviors, recommend corrective action(s), and determine the candidate's suitability for continuing in teacher preparation. NOTE: In accordance with the Nebraska Department of Education, Rule 20, the following information must be provided to all persons who apply for admission to programs leading to teacher certification: Persons who have felony convictions or misdemeanor convictions involving abuse, neglect or sexual misconduct are automatically rejected by the Nebraska Department of Education for certification.

Professional Education Sequence
All candidates in programs leading to teacher certification must complete the courses that constitute the professional education sequence. The professional education sequence is composed of 15 credit hours organized into five courses of three credits each: EDUC 2010 Human Growth and Learning; EDUC 2020 Educational Foundations; EDUC 2030 Human Relations, EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education; EDUC 2520 Instructional Systems; and Intermediate Field Experiences (EDUC 2514 and EDUC 2524). EDUC 2020 and EDUC 2030 are open to all students on the UNO campus with a 2.5 GPA. EDUC 2030 meets the Nebraska Department of Education requirement for human relations. For College of Education students, this course also meets the university’s Cultural Diversity requirement for a course in U.S racial or Hispanic minority groups. To enroll in any other professional education sequence course (EDUC 2010, EDUC 2510, and EDUC 2520), candidates must have been admitted to a teacher preparation program and must satisfy any other prerequisites listed for the course. Candidates who receive a grade below “C-”, an “I” (Incomplete), or a “W” (Withdraw) in a professional education sequence course may not continue in the sequence until that grade is removed. EDUC 2010 must be completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment in the last two courses. EDUC 2510 and EDUC 2520 and the Intermediate Field Experiences (EDUC 2514 and EDUC 2524) are usually completed in the same semester.
NOTE: Candidates, who receive a grade below “C-” or an “I”; or who voluntarily withdraw from any laboratory or field experience after being identified as a student in jeopardy; or who are withdrawn from any laboratory or field experience must petition the Field Placement Advisory Committee to continue in the program.

Field/Clinical/Practicum/Student Teaching Experiences
As part of their teacher preparation program, candidates are required to complete various field, clinical, practicum, and student teaching experiences. In accordance with policies and procedures of the Nebraska Department of Education, and in compliance with the requests of cooperating school districts, no candidate will be permitted to participate in K-12 classroom-based experiences (including student teaching) until a signed statement of personal and professional fitness to teach has been completed. The statement of personal and professional fitness is required as part of the Admission Application to Teacher Preparation. A candidate who withdraws from or is removed from any field, clinical, practicum, or student teaching experience may repeat the experience one time following the appropriate appeal through the Field Placement Advisory Committee and reapplication process.

First Day Attendance Policy
The College of Education strictly enforces a “first day attendance” policy in the following courses with field experiences: EDUC 2010, EDUC 2510, EDUC 2514, EDUC 2520, EDUC 2524, PE 3060, PE 3210, PE 3250, PE 3350, PE 4000, PE 4150, SPED 4400, SPED 4640, SPED 4720, SPED 4730, TED 2250, TED 3550, TED 3690, TED 4250, TED 4320, TED 4330, TED 4340, TED 4380, TED 4350, TED 4370, TED 4600, TED 4630, TED 4640. Students not attending the first day of class will be administratively withdrawn from the course.

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EDUCATION

Student Teaching Policies
All candidates for elementary, middle grades, special education, or secondary teacher certification will be required to complete one semester of full-day student teaching for a total of 12 credit hours. Candidates seeking additional endorsements to the basic certificate will be required to complete an additional student teaching experience in their endorsement area(s). Student teaching experiences will be completed in identified, local, metropolitan area schools where placement and supervision are arranged through the College of Education. Student Teaching Orientation is completed in conjunction with student teaching. This field experience is a non-credit lab consisting of two weeks preceding student teaching on site in a single school. Admission to student teaching is by application only. Application for student teaching must be made in the fall or spring term preceding the student teaching semester. Applicants cannot be considered for placement unless all application materials are submitted by the announced deadlines: October 1 for spring student teaching and February 15 for fall student teaching. Candidates must have satisfactorily completed all of their coursework prior to student teaching. Candidates must earn a grade of “C-” or better in the Fundamental Academic Skills areas of general education and in those courses identified on the candidate’s program of study as professional education courses, teaching area courses (for secondary education majors), and specialization courses (for elementary education majors). All grades below “C-” in these specified areas must be removed prior to student teaching. Candidates are responsible for contacting their adviser regarding said grades. Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in order to be eligible to student teach. Special Note: Candidates who are withdrawn from any student teaching placement, or who voluntarily withdraw after being identified as a candidate in jeopardy must petition the Field Placement Advisory Committee if they wish to continue in their professional preparation program.

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
In order to be admitted to a specialization and remain in good standing, a candidate must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better. No grade below a “C-” will be accepted in any professional education course, or any course in the specialization area. Each candidate will also complete the professional education sequence, including EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education and EDUC 2030 Human Relation, and be required to pass the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST).

For more information . . .
And forms visit the Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu/current.php

Deaf/Hard of Hearing
The program offers two tracks for candidates preparing for careers serving children who are deaf or hard of hearing, a Teacher Preparation Track and an Educational Interpreter Track. In the teacher preparation track, candidates must couple education of the deaf/hard of hearing with a major in elementary or secondary education. The preparation meets or exceeds the joint Council for Exceptional Children/Council of the Deaf (CEC/CED) standards for teachers of the deaf/hard of hearing. Required courses in the teacher preparation track are: SPED 1110, American Sign Language I; SPED 1120, American Sign Language II; SPED 2110, American Sign Language III; SPED 2120, American Sign Language IV; SPED 2200, The History, Psychology and Sociology of Deafness; SPED 4220, Teaching Speech to HearingImpaired Students; SPED 4420, Language Development in Children; SPED 4240, Teaching Language to the Hearing Impaired*; SPED 4330, Aural Rehabilitation; SPED 4350, Teaching Content Subjects to the Hearing Impaired; SPED 4370, Basic Audiology; SPED 4390, Hearing Science; SPED 4450, Speech Science II: Experimental and Applied Phonetics; SPED 4720, Student Teaching in Special Education; SPED 4810, Classroom Management: Each candidate will also complete the professional education sequence, including EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education, and EDUC 2030 Human Relations. The teacher preparation track also offers a K-12 field endorsement option. This option prepares teachers to work with students who are deaf or hard of hearing in selfcontained settings (e.g., day school, state school for the deaf) at all grade levels. The preparation meets or exceeds the joint Council for Exceptional Children/Council of the Deaf (CEC/CED) standards for teachers of the deaf/hard of hearing. Required courses in the K-12 track are: SPED 1110 American Sign Language I; SPED 1120 American Sign Language II; SPED 2110 American Sign Language III; SPED 2120 American Sign Language IV; SPED 2200 History, Psychology, & Sociology of Deafness; SPED 4220 Teaching Speech to the Deaf/Hard of Hearing; SPED 4240 Teaching Language to the Deaf/Hard of Hearing; SPED 4230 Language Development & Disorders for Teachers; SPED 4330 Aural Rehabilitation; SPED 4350 Teaching Content Subjects to the Deaf/Hard of Hearing; SPED 4370 Basic Audiology; SPED 4390 Hearing Science; SPED 4450

Certification
Upon successful completion of all coursework and student teaching, candidates are eligible for a State of Nebraska teaching certificate. Candidates should apply for the certificate in the semester they graduate. Information on application procedures can be obtained in the Office of Student Services, Kayser Hall 326. (http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/renewalcert.php)

Renewal of Certificate
Courses taken for renewal of a teaching or administrative certificate must be approved prior to enrollment by an adviser in the College of Education. Courses taken at non-accredited institutions or institutions without an approved teacher education program are not applicable to renewals. (http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/renewalcert.php)

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION
Speech Science II: Experimental and Applied Phonetics; SPED 4650 Career Development for Individuals with Disabilities; SPED 4710 Interactions Between Professionals and Parents; SPED 4800 Emotional Development of Children and Youth; SPED 4810 Classroom Management; SPED 4720 Student Teaching in Special Education* (Elementary/Secondary). Each candidate also will complete the professional education sequence: EDUC 2010 Human Growth and Learning, EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education; EDUC 2520 Instructional Systems; EDUC 2514 Level I Field Experience Orientation; EDUC 2524 Level I Inschool Practicum; TED 4320 Teaching Social Studies; TED 4330 Teaching of Math; and TED 4340 Teaching of Science.
*Competency in sign language is required for student teaching.

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Students interested in becoming educational interpreters should contact the department for additional information and transcript review.

Speech-Language Pathology
Candidates interested in becoming speech-language pathologists (SLPs) must apply for admission to the preprofessional preparation program. Application for admission and acceptance into the program is required for continuation in preparation to become an SLP. Minimum Requirements for Applying The following requirements must be met prior to submitting an application for formal admission to the undergraduate speech-language pathology program. • Admission to UNO and the College of Education. • Completion of the General Education Fundamental Skills requirements (ENGL 1150, ENGL 1160, MATH 1310, SPCH 1110), and EDUC 2020 (Educational Foundations) and EDUC 2030 (Human Relations) with a grad of “C-” or higher. • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better (UNO plus other institutions). • Passing scores on all sections of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). • Completion of a speech, language, and hearing screening at UNO. • Completion of the following speech-language pathology courses: SPED 1400 Introduction to Communication Disorders, SPED 4380 Speech Science I: Speech Mechanisms, SPED 4390 Hearing Science, and SPED 4450 Speech Science II: Applied Phonetics with a minimum GPA of an average of 3.0. • Note: Candidates may apply for admission during the semester in which they are enrolled in the last of the required coursework Application Procedures Candidates meeting the above criteria must formally apply for admission to the pre-professional preparation program. Formal admission policies can be found on the Web at http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/SLPadmissions.php. Deadlines for applying are March 1, July 1, and October 1. Admission is selective. Meeting the admission criteria does not ensure admission to the speech-language pathology program. Candidates planning to transfer to the speech-language pathology program from another college within UNO must meet all of the conditions and formally apply for admission to the speech-language pathology program. Majors in speech-language pathology must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 or better. A GPA of 3.0 or better within the major area is required prior to admission into SPED 4510, Basic Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology. SPED 4510 is taken on a Credit/No Credit basis. No other courses taken on a Credit/No Credit basis will be accepted for the purpose of fulfilling any of the required general education, special education or speech-language pathology courses. An undergraduate degree in speech-language pathology is a pre-professional degree which does not lead to a certificate endorsement in speech pathology to work in Nebraska schools. The certificate endorsement is recommended upon

The educational interpreter preparation track provides a specialized sequence of coursework and experiences related to sign language interpreting and transliterating in PreK-12 educational settings. This preparation track is designed to provide advanced training for individuals who have already established basic competence in sign language and have basic knowledge and skills in sign language interpreting. Upon completion of all requirements, students will earn a Bachelor of Science degree. Basic preparation in sign language and interpreting is available through a joint program with Metropolitan Community College. Students also may transfer into the advanced block from other twoyear interpreter preparation programs (IPP) or sign language/interpreting certificate programs. Candidates may enter the preparation at several points. However, in order to complete the preparation, candidates must meet all of the requirements for the bachelor=s degree (i.e., general education requirements, professional education sequence, basic interpreting block [knowledge, skills, and competencies], advanced interpreting block, suitable GPA). Required coursework will vary depending on previous postsecondary experiences of the candidates. The following coursework is required in the advanced interpreting block. EDUC 2010 Human Growth and Learning EDUC 2510 Applied Special Education EDUC 2520 Instructional Systems EDUC 2514 Level I Field Experience Orientation EDUC 2524 Level I In-School Practicum SPED 3100 English/ASL Comparative Linguistics SPED 311 American Sign Language V SPED 3120 English/Signed Language Interpreting Grades K-6 SPED 3130 English/Signed Language Interpreting Grades 7-12 SPED 3140 Discourse Analysis & Sociolinguistics SPED 4110 Communication Systems Used by Deaf/Hard of Hearing in Educational Settings SPED 4230 Language Development & Disorders for Teachers SPED 4270 Language Development in Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing SPED 4310 Simultaneous Interpreting English and Sign Language SPED 4320 Spoken/Signed Transliteration SPED 4740 Educational Interpreter School Practicum & Seminar

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completion of the master’s degree in speech-language pathology. The following are considered to be essential skills and/or abilities for speech-language pathology majors: adequate vision, hearing, speech, and language. Majors in speech-language pathology must take the following coursework as partial fulfillment of the general education requirements: ENGL 2400, Advanced Composition; BIOL 1020, Principles of Biology, a physical science; PSYC 1010, Introduction to Psychology I; PSYC 1020, Introduction to Psychology II; PSYC 1024, Laboratory: Introduction to Psychology II; and PSYC 3130, Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. The speech-language pathology requirements will include all of the following coursework. Each major will take all courses in the following sequence: First Year SPED 1400 Introduction to Communication Disorders SPED 4380 Speech Science I: Speech Mechanisms Second Year Fall semester SPED 4390 Hearing Science SPED 4450 Speech Science II: Phonetics Spring semester SPED 4420 Early Language Development in Children SPED 4370 Basic Audiology Third Year Fall semester SPED 4460 Later Language Development in Children SPED 4760 Assessment Procedures for SpeechLanguage Pathologists SPED 4430 Articulation Disorders SPED 4490 Pre-clinical Observation and Assessment Spring semester SPED 4500 Speech-Language Pathology: Practice and Procedures SPED 4750 Introduction to Assessment and Management of Childhood Language Disorders Final Year Fall semester SPED 4330 Aural Rehabilitation SPED 4510 Basic Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology (may be taken during either the fall or spring semester) All majors must also complete the professional education sequence. SPED 4550 (Special Needs Students from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities) can be taken in lieu of or in addition to EDUC 2030. Six hours in related elective coursework is required. Any related elective coursework must have adviser approval.

Mild/Moderate Disabilities Endorsement Track
The mild/moderate disabilities endorsement track is designed to prepare candidates to meet Nebraska requirements for an endorsement in mild/moderate disabilities, K-9 or 7-12 level certificate. Each candidate seeking teacher certification must complete general education and professional education requirements as well as coursework in the endorsement area and supporting content work for 7-12. Required courses for K-9 endorsement TED 3300 Teaching Reading in Elementary Schools: Introduction TED 4120 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation for the Classroom Teacher TED 4330 Teaching of Mathematics: Elementary TED 4340 Teaching of Science: Elementary TED 4350 Teaching of Reaching and Language Arts SPED 3020 Data Collection Technique: Role in Teaching/Learning Process SPED 4010 Child Abuse/Neglect SPED 4230 Language Development and Disorders for Teachers SPED 4400 Introduction to Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities SPED 4640 Methods and Materials in Special Education SPED 4710 Interactions with Parents of Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4800 Social and Emotional Development of Children and Youth SPED 4810 Classroom Management SPED 4720 Basic Student Teaching in Special Education SPEC 4724 Level II Field Experience Required courses for 7-12 endorsement PSYC 3130 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences TED 3690 Applying reading and Writing in Content Areas TED 4120 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation for the Classroom Teacher SPED 3020 Data Collection Technique: Role in Teaching/Learning Process SPED 4010 Child Abuse/Neglect SPED 4230 Language Development and Disorders for Teachers SPED 4400 Introduction to Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities SPED 4640 Methods and Materials in Special Education SPED 4650 Career Development for Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4710 Interactions with Parents of Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4800 Social and Emotional Development of Children and Youth SPED 4810 Classroom Management SPED 4720 Basic Student Teaching in Special Education SPEC 4724 Level II Field Experience

Mild/Moderate Disabilities
The program offers two tracks for candidates preparing for careers serving children with mild/moderate disabilities: a mild/moderate disabilities endorsement track or a special education/teacher preparation track where candidates must couple mild/moderate disabilities with a major in elementary or secondary education.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION
Special Education/Teacher Preparation Track
Undergraduate candidates seeking endorsement in the area of mild/moderate disabilities may also be enrolled in a program that leads to certification in elementary or secondary education and includes the professional education sequence. Each candidate will be required to pass the Pre-Professional Skills Test. K-9 candidates are required to take the following special education courses in addition to the coursework required for elementary education: SPED 3020 Data Collection Technique: Role in Teaching/Learning Process SPED 4230 Language Development and Disorders for Teachers SPED 4400 Introduction to Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities SPED 4640 Methods and Materials of Teaching in Special Education SPED 4710 Interactions With Parents of Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4720 Student Teaching in Special Education SPED 4724 Level II Field Experience SPED 4800 Emotional Development of Children and Youth SPED 4810 Classroom Management One Elective 7-12 candidates are required to take the following special education courses in addition to the coursework required for secondary education: SPED 3020 Data Collection Technique: Role in Teaching/Learning Process SPED 4230 Language Development and Disorders for Teachers SPED 4400 Introduction to Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities SPED 4640 Methods and Materials of Teaching in Special Education SPED 4650 Career Development of Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4710 Interactions With Parents of Individuals with Disabilities SPED 4720 Student Teaching in Special Education SPED 4724 Level II Field Experience SPED 4810 Classroom Management One Elective

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Candidates must meet the general education requirements. Candidates receiving school health education certification must complete the professional education sequence as well as EDUC 2030, Human Relations. The following hours are also required of those seeking certification: HED 1500, Foundations of Health Education; HED 2070, Drug Awareness; PE 2880, Basic Physiology and Anatomy; HED 2310, Healthful Living; HED 2850, Stress Management; HED 3030, First Aid; HED 3080, Health Concepts of Sexual Development; HPER 3090, Applied Nutrition; HED 3310, General Safety Education; HED 4000, Methods and Materials in Health Education; HED 4040, Prevention and Control of Disease; HED 4060, School Health Programs; GERO/HED 4550, Health Aspects of Aging; HED 4960 Health Education: Planning and Organization; TED 4000, Methods in Second Teaching Field; plus 12 credit hours of student teaching. Community Health Education The community health educator is prepared to start a career as a health promoter or educator in community, work site and/or medical care settings. The program provides opportunities for the student to: become a reflective practitioner in health education; develop critical thinking on health issues; sharpen health-directed community skills; advance health-related technological competence. Students must meet the general education requirements. Additionally, students must complete: PE 2880 Basic Physiology and Anatomy, BIOL 1330 Environmental Biology, a SPCH course, a SOC course, a PSYC course, and a PSCI course. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.5, no grade lower than a “C-” in required classes, and no incompletes in health education courses in order to be assigned a practicum and to be recommended for graduation. Students must complete the following 64 hours of coursework: HED 1500, Foundations of Health Education; JOUR 1500, Intro to Mass Communication; HED 2070, Drug Awareness; SOC 2130, Basic Statistics or PSYC 3130, Statistics for Behavioral Science; PA 2170, Intro to Public Administration; SPCH 2410, Small Group Communication; HED 2850, Stress Management; HED 3080, Health Aspects of Sexual Development; HPER 3090, Applied Nutrition; HED 3310, General Safety Education; PE 3900, Motivation for Physical Activity; HED 4000, Methods and Materials in Health Education; HED 4040, Prevention and Control of Disease; HED 4130, Community Health; HED 4550, Health Aspects of Aging; HED 4700, Women’s Health & Issues of Diversity; HED 4950, Public Health Leadership & Advocacy; HED 4960 Health Education— Planning and Organization; HED 4990, Field Practicum in Community Health.

For more information…
and a complete listing of program requirements visit the Web site at www.unocoe.unomaha.edu/sped/htm

SCHOOL OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
For more information, visit the Web at http://coe.unomaha.edu/hper or call (402) 554-2670. School Health Education The school health education program is designed to prepare candidates for positions in secondary schools. Candidates must have a GPA of 2.5, no grade lower than than “C-” in required classes and no incompletes in health education courses to student teach and be recommended for graduation.

Physical Education
The physical education program offers concentrations in physical education teacher preparation, exercise science and athletic training. Candidates achieving teaching certification may also pursue a coaching endorsement and/or adapted physical education endorsement.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION

Physical Education Teacher Preparation The teacher preparation programs in physical education are designed to prepare candidates to teach physical education in elementary and/or secondary schools. Certification programs leading to a Physical Education K-6 Endorsement and a Physical Education 7-12 Endorsement are available. Candidates must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, no grade lower than “C-” in required courses, and no incompletes in required physical education courses to student teach and be recommended for graduation. All candidates seeking teaching certification in physical education are required to complete the College of Education general education requirements and professional education sequence (EDUC 2010, 2020, 2510, 2520); the State certification requirements (ENGL 2300, EDUC 2030); and the professional physical education course requirements (PE 1800, 2220, 2430, 2800, 2880, 4150, 4220, 4630, 4930, 4940, HED 3030, PHYS 1110, 1154, PEA 111Y Track & Field). K-6 Teaching Endorsement In addition to the general education requirements, the professional education sequence, State certification requirements, the professional physical education course requirements and the activity course requirements, candidates seeking the K-6 teaching endorsement must complete TED 4640 and the physical education K-6 specialization requirements (PE 2300, 2350, 3060, 3210, 3350 and six hours of physical education electives). Of the electives, a maximum of three hours may be one-hour PEA courses. 7-12 Teaching Endorsement In addition to general education requirements, the professional education sequence, the State certification requirements, professional physical education course requirements and the activity course requirements, candidates seeking the 7-12 teaching endorsement must complete TED 3690, 4640, and the physical education 7-12 specialization requirements (PE 2300, 2350, 3250, 4000 and six hours of physical education electives). Of the electives, a maximum of three hours may be one-hour PEA courses. Supplemental Coaching Endorsement To receive a coaching endorsement, a candidate must possess or simultaneously receive teaching certification. Physical education majors must complete the requirements for K-6 and/or 7-12 endorsement and complete PE 3040, 4500, any two of PE 3730, 3740, 3750, 3760, 3770, 3780, 3790 and two coaching practica (PE 4980). Non-physical education majors must complete HED 3030, PE 3010, 3040, 3480 or 4220, and any two of PE 3730, 3740, 3750, 3760, 3770, 3780, 3790 and two coaching practica (PE 4980). Supplemental Adapted Physical Education Endorsement To receive an adapted physical education endorsement, a candidate must possess or simultaneously receive teaching certification. Candidates seeking the adapted physical education endorsement must complete EDUC 2510 or SPED 8030, PE 2800, 4150, 4170/8176, 4180/8186, 4260/8266, 3350 or 4000, and PEA 112B, Adapted Aquatics.

Exercise Science The exercise science concentration in physical education is designed to prepare students to assume positions as fitness or health promotion directors and exercise consultants in private or public agencies, health centers, cardiac rehabilitation programs, as well as corporate fitness programs. This concentration is also an excellent choice for students in the preprofessional programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy and medicine. It does not lead to a state teaching certification. Students must have a cumulative and major GPA of at least 2.5, no grade lower than “C-” in required courses, and no incompletes in required courses to do an internship and be recommended for graduation. In addition to the general education requirements, the following courses must be taken: PEA 111V Swimming, PE 1800, 2210, 2220, 2430, 2800, 2880, 3040, 3900, 4010, 4150, 4200, 4220, 4630, 4700, 4800, 4900, 4910, 4930, 4940, 4960, HPER 3090, HED 2310, 2850, 3030, 4550, CSCI 1000, CHEM 1140, 1144, MGMT 2800, PHYS 1110, 1154, PSYC 1010, PSYC 4630 or 4640, and nine hours of recommended electives. Athletic Training An Athletic Trainer is a qualified health care professional educated and experienced in the management of health care problems of the physically active. The athletic training program is designed to prepare students for a professional career in athletic training. Successful completion of this program provides the eligibility to sit for the National Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification examination. In addition to the general education requirements, the following professional preparation courses must be taken: PE 1010, 1800, 2700, 2880, 4010, 4310, 4320, 4330, 4340, 4350, 4360, 4630, 4930, 4940, 4960, 4990, HPER 3090, EDUC 2030; and 24 hours of electives approved by the adviser. International applicants are recommended to have a TOEFL score of 550 or higher. Accreditation standards require formal admission to this program. Students must be formally admitted to the program to register for the athletic training core courses (PE 2700, 4310, 4320, 4330, 4340, 4350, 4360). Once admitted to the Athletic Training Program, the student will obtain most of the clinical hours as part of course requirements. Students may obtain application materials from the HPER office. A grade of “C-” or higher in PE 1010 and PE 2880 and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 are required to apply. Applications must be submitted by March 1 for fall semester admission. Acceptance will be based on the completeness and quality of the application, the number of openings available, GPA, academic performance in PE 1010 and PE 2880, previous athletic training experience, and an interview with the selection committee. Fulfillment of the basic requirements does not guarantee admission to the program. Contact the School of HPER for admission requirements, acceptance criteria, technical standards and applications. The first semester after admission is a probationary period during which the student will be evaluated in terms of academic performance, reliability, productivity, communication skills, and progression of athletic training

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION
competencies and proficiencies. At the end of the probationary period, the student will meet with the athletic training program staff to discuss his/her future in the athletic training program. Students must have a cumulative and major GPA of at least 2.5, no grades lower than “C-” (2.0) in required courses, and no incompletes in required courses to do an internship and be recommended for graduation. Once admitted students are required to meet technical standards and First Aid and CPR requirements. Additional hours will be necessary to complete the educational competencies, proficiencies, and qualify for the National Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification examination. Students are expected to obtain at least 1,000 hours of clinical experience. Clinical experience includes some nights, weekends and travel. Clinical experience must be obtained over a minimum of two years (four academic semesters).

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Recreation and Leisure Studies
The Bachelor of Science in education degree with a major in recreation and leisure studies prepares students for professional positions in a variety of recreation settings. Specializations are designed to meet national certification standards with concentrations as generalists with a recreation administration focus or as recreation therapists. The recreation therapy specialization meets certification sitting requirements for the national written examination of the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification. Students are required to complete an appropriate sequence of courses for the concentration which they elect. Each concentration has a required professional education sequence containing a common core of 36 credit hours, a professional specialization of 27 credit hours, plus additional supportive requirements of 15 credit hours. A total of 125 credit hours are required. Students must complete all required coursework, both general and professional, with a minimum GPA of 2.5 before applying for their practicum experiences. Prior to graduation, all recreation and leisure studies coursework must be completed with at least a 2.5 overall GPA and no grade below a “C-”.

biology and physical science); EDUC 2030, Human Relations; MATH 2000, Math for Elementary Teachers, and MATH 2010, Geometry for Elementary Teachers; and physical and mental health. A candidate for a degree or teaching endorsement in grades K-6 must complete the following required coursework: ART 3050, Art in the Elementary School; MUS 3050, Music Fundamentals and Methods for Elementary Teachers; HPER 2400, Health Education and Physical Education for the Elementary School Teacher; TED 3300, Introduction to the Teaching of Reading; TED 4320, Teaching of Social Studies; TED 4330, Teaching of Mathematics; TED 4340, Teaching of Science; TED 4350, Teaching of Reading and Language Arts; TED 4650, Literature for Children and Youth; TED 4600, Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary; and Student Teaching Orientation. In addition to completing required courses in the K-8 program, a candidate seeking certification must choose from the following specialization areas: Early Childhood Deaf/Hard of Hearing English As a Second Language Foreign Language Interdisciplinary Studies Intermediate Grades Library Media Mild/Moderate Disabilities Physical Education The following elementary education specialization areas require an additional semester of student teaching in order to be endorsed in the respective area: Early Childhood Deaf/Hard of Hearing English as a Second Language Foreign Language Library Media Mild/Moderate Disabilities Physical Education

For more information…
and a complete listing of program requirements, visit the College of Education Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/majorprogs.php.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2670.

TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
In order to be admitted and remain in good standing, majors must meet the academic performance requirements for the College of Education. As noted below, individual programs may have additional requirements. Candidates seeking teacher certification must complete general education and professional education requirements as well as coursework in endorsement/specialization areas.

Middle Grades Education
The program in middle grades education is designed to prepare candidates to meet Nebraska requirements for a middle grades (4-9) level teaching certificate. Candidates must complete the following coursework as part of the general education requirements: introduction to literature; philosophy; EDUC 2030, Human Relations; physical/mental health (HED 2310, Healthful Living, or PE 1800, Fitness for Living). The required professional coursework includes: TED 3300, Introduction to Teaching Reading; TED 4350, Teaching Reading and Language Arts; TED 3690, Applying Reading and Writing in the Secondary School; TED 4660, Young Adult Literature; TED 4370, Introduction to Middle School; and TED 4390, Teaching at the Middle Level. Candidates are required to complete two teaching content areas as part of the middle grades endorsement

Elementary Education
The program in elementary education is designed to prepare students to meet Nebraska requirements for an elementary (K-6) level teaching certificate. Candidates must complete the following coursework as part of the general education requirements: American history; American government, geography; introduction to literature; philosophy; natural science (must include experience in

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION

program. Candidates must select their two content subjects from the areas of: mathematics, foreign language, science, social studies,and language arts. One of the choices must be either foreign language (German, French, Spanish), mathematics or science. All content areas will be a minimum of 18 credit hours each. (See an academic adviser for a listing of the required courses for each teaching content area.) Each content area will also include a course in methods for that particular discipline (i.e. TED 4000, Special Methods in the Content Area). Student teaching is required and will be completed in a middle grades setting.

French Geography German Health Education Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Physics Political Science Spanish Speech

Supplemental Endorsements Adaptive PE Coaching English as a Second Language All secondary education candidates seeking endorsement in deaf/hard of hearing, mild/moderate disabilities, library media, or English as a second language will be required to complete one additional semester of student teaching in the respective area.

For more information…
and a complete listing of program requirements, visit the College of Education Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/majorprogs.php.

For more information…
and a complete listing of program requirements, visit the College of Education Web site at http://coe.unomaha.edu/oss/majorprogs.php

Secondary Education
The secondary education program is designed to prepare candidates to meet Nebraska requirements for a secondary (7-12) level teaching certificate or a K-12 teaching certificate. Candidates completing the secondary education program must complete the following coursework as part of the general education requirements: introduction to literature; philosophy; EDUC 2030, Human Relations; and physical/mental health (HED 2310, Healthful Living, or PE 1800, Fitness for Living). A candidate for a degree or teaching endorsement in grades 7-12 or K-12 must complete the following course requirements: TED 3550, The Art and Science of Teaching in Secondary Schools; TED 3690, Applying Reading & Writing in the Secondary School; and TED 4000, Special Methods in the Content Area, which must be repeated for each subject endorsement or area of the field endorsement. 7-12 certification requires TED 4600, Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary; Secondary K-12 certification requires TED 4640, K-12 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary/Secondary. All candidates seeking 7-12 or K-12 certification must complete one of the following sets of requirements: a) academic requirements for two teaching subjects or one teaching field, or b) academic requirements for K-12 certification in art, music or physical education. A maximum of 18 credit hours from the field endorsement or nine hours from each subject endorsement may be applied to the general education requirements. Candidates may choose from the following teaching subjects or fields: Field Endorsements Art Language Arts Music Mathematics Subject Endorsements Biology Chemistry Earth Science Library Media English Natural Science Physical Science Social Science Speech and Theatre History Journalism Mathematics Mild/Moderate Disabilities Physical Education

Non-Teaching Programs
Students not desiring teacher certification may earn a non-teaching degree in the following program: Library Science All majors in the library science program must complete general education requirements. Required library science coursework includes: CIST 3100, Organizations, Applications & Technology; TED 4650, Children’s Literature; TED 4660, Young Adult Literature; TED 4710, Reference, Resources and Services; TED 4720, Special LIbraries; TED 4740, Cataloging and Classification; TED 4750, Advanced Cataloging and Technical Services; TED 4760, Managing Collections in Library and Information Centers; TED 4800, Library Leadership and Management; TED 4570, Capstone Practicum in Library Science. Each individual must complete 27 credits of electives distributed over the following areas: technology - nine credit hours; literacy - nine credit hours; and human relations - nine credit hours. Individuals must also complete an approved minor plus elective courses sufficient to reach the minimum of 125 credit hours needed for graduation.

For more information…
and a complete listing of program requirements, visit the College of Education Web site at www.unocoe.unomaha.edu/oss/Major Progs.htm.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION AND HUMAN SCIENCES
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Education and Human Sciences (at Lincoln and Omaha) is committed to individuals, families and communities of Nebraska in the context of the larger society. The College’s educational, research and outreach programs are focused on development of critical-thinking skills which reflect a concern for social responsibility. The mission of the College is to enhance the well being of individuals, schools, families and communities. Students learn about the interaction of individuals and families within the larger society, schools and communities. Students also develop an appreciation of public policy and international affairs as factors in the day-to-day lives of each person. The College of Education and Human Sciences develops the ability of professionals to improve the interface between the individual and the greater society. All courses in the College are designed to: 1. develop competencies for professional growth; 2. contribute to the broad educational base of students in the College; 3. develop creative problem-solving skills of students; and 4. strengthen analytical and communication skills of students. The Department offers programs leading to a bachelor of science in Education and Human Sciences with an option in Family and Consumer Sciences This major has several options including: Family Science Family and Consumer Sciences/Journalism and Mass Media (Omaha) Child Development/Early Childhood Education Family and Consumer Sciences Education Inclusive Early Childhood: Birth to Grade 3 These undergraduate programs provide students’ with an educational background for positions in a variety of business, industry, government, community service, health care, and educational employment settings.

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Full Accreditation
All baccalaureate degree programs in the human sciences in the College of Education and Human Sciences are accredited by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS). Nationally only a small number of schools offering undergraduate programs in family and consumer sciences meet the high standards set by AAFCS for program accreditation. This accreditation requires a commitment to self-regulation and peer evaluation. Accreditation helps to ensure that graduates of these programs have had formal preparation that meets nationally accepted standards of quality and relevance. Because accreditation requires ongoing self-study, external evaluation, and regular review by the Council for Accreditation for the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, the public is assured that programs reflect the development of knowledge and changes in professional practice which relate to issues in contemporary society. Accreditation is important to consumers of family and consumer sciences information and services, employers of graduates, and licensure and certification boards. The College of Education and Human Sciences is the only unit in the State of Nebraska accredited by AAFCS. Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Birth to Grade 3 are fully accredited through the Nebraska Dept. of Education and the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

Individual Certification
Graduates from Family and Consumer Sciences may apply for certification as a Family Life Educator through the National Council on Family Relations. Graduates from the College are eligible to sit for the AAFCS certification exam. The College offers coursework leading to teacher certification in Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Birth to Grade 3.

Scholarships and Fellowships
In addition to the scholarships awarded by the University, the College of Education and Human Sciences awards a number of scholarships funded by individuals, organizations, and foundations. Criteria for awarding these scholarships vary to meet the wishes of the donors but often include financial need, academic performance, major area of study, and class standing. Sixty to seventy scholarships ranging from $300 to $2,000 per person are awarded each year. To be eligible for consideration for any of the scholarships listed below, both new and continuing students must annually complete the scholarship application form from the UNO Office of Financial Aid, Eppley Administration Building 103.

Programs on the Omaha Campus
Two major fields of study can be completed entirely on the Omaha campus. These include: Family Science Family and Consumer Sciences/Journalism and Mass Media Students can begin some programs on the Omaha campus but they must be completed on the Lincoln campus. These programs include: Child Development and Early Childhood Education Family and Consumer Sciences Education Inclusive Early Childhood: Birth to Grade 3 Because of different publication dates for the UNO Undergraduate Catalog and the UNL Undergraduate Bulletin, it is not always possible to have identical course information in both publications. With this in mind, the students should remember to consult the UNL College of Education and Human Sciences for the latest information about new courses, course requirements, new options (majors), option changes, etc. The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences administrative office on the UNO campus (Arts and Sciences Hall 102) can also provide this information.

Honors and Awards
All students on both campuses of the College of Education and Human Sciences are eligible for the following honors and awards: Top Ten Students in the Respective Classes This award is based on academic performance. Outstanding Senior Awards • Margaret Liston Outstanding Student in Family

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Health Care Careers include rehabilitation, gerontology and counseling. Journalism and Mass Media Careers include broadcasting, news editorial and advertising. Education Careers include teaching in early childhood programs, middle schools and high schools; extension education; government, business and industry. Human Services Careers include social work, administration, law enforcement, program planning and management; gerontology; human services; job, family and personal counseling.

Financial Management • Henrietta Fleck Houghton Outstanding Senior in Family and Consumer Sciences Education • Outstanding Senior in Family Science • Outstanding Senior in Child Development/Early Childhood Education • Outstanding Senior in Inclusive Early Childhood Education Top Senior Award This award is presented to a senior student who has achieved the highest level of scholastic performance while in the College of Education and Human Sciences. The award is sponsored by the College of Education and Human Sciences Alumni Association. Dean’s List The Dean’s List, issued twice during the academic year, includes students enrolled in the College of Education and Human Sciences who have achieved a minimum 3.75 GPA for those semesters. Students who are on academic probation and/or are taking fewer than 12 credit hours are not eligible for the Dean’s List. This list is issued at the end of fall and spring semesters. Students are notified by mail.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE Entrance Requirements
Admission requirements for students majoring in Family Science and Family and Consumer Sciences Journalism and Mass Media on the Omaha campus are as follows: High School • English - 4 units All units must include intensive reading and writing experience. Innovative interdisciplinary courses and courses in speech and journalism may be substituted if they include substantial amounts of reading and writing. • Mathematics - 3 units Must include Algebra I, II and Geometry. • Social Sciences - 3 units At least one unit of American and/or world history and one additional unit of history, American government and/or geography; and a third unit of any social science discipline or subject. • Natural Sciences - 4 units At least two units selected from biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. One of the units must include laboratory instruction. • Foreign language - 2 units (same language)Students who are unable to take two years of one foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission. Such students will be required to take two semesters of foreign language at the University of Nebraska. These students are still required to complete 16 units of academic courses for admission. • Additional academic – 1 unit One unit chosen from any academic discipline. Students in Child Development/Early Childhood Education, Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Inclusive Early Childhood: Birth to Grade 3 must meet UNL entrance requirements. (See UNL Bulletin).
Note: One unit is one year of high school coursework.

Student Organizations
Kappa Omicron Nu Promotion of scholarship, graduate study, and research are the major objectives of the honorary. Only those individuals who meet the highest scholastic standards are eligible for membership. Phi Upsilon Omicron Members are chosen based upon scholarship, leadership, service and character. AAFCS The student chapter of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) is an organization open to all students in the College of Education and Human Sciences. A member may belong to a local chapter as well as to state and national organizations. NAEYC The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is an organization for students in Child Development, Early Childhood Education or Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Birth to Grade 3.

Career Opportunities
A degree in Education and Human Sciences provides a broad educational background that includes strong general education and professional courses which make it possible to enter and progress through a career. The strength of the program makes it possible for professionals to change goals and adapt to the employment marketplace while continuing to serve the needs of people. Recent graduates of the College hold positions in several areas: Business/Management Careers include, among others, retailing; investment, insurance and commodities sales; public relations and finance; and marketing.

Deficiency Removal
A student whose high school work fails to meet the admission requirements to the College must remove deficiencies by satisfactory completion of specified courses at the University or through the UNL Division of Continuing Studies. Students enrolling with deficiencies will be expected to remove deficiencies during their first year at

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the University. Students will not receive credit toward graduation for courses taken to remove deficiencies.

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Transfer Students
GPA Requirement Students who transfer to the College of Education and Human Sciences from other colleges (including UNL, UNO, UNK, technical schools, community colleges or universities) must meet the entrance requirements, fulfill degree requirements that exist at the time of their admission to the College, be in good academic standing, and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Maximum Number of Hours for Transfer Transfer courses are evaluated by the University and the College to determine course equivalencies. The College determines which courses will be accepted and how they will apply toward degree requirements. • Sixty-six is the maximum number of hours that will be accepted on transfer from a two-year college. • Ninety-five is the maximum number of hours that will be accepted on transfer from accredited four-year colleges and universities. Courses taken 10 years before admission or readmission to the College will be evaluated by the department to determine if it is appropriate to accept those courses for transfer and application to degree requirements. Specific Family and Consumer Sciences courses will be reviewed in keeping with the guidelines specified by each department. No more than 18 semester hours will be accepted in one department, and at least one-half of the professional-hour requirements must be taken in the College of Education and Human Sciences. Acceptance of “D” Grades Grades of “D” from UNL and UNK may transfer to fulfill requirements. Grades of “D” from other academic institutions will not be accepted. Transfer Credit from Technical, Non-Accredited and Foreign Institutions Students who desire to transfer from these institutions must have each course evaluated by the appropriate departmental representative. All rules stated above in reference to grades and maximum credit hours apply. For additional information and guidance in this process contact the Academic adviser at (402) 554-2351. Transfer Agreements Among UNL, UNO and UNK Transfer agreements among the three institutions within the University System allow for a smooth transition for students interested in taking courses from UNO, UNK and/or UNL. Although restrictions noted above on grades and maximum transfer hours still apply, there are some exceptions. Grades of “D” from UNL and UNK may transfer to UNO to fulfill requirements. Students planning to major in a program in the College should read the specific requirements noted with individual programs. Questions about academic transfer should be addressed to the academic adviser at (402) 554-2351. Agreements with Community Colleges Articulation agreements and Transfer with Ease

Programs with Nebraska community colleges indicate how courses and programs will transfer to UNO and the College of Education and Human Sciences. The same guidelines noted above on the acceptance of courses, grades and hours also apply to these institutions. Students interested in transferring from a community college should consult with the department academic adviser to determine which courses will transfer to fulfill specific College of Education and Human Sciences requirements. Courses from accredited two-year institutions which carry the 400-level designation will generally not be substituted for Family and Consumers Sciences classes in the College. The 300-level courses will be considered on an individual basis by the department in the College of Education and Human Sciences. • No more than 18 semester hours in one department will be accepted. • At least one-half of the professional hours requirements must be taken in the College of Education and Human Sciences. • Courses taken prior to course articulation agreements will be accepted contingent upon departmental validation of the credit. Transferring from Other Colleges at UNO Students transferring to the College of Education and Human Sciences from other University of Nebraska at Omaha colleges or from University Division must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, be in good academic standing, and meet the freshman entrance requirements that exist at the time of their admission to the College of Education and Human Sciences. All admission deficiencies must be removed prior to admission to the College. Students must fulfill degree requirements that exist at the time of their admission to the College, not at the time they enter UNO. Readmitted Students Students readmitted to the College of Education and Human Sciences who previously left the College in good academic standing (minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA and not on probation) may return to the College. Students will, however, be required to follow current requirement guidelines in the College. Students who left the College on probation or who were dismissed may seek readmission to the College after two semesters by applying to the UNO Admissions Office in the Eppley Administration Building. Readmission is not assured. However, the admissions committee is receptive to giving students a second opportunity to be successful. The committee is interested in knowing what the student has done in the intervening period that would suggest the student will be successful when readmitted. Successfully completing correspondence courses and/or community college courses is an effective way to demonstrate one’s commitment to academic success.

ACADEMIC POLICIES Integrative Studies/Essential Studies
The Comprehensive Education Program (CEP) is a general education program implemented on the UNL campus. It applies to all students enrolled in the College of

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enrich the student’s academic experience without lowering the student’s grade point average. Pass is interpreted to mean a grade of “C” or better. Free electives may be taken “P/N”. Students can earn no more than 12 hours of pass credit excluding courses offered only on “P/N” basis. All general education, core, departmental and supporting professional courses, specified by course and number in the bulletin, must be taken for a grade. Should a student have earned a “P” in one of the courses prior to starting the option, the “P” will be reviewed by the appropriate department. Exceptions shall be made for courses where credit is received through challenge tests or credit by examination.

Education and Human Sciences on the UNO campus who entered the University of Nebraska for the first time in the fall semester of 1995 or after. The CEP has been created to provide students, regardless of major or college, with a common set of educational experiences. It is designed to enhance their knowledge in a broad variety of academic areas and to help develop intellectual and social skills vital to college graduates in the 21st century.

Essential Studies (ES)
Each student will take a total of nine courses in essential areas of learning: communication, the social and behavioral sciences, mathematics, natural science, historical studies, the humanities, the arts, and human diversity. This requirement represents the minimum experience for an undergraduate student in the full range of university offerings. Thus, no ES course can simultaneously fulfill the requirement for two areas. The College of Education and Human Sciences will require courses beyond the minimum standard set by CEP, and will recommend certain ES courses in various areas for majors. Please check with your academic adviser for specific requirements.

Grade Appeals
Any student enrolled in a course in the College of Education and Human Sciences who wishes to appeal allegedly unfair and prejudicial treatment by a faculty member shall present his/her appeal in writing to the Dean of the College no later than 30 days after notice of the student’s final course grade posted on EBRUNO. The complaint will be forwarded to a committee consisting of faculty and student representatives. After a hearing, the committee will make a written recommendation regarding the appeal. The committee’s recommendation shall be binding on the appealing student and the faculty member. Letters of appeal should be sent to: Dean of College of Education and Human Sciences, 233 Mabel Lee, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0234

COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
The following minimum requirements apply to all programs in the Family and Consumer Sciences: Comprehensive Education .....................................34 Hours A. Communications ........................................................9 B. Mathematics...............................................................3 C. Human Behavior, Culture & Social Organization ........6 D. Science & Technology ................................................4 (biological or physical science with lab) E. Historical Studies........................................................3 F. Humanities ..................................................................3 G. Arts.............................................................................3 H. Race, Ethnicity & Gender ...........................................3 Professional Requirements ..............................53 -60 Hours

Graduation Requirements
In addition to the curriculum requirements presented under Programs and Departments, the following general graduation requirements exist for the College of Education and Human Sciences. 1. Credit Hours and Grade Point Average. A minimum of 120 semester hours of applicable credit is required to earn the bachelor of science degree in Education and Human Sciences. Some programs require more than 120 credit hours. In addition, a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA is required to graduate. Students in Family and Consumer Sciences Education must have a minimum 2.5 GPA. No more than 95 hours of credit from another college, even one of the University of Nebraska campuses, can be applied toward a degree in Education and Human Sciences. 2. Grades. Grades of “D” satisfy requirements of the College of Education and Human Sciences unless specified otherwise under the Programs and Departments section of the bulletin. Students who receive a grade of “D” however, are encouraged to retake the course, particularly if it is the major area. 3. Requirements. While the adviser will assist students in planning their programs, and monitoring their progress toward the degree, it is the responsibility of the student to be informed about requirements for graduation and to see that these requirements are met. 4. Course Exclusions and Restrictions. Courses taken to remove high school deficiencies may not be applied toward graduation requirements.

Academic Load
A maximum of 17 credit hours may be taken each semester without special permission from the academic adviser’s office. A minimum of 12 credit hours must be taken each semester to be classified as a full-time student. To complete the requirements for a degree in eight semesters, a student must earn an average of 15 credit hours each semester. Most students are advised to take 12 credit hours their first semester. This allows new students to make an easier transition from high school to college where course requirements are more rigorous. Most students need a minimum of two hours of preparation for every hour in class, so a schedule of 12 credit hours is actually equivalent to a 36 hour per week job. Outside work may interfere with academic success. The student who must work should plan to take some summer session courses or an extra semester or two to complete the work required for a degree.

Pass/No Pass (also, Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, or Credit/No Credit)
The pass/no pass option is designed for students who want to study elective areas or topics when they may have minimum preparation. If used for this purpose, the option can

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Residency Requirements and Correspondence Courses. At least 30 of the last 36 hours of credits needed for a degree must be registered for and completed in residence at the University of Nebraska. This means that the last year of work must generally be spent at UNO and/or UNL. Credits needed to graduate can be earned by means of correspondence courses; however, such credit does not count toward residence and thus cannot be among the last 30 credit hours earned. 6. Special Requests for Substitutions or Waivers. For special exceptions there may be a need or desire for students to request a special substitution or waiver be made to curriculum requirements. This request can be made only in unusual circumstances and cannot serve as an excuse for not following curriculum requirements. Specific instructions and procedures for consideration of exceptions are available from the academic adviser’s office. 7. Senior Check. After accumulating at least 75 hours, each student is expected to request an analysis of graduation requirements (Senior Check). This is done by filing a request form at the academic adviser’s office located in Arts & Sciences Hall, room 102 on the UNO campus. The student will be notified when the Senior Check is completed and ready for review in the office. The original signed copy will be placed in the student’s file and a copy will be given to the student. 8. Application for Degree. Each student who expects to receive a diploma must file an application for candidacy for the diploma by going on line to UNO’s main web page at www.unomaha.edu. Announcements regarding deadline dates are posted on campus bulletin boards and published in The Gateway. Deadlines are early in the semester. Students are responsible for informing the Registrar’s Office of the manner in which they are completing their requirements (i.e., by correspondence, by clearance of incompletes, by enrollment at another institution, by special examinations, etc.); and of any revision of such plans. In addition, any change in address or phone number should be specifically directed to that office if concerns or problems arise to avoid a postponement of graduation until a later semester. 5.

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understanding to student concerns. Intellectual mentoring by the academic adviser fosters: • Development of an awareness of available choices, alternatives and resources; • Guidance with decision making; • Encouragement to expand horizons by full participation in university life; and • Promotion of readiness to meet career, life and graduate/professional school challenges. Students are expected to take responsibility for a successful university experience and effective advising sessions by: • Participating in orientation/early enrollment programs; • Scheduling appointments with their adviser prior to early enrollment and at other times as needed. • Identifying class choices from requirements of the preferred program or major; • Identifying questions to address; • Informing the adviser of any special needs, deficiencies or barriers that might affect academic success; • Knowing academic policies and academic calendar deadlines, procedures (e.g., registration, fee payment) and degree or program requirements; • Remaining informed about progress in meeting academic requirements by maintaining careful academic records and seeking assistance to resolve any errors or questions; and • Following through on recommendations to seek assistance from the various student support services provided by the university.

International Opportunities
The College is committed to preparing students to function in a global, culturally diverse and changing society. The success of the College’s graduates will be enhanced by knowledge of a foreign language and understanding of other cultures. A global perspective is developed in many of the College’s courses and study abroad is encouraged. The College offers a minor in international studies which includes a study experience in another country. The College sponsors overseas programs for the students in the College and works closely with the International Affairs Office of the University (UNL campus) to see that students are aware of the many study abroad opportunities that exist for students. The College is affiliated with The American College in London and Queen Margaret College in Edinburgh, Scotland. Proficiency in a foreign language is not required for all international programs. Foreign language study, however, is often a part of the programs.

Academic Advising Responsibilities
Academic advising is important to a successful college experience. All students in the College of Education and Human Sciences are advised by a central adviser in the department. The adviser is available to all students for assistance in assessing educational goals, planning programs of study, understanding program requirements, and knowing policies and procedures. The UNO adviser is located in Arts & Sciences Hall, room 102 and the phone number is 402.554.2351. Ultimately, students are responsible for fulfilling all of the requirements of the curriculum in which they are enrolled. The intellectual mentoring relationship between academic adviser and student is protected by confidentiality and strengthened by listening with

Minor in International Studies
Students in the College of Education and Human Sciences may minor in international studies by completing the following requirements: Foreign language of region/country of focus..................6 EHS - International perspective ......................................3 ANTH 421 Cultural Anthropology ...................................3 Region/country specific courses ....................................6 Study abroad experience................................................3 TOTAL...........................................................................21

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Family Sciences Option
The option for Family Science (working with children and families) provides a comprehensive program grounded in family science theory, research, and professional practice and application. The distinct feature of this option is that it provides students with knowledge and intervention skills that will assist them in helping to prevent and remedy interpersonal problems experienced by individuals in their family relationships, building on the family’s strengths. This option will prepare students for graduate school (e.g. family science, family therapy, social work, counseling, psychology, law) or for employment in human services agencies or programs. Family Science majors are required to complete either an official minor listed in the appropriate bulletin (e.g. 18 hours of Sociology) or an approved area of concentration consistent with their program of study and relevant to their professional goals. See academic adviser for the Minor form. I. Comprehensive Education..................................34 credits a. Communication ...................................................(9 cr) Select from SPCH 1110 or 2010............................3 cr Composition & Writing Select from ENGL 1150, 1160, or 2400.................6 cr b. Mathematics ...........................................................3cr MATH 1310 c. Human Behavior, Culture, and Social Organization ...6 cr Select two courses from anthropology, economics, psychology.sociology, gerontology or political science d. Science & Technology ............................................4 cr One course in biological or physical sciences with LAB e. Historical Studies....................................................3cr One course in history f. Humanities .............................................................3 cr One course in religion, literature or philosophy. g. Arts..........................................................................3cr One course in art, music or theater h. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender ..................................3 cr One course in Black Studies, Latino/Latin American Studies, Native American Studies, Women’s Studies, ENGL 4710, EDUC 2030 II. Human Sciences Core .........................................6 credits FMCS 2800 Family Sciences.......................................3 c FMCS 4970 Comm. Internships in FMCS ..................3 cr III. Family and Consumer Sciences Professional Core..............................................21 credits FMCS 1600 Human Dev. & Family ..............................3cr FMCS 2220 Intro to Fam Finance Mgnt ......................3cr FMCS 3810 Fam Intervention w Fieldwork .................3cr FMCS 3820 Parenting .................................................3cr FMCS 4880 Child & Family Policy ...............................3cr Family and Culture Diversity ........................................3cr Complete 1 course from FMCS 4950 or any ethnic studies course or EDUC 2030 Human Development ..................................................3 cr Complete 1 course from FMCS 3720; SOC 2000; GERO 2000, 3070, 4460, 4470, 4480; PSYC 3520, 3540

For region specific courses and languages, consult with your adviser or obtain a copy of the International Studies minor description from Arts and Sciences Hall, Room 102. Students may declare the minor by filing the minor declaration form available in the College office.

Minors in Other Colleges
An undergraduate student with a major in Education and Human Sciences who wants a minor in another college should consult with their academic adviser and prepare the list of approved courses desired for the minor. Declaration of the minor must be made through the department offering the minor.

Minor in Family and Consumer Sciences
FMCS 1600, 2800 and four other courses in the department which must be at the 300 level or above are required.

Procedures on Dropout and/Transfer Into Options
Dropout From Option Department majors who drop out for five successive academic years, or more, and later choose to reenter in their respective option or into another option in the department will be expected to meet the graduation requirements in effect at the time of re-enrollment. Transfer Into Option Students transferring into Family and Consumer Sciences from another institution or from another department within the University or the College will complete the graduation and/or certification requirements in effect at the time of transfer into the option.

Course Numbers
Students should be aware that courses designated by four numbers, such as FMCS 4970, are offered on the Omaha campus. Courses using a three-number designation or three numbers plus an alpha (FACS 497B) are offered on the Lincoln campus.

DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (FMCS)
Students may select from several majors: Family Science, Family and Consumer Sciences Journalism and Mass Media, Child Development/Early Childhood Education, Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Inclusive Early Childhood: Birth to Grade 3. The department is home to three teaching/research laboratories on the UNL campus: the Ruth Staples Child Development Laboratory, the Infant Research Laboratory, and the Family Resource Center. Two major fields of study in the College can be completed entirely on the Omaha campus. These include: Family Science Family and Consumer Sciences/Journalism and Mass Media Students can begin some programs on the Omaha campus but they must be completed on the Lincoln campus. These programs include: Child Development and Early Childhood Education Family and Consumer Sciences Education Inclusive Early Childhood: Birth to Grade 3

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Family Science career path
Select either the (1) Human and Community Services-for students wanting to work with children and families in human services and youth organizations, or (2) Family Science Research-for students planning to pursue an advanced degree in family science/studies or marriage and family therapy. Must have a 3.00 GPA for the Family Sciences Research option. (1) Human and Community Services Path .............18 credits FMCS 4160 Educational Programming ......................3 cr FMCS 4460 Addiction and violence in families ..........3 cr FMCS 4930 Family Economics ..................................3 cr HED 3080 Human Conc. of Sexual Dev. ....................3 cr Atypical Development: Select from PSYC 4440;........3 cr SPED 1400, 4010, 4810; COUN 4010 Additional coursework: Select from FMCS 3220, 3720, 4950, 4980 or any other FMCS course not already taken.............3 cr Electives ......................................................24-25 credits (2) Family Science Research Path ........................21 credits (3.00 overall GPA required) FMCS 4460 Addiction and violence in families ..........3 cr FMCS 4930 Family Economics ..................................3 cr FMCS 4980 Research Exp. in FCS.............................3 cr (The work will be supervised and evaluated by a FMCS faculty member.) HED 3080 Human Conc. of Sexual Dev. ....................3 cr Atypical Development:................................................3 cr Select from PSYC 4440; SPED 1400, 4010, 4810; COUN 4010 Complete 1 Research sequence: ...............................6 cr PSYC 3130 & 3140 OR SOC 2130 & 2510 Electives ......................................................21-23 credits Both Family Science Career Paths must also complete 18 credit hours of an approved Minor or area of concentration. Obtain the correct form and approval from your academic adviser. TOTAL CREDITS................................................120 credits

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Family & Consumer Science/Journalism and Mass Media
This option provides a broad-based, multidisciplinary exposure. The option encompasses coursework in Family and Consumer Sciences, journalism, radio and television. Career possibilities include newspapers, magazines and radio-television as well as public relations and promotion of business and industry or government. This option is to be completed only on the Omaha campus. Students will choose one of the following paths: J-1 = Public Relations; J-2 = News Editorial; J-3 = Broadcasting I. Comprehensive Education .................................37 Credits a Communications....................................................9 cr SPCH 1110 or 2010 ...............................................3 cr English composition: ENGL 1150 or 1160 or 2400...................................................................6 cr b Mathematics ..........................................................3 cr MATH 1310 .............................................................3cr c. Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organizations ..............................................9 cr Select three courses from: Psychology,

Sociology or............................................................3cr Communication, JOUR 4500 ..................................3cr J-1, J-2 JOUR 3270 Public Affairs Reporting.........3cr d. Science and Technology .......................................4 cr Select one in biological or physical science with lab e. Historical Studies...................................................3 cr JOUR 4010 History of Mass Communication.........3cr f. Humanities ...........................................................(3 cr) J-1, J-2 JOUR 4220 Literary Journalism................3cr J-3 One course in literature, philosophy, or religion ................................................................3cr g. Arts.........................................................................3 cr J-1, J-2 JOUR 3110 Photography........................3 cr J-3 BRCT 2310 Film History & Appreciation .........3 cr h. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender ...................................3 cr One course in Black Studies; Native American Studies; Latino/Latin American Studies; Women’s Studies; EDUC 2030; ENG 4530, 4710 ..................3cr II. Education and Human Sciences Core .................9 credits FMCS 1200 Individuals & Families as Consumers ......3cr FMCS 2800 Family Science ........................................3cr HED 2310 Healthful Living...........................................3cr III. Family Life Educator Core.................................36 credits Families in Society FMCS 3820 Parenting.............................................3cr FMCS 3810 Family Intervention & Field Work ........3cr FMCS 4880 Child & Family Policy ..........................3cr Ethics ..........................................................................6 cr PA 2000 OR PHIL 2030...........................................3cr FMCS 4970 Comm Internship in FMCS .................3cr (Students will select a practicum based on their career path). Interpersonal Relationships .........................................3cr Select one of the following: FMCS 4930 Spec. Topics in Cont. Fam. Issues SPCH 4140 Comm/Human Relationships SPCH 3700 Interpersonal Conflict SPCH 3750 Gender and Communication PHIL 1020 Critical Reasoning COMM 371 Comm. in Neg. and Confl. Res. PSYC 261 Conflict & Conflict Resolution Human Growth & Development ..................................9 cr FMCS 1600 Hum. Dev. & Family FMCS 3720 Middle Child & Adol. PLUS one of the following: PSYC 3510 Educational Psychology PSYC 3540 Adolescent Psychology GERO(PSYC) 4460 Psy. of Adult Dev. & Aging GERO (SOC) 2000 Intro to Gerontology FACS 271/271L Infancy/Lab FACS 270/271 Dev. of Preschool Child FACS 462 Adulthood & Aging FACS 474 Assess. of Young Child FACS 476 Dev. Of Young Child EDPS 451 Psych. of Adolescence EDPS 362 Learning in the Classroom Family Financial Management ....................................3 cr FMCS 2220 Family Financial Management Family Life Methodology........................................3 cr FMCS 4160 Educational Programming Human Sexuality.........................................................3 cr

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programs offer a strong foundation for varied graduate studies. Classes may also be taken to fulfill the Family Life Education core, so credit hours may vary. I. Comprehensive Education..................................34 credits a Communication .....................................................9 cr Select from: SPCH 1110 or 2010............................3cr Composition & Writing Select from ENGL 1150, 1160, or 2400.................6 cr b Mathematics ..........................................................3 cr MATH 1310 or 1530 ................................................3cr c. Human Behavior, Culture, and Social Organization ..............................................6 cr ) SOC 1010 OR PSYC 1010......................................3cr NUTR 253 Cult. Aspects of Food ..........................3 cr d. Science & Technology............................................4 cr One course in biological or physical sciences with lab ..................................................................4 cr e Historical Studies...................................................3 cr One course in history..............................................3cr f. Humanities .............................................................3 cr One course in religion, literature or philosophy ......3cr g. Arts.........................................................................3 cr One course in Art, Music or Theater.......................3cr h. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender ..................................3 cr One course in diversity: Black Studies, Native American Studies,Latino/Latin Amer. Studies, Women’s Studies, EDUC 2030, ENGL 4530, ENGL 4710 II. Human Sciences Core .......................................10 credits FMCS 2800 Family Sciences.......................................3cr FMCS 497A Practicum in Early Childhood..................7cr III. Family and Consumer Sciences Professional Core..............................................22 credits FMCS 1600 Hum. Dev. & Family .................................3cr FMCS 2220 Intro to Fam. Finance...............................3cr FMCS 3810 Fam. Intervention w/Fieldwork ................3cr FMCS 3820 Parenting .................................................3cr FMCS 4880 Child and Family Policy ...........................3cr FMCS 4950 special topics in Family & Cultural Div. or a different course than in “H” Race, Ethnicity or Gender .................................................3cr FACS 271/271L............................................................4cr

HED 3080 Health Concepts of Sexual Development Supporting Courses ..........................................12 credits Family Diversity -- Select one ................................3 cr FMCS 4930 Cont. Family Issues (Ethnic Fam.) SOC 3900 Ethnic Group Relations SOC 4150 American Family Problems SOCI 448 Family Diversity SOCI 481 Minority Groups PSYC 425 Psych. of Racism Child & Family Issues and Problems .........................6 cr select two: FMCS 4460 Family Violence FMCS 4930 Cont. Family Issues (Any topic not already taken.) FMCS 3220 Adv. Family Financial Mgnt. Research/Modes of Inquiry -- Select one....................3cr PSYC 3140 Methods of Psychological Inquiry SOC/CJUS 2510 Research Methods PSYC 350 Res. Methods & Data Analysis SOCI 205 Intro. to Social Research SOCI 407/807 Strats of Sec. Res: Qualitative Methods CURR 430 Intro to Philosophy of Education Additional courses for each field Choose one field: Public Relations J-1 .........................................21 Credits JOUR 2150 News Writing/Reporting ......................3cr JOUR 2160 News Editing .......................................3cr JOUR 3500 Publication Design & Graphics............3cr JOUR 4230 Principles of Public Relations..............3cr JOUR 4240 Public Relations - Case Studies..........3cr JOUR 4250 Public Relations – Writing ...................3cr JOUR 4410 Communication Law ...........................3cr News Editorial J-2 ............................................21 Credits JOUR 2150 News Writing & Reporting ...................3cr JOUR 2160 News Editing .......................................3cr JOUR 3500 Publication Design & Graphics............3cr JOUR 3620 Prin. of Creative Advertising................3cr JOUR 4410 Communication Law ...........................3cr 6 hr Journalism Elective.........................................6 cr Broadcasting J-3..............................................24 Credits JOUR 2150 News Writing & Reporting ...................3cr JOUR 4410 Communication Law ...........................3cr BRCT 2320 Television Production ..........................3cr BRCT 2370 Radio Production I...............................3cr BRCT 3030 Radio & TV News Writing ....................3cr BRCT 3320 Television Production II .......................3cr BRCT 3330 Television News Video.........................3cr BRCT 3370 Radio Production II..............................3cr Elective Hours - applicable toward total hours ..J -1 & J-2 = 9 credits J3 = 6 credits TOTAL.................................................................120 credits

Child Development/Early Childhood Education career path
Select either the (1) Child Development Program Management, OR (2) Child Development Research — for students interested in pursuing graduate studies. Must have 3.00 GPA for the Child Development Research option. (1) Child Development Program Management Path.............................................31 credits FACS 170 Intro to Early Care and Education...............3cr FACS 270/270L Dev. of Preschool Child .....................3cr FACS 374/374L Curriculum planning in ECE ..............4cr FACS 474 Assess in Early Childhood ..........................3cr FACS 477 Adm. of Early Child. Programs ...................3cr Atypical Development Select from PSYC 4440; SPED 1400, 4010 COUN 4010 .................................................................3cr HED 2310 Healthful Living...........................................3cr MGNT 3490 Management ...........................................3cr

Child Development/Early Childhood Education Option
The Child Development/Early Childhood Education option provides comprehensive programs in child development theory, research, professional practice and application. Studies lead to qualification for a variety of child-oriented professions including: teaching in early childhood settings, child development program management, and other child service professions. These

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION AND HUMAN SCIENCES
Choose One: ACCT 2010, ECON 2200, MGMT 3040, 3510, 4040, 4310 ....................................................3cr FACS 497D Community Internship in Family /Cons. Sciences .................................................................3cr (with an internship in program management) Elective ........................................................24-26 credits (2) Child Development Research Path ...................25 credits FACS 170 Intro to Early Care and Educ. .....................3cr FACS 270/270L Dev. of Preschool Child .....................3cr FACS 374/374L Curriculum Planning in ECE .............4 cr FACS 474 Asses. in Early Childhood...........................3cr FMCS 4980 Research Exp. in FCS..............................3cr Atypical Development-Select from ..............................3cr PSYC 4440; COUN 4010; SPED 1400, 4010, 4810 Complete 1 sequence: PSYC 3130 and 3140 OR SOC 2130 and 2510 6 cr Electives ......................................................30-32 credits TOTAL.................................................................120 credits

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• No grade lower than “C” but with a cumulative average of 2.5 in TEAC 259, TEAC 330/EDUC 2030, SPED 401B, EDPS 457 and TEAC 424 Review by Faculty Every student will be reviewed by the faculty at the end of each semester. Basic skills test scores, GPA, communication skills, and personal-social adjustment will be considered in this review. Students will need faculty recommendations in order to enter the student teaching semester. Felony or Misdemeanor Convictions The Nebraska Department of Education policy requires that a person with a felony or misdemeanor conviction involving abuse, neglect, or sexual misconduct shall not be allowed to participate in pre-student teaching laboratory or classroom experiences or student teach without approval by the Board of Education. Moral Character and Safety Teaching requires candidates to be individuals of integrity. Prospective teachers must be able to demonstrate they have strong moral character and can make mature decisions. Individuals must show a high degree of moral character and must act responsibly, representing our College and University. Should the College discover behavior, which in its reasonable judgment, establishes on the part of the candidate a lack of integrity, questionable moral/ethical character, or otherwise indicates a potential of risk to young persons and others in the educational community, the FCS Department reserves the right to deny entry to or dismiss anyone from the program leading to certification. These kinds of behaviors shall be adequate foundation to deny any candidate or potential candidate from participation in any practicum, student teaching or other field experience. Personal-Social Adjustment Where the Family and Consumer Sciences Education faculty have reason to feel there is instability in the student’s personal-social behavior, the student may be asked to conference with a counselor to determine the degree to which the student can be expected to adjust to the school and classroom environment. FCS Related Occupations Endorsement Students wishing to be endorsed for FCS related occupations must complete additional coursework and work experience requirements. The student’s adviser will assist the student in planning to meet these additional requirements: • 3 cr Coordination Techniques (TEAC 425) • 1000 verified hours of paid work or combination of paid and volunteer work related to FCS (not more than half can be volunteer) • OR 300 hours of supervised work experience in FCS related occupations under the direction of an FCS teacher educator at UNL. Nebraska Extension Students interested in Nebraska Extension are encouraged to add FCS 497D Practicum in FCS and complete an internship experience in Cooperative Extension.

Family and Consumer Sciences Education Option (Teaching Grades 7 – 12)
The students enrolled in this option will meet the requirements for the Nebraska Secondary Teaching Certificate and endorsement in Family and Consumer Sciences. Students may also combine the area with other subject matter areas that will lead to teaching endorsements in other fields. Students wishing to be endorsed for Family and Consumer Sciences related occupations must complete additional coursework and work experience requirements. The adviser will assist the student in planning to meet these requirements. Admissions requirement Prior to entering the program and taking FACS 401 and FACS 401A, students are required to receive passing scores in the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). Computer Based Academic Skills Assessment (CBT) or Content Mastery Examination for Educators (CMEE). In addition, students must be admitted into the FCS Education program. (See application for admission to Secondary Education programs in the Department office located in Arts & Sciences Hall, room 102.) Student Teaching All students who are candidates for an appropriately endorsed NE Teacher’s Certificate are required to student teach. FAC 413 Student Teaching is only offered in the fall semester and is a full-day experience on a semester basis. Students must apply for student teaching by the preceding March 1 to the Director of Field Experiences in Lincoln at 104 Henzlik Hall or to FCS Department Chair in Lincoln at 135 Mabel Lee Hall. Admission to student teaching requires the following: • Admission to FCS Education program • A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 • No grade lower than a C+ in FACS 401/401A, FACS 402/402A • FCS Education faculty recommendations • No grade lower than a “C”, but with a cumulative average of 2.5 in EDUC 131, TEAC 331, EDUC 2020, CEHS 200, and EDPS 251, 297, FMCS 3720

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

EDUCATION AND HUMAN SCIENCES
FMCS 3720 Middle Child & Adolescence ...................3cr EDPS 251 Fund of Adol Dev (3 cr) & ...........................4cr EDPS 457 Lear & Motivation Prin. of Sec. Educ .........3cr TEAC 259 Instructional Technology.............................3cr TEAC 424 Foundations of Career & Teach. Educ. .......3cr TEAC 424 Found of Career & Tech Educ.....................1cr FACS 401A Educ. Practicum I (taken concurrently w/ FACS 401) 1 cr FACS 402/402A FCS Educ Meth of Inst &...................5cr FCS Educ Practicum II SPED 401B Accom. Spec. Learners ...........................3cr Electives .................................................................7-10cr TOTAL.................................................................120 credits

Communications Students with disabilities will be helped to develop professional practices in order to ensure effectiveness in their classrooms. Course Requirements Courses identified by number cannot be taken credit/no credit (pass/no pass; satisfactory/unsatisfactory) with the exception of FACS 413. Should a student have earned such a passing grade (e.g., “P”, “Cr”, or “S”) in one of the courses (except those listed above) prior to starting the option, the grade will be reviewed.
NOTE: 4-digit course numbers (FMCS 2800) are UNO courses. 3-digit course numbers (FACS 280) are UNL courses

I. Comprehensive Education..................................37 credits a. Communication (9 cr) Select from: SPCH 2010, 2410, 3130, 3140, 45303 cr Composition & Writing Select from ENGL 1150, 1160, or 2400.................6 cr b. Mathematics & Statistics (3 cr) MATH 1310 or 1530 ................................................3cr c. Human Behavior, Culture, and Social Organization.........................................9 cr FMCS 1600 Hum. Dev. and Family.........................3cr FMCS 4880 Child & Family Policy ..........................3cr HED 2310 Healthful Living ......................................3cr d. Science & Technology ( 4 cr ) CHEM 1140 & 1144 OR .........................................4 cr CHEM 1180 & 1184 ...............................................4 cr e. Historical Studies (3 cr) One course in History .............................................3cr f. Humanities .........................................................( 3 cr ) PHIL 1210 Critical Thinking ....................................3cr g. Arts.......................................................................(3 cr) One course in Art, Music or Theater.......................3cr h. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender ................................(3 cr) EDUC 2030 Hum. Rela for Bias-Free Classroom (C+ or better) .................................................................3cr II. Human Sciences Core .......................................15 credits FMCS 2800 Family Science .......................................3 cr FACS 413 Student Teaching.....................................12 cr (Also a Professional Edu. requirement) III. Family and Consumer Professional Core..........12 credits FMCS 2220 Intro to Family Fin. ...................................3cr FMCS 3810 Family Intervention/Fieldwork..................3cr FMCS 3820 Parenting .................................................3cr FMCS 4950 Spec Topics in Fam & Cultural Div...........3cr or an ethnic studies course Additional Content Requirements..........................25 credits FMCS 3300 Family and the Economy .........................3cr HED 3080 Health Conc. of Sex. Development ............3cr NUTR 244 & 245 Sci. Prin. of Food Prep w/Lab..........4cr NUTR 250 Human Metabolism....................................3cr NUTR 372 Food Safety and Sanitation .......................3cr TXCD 123 Clothing & Human Behavior .......................3cr FACS 401 FCS Curriculum ..........................................3cr (grade must be “C+” or better) Additional Professional Requirements ...................27 credits All grades must be C+ or better in this section EDUC 2020 Educational Foundations .........................3cr EDUC 2030 Hum. Relat. for Bias-free Classroom OR TEACH 330 ............................................................3cr

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Engineering offers programs on both the Lincoln and Omaha campuses. There are seven degree programs offered on the Omaha campus. All degree programs based in Omaha are fully described in this catalog. In addition, the first two years of five additional engineering programs can be taken in Omaha with the remainder of those programs to be completed at Lincoln or elsewhere. Students interested in these additional fields should refer to the undergraduate bulletin of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for a comprehensive description of total degree requirements. To meet the need for well-rounded engineers, the College’s engineering programs offer broad education in the physical sciences, social sciences, mathematics, information sciences and humanities. This education is complemented by study in engineering methods of modeling, analysis, synthesis and design in students’ areas of specialization. In addition to preparing students for careers in engineering, bachelor degree programs in engineering provide excellent preparation for graduate study in engineering. The Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology defines engineering as follows: “Engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences gained by study, experience and practice is applied with judgment to develop ways to utilize, economically, the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of mankind.” The construction management program provides intensive technical and management related applications of principles and procedures utilized in the construction industry. The program prepares graduates for activities and positions that support a broad range of construction related functions and operations. Graduates find richly rewarding careers in a wide variety of construction organizations, having responsibilities for planning, scheduling and building the projects designed by architects and engineers. An associate of science degree is available in fire protection. The program is open to entering freshmen, as well as readmit and transfer students. The associate degree is obtained upon successful completion of requirements as listed. The associate degree may be pursued as either a twoyear terminal degree or a significant educational milestone on the way toward earning a baccalaureate degree. Currently there are five bachelor of science degree programs in engineering which can be completed in four years of full-time study on the Omaha campus. These programs are architectural engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, construction engineering, and electronics engineering. In addition, first and second-year coursework is available on the Omaha campus that satisfied program requirements in agricultural engineering, biological systems engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, and mechanical engineering offered by the College of Engineering on the Lincoln campus. Qualified engineering students who have attended a two-year community college transfer program in engineering may wish to consider all options available to him/her. All prospective students are invited to visit the campus and meet with an adviser.

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING PROGRAMS Engineering
Architectural Engineering • B.S. Degree Program Civil Engineering • B.S. Degree Program Computer Engineering • B.S. Degree Program Construction Engineering • B.S. Degree Program Electronics Engineering • B.S. Degree Program First two years of: • Agricultural Engineering • Biological Systems Engineering • Electrical Engineering • Industrial Engineering • Mechanical Engineering

Management
Construction Management • B.S. Degree Program

Technology
• Associate Degree Program - Fire Protection Technology

The agricultural engineering, architectural engineering, biological systems engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering (Lincoln and Omaha campuses), computer engineering (Omaha campus), computer engineering (Lincoln campus), electrical engineering, electronics engineering, industrial engineering, and mechanical engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering & Technology, Ill Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700, Web site www.abet.org. The construction management program (Lincoln campus) is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education, 1300 Hudson Lane, Suite #3, Monroe, LA 71201.

Graduate Programs
A variety of graduate programs in engineering and construction management are available. For details on programs leading to masters and doctorate degrees, including the application process, individuals should contact the appropriate department or office of the dean in the College of Engineering.

ADMISSION AND ACADEMIC POLICIES
These policies are subject to change. Students should consult their adviser, their department chair, or the Office of the Dean, if they have questions on current policies.

Engineering and Construction Management Admission Requirements
Engineering • High school transcripts are required of students including those transferring from colleges within

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

UNO or the University of Nebraska system. Students wishing to enter an engineering or the construction management program must have the following minimum units (one unit equals one year) of high school credit for: English...................................................................4 Trigonometry or pre-calculus ................................1 Algebra..................................................................2 Geometry ..............................................................1 Physics..................................................................1 Chemistry*.............................................................1 Natural Science.....................................................1
* A second unit of natural science may be used in place of chemistry for construction management applicants.

College of Engineering . Students may be reclassified from pre-engineering to restricted status when their accumulative GPA falls below 2.4.

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT STUDENT CLASSIFICATION
Regular Engineering Students: Students who have completed 43 credit hours that are applicable to the engineering degree they seek in the College of Engineering may apply for formal admission to a degree program. Those students whose credit hours applicable to the degree they seek exceeds 61 must receive formal admission to an engineering degree program if they are to continue to take engineering courses taught in the College of Engineering and/or be identified with the College. Students in the College of Engineering, students from other majors or colleges in the University, readmitted students, and transfer students from other institutions may make application to an engineering degree program during the first four weeks of the fall or spring semester. Students must have at least 12 credit hours of coursework from the University of Nebraska on record before an application will be considered. The application must be submitted with a complete record of coursework. Students may select a first and second choice of an engineering degree program on a single application and may submit no more than two applications and only in successive semesters. Applications will be judged on a competitive academic performance basis. Admission of non-Nebraska residents may be limited to 10 percent of the total. Regular engineering students may have their admission to a degree program suspended if their academic record is unsatisfactory. In addition, regular engineering students whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.4 will be reclassified to restricted status. Students may not graduate with a degree in engineering, technology or construction management while in the restricted status. Regular Construction Management Students: Pre-construction management students must apply and be admitted to the construction management degree program after completing 30 credit hours of required coursework. Students failing to be admitted to the construction management degree program prior to earning 65 credit hours may be dropped as a construction management degree candidates. Regular construction management students who fail to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.4 may be reclassified as a restricted student. Students may not graduate with a degree in engineering, technology or construction management while in the restricted status.

In addition to the specific high school unit requirements listed previously, students are expected to meet core course requirements as specified for admission by the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Students having composite ACT scores of 28 or greater (or equivalent SAT score) will be admitted to the College of Engineering even if they lack one unit of the following: trigonometry / pre-calculus, chemistry, or physics.. Official transcripts are required from all institutions of higher education previously attended. A minimum cumulative grade point average from the last institution of higher education attended (for 12 or more earned collegiate semester credit hours) of 2.5 for residents of Nebraska and 3.0 for non-residents is required for admission to engineering and construction management. Exception: a grade point average (cumulative and most recent term) of 2.5 is required for both residents and non-residents transferring from another college in the University of Nebraska system or from an EAC of ABET program at another institution. A composite ACT (enhanced) score of 24 or greater, or a SAT (verbal + math) score of 1110 or greater. Exception: transfer and readmitted students with 12 or more earned collegiate semester credit hours. Entering students are required to have appropriate math, English and chemistry placement examination results prior to their first semester of enrollment. Students for whom English is not their language of nurture must score a minimum of 500 on the TOEFL before admission will be considered. Students must be accepted into an engineering or construction management program by the end of the week prior to registration. Students with substantial potential to perform college-level academic work, but lack college entrance requirements may be admitted to the college with pre-engineering status based on ACT score, high school rank, and high school credits. These students are accepted on a provisional or trial basis for the purpose of establishing their academic credential and firming up their career objectives. Pre-engineering students may take freshman and sophomore-level courses in the

Students Who Have Not Been Admitted to the College of Engineering
Students who have not been admitted to the College of Engineering will be classified as restricted and will need to enroll in another college. These students are generally restricted from taking College of Engineering courses while in this restricted status. • New students or students with less than 12 credit hours of college credit will be classified as restricted students if:

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
They have not completed the high school entrance course requirements for the College of Engineering. - Their composite ACT score falls below 24 or their SAT (verbal + math) score falls below 1110. Transfer and readmitted students with 12 or more credit hours of college credit will be classified as restricted students if: - They have not completed the high school entrance requirements for the College of Engineering. They fail to meet the following GPA from their previous college work: 2.5 for Nebraska residents; 3.0 for non-residents. Students who have not completed admissions to UNL or UNO by the end of the week prior to general registration will be classified as restricted. (Applies to only Engineering majors on UNO campus.) Students may be reclassified to restricted status when their cumulative GPA falls below 2.4. These students may request reclassification from the “restricted” status to “pre” status when: - All high school deficiencies have been satisfied; - Cumulative GPA for a total of at least 12 credit hours and most recent semester or term GPA at UNO is at least 2.5. •

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Technology Admission Requirements
• Entering students are required to have appropriate math and English placement examination results prior to their first semester of enrollment. • Transfer student (12 or more earned credit hours): official transcripts from institutions previously attended must be on file with the department and show a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5. Exception: a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required for students transferring from another program in the University of Nebraska system and for students seeking readmittance to technology programs. • Applicants for whom English is not their language of nurture must score a minimum of 500 on the TOEFL before admission will be considered. • All entering students are required to have on file with the department an official high school transcript which shows the following minimum units: English...................................................................4 Algebra .................................................................2 Geometry ..............................................................1 Natural Science.....................................................3 (physics and chemistry preferred) • A minimum composite ACT score of 20 or an SAT (verbal + math) score of 950 must be on file with the department. Exception: neither an ACT or SAT score is required for transfer or readmitted students with 12 or more earned credit hours. Technology Student Status • Students who meet all of the admission requirements will be allowed entry into department programs. • An applicant who does not meet all of the entrance

requirements may be granted provisional admittance as a “restricted” student. All students (new, former and transfer) who are admitted under the “restricted” classification will have one semester to clear all listed admission requirements. Any provisionally admitted “restricted” student who fails to meet admission requirements after one semester will not be allowed to continue. An extension beyond the one semester limitation may be granted by the Associate Dean of the College of Engineering. Only those students who maintain a semester GPA of at least 2.5 for each semester in which they are enrolled under the provisional category shall be eligible to receive an extension. Provisionally admitted transfer students from within the University of Nebraska system and readmitted students whose cumulative GPA is below the listed minimums will be reclassified by their adviser to unrestricted status if: - their cumulative GPA is 2.0 or higher; and - they meet all other admission requirements. Provisionally admitted transfer students from other than University of Nebraska System whose cumulative GPA is below the listed minimums will be reclassified by their adviser to unrestricted status if: - their semester GPA for the first semester enrolled (after being provisionally admitted as a restricted student) is 2.5 or higher; and - they meet all other admission requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose ACT or SAT score is below the listed minimums will be reclassified by their adviser to unrestricted status if: - their semester GPA for the first semester enrolled (after being provisionally admitted as a restricted student) is 2.0 or higher; and - they meet all other admission requirements. Continuing students whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be placed on restriction and can take no new engineering technology courses until their cumulative GPA is raised to 2.0 or higher. Exceptions: Students who have been granted an extension. Also, introduction to engineering technology, technical problem analysis, and technical writing courses (GET 1000, 1100, 1010, 1020, 2010, 2140, 3010) may be assigned by the students’ adviser.

GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES
These policies are applicable to all students in the College of Engineering, except where specific policies for engineering technology programs apply. • Student priority for entrance into classes for which demand exceeds available class space will be based on cumulative GPA. This priority will be applied at the end of early registration (when applicable). • Non College of Engineering students must meet applicable College GPA policies, not be in violation of the College course repeat policies, and have

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

written approval from the College of Engineering before they enroll in any engineering, construction management or technology course. Students may take any one any one College of Engineering course a maximum of two times. In addition, - Engineering technology and construction management students may repeat a maximum of three College of Engineering courses with “F” grades. - Engineering students and students from other colleges may repeat a maximum of three College of Engineering courses with “D” or “F” grades. All students must have an College of Engineering adviser’s, chairperson’s or dean’s signature on all worksheets, enrollment and drop-add forms. Any subsequent changes on these forms, or in enrollment from those courses previously approved, must also be approved by an adviser, chairperson or dean. At least 30 of the last 36 credits need for a degree must be registered for and completed at UNO, UNL or UNK while identified with the College of Engineering . This means that, practically speaking, the last year of a student’s work must be spent in residence. Students in the College of Engineering are not encouraged to take courses on a Credit/No Credit (Pass / No Pass) basis. Exception: Engineering 4000. In addition, students may take up to 12 credit hours of courses in the humanities and social sciences on a Credit / No Credit basis. Students in the College of Engineering may not take other required courses or technical electives with a grading option of Credit / No Credit. Credits for “English for Foreign Students who are Non-native Speakers” at UNL and “English as a Second Language” at UNO are not applicable to degree programs in the College of Engineering. Students who are officially accepted into the College of Engineering under the academic year (Fall, Spring, Summer) of this catalog and maintain continuous enrollment must fulfill the requirements as stated in this UNO Undergraduate Catalog (or UNL Bulletin when applicable) or in any other UNO Catalog which is published while they are enrolled in the College, provided that the catalog is no more than ten (10) years old at the time of graduation. A student must, however, meet the graduation requirements from one catalog only. A student may not choose a portion from one catalog and the remainder from another catalog. Additional departmental and program based conditions and requirements may apply. Students are expected to meet the general education requirements of the campus (UNO or UNL) on which they apply for graduation. The College of Engineering does not accept courses for transfer from outside the University of Nebraska (at Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha) system

in which a grade is less than “C-” is received. Subject to space availability, any student with a cumulative GPA less than 2.40 may enroll in AE 1010, CNST 1310, CIVE 112, and CONE 1030 providing they have permission from the College of Engineering and their enrollment does not violate course repeat policies of the College of Engineering. Similarly, students who have College of Engineering permission, do not violate College of Engineering course repeat policies, have the appropriate course prerequisites and whose cumulative GPA is above 2.0 may enroll in EMEC 2200 and EMEC 3240.

APPROVED MINORS FOR COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering enables students to participate in approved minors subject to the following conditions: 1. A minor will not reduce or alter the existing course or degree requirements for students electing to pursue a minor. 2. A student’s minor program(s) must be organized and approved by an adviser prior to the submission of the senior check to the department chair or head. 3. The minor(s) must be approved by the adviser, the department chair or head, the Dean and the cognizant program offering the minor(s). 4. Minors on the Lincoln and Omaha campuses may be added to the following list on approval of the College of Engineering Curriculum Committee and faculty. (Availability and specific course make-up of minors may vary by campus.) Approved Minors: Agricultural Economics Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication Agricultural and Natural Resources Agronomy Animal Science Art History Aviation Biochemistry Biological Sciences Business Minor for JD Edwards Communication Studies Construction Management Economics Engineering Mechanics English Ethnic Studies European Studies General Business Geology History International Agriculture and Natural Resources Japanese Mathematics and Statistics Meteorology - Climatology Modern Languages Music Philosophy Physics

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
Political Science Psychology Sociology Water Science Women Studies

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LIFE LONG LEARNING
The education of professionals in construction management, engineering and engineering technology is a continuing process. The ground work in both technical and nontechnical studies is laid while in college, but education does not stop on the day of graduation. For a professional, education will continue not only in the technical areas but in areas that relate to human and social concerns. A professional may expect to take a leadership role in the community and must have a broad awareness of human and social accomplishments, needs, values, and a willingness to take the responsibility for meeting these needs. For these reasons, an integrated program of coursework in the humanities and social sciences is part of the educational requirements.

from degree consideration by applying to the Office of the Dean after either completing 15 simultaneous or sequential credit hours with at least a 3.0 grade point average or 30 hours with at least a 2.5 grade point average at the University of Nebraska at Omaha following the semester(s) the student wishes to remove. The application will be forwarded to the campus College Academic Appeals Committee for review and approval, if appropriate. Appeals of Course Grades Students who have a valid cause for appealing a grade for a course may file a written appeal with the Office of the Dean. Appeals must be filed within 21 days after the date of electronic posting of the grades by the Registrar for the semester in which the appealed grade was earned. Appeals will be forwarded to the campus College Academic Appeals Committee for consideration. Appeals of Academic Suspension Appeals of academic suspension must be filed in writing with the Office of the Dean within 21 days after official electronic notification/posting of the grades by the Registrar for the semester at the end of which the suspension was invoked. Suspended students who have filed a notice of appeal may apply to the Office of the Dean for a temporary release from suspension pending the final disposition of the appeal by the campus College Academic Appeals Committee.

OTHER COLLEGE INFORMATION
Application for the Diploma Each student who expects to receive a diploma must file an application of candidacy for the diploma at the Office of the Registrar, Eppley Administration Building. Announcements about deadline dates are posted upon bulletin boards and printed in the Gateway. It is the responsibility of the students to inform the Registrar’s Office of their graduation plans including their address and the manner in which they are completing their requirements. Failure to meet these stipulations may necessitate postponement of graduation until the next semester. Graduation with Distinction Students with outstanding scholastic records may obtain the College special honor of graduation WITH DISTINCTION upon the recommendation of the faculty of the College, and have a minimum GPA of at least 3.25 in required program courses. Professional Registration The College encourages registration and many of the College’s seniors take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination prior to graduation. This examination is the first step in the process of becoming a registered professional engineer. To become a licensed professional engineer, one must pass the FE exam, have four years of experience, and pass a professional practice examination. Students may take the FE exam in the last semester of their engineering baccalaureate program. Arrangements are made through the State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Architects, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508.

REGULATIONS
The College and its various divisions and departments reserve the right to change the rules governing admission to, instruction in, and graduation from the College or its various divisions. Such regulations are operative whenever the College authorities deem necessary and apply not only to prospective students but also to those currently enrolled in the College. The College also reserves the right to withdraw courses and to reassign instructors. Prerequisites for courses offered in the College are effective even if they are not listed in the schedule. A maximum amount of credit that a student may earn during any semester does not generally exceed 18 credit hours without the Dean’s permission.

Architectural Engineering (AE)
The architectural engineering undergraduate program is a four-year program requiring 123 credit hours. A one-year Master of Architectural Engineering (MAE) program of 36 credits is also offered. The educational objective of the program is to produce graduates who: • Practice architectural engineering as licensed professionals in the following application areas of building design; - building structural systems - building mechanical systems - building acoustics - building lighting systems - building electrical systems • Apply the fundamental principles of science, engineering, and mathematics to the analysis of architectural engineering problems

ACADEMIC AMNESTY AND APPEALS
The following policies shall apply for academic amnesty, appeals of course grades, and appeals of academic suspension. Academic Amnesty A student may remove two or more semesters of work

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

• Design solutions to architectural engineering problems under realistic conditions that include: - identifying relevant issues - formulating solutions - evaluating and selecting a solution - communicating the final design Architectural Engineering (AE) is the engineering design of buildings. Students will have the option to specialize in either the design of building structural systems, building mechanical systems and acoustics or building lighting and electrical systems. The first three years are common to all three fields of specialization, and include the same math and science courses common to all engineering programs. Students will take an introductory course in AE in their first semester. This course exposes the students to the materials and systems that make up a modern building. It will also provide a preview of the work they can expect to do after graduation. This first AE course helps the student to decide if this is the career path he/she wishes to pursue. In the second semester, the AE student begins the first of a four-course sequence of courses in architecture. The purpose of these courses is to familiarize the engineering student with the thought and design process of architects and to develop an appreciation of the architectural features of buildings. This exposure to architecture is an important part of the student’s education. It develops creativity and gives the AE graduates a unique ability to work effectively with their professional colleagues in architecture. The intent of the AE program is to develop both breadth and depth. This is done by requiring the students to have a good understanding of all the systems that make up a building while also giving them a specialized education in their chosen option areas. The breadth is provided in the 5th and 6th semesters, with all students taking courses in each of the three areas of specialization. The depth is provided in the 7th and 8th semesters, as the program splits into the three option areas. The final year of the AE undergraduate program features a senior design project. The project requires the student to practice all the design skills and understanding of building systems developed throughout the program. Students in teams will complete a significant building design in a manner that closely simulates professional practice. Industry and faculty members will serve as consultants to the students. A one-year Master of Architectural Engineering degree follows the four-year undergraduate program. This fifth year continues the specialized education in each of the three option areas, and provides an introduction to some of the professional practice topics that Architectural Engineers will need later in their careers. Architectural Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

considered as new students upon re-entering the program and will be subject to the requirements of the undergraduate catalog current at the time of their re-entry AE students must pass any course offered by the AE program (those with an AE or CE prefix) with a grade of “C” or higher to obtain credit toward graduation for that course. All courses that are prerequisites for AE or CE courses must be passed with a grade of “C-” or higher to obtain entry into the subsequent course. Students must complete at least 43 credit hours in the AE program before applying for admission to the degree program in AE. Transfer students must have all transfer hours accepted before applying for admission. The number admitted will depend on the availability of space, faculty, and other academic resources. Admission will be based on academic performance in a set of 43 credit hours of courses taken in the AE program. Students will not be permitted to register for more than 61 credit hours of courses listed in the AE curriculum until they have been accepted into the degree program in AE. Three courses each in the humanities and social sciences are required in the AE program. Because of the specific needs of the program, most of these courses are specified in the curriculum.

Career Opportunities
Architectural engineering graduates normally enter the building design industry and become registered professional engineers. There are only fourteen accredited Architectural Engineering programs in the country, so there is a large unfulfilled demand for engineers educated in building design. This is especially true in Nebraska, the home of several large Architectural and Engineering design firms.

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering (126 Credits)1
First Semester AE 1010 Intro. to Architectural Engineering....................1 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals ..................3 MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 CHEM 1180 General Chemistry......................................3 CHEM 1184 Gen. Chemistry Lab ...................................1 CIST 1400 Computer Programming ...............................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Semester AE 2250 Const. Graphics & Design Process ..................3 ARCH 10602 Intro to Design ...........................................3 MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 PHYS 2110 General Physics ..........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Third Semester AE 2400 Building Systems..............................................3 ARCH 2100 Basic Design ...............................................3 MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 PHYS 2120 General Physics ..........................................4 PHYS 1164 General Physics Lab II.................................1 EM 2230 Engineering Statics..........................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................18

Departmental Controls
Because of rapid technical developments, the AE curriculum will be continually reviewed and upgraded. Currently enrolled students are expected to modify their programs to take advantage of such revisions. Students who do not maintain continuous progress toward the degree through enrollment in applicable coursework will be

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
Fourth Semester ELEC 2110 Elements of Electrical Engineering ..............3 MENG 2000 Thermodynamics........................................3 MATH 3350 Differential Equations I ................................3 EM 3250 Mechanics Of Elastic Bodies...........................3 EM 3730 Engineering Dynamics.....................................3 AE 3070 Mechanics of Materials Lab .............................1 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Fifth Semester AE 3200 Lighting Fundamentals.....................................3 AE 3300 Building Acoustics Fundamentals ....................3 CE 310 Fluid Mechanics .................................................3 CE 319 Fluid Mechanics Lab ..........................................1 CE 341 Introduction to Structural Engineering ...............4 ART 37703,4 History of Architecture to 1850....................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17 Sixth Semester AE 3220 Electrical Systems for Buildings I .....................3 AE 3100 HVAC Fundamentals ........................................3 CE 441 Steel Design .......................................................3 MECH 420 Heat Transfer ................................................3 STAT 3800 Applied Engr Probability and Stats...............3 Social Science Elective5 ..................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................18 Seventh Semester All options ENGL 39806 Technical Writing ...................................3 ISMG 2060 Intro. to Industrial Decision Models ........3 AE 4120 Building Energy II: Secondary Systems ......3 PSYC 10107 Introduction to Psychology ...................3 Lighting and Electrical Options AE 4200 Lighting II: Theory, Design & Application.....4 AE 4120 Bldg. Energy II: Secondary Systems ...........3 Mechanical and Acoustics Options ECON 22007 Principles of Economics (Micro) ..........3 AE 4120 Bldg. Energy II: Secondary Systems ...........3 Structural Option ECON 22007 Principles of Economics (Micro) ..........3 CE 440 Reinforced Concrete Design .........................3 Semester Total .........................................................15/16 Eighth Semester All options ART 37802 History of Architecture since 1850 ...........3 AE 4050 AE Interdisc. Team Design Project ..............3 Lighting and Electrical Options PSYC 42107 Sensation and Perception .....................3 Mechanical and Acoustics Options AE 4140 Bldg. Energy III: Primary Systems ...............4 Structural Option CE 334 Intro. to Geotechnical Engineering................4 Semester Total ...........................................................9/10
Notes: 1. This curriculum assumes the student has placed into MATH 1950 and ENGL 3980. If not, the prerequisites must also be taken. 2. Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts requirement. 3. Satisfies a Humanities and Fine Arts requirement and the International Focus requirement 4. AE 3770, Global Experiences in Architectural Engineering, is an accepted equivalent for ART 3770. 5. Must satisfy the US Racial or Hispanic Minority Group requirement. 6. ENGR 3000 is an accepted equivalent for ENGL 3980. 7. Satisfies a Social and Behavioral Science requirement.

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Civil Engineering (CIVE) Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
The Department of Civil Engineering offers a complete undergraduate program to students on the Lincoln and Omaha campuses of the University of Nebraska. Curriculum requirements are nearly identical on both campuses. The goal is to prepare students for entry into the civil engineering profession immediately after graduation or to pursue graduate-level work. The general educational objectives of the University of Nebraska civil engineering undergraduate program are to prepare our graduates to: • successfully obtain employment in their areas of expertise in the public or private sectors; • understand the ethical and professional demands of contemporary civil engineering practice; • successfully enroll in graduate engineering or other professional programs; • understand the necessity of team work in engineering practice; • be able to communicate effectively in professional settings; • understand and be able to account for the effects of their professional decisions on the quality of life and the environment; • successfully pursue professional licensure; and • continue to seek further education in a process of life-long learning. As a professional discipline, civil engineering is closely related to the total human environment. In all professional endeavors, the civil engineer must consider ecological effects as well as the social, economic, and political needs of people. The civil engineer designs systems to control and manage our water resources to provide electric power, agricultural irrigation, flood control, recreation, water supplies and wastewater treatment systems for our urban and industrial needs. The civil engineer plans, designs, and constructs our transportation systems including highways, railroads, waterways, and airports to connect rural, urban, and industrial areas. The civil engineer also designs and constructs housing and facilities for recreational, industrial, and commercial complexes, which comprise the urban environment. It is the responsibility of civil engineering to minimize air, water, and land pollution and protect the environment. Instructional emphasis is placed on fundamental engineering principles derived from mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering science. These subjects provide a sound background for the subsequent introductory courses in environmental, geotechnical, structural, transportation, and water resources engineering. Students are introduced to design concepts in the freshman year. Design is incorporated throughout the curriculum which culminates in two senior-level courses, CIVE 490 Issues in Civil Engineering and CIVE 495 Senior Design Project. Instructional laboratories in environmental engineering, hydraulics, geotechnical engineering, structures, surveying, and transportation provide each student with an opportunity to learn, through individual participation, the operation of the testing equipment used

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

to establish engineering design criteria and to monitor and model engineering facilities such as water and wastewater treatment plants, highway systems, river control systems, and structural systems.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
(Lincoln and Omaha campuses) Students should apply for formal admission to the degree program after completing 43 credit hours toward the degree. See College of Engineering Admission Requirements. Degree Requirements - 130 hours First Semester MATH 1950 (Calc. I) ........................................................5 CHEM 1180 (Gen. Chem.) .............................................3 CHEM 1184 (Gen. Chem. Lab) ......................................1 CIVE 112 (Intro. to Civil Engr.).........................................1 CIST 1400 (Intro. to Comp. Prog.) .................................3 English proficiency .........................................................0 Humanities/social science elective .................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................16 Second Semester MATH 1960 (Calc. II) .......................................................5 PHYS 2110 (Gen. Phys.) .................................................4 PHYS 1154 (Phys. Lab)1 ................................................1 SPCH 1110 (Fund. of Speech Comm.) ..........................3 Computer Aided Design2 ................................................2 Total Hours Second Semester .....................................15 Third Semester MATH 1970 (Calc. III) .....................................................4 PHYS 2120 (Gen. Phys.)3 ..............................................4 CIVE 221 (Geometric Control Sys.).................................3 ENGL 3980 (Technical Writing)4 ....................................3 EMEC 2230 (Engr. Statics) .............................................3 Total Hours Third Semester ..........................................17 Fourth Semester MATH 3350 (Dif. Eq. I) ....................................................3 CIVE 361 (Highway Engr.) ...............................................4 EMEC 3250 (Mech. of Elastic Bodies) ...........................3 EMEC 3730 (Engr. Dynamics) ........................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours Fourth Semester .......................................16 Fifth Semester STAT 3800 (Prob. and Stat.) ...........................................3 CIVE 310 (Fluid Mechanics) ............................................3 CIVE 319 (Hydraulics Lab) .............................................1 CIVE 326 (Intro. to Env. Engr.) ........................................3 CIVE 327 (Env. Engr. Lab) ...............................................1 CIVE 341 (Intro. to Structural Engr.) ................................4 Total Hours Fifth Semester ...........................................15 Sixth Semester Computer Methods5.......................................................3 CIVE 378 (Materials of Construction) .............................3 CIVE 334 (Intro. Geotechnical Engr.) ..............................4 CIVE 352 (Intro. Water Res. Engr.) .................................4 CIVE Design elective ......................................................3 Total Hours Sixth Semester ..........................................17

Seventh Semester CIVE 490 (Issues in Civil Engineering) ............................1 Technical electives .........................................................3 CIVE Design electives6 ..................................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................6 Total Hours Seventh Semester ....................................16 Eighth Semester CIVE 495 (Senior Design Project) ..................................3 Technical electives7 .......................................................9 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................6 Total Hours Eighth Semester .......................................18
1PHYS 1164 is an acceptable substitute if taken parallel with PHYS 2120. 2 AE 2250 or equivalent. 3CHEM 1190 & 1194 are acceptable substitutes. 4GET 2140 is an acceptable substitute. 5Computer Methods must be selected from EMEC 4800, MATH 3300, or MATH 2050. 6Nine (9) credits must be taken from courses designated as Design Electives. CIVE Design electives must be taken from at least two subdisciplines. 7Technical electives will be selected by the student in consultation with his/her adviser to formulate a coherent program in civil engineering. Two technical electives (up to six credits) can be taken from MENG 2000, ELEC 2110, ISMG 2060 or any approved course in science, mathematics, or other engineering areas approved by the department. The department has an approved list.

CIVE Design Electives CIVE 419 Flow Systems Design .....................................3 CIVE 425 Process Design in Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment ...............................................3 CIVE 426 Design of Water Treatment Facilities ..............3 CIVE 427 Design of Wastewater Treatment & Disposal Facilities .....................................................................3 CIVE 436 Foundation Engineering ..................................3 CIVE 440 Reinforced Concrete Design...........................3 CIVE 441 Steel Design I ..................................................3 CIVE 452 Water Resources Development ......................3 CIVE 460 Highway Design ..............................................3 CIVE 464 Traffic Control System Design ........................3 Civil Engineering Technical Electives CIVE 421 Hazardous Waste Management CIVE 422 Pollution Prevention Principles and Practices CIVE 424 Solid Waste Management Engineering CIVE 430 Principles of Water Quality CIVE 434 Soil Mechanics II CIVE 443 Advanced Structural Analysis CIVE 444 Structural Design and Planning CIVE 445 Structural Analysis I CIVE 446 Steel Design II CIVE 447 Reinforced Concrete II CIVE 451 Intro to Finite Element Analysis CIVE 452 Water Resources Development CIVE 454 Hydraulic Engineering CIVE 455 Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Engineering CIVE 456 Surface Water Hydrology CIVE 458 Groundwater Engineering CIVE 461 Urban Transportation Planning CIVE 462 Airport Planning and Design CIVE 465 Traffic Engineering Laboratory CIVE 468 Portland Cement and Asphalt Laboratory CIVE 469 Pavement Design and Evaluation CIVE 475 Water Quality Strategy CIVE 498 Special Topics in Civil Engineering

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
For more information…
please call (402) 554-2462.

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Computer Engineering (CENG) and Electronics Engineering (EENG)
The mission of the department of Computer and Electronics Engineering (CEEN) at the University of Nebraska is to develop and maintain programs of excellence in teaching and research which meet the educational needs of its constituents, which will support the state of Nebraska in its development as a leading center for high-technology computer/electronics/telecommunications industry and which will support national needs for well-educated computer and electronics engineering professionals. To fulfill this mission, the department offers the degrees of bachelor of science in computer engineering and bachelor of science in electronics engineering as well as several graduate programs. The faculty takes pride in its high level of interaction with both undergraduate and graduate students. General Requirements The following sections apply to both the computer engineering program and the electronics engineering program. Advisement Upon entry into the curriculum, each student will be assigned a faculty academic adviser. It is required that the student meet with the adviser prior to each class registration period and that all courses to be applied toward the degree be selected with the advice and approval of the adviser. Students are expected to have their academic records reviewed and obtain approval from the department prior to application to the University registrar for award of the Degree in order to insure that all curricular requirements will be satisfied by the time of intended graduation. Curriculum Because of the rapid developments in the fields of computer engineering and electronics engineering, the curricular requirements are continually reviewed and upgraded to reflect technological advances. Curricular sequence and course descriptions contained herein are intended to serve as general guidelines. Contact the department for information on any changes to the requirements that are currently in effect but not listed in this catalog. Currently enrolled students are expected to modify their programs to take advantage of such revisions. Students who do not maintain continuous progress toward the degree through enrollment in applicable coursework will be considered as new students upon reentering the computer or electronics engineering curricular sequence and will be subject to the requirements of the curriculum current at the time of their reentry. Certain courses may not be valid as prerequisites or as credit toward the degree after two academic years; the student’s academic adviser should be consulted regarding applicability. The department maintains a high standard of excellence in meeting its objective of providing the student with extensive experience in the fields of computer engineering

and electronics engineering. The development of both hardware and software and the knowledge of the interrelationship of these areas is enhanced through the extensive use of laboratory equipment. All coursework must be of “C” grade level or higher to be credited toward graduation requirements or to be valid as a prerequisite for another course. The applicable University bulletins and College academic policies must be followed for the areas of humanities and social sciences to ensure that such enrollments satisfy the campus general education requirements. Senior Thesis The capstone Senior Thesis requirement provides a unique and challenging opportunity for the undergraduate student to demonstrate his/her ability to apply the knowledge gained in the coursework sequence to the planning, design, execution, testing and reporting of a significant project in the applications of engineering principles. The initiative and responsibility expected of the student executing the Senior Thesis parallel the expectations of the employer of the program graduate. After faculty approval of the Thesis topic, each student is assigned to a faculty Senior Thesis adviser who will supervise the execution of the work. Electives Computer engineering and electronic engineering courses which are described in the catalog but are not shown as requirements in the semester sequences are offered as the need arises to provide co-interest areas wherein the students may broaden their background in the applications of computer engineering or electronics engineering. In addition, appropriate specified technical electives will be selected to augment the student’s particular area of interest. The applicability of transfer coursework with engineering content toward credit in the curriculum is determined on a case-by-case basis by the department. The credit hours in the curriculum designated as free electives are those courses that the student may choose to enhance personal objectives in his/her academic plan. Free electives must be selected with the approval of his/her departmental adviser and may not duplicate the content of curricular requirements nor be of a remedial nature. Special Interest Areas Opportunities are provided for the development of areas of special interest through enrollment in the Individual Study in Computer and Electronics Engineering courses which are offered at the freshman through senior level for the student who may wish to develop a topic under the guidance of a department faculty member. Enrollment is by permission after the department chair has approved a written proposal. Special Topics in Computer and Electronics Engineering classes also are offered by the department as the need arises to cover topics needing emphasis as a result of the rapidly developing fields of computer engineering and electronics engineering. Academic advisers should be consulted regarding the particular topics to be covered and the necessary prerequisites for each offering of this course.

166

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

Students who expect to continue their education at the graduate level after the award of the baccalaureate degree should consult their adviser regarding course selections that would enhance that objective. Students are encouraged to develop their professional and leadership potential through participation in student chapters of related professional organizations and in University extracurricular activities. Participation in the University Honors Program is encouraged for those who qualify. Financial Aid Numerous opportunities exist for students to obtain financial aid during the course of their academic work at the university. The office of the dean of the college and the campus financial aid office should be consulted to determine the availability of such assistance.

graduate to enter employment in positions involving computer hardware design and applications, computer software design and development, microcomputer based applications, and computer networking. The program also leads to the preparation for graduate work in computer engineering, computer science or electrical engineering. First Year First Semester CEEN 1030 CEEN Fundamentals ...................................4 CIST 1400 Intro Comp. Programming ............................3 MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 ENGL 1160 English Comp ..............................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester CEEN 1060 Microprocessor Apps. .................................3 CEEN 2250 CEEN Seminar.............................................1 CSCI 1620 Intro. Comp. Sci. II........................................3 MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 PHYS 2110 General Physics I.........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17 Second Year First Semester CEEN 2130 Electrical Circuits I.......................................4 CEEN 2184 Circuits Lab I ...............................................1 MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 MATH 3350 Differential Equations ..................................3 PHYS 2120 General Physics II........................................4 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................16 Second Semester CEEN 2220 Electronic Circuits I .....................................3 CEEN 2234 Electronic Circuits Lab I ..............................1 CEEN 3130 Switching Ckt. Theory .................................4 MATH/Science Elective...................................................3 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing .........................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17 Third Year First Semester CEEN 3100 Digt. Dsgn. and Interface ............................4 CEEN 3280 Applied Fields..............................................3 MATH 2040 Finite Discrete Mathematics........................3 STAT 3800 Engr. Probability and Stat. ............................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................16 Second Semester CEEN 3250 Communications Sys. .................................4 CEEN 4330 Computer Dsgn. I ........................................4 CSCI 3320 Data Structures ............................................3 SPCH 3130 Speech Bus. and Prof. ................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17 Fourth Year First Semester CEEN 4360 Computer Dsgn. II .......................................4 ENGR 4690 Technology Science and Civ. ......................3 CSCI 4500 Operating Systems.......................................3

Computer Engineering (CENG)
The computer engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone :(410) 347-7700. The CEEN department’s program educational objectives for the computer engineering program ensure that graduates will be prepared to: • Be employed in industries and provide: - design with microprocessors/embedded systems - digital design - hardware/software integration - computer architecture • Function on teams with multidisciplinary aspects • Participate in lifelong learning • Exhibit competency in written and oral communications • Continue formal education in graduate programs • Have an ethical approach to engineering practice These program educational objectives were developed with input from the program’s educational objectives constituency consisting of employers (including CEEN Industry Advisory Board), graduates of the program, and faculty of the department. Requirements Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering The 133 credit hour program in computer engineering leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering. Twenty-three hours of mathematics, nine hours of physics, 12 hours of computer science, and three hours of mathematics or physical science electives complement the required 44 hours of work in the computer engineering area. Nine hours in written and oral communications, 18 hours in the humanities and social sciences, and 15 hours of technical and free electives provide the opportunity for the student to acquire a general educational background and gain the cultural attributes associated with a university education. The individual holding this degree will have advanced knowledge in his or her field of engineering interest and in addition will have a university educational background involving mathematics, the physical sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. Completion of this curriculum will enable the

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
Specified tech. elective...................................................5 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................18 Second Semester CEEN 4980 Senior Thesis...............................................3 Specified tech. elective...................................................5 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Free elective....................................................................7 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18

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networks. The program also leads to the preparation for graduate work in electronics engineering or electrical engineering. First Year First Semester CEEN 1030 CEEN Fundamentals ...................................4 MATH 1950 Calculus I. ...................................................5 CIST 1400 Intro to Comp Prog. .....................................3 ENGL 1160 English Comp. .............................................3 Total Hours First Semester............................................15 Second Semester CEEN 1060 Microprocessor Apps ..................................3 CEEN 2250 CEEN Seminar.............................................1 MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 PHYS 2110 General Physics I.........................................4 PHYS 1154 General Physics Lab I .................................1 Humanities/Social Science Elective ...............................3 Total Hours First Semester............................................17 Second Year First Semester CEEN 2130 Electrical Circuits I.......................................4 CEEN 2184 Circuits Lab I ..............................................1 MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 MATH 3350 Differential Equations. .................................3 PHYS 2120 General Physics II........................................4 Total Hours First Semester............................................16 Second Semester CEEN 2140 Electrical Circuits II......................................3 CEEN 2220 Electronic Circuits I .....................................3 CEEN 2234 Electronic Circuits Lab I. ............................1 CEEN 3130 Switching Ckt theory ...................................4 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing .........................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective ...............................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17 Third Year First Semester CEEN 3280 Applied Fields .............................................3 CEEN 3520 Electronic Circuits II. ...................................4 STAT 3800 Engr Probability & Stat..................................3 SPCH 3130 Speech Bus & Prof......................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours First Semester............................................16 Second Semester CEEN 3250 Communications Sys ..................................4 CEEN 3550 Signals & Linear Systems............................3 CEEN 3610 Data & Telecom Transceiver ........................4 Math/Science Elective ....................................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17 Fourth Year First Semester CEEN 4630 Digital Comm Media....................................4 CEEN 4660 Telecomm Engineering I ..............................4 ENGR 4690 Technology, Science & Civ..........................3 Specified Tech Elective ...................................................3 Free Elective ...................................................................3 Total Hours First Semester............................................17

Electronics Engineering (EENG)
The computer engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone :(410) 347-7700. The CEEN department’s program educational objectives for the electronics engineering program ensure that graduates will be prepared to: • Be employed in industries in the following areas: - communication systems - telecommunication networks - analog, digital and microprocessor systems - hardware/software integration • Exhibit competency in written and oral communications • Function on teams with multidisciplinary aspects • Have an understanding of the social environment in which electronics engineering is practiced • Have an ethical approach to electronics engineering practices • Continue life-long learning These program educational objectives were developed with input from the program’s educational objectives constituency consisting of employers (including CEEN Industry Advisory Board), graduates of the program, and faculty of the department. Requirements Bachelor of Science in Electronics Engineering The 133 credit hour program in electronics engineering leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Electronics Engineering. Twenty hours of mathematics, nine hours of physics, and three hours of mathematics or physical science electives complement the required 58 hours of work in the electronics engineering area. Nine hours in written and oral communications, 18 hours in the humanities and social sciences, and sixteen hours of technical and free electives provide the opportunity for the student to acquire a general educational background and gain the cultural attributes associated with a university education. The individual holding this degree will have advanced knowledge in his or her field of engineering interest and in addition will have a university educational background involving mathematics, the physical sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. The curriculum has a strong focus in telecommunications engineering. Completion of this program will enable the graduate to enter employment in positions involving telecommunications engineering design, analog circuit design, telecommunications network performance analysis, and technical management of telecommunications

168

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

Second Semester CEEN 4980 Senior Thesis...............................................3 Specified Tech Elective ...................................................8 Free Elective ...................................................................4 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................16

Bachelor of Science in Construction Engineering (127 Credits)
First Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CHEM 1180 General Chemistry I...............................3 CHEM 1184 General Chemistry I Laboratory ............1 CONE 103 Introduction to Construction Engineering1 CIST 1400 Introduction to Computer Programming..3 MATH 1950 Calculus I................................................5 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 .........................3 Semester total..........................................................16 Second Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 AE 2250 Construction Graphics and Design Processes2.............................................................3 MATH 1960 Calculus II...............................................5 PHYS 1154 General Physics Laboratory I3 ................1 PHYS 2110 General Physics - Calculus Level...........4 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals .............3 Semester Total .........................................................16 Third Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CONE 210 Geomatics................................................3 EMEC 2230 Engineering Statics ................................3 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing Across the Disciplines...........................................3 MATH 1970 Calculus III..............................................4 PHYS 2120 General Physics - Calculus Level...........4 Semester Total .........................................................17 Fourth Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CONE 211Construction Business Methods and Management .........................................................3 ISMG 2060 Engineering Economy I ...........................3 EMEC 3250 Mechanics of Elastic Bodies..................3 EMEC 3730 Engineering Dynamics ...........................3 MATH 3350 Differential Equations .............................3 Semester Total .........................................................15 Fifth Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CIVE 310 Fluid Mechanics .........................................3 CIVE 341 Introduction to Structural Engineering .......4 CONE 316 Construction Estimating ..........................3 CONE 319 Construction Methods and Equipment....3 STAT 3800 Applied Engineering Probability and Statistics4 ..............................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................16 Sixth Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CIVE 334 Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering..4 CIVE 378 Materials of Construction...........................3 ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) ............3 ELEC 2110 Elements of Electrical Engineering..........3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1........................3 Semester Total .........................................................16 Seventh Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CONE 365 Project Budget and Controls ...................3

CONSTRUCTION
Construction Degrees The Charles W. Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction offers the student a full range of professional opportunities in the construction industry from Construction Engineering to Construction Management. These two degree options are described in further detail below. Additional information is available at www.const.unomaha.edu.

Construction Engineering (CONE)
The Construction Engineering major integrates engineering, construction, and management courses. This program is designed for persons fulfilling the construction industry’s need for licensed professional engineers. It resembles the construction management program but provides a greater emphasis on engineering, scientific, and technical courses so that requirements for licensure are met. The courses in Construction Engineering focus on the application of engineering principles to solve real world construction problems. Under the stimulus of increasing demand for its services globally, the construction industry has expanded its technological capabilities pertaining to physical and informational systems. This demand gives the Construction Engineering graduate an unprecedented number of opportunities for employment and for pursuing an advanced degree. Construction engineers participate in the preparation of engineering and architectural plans and specifications which they translate into finished projects, such as buildings, bridges, highways, power plants, or other constructed facilities. These projects involve thousands of details shared by a team of owners, architects, engineers, general constructors, specialty constructors, manufacturers, material suppliers, equipment distributors, regulatory bodies and agencies, labor resources, and numerous others. The constructor assumes responsibility for delivery of the completed project at a specified time and cost and also accepts associated legal, financial, and management obligations. Because of the broad scope of the construction engineer’s project responsibility, he/she must assure the project’s ability to be constructed as well as its ability to be operated and sustained. The Construction Engineering student is required to enroll into a predetermined set of courses specifically designed for general construction education. Each student selects, with the approval of his/her adviser, a set of approved electives. The program outlined below leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Engineering. In addition to the required classroom work, each new and transfer student must complete a minimum of 1,000 hours of professional practice during their enrollment in the program. These hours are monitored by the student’s assigned program adviser.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
CIVE 440 Reinforced Concrete Design ......................3 CONE 333 Construction Planning, Scheduling and Controls.................................................................3 CONE 414 Accident Prevention in Construction .......3 Technical Elective5 ......................................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 .........................3 Semester Total .........................................................18 Eighth Semester CONE 496 Professional Practice ...............................0 CIVE 441 Steel Design I .............................................3 CONE 490 ConE Capstone........................................3 CONE - Design Elective .............................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 .........................3 LAWS 3910 Introduction to Business Law and Ethics......................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................18
1 A minimum of 5 semester credit hours of social science electives and a minimum of 8 semester credit hours are humanities electives in addition to the 3 semester credit hour ECON 220 are required. A total of at least 16 semester credit hours of humanities/social science electives is required. A total of 2 humanities/social sciences electives must be cultural diversity courses, and at least one of those courses must meet the university’s racial or Hispanic minority group diversity requirement. 2 Counts as 2 semester credit hours. Equivalent to MECH 130 offered on the UNL campus. 3 PHYS 1164 is an acceptable substitute if taken with PHYS 2120. 4 Suitable equivalent probability and statistics courses can be substituted with the approval of the student’s adviser. 5 Suitable technical electives selected with concurrence of adviser selecting from the following: EMEC 4480, 4600, 4800; MENG 2000, 4200 and their UNL equivalents. Other College of Engineering courses approved by the student’s adviser can satisfy this requirement.

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highways, railroads, waterways, and airports; municipal service facilities and utilities, such as power plants and energy distribution systems; military bases and space center complexes. Thus the construction management field is broad and challenging, requiring a unique educational background for its professional practitioners. Although the range of construction activities appears wide and diverse, the general educational requirements for construction management are universal regardless of a particular firm’s area of specialization. Since construction is primarily a business enterprise, the graduate must have a sound background in business management and administration areas, as well as an understanding of the fundamentals of architecture and engineering as they relate to the project design itself as well as to the actual construction process in the field. Professional expertise lies in the fields of construction science, methods, and management. A working knowledge of structural design, mechanical and electrical systems, soil mass behavior, and construction equipment is also essential. The construction management curriculum embraces a course of study in specifications, contractual agreements, labor relations, personnel management, materials, methods, and work analysis techniques. Technical and humanity electives provide for a well-rounded education that leads to a challenging career in the construction industry.

Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (127 Credits)
First Semester CNST 1310 Introduction to the Construction Industry .................................................................1 ENGL 1160 English Composition ..............................3 GEOL 1170 Physical Geology....................................4 MATH 1950 Calculus I................................................5 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals .............3 Semester Total .........................................................16 Second Semester CNST 1120 Construction Communications...............3 ARCH 1060 Introduction to Design............................3 MATH 1530 Introduction to Applied Probability and Statistics ........................................................3 Behavior/Social Science Elective...............................3 PHYS 1050 Introduction to Physics...........................4 PHYS 1054 Introduction to Physics Laboratory ........1 Semester Total .........................................................17 Third Semester ENGR 3000 Creativity and Writing for Engineers.......3 CET 2000 Construction Surveying I...........................3 CIVE 252 Materials Testing Lab .................................1 CNST 241 Construction Equipment and Methods I ..3 CNST 251 Construction Materials and Specifications.................................................3 EMEC 2200 Statics ....................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................16 Fourth Semester CNST 242 Construction Equipment and Methods II .3 SPCH 3130 Speech-Communication in Business and the Professions...............................3 ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro) ............3

Electives - Technical and Design CONE 416 Wood/Miscellaneous Materials Design....3 CONE 417 Formwork Systems ..................................3 CONE 466/866 Heavy/Civil Estimating......................3 CONE 481/881 Highway & Bridge Construction .......3 CONE 483/883 Support of Excavation ......................3 CONE 485/885 Temporary Construction ...................3 CONE 498 Special Projects....................................1-6 Construction Management (CNST) Construction is the largest and most diversified industry in the country, accounting for approximately 10 percent of the gross national product. The key professional in this vast enterprise is the “constructor”, a term given to the leaders and managers in the construction industry, having the responsibility for planning, scheduling, and building the projects designed by architects and engineers. These highly specialized efforts are indispensable in meeting the country’s growing need for new structures and environmental control projects. Construction firms vary in size from large corporations to small proprietorships and partnerships. These are often classified according to the kind of construction work they do: general contractors, heavy and highway contractors, specialty contractors including mechanical and electrical, and residential builders and developers. Many firms engage in more than one category of work. Some larger companies incorporate the architectural and engineering design functions as part of their activity as a design/build firm. Collectively, constructors build our entire man-made environment – buildings for housing, commerce, industry, and government; transportation services including

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

EMEC 3240 Strength of Materials..............................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective...........................3 Semester Total .........................................................15 Fifth Semester ACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting I.......................3 ECON 2220 Principles of Economics (Macro) ...........3 ARCH 3310 Structural Design I .................................3 CNST 305 Building Environmental Technical Systems I ..............................................................3 CNST 378 Construction Estimating I .........................3 MGMT 4040 Managerial Leadership..........................3 Semester Total .........................................................18 Sixth Semester ARCH 3320 Structural Design II.................................3 CNST 306 Physical Environmental Systems II...........3 CNST 379 Construction Estimating II ........................3 ISMG 2060 Engineering Economy I ...........................3 Technical Elective.......................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................15 Seventh Semester LAWS 3910 Introduction to Business Law and Ethics .............................................................3 CNST 480 Productivity and Human Factors in Construction......................................................3 CNST 485 Construction Project Scheduling and Control ...........................................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective...........................3 Technical Elective.......................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................15 Eighth Semester CNST 420 Professional Practice and Ethics..............3 CNST 476 Construction Cost Controls......................3 CNST 490 Senior Construction Project .....................3 Construction Management Elective...........................3 Technical Elective.......................................................3 Semester Total .........................................................15
1 ECON 210, Introduction to Economics (5 credit hours), from UNL may substitute for ECON 2200 (3 credit hours) and ECON 2220 (3 credit hours) at UNO 2 ACCT 306, Survey of Accounting (4 credit hours), from UNL is similar to ACCT 2010 (3 credit hours) and/or ACCT 2020 (3 credit hours) in Omaha

First Year First Semester FPT 1100 Principles of Fire Protection ...........................3 CET 1270 Intro to Construction ......................................3 CET 1250 Construction Drawing ....................................3 ENGL 1160 English Composition ...................................3 SPCH 1110 Public Speaking Fundamentals ..................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester FPT 1510 Hazardous Materials Management ................3 FPT 1600 Fire Chemistry ................................................3 FPT 2210 Hydraulics and Pumping Applications ...........3 CET 2250 Computational Analysis .................................3 MATH 1320 College Algebra...........................................3 GET 2140 Technical Report Writing ................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18 Second Year First Semester FPT 2100 Municipal Fire Administration .........................3 FPT 2190 Fire Protection Equipment..............................3 FPT 2310 Fire Protection System ...................................3 FPT 2991 Fire Officer I ....................................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester FPT 2200 Codes and Inspection ....................................3 FPT 2300 Fire Investigation ............................................3 FPT 2410 Fire Strategy and Tactics................................3 FPT 2992 Fire Officer II ...................................................3 CET 2900 Electrical Systems for Bldgs ..........................3 FPT 2320 Firefighter Health and Welfare ........................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18 Total Hours for Associate Degree .................................66 FPT electives are to be selected with approval of an adviser.

Construction and Fire Protection
General Requirements The following elective course listings and requirements apply to all programs in the Construction Systems (CS) department, including the CET and FPT programs. It is possible to combine fire protection studies with a construction program. Details must be arranged with an adviser.

Technical Electives
CNST 405 Mechanical Estimating .............................3 CNST 406 Electrical Estimating .................................3 CNST 415 Mechanical/Electrical Project Management .........................................................3 CNST 434 Professional Trends in Design/Build.........3 CNST 441 Industrialized Systems Building ...............3 CNST 486 Construction Management Systems........3 CNST 498 Special Topics in Construction Management .........................................................3

Departmental Controls
The department reserves the right to change or update programs. Classes which are dropped from a required curriculum may no longer apply to degree requirements. Classes added to a required curriculum may be required of all subsequent graduates. Some prerequisites may not apply after two years. A non-continuous student (one who drops out for one semester, or longer) will face revised or updated graduation requirements. Prior approvals, acceptances or other advising agreements will no longer apply in such cases of non-continuous enrollment. Access to departmental courses is controlled by the department. Students whose GPAs are below certain limits, and students who fail to acquire prior departmental approval to enroll, may not be eligible. If space is limited in classes,

Fire Protection Technology
66 Credit Hours The 66 credit-hour program as outlined leads to the Associate degree in fire protection technology (FPT). It prepares individuals for those positions directly related to industrial and municipal fire protection.
NOTE: See general departmental requirements and elective course listings after the following FPT listing

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
priority may be given to those students who are near to graduation, and need such classes for graduation.

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Academic Performance
The minimum acceptable grade for required courses in a student’s major field is “C.” In the construction and fire protection programs, this applies to all courses prefixed by “CONE”, “CNST”, “FPT,” and the specific courses: EMEC 2200 (Statics) and EMEC 3240 (Strength of Materials). In addition, the minimum acceptable grade is “C”; “C-” is not an acceptable grade. 1) in mathematics and science courses completed after January 1, 1991, and 2) in all transfer courses in mathematics and science. 3) in any construction, fire protection, math or science elective course requiring a prerequisite, that prerequisite course must have a completed grade of “C” or better. A student will be allowed to preenroll in a course prior to completing the prerequisite course, but will be withdrawn from the course if the prerequisite course is not completed by the beginning of the new course semester with the “C” grade or better. A student may retake any one single course, previously taken and not passed (“F”), only once. This rule also provides that he or she may retake no more than three different courses, previously taken and not passed, in such a manner. This rule applies only to courses offered in the College of Engineering. If required courses are involved, application of this rule may put the student in a position of not being able to meet graduation requirements for the program major involved. Since changing majors may involve considerable loss of time and effort, it is critical that the student withdraw from, or change status to “audit” in, any course which he or she is in jeopardy of not passing. Such changes must be made prior to the end of the eleventh week of classes.

systems engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering and mechanical engineering are provided on the Omaha campus. The courses listed below are similar in content to equivalent courses at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, allowing for maximum transferability of credit. Students should select courses at UNO that meet degree requirements as stated in the Catalog of the institution to which they plan to transfer.

Pre-Agricultural Engineering
Agricultural Engineering (AGEN) involves the design, analysis, manufacture and management of machines; soil and water resources engineering; and sensors and control systems for plant and animal production. Students choosing the pre-agricultural engineering program on the Omaha campus should be aware that there are three courses in the first two years (AGEN 112, 118 and 225; six total credit hours) for which there are no equivalents on the Omaha campus. However, substitutions for AGEN 112 and 118 may be available on a case by case basis. First Year First Semester MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 CIST 1400 Intro to Comp. Prog. ....................................31 CHEM 1180 Gen. Chemistry I.........................................3 CHEM 1184 Gen. Chemistry I Lab..................................1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 2..............................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 CHEM 1190 Gen. Chem. II .............................................3 CHEM 1194 General Chemistry Lab II............................1 PHYS 2110 Gen. Physics (Calculus Level) .....................4 AE 2250 Constr. Graphics and Design Process .............3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................16 Second Year First Semester MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 PHYS 2120 General Physics II (Calc. Level) ...................4 EMEC 2230 Engr. Statics................................................3 ISMG 2060 Engr. Econ. I.................................................3 SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communications ...................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................17 Second Semester MATH 3350 Differential Equations ..................................3 MENG 2000 Thermodynamics........................................3 ELEC 2110 Elements of Elec. Eng OR EMEC 3250 Mech. of Elas. Bodies. ...........................3 EMEC 3730 Engineering Dynamics ................................3 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing3 ........................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 2..............................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18 Other courses available: CIVE 3100 Fluid Mechanics............................................3 STAT 3800 or ISMG 3210 Calculus-based Statistics......3 EMEC 4800 Digital Methods in Engr. Analysis ...............3
1 One of the three credit hours can be used in AGEN. 2 Selected from humanities and social science elective list.

Transfer Students
Transfer students’ equivalency credit will be evaluated by the departmental adviser for official acceptance toward degree requirements. It is the students’ responsibility to confer with the adviser as soon as possible to have their past work evaluated so that they do not start out in the wrong courses. The actual total number of credit hours transferred into the University may include courses which are not applicable to a given degree. For this reason credits applied to specific course-by-course graduation requirements may be less than the total credits transferred.

Graduation
To assist the students in the graduation process, students should write a letter to the chair one year in advance of their intended date of graduation stipulating when they intend to graduate.

Electronics Engineering Technology (EET)
The EET program is undergoing phase-out. For more information consult with the department chairperson.

PRE-ENGINEERING
Two years of coursework applicable to Bachelor of Science degrees in agricultural engineering, biological

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING

3 EPPE sophomore level placement or successful completion of ENGL 1160/1164.

Pre-Electrical Engineering
Students planning to transfer to Electrical Engineering on the Lincoln campus can take the first two years of coursework on the Omaha campus. The students will be advised through the Computer and Electronics Engineering department. The list of courses is available from that department.

Pre-Biological Systems Engineering
Biological Systems Engineering (BSEN) is one of the most rapidly developing disciplines in all of engineering. Biological systems engineers are trained to solve problems in biomedical engineering, environmental and water resources engineering, and food and bioproducts engineering. Students who choose pre-biological systems engineering on the Omaha campus, should be aware that there are three courses in the first two years (BSEN 112, 118, and 225; six total credit hours) for which there are no equivalents on the Omaha campus. However, substitutions for BSEN 112 and 118 may be available on a case by case basis. First Year First Semester MATH 1950 Calculus ......................................................5 CIST 1400 Intro to Comp. Programming .......................31 CHEM 1180 Gen. Chem. I ..............................................3 CHEM 1184 Gen. Chem. I Lab .......................................1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 .............................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 CHEM 1190 Gen. Chem. II. ............................................3 CHEM 1194 Gen. Chem. II Lab ......................................1 PHYS 2110 Gen. Physics (Calculus Level) .....................4 AE 2250 Constr. Graphics and Design Process .............3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................16 Second Year First Semester MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 BIOL 1450 Biology I .......................................................52 CHEM 2210 Fund. of Org. Chemistry ...........................43 CHEM 2214 Fund. of Org. Chemistry Lab. .....................1 EMEC 2230 Engr. Statics................................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................17 Second Semester MATH 3350 Differential Equations ..................................3 SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communication.....................3 ELEC 2210 Elements of Elec. Engr OR ISMG 2060 Engr. Econ. I............................................3 EMEC 3730 Engr. Dynamics ...........................................3 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing5 ........................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 4..............................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18 Other courses that can be used to meet BESN requirements: MENG 2000 Thermodynamics........................................3 CIVE 3100 Fluid Mechanics............................................3 STAT 3800 or ISMB 3210 Calculus-based Statistics......3 CHEM 3650/3654 Biochemistry .....................................4
1 2 3 4 5 One of the three hours can be used in BSEN. Four of the five hours can be used in BSEN. Three of the four hours can be used in BSEN. Selected from humanities and social science elective list. EPPE sophomore level placement or successful completion of ENGL 1160/1164.

Pre-Industrial Engineering
First Year First Semester MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 CHEM 1180 Gen. Chem. I ..............................................3 CHEM 1184 Gen. Chem. I Lab .......................................1 CIST 1400 Intro. to Computer Prog. ...............................3 CIST 1404 Intro. to Computer Prog. Lab........................1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 .............................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................16 Second Semester MATH 1960 Calculus II ...................................................5 PHYS 2110 Gen. Physics (Calc. Level)...........................4 SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communication.....................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1..............................3 Total Hours Second Semester1.....................................15 Second Year First Semester MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 PHYS 2120 Gen. Physics ...............................................4 EMEC 2230 Engr. Statics................................................3 ISMG 2060 Engineering Econ. I......................................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1..............................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................17 Second Semester MATH 3350 Differential Equations ..................................3 Engineering Science Electives2 .......................................6 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing3 ........................................3 STAT 3800 Applied Math for Engineers ..........................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................15
1 Selected from humanities and social science elective list. 2 Selected from MECH 2000, EMEC 3250 and EMEC 3730 3 EPPE sophomore level placement or successful completion of ENGL 1160 required.

Pre-Mechanical Engineering
First Year First Semester MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 CHEM 1180 Gen. Chem. I ..............................................3 CHEM 1184 Gen. Chem. I Lab .......................................1 SPCH 2010 Interpersonal Communication.....................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1..............................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................15 Second Semester MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 CHEM 1190 Gen. Chem. II .............................................3 CHEM 1194 Gen. Chem. Lab II ......................................1 PHYS 2110 Gen. Physics (Calc. Level)...........................4 PHYS 1154 Gen. Physics Lab ........................................1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1..............................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................17

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

ENGINEERING
Second Year First Semester MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 PHYS 2120 Gen. Physics (Calc. Level)...........................4 EMEC 2230 Eng. Statics.................................................3 MATH 2050 Applied Linear Algebra................................3 ISMG 2060 Eng. Economy I............................................3 Total Hours First Semester ...........................................17 Second Semester MATH 3350 Differential Equations I ................................3 MENG 2000 Thermodynamics........................................3 EMEC 3250 Mech. of Elastic Bodies ..............................3 EMEC 3730 Engr. Dynamics ...........................................3 STAT 3800 App. Engineering Prob. and Stat. .................3 ENGL 3980 Technical Writing2 ........................................3 Total Hours Second Semester ......................................18 Other required courses available: MENG 4200 Heat Transfer ..............................................3 CIVE 310 Fluid Mechanics..............................................3 ELEC 2110 Elements of Electric Engr. ............................3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1..............................3
1 Selected from humanities and social science elective list. 2 EPPE sophomore level placement or successful completion of ENGL 1160 required.

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4430, 4540 Philosophy - 2110, 3130 Political Science - 2310, 3340 Religion - 3120, 3170 Spanish - 3410, 3420 AREA F: The Humanities Speech Communication - 1710 English (literature) - 2230 or 2830, 2250 or 2260, 2270, 2300, 2310, 2320, 2350 or 2360, 2450, 2460, 2470, 2500 or 2510, 2520, 2850, 3430, 4340 French - 3150, 3160 German - 3150 History - 4120 Religion - 3170 Russian - 3150 Philosophy - 1010, 1210, 2110, 2030, 3130, 3200, 3210, 3220, 3400, 3600, 3700, 4050, 4650 Spanish - 3170 and 3180, 3210 and 3220, 3420 AREA G: The Arts Architecture - 1060 Art (History) - 1100, 1110, 2050, 2060, 3310, 3410, 3610, 4880 Music - 1090, 2550, 2560, 2570 Theater Arts - 1010, 4710, 4720 AREA H: Race, Ethnicity and Gender Anthropology - 3210, 3220 English - 2350 or 2360, 2470 Geography - 3070, 3080 History - 2470, 2480, 2810, 2820, 4400 Management - 3510 Political Science - 3120, 3660, 3680 Sociology - 2010, 3810 Spanish - 3420 Speech Communication - 3750, 4530 Women’s Studies - 2010 AREA I: Other Any course not listed in Areas C, E, F, G, or H must be approved in advance by your academic adviser and the Associate Dean. Any approved course designated as Area I (other) will not satisfy the UNL Essential Studies requirement, but may be used for up to three credit hours toward Humanities/Social Sciences requirement for engineering and construction management studies.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3276.

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES
Engineering majors are required to complete a program of 18 credit hours (6 courses) in the social sciences and humanities. Those students completing their program on the Lincoln campus must follow the guidelines given below. At least five courses must be chosen from four of AREAS C, E, F, G, or H listed below (minimum of 15 credits). No more than one course (maximum of 3 credits) may be chosen from AREA 6 with the approval of an academic adviser. At least two courses must be taken from a single department. AREA C: Human Behavior, Culture and Social Organizations Anthropology - 1050, 3210, 3220, 4210 Speech Communication - 2010, 2410, 4510, 4530, 4550 Criminal Justice - 3350 Economics - 2200, 2220 English - 2280 Geography - 1000, 1020, 3070, 3080, 3130, 3230, 3240, 3330, 4120 History - 4430 Journalism - 4010, 4410, 4500 Management - 4040 Political Science - 1100, 2110, 2210, 2500, 3120, 3160, 3500, 3660, 3680, 4040, 4050, 4200 Psychology - 1010, 2500, 3010, 30 70, 3450 Sociology - 1010, 2010, 2100, 2150, 3810, 3840 Speech Communication - 2-1-, 2410, 4510, 4530, 4550 Women’s Studies - 2010 AREA E: Historical Studies French - 3370 German - 3370 History - 1110, 1120, 1510, 1520, 2020, 2510, 2520, 2610, 2620, 2710, 2720, 2810, 2820, 4120, 4400,

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Application for Admission form. A minimum ACT score of 24 or an SAT score of 1110 (Verbal/Math) is required for all incoming freshmen to be admitted to the College.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Information Science and Technology was established on July 1, 1996, following a study by business leaders and academic representatives that identified the need for the college. It is committed to the integration of scholarship, teaching, service and industry outreach in a way that is responsive and relevant to the needs of business and industry, students, government and the community. The principal goal of the college is to produce the next generation of information specialists. These individuals are technically prepared to enter the information industry, communicate and apply technology in organizational environments, embrace life-long learning and contribute to their community. To achieve this goal, the college is building bridges with the business community. Outreach efforts include establishing student internships, providing for faculty and company specialist exchanges, sharing expensive information systems and tools, sharing real problems with faculty and students, working with industry to set college directions, and identifying future needs. The college offers degree programs in Bioinformatics (BIOI), Computer Science (CS) and Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis (ISQA). The ISQA department is pleased to offer a new Integrated Undergraduate/Graduate Track (IUG) which allows dedicated students to complete the BS in MIS undergraduate degree and the MS in MIS graduate degree in five years. The discipline of Management Information Systems focuses on finding computer-based solutions to organizational problems. The discipline of Computer Science focuses on the development and enhancement of core technologies such as programming languages, protocols, database management systems, etc. and their constituent algorithms and theories. The discipline of Bioinformatics combines computational science, biology, chemistry and mathematics to provide cutting edge research in molecular biology. The College of Information Science and Technology undergraduate programs in Computer Science and Management Information Systems are accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: (410) 347-7700.. The College of Information Science and Technology offers concentrations in Information Assurance and Internet Technologies (iT). The concentrations are designed to provide students within existing ISQA or CS degree programs an opportunity to add a more technical or applied dimension, respectively, to their programs of study. The ISQA department offers additional concentrations in the areas of IT Audit and Control, i-Business Application Development and Management, and Decision Support and Knowledge Management.

Academic Performance
For the purposes of meeting general education requirements, distribution requirements, and prerequisite requirements for classes, a “C-” is considered the functional equivalent of a “C”, and a “D-” is considered the functional equivalent of a “D” keeping in mind that a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for the College of Information Science & Technology.

Degrees
College of Information Science and Technology currently offers three degree options. 1. Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics (BSBI) 2. Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BCS) 3. Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems (BIS)

Concentrations
The College of Information Science and Technology offers an Information Assurance Concentration and an Internet Technologies (iT) concentration for CS or MIS majors*.

Information Assurance Concentration
The Information Assurance concentration supplements and extends the Computer Science (CS) and Management Information Systems (MIS) curriculum by focusing on the foundational principles, worked examples, theory, and skills necessary to analyze, design, and construct secure information systems. These courses address the fundamental technologies, policy, assurance, and ethics involved in the protection of information systems. Hands-on experience is gained through numerous laboratory exercised associated with each course. The concentration is designed to accommodate students with either a CS or MIS background.
*Note: The 18 credit hours Information Assurance concentration can be taken through Computer Science or Management Information Systems.

Internet Technologies (iT) Concentration
The Internet Technologies (iT) concentration supplements the Computer Sciences (CS) and Management Information Systems (MIS) curriculum by focusing on the expertise needed to implement solutions that involve contemporary Internet technologies and software applications. The concentration is designed to accommodate the differing backgrounds of MIS and CS majors. The requirements of either the MIS or CS majors provide the background necessary to pursue the iT concentration. The concentration makes extensive use of existing MIS and CS courses, building on what has been accomplished in these programs. The iT concentration provides extensive hands-on, project based experience for the students.

i-Business Application Development & Management Concentration
The i-Business Application Development & Management Concentration is available only to MIS majors and provides students with the technical, organizational, and managerial background to plan, develop, and manage Internet-based applications. The concentration includes courses that provide students with an understanding of the issues,

Admission to the College
Students who have been admitted to the University may apply for entrance to the College of Information Science and Technology during initial registration by indicating their preference in the appropriate place on the University

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
concepts, and technologies involved in establishing and implementing a corporate strategy for electronic business. These courses address issues of organizational strategy, process re-engineering, and supporting information systems architecture. Students will also learn and apply technical skills needed to develop Internet-based distributed applications. This concentration consists of 18 credit hours.

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biomedical and biotechnology industries, for graduate study in bioinformatics or related areas or, with the addition of only a couple of medical school courses.

Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics (BSBI)
A minimum of 132 credit hours is required for the degree. Thirty of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and carried at UNO. Registration in courses without the having taken the stated prerequisites could result in administrative withdrawal. To earn a Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics degree a student must complete each of the following: • General University Requirements • Recommended Electives • College of IS&T Requirements • Mathematics Requirements • Biology Requirements • Chemistry Requirements • Bioinformatics Requirements

IT Audit and Control Concentration
The IT Audit and Control Concentration is available only to MIS majors and provides student with the technical, organizational, accounting/auditing, and managerial background to plan and conduct IT audit and control activities. The concentration will cover the following conceptual area: business risks an the management of business risk, IT risk as a component of business risk, the need to manage IT risks, basic type of controls required in a business system in order to control IT risks, controls associated with top management, system development, quality assurance, boundary controls, and communications. Issues associated with new system control risks created by the use of the internet for business applications and electronic business will also be covered in one or more courses. Students will learn and apply and integrate technical, managerial and conceptual skills needed to plan and conduct IT audits and establish appropriate controls.

General University Requirements for the BSBI Degree
• 9 hours of English ENGL 1150 (or equivalent) - 3 ENGL 1160 (or equivalent) - 3 The Third English requirement can be satisfied by one of the following courses: ENGL 3980 (Special Topics in Composition) ENGL 2400 (Advanced Composition) All freshman students must take the English Diagnostic Test. Courses such as English 1050, 1090, and 1100 and orientation courses in other colleges or divisions may not be counted as part of the minimum of 132 credit hours in the degree program. University Division 1010 may be applied as an elective if taken in the first 30 hours of the degree program. For students testing into ENGL 1150, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing ENGL 1150, ENGL 1160, & ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400. For students testing into ENGL 1160, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing ENGL 1160, ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400 and any three additional hours of English at the 2000 level or above. For students testing proficient on the English Diagnostic Test, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing six hours of English at the 2000 level or above and three hours of ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400. • 3 hours of public speaking this must be fulfilled by SPCH 1110, 2120, 3120, 3130 or 3140 • 9 hours of humanities (CIST 3110-Required) • 9 hours of social sciences • *3 hours of U. S. racial or Hispanic minority cultural diversity • *3 hours of international or women’s studies
*Students may apply these hours towards satisfaction of the humanities, social sciences and cultural diversity requirements (for selected courses).

Decision Support & Knowledge Management Concentration
The Decision Support & Knowledge Management Concentration is available only to MIS majors and provides student with the analytic tools and problem-solving techniques to support decision making in both service and production applications. The concentration includes courses that provide students with an understanding of the issues, concepts, and methods involved in performing sophisticated analyses of business problems and organizational performance. Students will learn to apply these concepts and skills in the development of applications for data warehousing, data mining, collaborative systems, and knowledge management purposes.

DEGREE PROGRAMS Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics is an emerging, rapidly-expanding scientific discipline that addresses problems related to the collection, processing, analysis of the vast amounts of data describing the structure and function of biological systems. Bioinformatics is a truly interdisciplinary science, bringing together aspects of computer science, molecular biology, chemistry and mathematics. Bioinformatics merges computer and information science with the study of genetic information and biological structures. Bioinformatics allows researchers to open new windows of insight into our genetic makeup, providing pathways to understanding disease processes and creating novel diagnostic and treatment strategies. There is an immense and growing need for experts in this field, in order to capitalize on the growing body of knowledge regarding the genome. A graduate of the UNO Bioinformatics program will gain a solid background in a wide variety of positions in the

For more information…
about the specific course listings of the above requirements contact the advising office at (402) 554-3819.

9 hours of Recommended Electives
Must complete at least 9 hours of elective courses from one of the following three areas: Computational Sciences, Mathematics, or Biosciences. *Pre-Med majors can

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
CSCI 1620.......................................................................3 ENGL 1160 .....................................................................3 BIOL 1450 .......................................................................5 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Summer Session (s) Elective ...........................................................................3 SPCH 1110 .....................................................................3 Total ................................................................................6 Second Year First Semester MATH 2040 .....................................................................3 MATH 1970 .....................................................................4 CHEM 1180 ....................................................................3 CHEM 1184 ....................................................................1 CIST 3110/Humanities....................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Second Semester BIOI 3000 ........................................................................3 CSCI 3320.......................................................................3 BIOL 2140 .......................................................................4 CHEM 1190 ....................................................................3 CHEM 1194 ....................................................................1 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Summer Session ENGL 3980 .....................................................................3 Humanities/cultural diversity...........................................3 Session Total...................................................................6 Third Year First Semester CHEM 2250 ....................................................................3 CSCI 2710.......................................................................3 BIOI 3020 ........................................................................3 BIOI 4860 ........................................................................3 Social sciences ...............................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester CHEM 2260 ....................................................................3 CHEM 2274 ....................................................................2 CSCI 4830.......................................................................3 CSCI 4850.......................................................................3 BIOI 4870 ........................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Fourth Year First Semester ISQA 4890 or CSCI 4150 ................................................3 STATS 3800.....................................................................3 CHEM 4650 ....................................................................3 CHEM 4654 ....................................................................1 Social sciences ...............................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Semester Social sciences/Cultural diversity ...................................3 BIOI 4130 or BIOL 4140..................................................4 BIOI 4960 ........................................................................1 BIOI 4970 ........................................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................3

complete the 9 hours of elective course from the recommended Physics courses and remaining hours from the Biosciences area. For more information about the specific course listings of the above requirements contact the advising office at (402) 554-3819. College of IS&T Requirements ...............................21 cr. hrs. CIST 1400 Introduction to Computer Programming.......3 CSCI 1620 Introduction to Computer Science II ............3 CSCI 2710 Intro. To Digital Design Principles.................3 CSCI 3320 Data Structures ............................................3 CSCI 4830 Intro. To Software Engineering .....................3 CSCI 4850 Database Management Systems .................3 ISQA 4890 Data Warehousing and Data Mining .............3 OR CSCI 4150 Graph Theory & Applications ......................3 Mathematics Requirements ..................................20 cr. hrs. MATH 1950 Calculus I ....................................................5 MATH 1960 Calculus II....................................................5 MATH 1970 Calculus III...................................................4 MATH 2040 Finite Discrete Math for IS&E ......................3 STAT 3800 Applied Engineering Probabilities & Stats...3 Biology Requirements............................................16 cr. hrs. BIOL 1450 Biology I ........................................................5 BIOL 2140 Genetics........................................................4 BIOL 3020 Molecular Biology of the Cell........................3 BIOL 4130 Molecular Genetics.......................................4 OR BIOL 4140 Cellular Biology.............................................4 Chemistry Requirements .......................................20 cr. hrs. CHEM 1180 General Chemistry I....................................3 CHEM 11840 General Chemistry I Lab...........................1 CHEM 1190 General Chemistry II...................................3 CHEM 1194 General Chemistry II Lab............................1 CHEM 2250 Organic Chemistry I....................................3 CHEM 2260 Organic Chemistry II...................................3 CHEM 2274 Organic Chemistry Lab...............................2 CHEM 4650 Biochemistry I.............................................3 CHEM 4654 Biochemistry I Lab......................................1 Bioinformatics Requirements.................................16 cr. hrs. BIOI 1000 Introduction to Bioinformatics .......................3 BIOI 3000 Applied Bioinformatics..................................3 BIOI 4860 Algorithms for Computational Biology...........3 BIOI 4870 Database Search & Pattern Discovery in Bioinformatics ............................................................3 BIOI 4960 Seminar (Colloquium) in Bioinformatics.........1 BIOI 4970 Senior Project in Bioinformatics ....................3

Suggested Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics
First Year First Semester MATH 1950 .....................................................................5 CIST 1400 .......................................................................3 ENGL 1150 .....................................................................3 BIOI 1000 ........................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Second Semester MATH 1960 .....................................................................5

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Humanities ......................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................17 Total Hours for BSBI Degree.........................................132

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Computer Science
Computer science is concerned with the study of all aspects of computing, including hardware, software, algorithms and contemporary applications. Conceptually it appears in the spectrum of computing-related disciplines between computer engineering and management information systems (information systems and quantitative analysis at UNO). The undergraduate degree program in computer science provides students with a solid background in the fundamentals of computing and prepares them for employment in a wide variety of positions and for graduate study in computer science. The content of the department’s courses is continually monitored to ensure they are consistent with the fastchanging developments in the discipline. Courses are offered in day and evening sections for the convenience of the students. Appropriate university and departmental computing resources are available to students taking computer science courses.

and three hours of ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400. • 3 hours of public speaking this must be fulfilled by SPCH 1110, 2120, 3120, 3130 or 3140 • 12 hours of natural sciences (must include twosemester sequence of natural science, with a laboratory component each semester, in the same discipline. • 9 hours of humanities (CIST 3110-Required) • 9 hours of social sciences • *3 hours of U. S. racial or Hispanic minority cultural diversity • *3 hours of international or women’s studies
*Students may apply these hours towards satisfaction of the humanities, social sciences and cultural diversity requirements (for selected courses).

For more information…
about the specific course listings of the above requirements contact the advising office at (402) 554-3819. College of IS&T Core Courses (12 hours) The College of IS&T has developed a series of courses that is required of students wishing to obtain a degree from the college. The development and implementation of this core curriculum is unique; it serves as a basis for preparing students to enter more advanced courses.
Students are accountable for prerequisites of courses.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BCS)
A minimum of 125 credit hours is required for the degree. Thirty of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and carried at UNO. Registration in courses without having taken the stated prerequisites could result in administrative withdrawal. To earn a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree a student must complete each of the following: • General University Requirements • College of IS&T Core Courses • Computer Science Core Courses • Mathematics Courses, and • Computer Science Core Extension These requirements are described in detail as follows: General University Requirements for the BCS Degree • 9 hours of English ENGL 1150 (or equivalent) - 3 hours ENGL 1160 (or equivalent) - 3 hours The third English requirement can be satisfied by one of the following courses: ENGL 3980 (Special Topics in Composition) ENGL 2400 (Advanced Composition) All freshmen students must take the English Diagnostic Test. Courses such as English 1050, 1090, and 1100 and orientation courses in other colleges or divisions may not be counted as part of the minimum 125 credit hours in the degree program. University Division 1010 may be applied as an elective if taken in the first 30 hours of the degree program. For students testing into ENGL 1150, the ninehour requirement is satisfied by completing ENGL 1150, ENGL 1160, & ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400. For students testing into ENGL 1160, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing ENGL 1160, ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400, and any three additional hours of English at the 2000 level or above. For students testing proficient on the English Diagnostic Test, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing six hours of English at the 2000 level or above

Required IS&T core courses (12 hours) CIST 1400 Introduction to Computer Programming...3 *CIST 1404 Introduction to Computer Programming Lab ............................................................1 CSCI 1620 Introduction to Computer Science II.........3 CIST 3100 Orgs. Apps. & Techs .................................3 CIST 2500 Introduction to Applied Statistics for IS&..3
* Optional

Computer Science Core Courses (27 hours) Each of the following courses is required for the BCS degree: CSCI 2710 Introduction to Digital Design Principles...3 CSCI 3320 Data Structures .........................................3 CSCI 3550 Communication Networks ........................3 CSCI 3660 Theory of Computation .............................3 CSCI 3710 Introduction to Computer Org. & Arch......3 CSCI 4220 Programming Languages..........................3 CSCI 4350 Computer Architecture .............................3 CSCI 4500 Operating Systems ...................................3 CSCI 4830 Introduction to Software Engineering .......3 CSCI 4000 Assessment ..............................................0 Mathematics Courses (16 hours) Each of the following mathematics courses is required for the BCS degree: MATH 1950 Calculus I ..................................................5 MATH 1960 Calculus II .................................................5 MATH 2030 Discrete Mathematics ...............................3 MATH 2050 Applied Linear Algebra..............................3 Computer Science Core Extension (24 hours) A core extension of at least 24 hours must be completed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. At least 12 of the 24 hours must be approved upper division computer science courses (courses with numbers greater than 3000). The remaining hours must be

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Information Assurance Concentration
Prerequisites CIST 1400 CIST 3100 CSCI 1620 CSCI 1840 MATH 1950 MATH 2030 CSCI 3320 Introduction to Computer Programming Org. Apps. & Tech. Introduction to Computer Science II Advanced Topics in C Calculus I Discrete Mathematics Data Structures

in an area of emphasis consistent with the computer science degree. They may include additional upper division computer science courses or courses selected from a different academic area. Selected courses from the Information Assurance or Internet Technologies concentrations may be applied towards the core extension area. The entire core extension must be approved by the Computer Science Undergraduate Program Committee, and should be submitted at the end of the sophomore year.

Minor in Computer Science
A minor in computer science may be earned by completing 12 hours of the IS&T Core Courses (CIST 1400, CSCI 1620, CIST 3100 and CIST 2500) and a minimum of 12 hours of computer science courses consisting of CSCI 2710, 3320, 3710, 4220 or 4500. A minor may also be earned by completing 12 hours of the IS&T Core courses (CIST 1400, CSCI 1620, CIST 3100 and CIST 2500) including 6 hours computer science courses at the 2000 level or above and 6 hours at the 3000 level or above).
Student is accountable for prerequisites of courses.

Core Courses (18 credit hours) CIST 3110 Information Technology Ethics CSCI 3550 Communication Networks CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy CIST 4360 Foundations of Information Assurance CIST 4370 Security Administration CIST 4540 Computer Security Management
(Note: CSCI majors may complete the above concentration and apply selected courses towards the area of Core Extension.)

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3819.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3819 or (402) 554-2423.

Suggested Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
First Year First Semester MATH 1950 .....................................................................5 CIST 1100 .......................................................................3 ENGL 1150 .....................................................................3 Public Speaking ..............................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................1 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester MATH 1960 .....................................................................5 CIST 1400 ......................................................................3 ENGL 1160. ....................................................................3 Natural Science...............................................................4 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Year First Semester MATH 2030 .....................................................................3 CSCI 1620.......................................................................3 ENGL 3980 .....................................................................3 Natural Science...............................................................4 CIST 3100 .......................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Semester CIST 2500 .......................................................................3 CSCI 3320.......................................................................3 CSCI 2710.......................................................................3 Natural Science...............................................................4 CIST 3110/Humanities....................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Third Year First Semester MATH 2050 .....................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 CSCI 3710.......................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3

Internet Technologies (iT) concentration in Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
The iT concentration in BCS can be earned by completing the following 18 credit hours: Core Courses (6 hours) CSCI 2850 Programming on the Internet .......................3 CSCI 3550 Communications Networks ..........................3 Elective Courses (9 hours) A Student can select only 3 courses in consultation with the adviser CIST 2910 Multimedia Systems......................................3 CSCI 2830 Java Programming I .....................................3 CSCI 3830 Advanced Java Programming ......................3 CIST 4360 Found. of Information Assurance .................3 CSCI 4760 Topics in Modeling .......................................3 CSCI 4850 Data Base Management System..................3 CSCI 4980 Special Topics In CSCI .................................3 (Topic MUST be related to Internet Technologies. Prior approval from the Undergraduate Program Committee is required to use this course in the concentration) ISQA 4180 Electronic Commerce ...................................3 ISQA 4300 Database Administration ..............................3 ISQA 4890 Data Warehouse and Data Mining ..............3 ISQA 4730 Decision Support Systems ...........................3 *Capstone Course (3 hours) CSCI 4900 Internet Systems Development ....................3 The student must obtain a grade of “C-” or better for the purposes of meeting departmental and college requirements. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for the College of Information Science & Technology.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3819 or (402) 554-2423.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Humanities ......................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester CSCI 3550.......................................................................3 CSCI 3660.......................................................................3 CSCI 4350.......................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Social Sciences...............................................................3 Humanities/Cultural Diversity..........................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................18 Fourth Year First Semester CSCI 4500.......................................................................3 CSCI 4220.......................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Social Science/Cultural Diversity ....................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester CSCI 4830.......................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Core Extension................................................................3 Social Science ................................................................3 CSCI 4000.......................................................................0 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Total Hours for BCS Degree..........................................125

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degree and the MS in MIS graduate degree in five years. The primary purpose of UNO’s College of IS&T’s integrated undergraduate/graduate (IUG) track in MIS is to provide outstanding students in the College of IS&T an option to complete the BS undergraduate degree in MIS and the MS graduate degree in MIS in five years (152 total hours). The IUG program is designed for dedicated students who are motivated and willing to take on early the challenges relating to graduate education. As such, the program involves both intensive study and preparation in the MIS field. Interested students are encouraged to meet with their adviser to find more information about this track.

Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems (BIS)
The Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems (BIS) degree will provide the students with the educational background for pursuing an exciting career in applying computers in business and government to process data and solve a wide variety of business problems. The computer is an important tool, which processes information for management decision-making. Managers can be more effective and efficient when assisted by computer-based information systems. The student will learn how the computer can be applied to produce information both for controlling the day-to-day operations of a business and for planning for the future of that business. Information systems and quantitative analysis produces the educational background appropriate for pursuing career opportunities in business data management, management information systems, information centers, systems analysis, systems design, decision support , information security, electronic commerce, and other related areas. A minimum of 125 credit hours is required for the degree. Thirty of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and carried at UNO. Registration in courses without having taken the stated prerequisites could result in administrative withdrawal. To obtain a BIS a student must fulfill certain University, College and departmental requirements listed below. General University Requirements for the BIS Degree • 9 hours of English ENGL 1150 (or equivalent) - 3 Cr. Hrs. ENGL 1160 (or equivalent) - 3 Cr. Hrs. The third English requirement can be satisfied by one of the following courses: ENGL 3980 (Special Topics in Composition) ENGL 2400 (Advanced Composition) All freshmen students must take the English Diagnostic test. Courses such as English 1050, 1090, and 1100 and orientation courses in other colleges or divisions may not be counted as part of the minimum 125 credit hours in the degree program. University Division 1010 may be applied as an elective if taken in the first 30 hours of the degree program. For students testing into ENGL 1150, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied by completing ENGL 1150, ENGL 1160, and ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400. For students testing into ENGL 1160, the nine-hour requirement is satisfied

Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis
The study of Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis involves application of computers, mathematics, statistics, and other quantitative techniques in the solution of a wide variety of business problems. While computer science often concentrates on building the computer tools which make computers useful, it is information systems and quantitative analysis which specifically focuses on effectively applying these tools in the solution of everyday business problems. The discipline of information systems (IS) includes the acquisition, deployment and management of information systems resources. IS encompasses the development, implementation and management of computers, communications and data for organization-wide systems as well as departmental and individual technology systems. It also includes the responsibility for acquiring new information technology and incorporating it in the organization’s strategy, planning and practices. IS also includes the development and evolution of organizational infrastructure and systems to support organizational processes by applying methods, techniques and technology. The creation of information systems requires innovative and quality human machine systems and interfaces as well as recognition of socio-technical design issues and change management.

Integrated Undergraduate/Graduate Track
The department of Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis is pleased to offer a new Integrated Undergraduate/Graduate Track which allows dedicated students to complete the BS and in MIS undergraduate

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Required Courses (21 hours) One additional programming course (e.g. CSCI 1810, Introductory COBOL; CSCI 2840, C++ and Object Oriented Programming; CSCI 2850, Programming on the Internet; CSCI 2830, Java Programming; ISQA 4000, Special Topics; offerings that focus on programming and programming languages, CSCI 2730, Digital Computer Structures with Lab) ISQA 3210 Advanced Technologies for Personal Productivity ISQA 3300 File Structures for Information Systems ISQA 3310 Managing the Data Base Environment ISQA 3400 Business Data Communications ISQA 4110 Information Systems Analysis ISQA 4120 Systems Design and Implementation Specialization Elective Courses (12 hours) ISQA 3150 Principles of Quantitative Analysis ISQA 3250 Intermediate Quantitative Analysis ISQA 3520 Graphical User Interface Design CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy ISQA 4000 Special Topics in Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis* ISQA 4010 Business Intelligence ISQA 4100 Information Systems Architecture and Organization ISQA 4150 Advanced Statistical Methods for IT ISQA 4180 Electronic Commerce ISQA 4190 Process Re-engineering with Information Technology ISQA 4200 Applications in Service Operations ISQA 4300 Database Administration ISQA 4310 Software Maintenance and Management CIST 4360 Found. of Information Assurance CIST 4350 Tech. Systm. Admin. ISQA 4380 Distributed Technologies and Systems ISQA 4500 Special Problems in Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis ISQA 4510 Internship CIST 4540 Computer Security Management ISQA 4730 Decision Support Systems ISQA 4880 Systems Simulation and Modeling ISQA 4890 Data Warehouse and Data Mining ISQA 4900 Internet Systems Development ISQA 4910 Project Management
*Note that there are different topics covered in ISQA 4000. Check the class schedule for specific topics offered during a particular semester.

• • • • • •

by completing ENGL 1160, ENGL 3980 or ENGL 2400, and any three additional hours of English at the 2000 level or above. For students testing proficient on the English Diagnostic Test, the ninehour requirement is satisfied by completing six hours of English at the 2000 level or above and ENGL 3980 or ENGL 240 . 6 hours of mathematics - must be fulfilled by Math 1930 Calculus for the Managerial, Life and Social Sciences and Math 2040 Finite Discrete Mathematics for Information Science and Engineering 3 hours of public speaking - which must be fulfilled by SPCH 2110, 1120, 3120, 3130, or 3140 8 hours of natural sciences (including at least 1 course with a lab) 8 hours of humanities (CIST 3110-Required) 8 hours of social sciences (ECON 2200 & ECON 2220 required) 3 hours of U. S. racial or Hispanic minority cultural diversity 3 hours of international or women’s studies

For more information…
about the specific course listings of the above requirements contact the Advising office at (402) 554-3819. College of IS&T Core Courses (16 hours) The College of IS&T has developed a series of courses that is required of students wishing to obtain a degree from the college. The development and implementation of this core curriculum is unique; it serves as a basis for preparing students to enter more advanced courses. The core curriculum is as follows (students are accountable for prerequisites of courses): CSCI 1010 Foundations of IS&T....................................1 CIST 1100 Introduction to Personal Computing ...........3 CIST 1400 Introduction to Computer Programming .....3 *CIST 1404 Introduction to Computer Programming Laboratory ...................................................1 CSCI 1620 Introduction to Computer Science II ...........3 CIST 3100 Organizations, Applications and Technologies ...............................................3 CIST 2500 Intro To Applied Stats For IS&T ...................3
*Optional

Department Requirements for the BIS Degree
A minimum of 33 credit hours must be completed, including 21 hours of required courses and at least 12 hours of specialization elective courses. In addition, certain co-requisite courses must be taken, primarily from the College of Business Administration. The department also suggests selecting free electives from among the courses listed below. ISQA 3300 and ISQA 3310 should be completed during the junior year, and 4110 and 4120 should be completed during the senior year. The student must also complete the 18 hours of co-requisite courses listed. The student is also encouraged to select courses from the list of “free electives” for other courses. Courses must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for the College of Information Science & Technology.

Co-requisite Courses from the College of Business
Because the management information systems area is cross disciplinary in nature, a student needs to have an understanding of statistics, economics and business functions. These areas are covered by the following corequisite required courses: ACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 2020 Principles of Accounting II ECON 2200 Principles of Economics (Micro)** ECON 2220 Principles of Economics (Macro)** Upper-level business: select one from the following: FNBK 3250, MKT 3310, MGMT 3510 or ISQA 4910 ISQA 3420 Managing In Digital World
**ECON 2200 and ECON 2220 should be taken to satisfy the social science requirement.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Suggested Free Electives Any 3000 or 4000-level CSCI or BSAD courses

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Capstone Course (3 hours) ISQA 4380 Distributed Technologies & Systems

Internet Technologies (iT) concentration in Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems (18 hours)
The iT concentration in BIS can be earned by completing the following 18 credit hours: Core Courses (6 hours ) CSCI 2850 Programming on the Internet .......................3 CSCI 2830 Java Programming I .....................................3 Elective Courses (9 hours) A Student can select only 3 courses in consultation with the adviser CIST 2910 Multimedia Systems......................................3 CSCI 3830 Advanced Java Programming ......................3 CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy ....................3 ISQA 3310 Managing the Data Base Environment. ........3 ISQA 3400 Business Data Communications ..................3 ISQA 4300 Database Administration ..............................3 ISQA 3520 Graphical User Interface Design...................3 *ISQA 4000 Special Topics In ISQA ................................3
(Topic MUST be related to Internet Technologies. Prior approval from the Undergraduate Program Committee is required prior to taking this course.)

Decision Support & Knowledge Management Concentration
This concentration consists of 18 credit hours. Pre-Requisite Courses CIST 3100 Organizations, Applications, and Technology – IS&T Core CIST 2500 Introduction to Applied Statistics for IS&T – IS&T Core Required Courses (6 hours) ISQA 3150 Principles of Quantitative Analysis ISQA 4730 Decision Support Systems Elective Courses (9 hours) ISQA 3250 Intermediate Quantitative Analysis ISQA 4000 Special Topics in ISQA (Topic MUST be related to Decision Support and Knowledge management. Prior approval from the Undergraduate Program Committee is required prior to taking this course.) ISQA 4010 Business Intelligence course ISQA 4150 Advanced Statistical Methods for IT ISQA 4200 Applications in Service Operation ISQA 4880 Systems Simulation and Modeling Capstone Course (3 hours) ISQA 4890 Data Warehousing & Data Mining

ISQA 4180 Electronic Commerce ...................................3 ISQA 4730 Decision Support Systems. ..........................3 ISQA 4880 System Simulation and Modeling.................3 ISQA 4890 Data Warehouse and Data Mining................3 Capstone Course (3 hours) ISQA 4900 Internet Systems Development ....................3

Information Assurance Concentration information Assurance Concentration (MIS Majors)
Prerequisites CIST 1400 Introduction to Computer Programming CIST 3100 Org. Apps. & Tech. CSCI 1620 introduction to Computer Science II CSCI 1840 Advanced Topics in “C” MATH 1930 Calculus for Mgr. Life & Soc. Science MATH 2040 Finite Discrete Mathematics or MATH 2030 Discrete Mathematics ISQA 3300 File Structures for Information Systems or CSCI 3320 Data Structures Core Courses (18 credit hours) CIST 3110 Information Technology Ethics ISQA 3400 Business Data Communications or CSCI 3550 Communication Networks CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy CIST 4360 Found. of Information Assurance CIST 4370 Security Administration CIST 4540 Computer Security Management

ISQA Concentrations i-Business Application Development & Management Concentration
This concentration consists of 18 credit hours. Pre-Requisite Courses CIST 3100 Organizations, Applications, and Technology — IS&T Core ISQA 3310 Managing the Database Environment – MIS Core ISQA 4110 Information Systems Development – MIS Core ISQA 4120 Systems Design and Implementation – MIS Core Required Courses (6 hours) ISQA 4180 E-Commerce ISQA 3210 Advanced Technology for Personal Productivity Elective Courses (9 hours) CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy ISQA 3520 Graphical User Interface Design ISQA 4000 Special Topics in ISQA
(Topic MUST be related to I-Business. Prior approval from the Undergraduate Program Committee is required prior to taking this course.)

IT Audit and Control Concentration
Prerequisite Courses ACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 2020 Principles of Accounting II ISQA 3210 Adv. Tech. for Personal Prod. CIST 3100 Org. Apps. & tech., OR BSAD 3100 Management Information Systems Required courses – 9 hours CIST 3110 IT Ethics ACCT 4080 Principles of Auditing CIST 3600 Information Security and Policy

ISQA 4100 Information System Architecture and Organization ISQA 4190 Business Process Re-Engineering with Information Technology ISQA 4910 Introduction to Project Management

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Third Year First Semester ECON 2220** ..................................................................3 Additional programming course .....................................3 ISQA 3310.......................................................................3 Cultural Diversity.............................................................3 CIST 3110/Humanities....................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................15 Second Semester ISQA 3420.......................................................................3 Business Co-Req. (select one course from the following: MKT 3310, MGMT 3510, FNBK 3250 or ISQA 4910 .3 ISQA 3400.......................................................................3 ISQA Elective ..................................................................3 Natural Science...............................................................5 Semester Total ..............................................................17 Fourth Year First Semester ISQA 4110.......................................................................3 ISQA Elective ..................................................................3 ISQA Elective ..................................................................3 Natural Science...............................................................3 Electives..........................................................................1 Humanities ......................................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Semester ISQA 4120.......................................................................3 ISQA Elective ..................................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................4 Social Sciences...............................................................3 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Total Hours for BIS Degree ...........................................125
**ECON 2200 and ECON 2220 should be taken to satisfy the social science requirement.

Elective Courses – 6 hours
(Note: This list of electives is not exhaustive. Students can take other courses as electives in consultation with their undergraduate adviser).

ACCT 4060 Advanced Managerial Accounting ACCT 4090 Advanced Auditing ACCT 4000 Special Topics in Accounting
(Topic MUST be related to IT Audit and Control. Prior approval from the ISQA department is required to use this course in the concentration.)

ISQA 4000

Special Topics in ISQA

(Topic MUST be related to IT Audit and Control. Prior approval from the ISQA department is required to use this course in the concentration.)

ISQA 4500

Independent Study in ISQA

(Independent Study Topic MUST be related to IT Audit and Control. Prior approval from the department is required to use this course in the concentration.)

ISQA 4510

Internship in ISQA

(Internship experience must be directly related to IT Audit and Control. Prior approval from the ISQA department is required to use this course in the IT Audit and Control concentration.)

ISQA 4190 ISQA 4910

Process Reengineering with IT Introduction to Project Management

Capstone Course – 3 hours ISQA 4590 IS/T Audit and Control

Suggested Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems
First Year First Semester MATH 1930 .....................................................................3 CIST 1010 .......................................................................1 CIST 1100 .......................................................................3 English 1150 ...................................................................3 Public Speaking ..............................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................1 Semester Total ..............................................................14 Second Semester CIST 3100 .......................................................................3 CIST 1400 .......................................................................3 English 1160 ...................................................................3 Humanities ......................................................................3 Cultural Diversity.............................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................1 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Year First Semester MATH 2040 .....................................................................3 CSCI 1620.......................................................................3 English 3980 ...................................................................3 ACCT 2010 .....................................................................3 Elective ...........................................................................4 Semester Total ..............................................................16 Second Semester CIST 2500 .......................................................................3 ISQA 3300.......................................................................3 ECON 2200 .....................................................................3 ACCT 2020 .....................................................................3 ISQA 3210 Adv. Tech. For Personal Productivity............3 Semester Total ..............................................................15

Minor in Management Information Systems
A minor in management information systems may be obtained by completing ISQA 3210, ISQA 3310 and ISQA 4110, plus three hours of upper-division information systems and quantitative analysis courses in management information systems. A grade of "C-" or better is required in each course applied toward this minor in management information systems. Required Courses (9 hours) ISQA 3210 Adv. Tech. For Personal Productivity* ISQA 3310 Managing the Database Environment* ISQA 4110 Information Systems Analysis*
*These courses also count toward the major in management information systems

Suggested Electives (3 hours) Any other ISQA 3000 or ISQA 4000 level course

Minor in Management Information Systems for Accounting Majors
The following five courses have been approved by the departments of ISQA and Accounting as specifically relevant to students in the accounting area. The prerequisites are consistent with course requirements of accounting students.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
ISQA 3210 Adv. Tech. For Personal Productivity
Prerequisite: CIST 1100 or CSCI 1000

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ISQA 3310 Managing the Database Environment.
Prerequisite: BSAD 3100/CIST 3100 & ISQA 3210 (co-requisite)

ISQA 3400 Business Data Communications.
Prerequisite: BSAD 3100/CIST 3100

ISQA 4110 Information Systems Analysis
Prerequisite: BSAD 3100/CIST 3100, ISQA 3210, & ISQA 3310 (co-requisite)

ISQA 4120 System Design and Implementation.
Prerequisite: ISQA 3210, ISQA 3310, & ISQA 4110

Integrated Undergraduate/Graduate Track (IUG) in Management Information Systems The IUG MIS program of Study
The IUG track is a 152- hour undergraduate-graduate option that allows eligible students to work towards the MS in MIS degree requirements while completing their undergraduate degree. Students interested in this option will work closely with an adviser and a faculty mentor to develop an integrated plan of study.

with a faculty mentor who knows their background and can champion their application to the IUG track. 5. All applicants will need to meet any other admission requirements established for the MS in MIS program. Other Requirements: • The application to the IUG track will be considered as a complete package and therefore obtaining a high UGPA and/or GMAT/GRE Score is not a guarantee of admission. • Students are allowed to apply up to 9 hour of ISQA 8xx5 or ISQA 8xx6 courses towards the undergraduate degree.

For more information…
please call (402) 554-3819.

Second Baccalaureate Degree
A student, who has met the degree requirements for a BS in MIS at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, must complete a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at the university for a different (second) degree. In particular, students interested in also obtaining a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree should check early in their academic career with an adviser. This can significantly reduce the number of hours needed to accomplish this task. ISQA, in conjunction with the College of Business Administration has developed a set of courses, which can satisfy requirements in each college. The two baccalaureate degrees may be awarded simultaneously when the student becomes eligible to receive them.

General Guidelines:
Time of admission to the program: Students will be eligible for admission to the integrated degree program when they have completed their junior year in the College of IS&T. Students can apply for consideration in the last part of their junior year. Student will start taking courses in the graduate program in their senior year. Joint admission: Students must apply to and meet admission requirement of the MS in MIS graduate program. Plan of Study: In consultation with an adviser and a faculty mentor, students will be required to prepare a plan of study. The plan will cover the entire time period of the program and it will be periodically reviewed with an adviser. Advising: Students will present their portfolio and a plan of study in person to the integrated program committee prior to being admitted to the program. Tuition charges: Students will be required to pay graduate tuition rates when taking graduate courses.

Honors Program
The ISQA Department will periodically offer special topics courses for Honors credit.

Other College Information
Catalog Choice A student registering in the College of Information Science and Technology for the first time will work with an adviser to develop a matriculation form based on the current printed catalog. The matriculation form used to develop a plan of study for students in the College will be the primary source for a student’s most current academic plan provided the student has continuous enrollment. It is important for all new and current students to seek undergraduate advising to establish as early as possible a matriculation form that outlines their plan of study. The College reserves the right to institute and make effective, after due notice, during the course of a student's work towards a degree, any new ruling which may be necessary for the general good of the College, and to substitute courses currently offered for those no longer offered. It is the responsibility of each student admitted to the College of Information Science and Technology to become familiar with the procedures and regulations in the Undergraduate catalog and program brochure. Academic Advising The College of IS&T's Academic Undergraduate Advising office recognizes that students have individual academic, career and sometimes personal needs which might require special assistance. Following are some

Admission Requirements and Procedures
1. Students with Junior standing and at least 85-90 hours of completed coursework in their undergraduate degree program may apply for admission consideration into the integrated undergraduate/graduate (IUG) track. 2. At the time of application, a student must have a GPA in their major area greater than or equal to 3.90 and an overall GPA of 3.75 or above. 3. Interested students will be required to present a “portfolio” of the following credentials. Whenever possible, candidate students will be required to present their “portfolio” in a presentation to the IUG Selection Committee. • Three letters of recommendations, at least two from faculty. • Statement of intent---a personal statement about why the student wishes to apply for the IUG track. • Undergraduate transcripts • GMAT or GRE Scores • Other supporting documents (e.q., projects and papers, software, work experience, etc.) should be included where possible. 4. Students are highly encourages to identify and work

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INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
College of Information Science and Technology Honors Program is to provide a challenging opportunity to dedicated students in an effort to broaden their abilities. In order to meet the graduation requirements of the UNO Honors Program aspiring students may choose from the two options: • Option I shall be known as University Honors with Distinction and will require 30 hours of Honors work and thesis. The recommended Curriculum is for students to take 6 to 9 hours of Honors work each of the first two years and 6 hours each of the last two years. • Of the total hours, 6 hours should be colloquia; 3-6 hours should be Thesis/Creative Activity/Departmental Capstone with contract. Up to 9 hours of AP can be used, and up to six hours can be TAG, Internship, or similar activity. • Participants who complete a minimum of 30 hours credit in Honors Program work (with a 3.5 GPA or higher) and whose overall GPA is as determined by the appropriate college, will have the notation “University Honors Program” printed on their diplomas, on the official transcript of credits and in the graduation program. Theses titles will also be printed in the Commencement Program. • Option ll shall be known as University Honors and will require 24 hours of Honors Work and no Thesis. The recommended curriculum is for students to take 6 to 9 hours of Honors work the first year and 6 hours each the last three years. Of the total 24 hours 6 hours must consist of two colloquia; there may be 3 to 6 hours of Internship, TAG, Service Learning, or Tutoring. Up to 6 hours of AP credit may be accepted. • Participants who complete a minimum of 24 hours credit in Honors Program work (with a 3.5 GPA or higher) and whose overall GPA of 3.50, will have the notation “University Honors Program” printed on the official transcript of credits and in the graduation program. This option may not be available in all colleges. The IS&T Honors Program is a part of the University Honors Program. All students entering or enrolled in good standing in the College of Information Science and Technology may be considered for membership to the CIST Honors Program. Students on their own initiative may apply for admission or they may be invited to apply by the Program Director. The minimum requirement for admission to the CIS&T Honors Program is: 1. For entering Freshmen: A composite ACT score of 26 or above. 2. For transfer and current students: A cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or above for at least twelve credit hours at UNO. Applicants must submit an Honors Program application and return it to the Honors Program Office. The application can be obtained at the Honors Program Office. The Program Coordinator retains the application for his/her records and returns an acceptance/rejection to the Honors Program. If more specific information is desired, contact the Academic Advising Office at (402) 554-3819.

guidelines on how your academic adviser can help you. To ensure better service, students are strongly encouraged to make and appointment to meet with their adviser. What do the advisers do? The advisers can explain the rules and requirements for the IS&T programs and help you figure out how they apply to your situation. The adviser will actually prepare your records so that you meet all the requirements for the degree in the "final audit" process. The chairs of each program will then sign off on your record. The most useful thing the advisers can do is provide advice about what degree program specific courses, or scheduling would be most helpful to you. They can also help with difficult situations in which you have a concern with your grades, course instruction, time management, scheduling conflicts, or other academic issues you might have with your courses and the program. When should I see an adviser? During your freshman and sophomore year, you are required to check with your adviser every semester. After that, it's a good idea to check in with your adviser at least once per year, to make sure that your record is up-to-date and to catch any problems early. Seniors are required to schedule a meeting for a senior check Dean’s List A full time student will be placed on the Dean’s List with a semester GPA of 3.5 or better. A part time student will be placed on the Dean’s List after having completed 12 hours of semester coursework with a GPA of 3.5 or better. Once a part-time student is placed on the Dean’s List, the accumulation of the 12 hours starts over. No SPU’s (special undergraduates/second degree seeking) or Graduate Students can be on the Dean’s List. Senior Check After students reach 91 hours of coursework completed, they must request a senior check to be done by their academic adviser. Assuming satisfactory completion of all approved courses, this process will assure the student’s graduation date. Should this procedure not be followed, responsibility for meeting graduation requirements falls on the student, if errors are made they can prevent graduation at the anticipated date. Application for Degree Each student who expects to receive a diploma must file an application for degree. The application for degree is available online via the Web by logging into E-BRUNO. Announcements about deadline dates are posted upon bulletin boards and printed in the Gateway. It is the responsibility of the students to inform the Registrar’s Office of their graduation plans including their address and the manner in which they are completing their requirements. Failure to meet these stipulations may necessitate postponement of graduation until the next semester. Honors Program The College of Information Science and Technology (CIST) actively supports the University of Nebraska at Omaha University Honors Program. The purpose of the

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INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Challenge Program The College of Information Science and Technology is committed to a complimentary CIST Challenge Program that extends the opportunities for student enrichment and autonomous learning experiences to all CIST students whether or not the student is formally enrolled in the University Honors Program. The CIST Challenge Program encourages the development of these opportunities throughout all disciplines within the college. This multifaceted program spans the learning spectrum of exploration, investigation, and in-depth studies through innovative, student-centered strategies integrating academics, research, and service experiences. The goal of the CIST Challenge Program is to facilitate our students’ achievement of the highest levels of excellence possible to include the essential skills for effective life-long learning. Each CIST faculty is a willing mentor who will encourage students to investigate and pursue the opportunities available through the Honors and Challenge Programs. CIST faculty may develop an Honors section within the courses they teach in accordance with the University Honors Program guidelines and faculty have the option to include other participants based on student interests and qualifications. The college goal is to offer Honors sections and Challenge options for as many CIST core courses as possible and to encourage similar goals throughout the college disciplines. CIST faculty may also offer Honors contracts with interested students in accordance with the University Honors Program guidelines and they may develop similar Challenge Program contracts with CIST students to foster and facilitate the pursuit of in-depth studies in areas of specific student passions. CIST faculty may also sponsor CIST student participation in Challenge Program research activities commensurate with student skills and learning objectives. They may also provide opportunities for student involvement in Challenge Program out-reach and community service-oriented learning experiences. This aspect may be associated with Challenge Program research opportunities and may include the role of more advanced students serving as mentors for their lessexperienced fellow students. CIST is committed to seek and pursue additional avenues to facilitate and recognize our students’ Challenge Program achievement of autonomous learning skills and life-long excellence. There is a continuing effort to develop appropriate procedures to implement and support the efforts of both students and faculty in pursuing the goals of the CIST Challenge Program. For more information contact the Academic Advising Office at (402) 554-3819.

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UNO, UNL or UNK with a GPA of 2.5 or better 2. A student may remove 1 or 2 consecutive semesters (does not have to be 1st and 2nd) from UNO, UNL or UNK 3. Must be removed 4 years from the semester or year to be deleted 5. If the committee agrees, those courses that were completed with “C-” or better may count toward hours for graduation 6. Student may not graduate with academic honors. Appeals for Course Grades Students who wish to appeal a grade which they feel was erroneously given shall first discuss the matter with the instructor and/ or the department chairperson. If a satisfactory agreement cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the Office of the Dean within 30 days of receipt of the grade report from the Registrar’s Office. The Academic Evaluation Committee of the College of Information Science and Technology will hold a hearing to make a final determination based on the facts presented. Appeals for Academic Suspension Appeals of Academic suspension must be filed in writing with the Academic Advising Office. After an appeal is properly filed, implementation of suspension is delayed until a decision is made. Students must fill out appropriate paperwork in the Advising Office and a temporary release is filed with the Registrar’s Office with the student’s understanding that if the appeal is denied, they will be dropped from their classes and tuition but not fees will be refunded.

For more information…
contact the Academic Advising Office at (402) 554-3819.

Academic Amnesty and Appeals
The following policies shall apply to academic amnesty, appeals of course grades and appeals of academic suspension. Academic Amnesty In order to petition for Academic Amnesty, the student must meet the following conditions: 1. Have completed 24 semester hours (12 semester hours if the student is part-time) of coursework at

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for determining the required number of credit hours in the areas of English, humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, mathematics and oral communications. English Proficiency Exam: Students transferring English composition courses equivalent to the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s English 1150 or 1160 to the College of Public Affairs and Community Service from other accredited institutions of higher education with a grade of “C” or better will be given credit for their transfer hours and will not be required to take the English Placement Examination. Students entering College for the first time, transfer students with no English composition transfer hours, and transfer students who earned grades of “D” or lower in English composition courses will be required to take the English Placement Examination. Students who transfer six hours of English coursework (equivalent to English 1150 and 1160) with a grade of “C” or better will be considered to have fulfilled the UNO freshman English requirements and will be considered proficient in English. This policy does not replace, but is supplemental to specific English requirements of the individual units of the College of Public Affairs and Community Service. NOTE: Because the above described English policy is a unique offering through the UNO English department, academic programs of the College based on a campus other than Omaha are currently excepted from this policy. Major Field: each student must present a major including at least 15 credit hours of upper division work designated as appropriate by the faculty of the department in which enrolled. A candidate meeting the requirements of each of two fields may present a double major in these fields. Individual departments should be consulted for the number of upper division hours required. Acceptability of Credits: the student should refer all questions concerning the acceptability of credits earned in programs such as Cooperative Education and Credit by Examination to the department in which enrolled. Credit earned in courses below the 1000 level may not be applied toward the degree offered by the College of Public Affairs and Community Service. Each student must satisfy the UNO general education core requirements. Prerequisite Courses: completion of a course within the major with a grade below a “C-” will not be considered as having fulfilled prerequisite requirements for additional courses taken in the major field of study. A higher grade may be designated by the department/unit.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Public Affairs and Community Service (CPACS) offers undergraduate coursework leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in aviation, criminal justice, social work, and urban studies. The Division of Continuing Studies administers the Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree. In addition to its four undergraduate degree programs, CPACS offers courses in the field of aviation, gerontology and public administration; the Goodrich program, a specialized scholarship program for students with marked financial need; and credit for specialized areas of independent study which may be developed in conjunction with other UNO Colleges or governmental units. The College also offers graduate programs in aviation, criminal justice, gerontology, public administration, social work and urban studies. The goal of CPACS is to make available to the student an interdisciplinary program based on classroom learning, research, and community service. Students will be expected to participate in each of these activities.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
Students who have been admitted to the University may apply for entrance to the College of Public Affairs and Community Service during initial registration by indicating their preference in the appropriate place on the University Application for Admission form. The Division of Continuing Studies has different admissions requirements. Refer to the section “Division of Continuing Studies” on page 196 for admission requirements. Students who wish to transfer into the College from one of the Schools or Colleges within the University must request permission from the Dean’s Office and the department offering the student’s intended major. A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is required to transfer into the College. The College does not accept undeclared students. Exceptions to this rule are made where the student can demonstrate by written request substantial reasons for undeclared status. Permission must be granted by the Dean of the College.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
• Total hours: each candidate must present a total of at least 125 credit hours of college credit to meet graduation requirements. • Quality of work: each candidate for the degree must attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 (“C”) in all college work, including work transferred from other institutions. A grade of at least “C-” must be earned in all required courses within the major, unless a higher grade is designated by the department/unit. All grades reported by the faculty to the Registrar become a part of the student’s permanent record and are included in the computation of the grade point average, even though some of these grades may be for work done in excess of the 125 hours required for graduation. • Residence: thirty of the last 36 hours required for the degree must be registered for and carried within the University of Nebraska System. • Area requirements: each department is responsible • •

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE
Refer to the section “Division of Continuing Studies” on page 196 for B.G.S. requirements.

THE GOODRICH SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
The Goodrich Scholarship Program was started in 1972 with funds from the Nebraska State Legislature. It is

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designed to provide scholarship funds and supportive services for students with financial need. The overall intent of the Program is to provide a college education for persons who might otherwise find college difficult to afford, while offering them a broad and meaningful experience in general education. The students it has served have displayed a wide range of academic ability. From those who, in spite of strong motivation, have yet to fulfill their full academic potential, to those who are already highly skilled and can help create a stimulating learning environment for their fellow students. The Program has a three-pronged approach. It provides • financial aid in the form of tuition and fees toward a bachelor’s degree; • a specialized curriculum emphasizing the humanities and the social sciences via a multicultural perspective; and • a comprehensive program of academic support, counseling, and other related student services.

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Application Procedures
In order to be considered for the Goodrich Program, a candidate must meet each of the following requirements. 1. The applicant must be admitted as soon as possible to the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Our receipt of official financial aid information is delayed if applicants don’t apply for admission quickly. In order to be admitted to the University of Nebraska at Omaha an applicant must: a. Submit an admission application, an official high-school transcript, along with a $45.00 application fee to the UNO Admissions Office, and b. Take the American College Test (ACT) and have scores sent to the UNO Admissions Office unless the university does not require the student to take this test, and c. Receive an official Certificate of Admission from the UNO Admissions Office when the admission process is complete. 2. The applicant must complete a Goodrich application and submit it to the Goodrich Program Office no later than February 15. 3. The applicant must ask two different individuals to complete and submit the Personal Reference Form to the Goodrich Program Office. Teachers, counselors, and employers are appropriate people to ask for references. 4. In order to be eligible for the scholarship, the student must establish financial need as determined by the UNO Financial Aid Office by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) between January 1 and March 1. In order to get an ESTIMATE of financial need, the student must complete the College Funding Estimator, which Goodrich will send shortly after the application has been submitted. 5. The applicant must take the English Placement/Proficiency Exam (EPPE) scheduled by the UNO Testing Center (554-4800) AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, BUT NO LATER THAN MARCH. See

your counselor, or call UNO’s Testing Center (5544800) for registration dates. 6. The applicant must arrange for a photocopy of the high-school or G,E,D, transcript to be sent to the Goodrich Program Office. (G.E.D. transcripts may be ordered from the Nebraska State Department of Education.) This is in addition to the official transcript that must be sent to UNO’s Admission Office. 7. The Applicant must also have ACT scores sent to the Goodrich Program. If ACT scores are currently attached to the applicant’s high school transcripts, separate ACT scores are not necessary. 8. Only after applicants have completed steps 1-7 will the Goodrich Program Office consider their files complete. Applicants with complete files will undergo a screening process. The screening process will determine which applicants will be scheduled for personal interviews. Final selection of Goodrich scholars will then be made on a competitive basis. No interviews will be scheduled prior to the February 15 deadline. Applicants who receive a Nebraska State Regents or NU-Paths scholarship are not eligible for the Goodrich Scholarship. Questions should be directed to the UNO Office of Financial Aid..

For more information…
please call (402) 554-2274

CENTER FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS RESEARCH
The Center for Public Affairs Research (CPAR) is the major research component of the College of Public Affairs and Community Service. The Center has a full-time professional staff conducting research on a broad range of current community problems and issues of local, regional, state and national concern. CPAR also administers a program of student research internship in conjunction with the departments of the College. CPACS students are invited to serve research internships at the Center in order to gain applied research experience. Students find CPAR a valuable resource for class projects and papers on urban and public affairs topics.

Labor Studies
The William Brennan Institute for Labor Studies provides continuing education for a specialized audience. The Institute serves the labor movement state-wide by helping to develop citizenship and leadership. Through educational programs, individual workers gain the knowledge and skills that will equip them to be effective leaders in a democratic labor movement in a democratic society. For more information, call 402/595-2343 or email webmaster@unomaha.edu.

OTHER INFORMATION Academic Advisement
The aim and purpose of academic advising is to assist students in meeting the requirements of the degree program and in interpreting College policy regarding academic requirements. In CPACS, academic advising is conducted at the departmental level.

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reached the students must appeal, in writing, to the department/school curriculum committee. If a satisfactory agreement cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the Office of the Dean within 20 working days of the exhaustion of the departmental procedures. The Committee on Academic Standards and Curriculum for the College of Public Affairs and Community Service is the official body for handling the appeal. In the event the instructor is unavailable for handling a grade complaint, the student will meet with the department Chair and the Dean to determine the most appropriate course of action agreeable to all parties. Copies of the CPACS Procedures for Student Grades and Suspension Appeals are available from the Chair of the Committee on Academic Standards and Curriculum for the College and the Office of the Dean.

Students should see an academic adviser whenever questions arise concerning their programs. Students are encouraged to seek advisement with their assigned academic adviser prior to registering each semester. At a minimum, students should seek advisement with their academic adviser at least one time each year; in particular when registering for the senior year.

Academic Amnesty Policy
Students after one full year of successful work at UNO (at least two consecutive semesters of 12 hours each with a 2.5 GPA) or four consecutive semesters (may include summer semester) with a total of 24 or more hours and with at least a GPA of 2.5 or better may petition the CPACS Committee on Academic Standards and Curriculum for removal of all work taken during either or both of the first two semesters. This petition is subject to the following stipulations: • The student shall be at least three years removed from the semester or year to be deleted. • The student is responsible for initiation of the petition. • This petition is to come through the student’s counselor or academic adviser, to the Committee on Academic Standards and Curriculum and then to the Dean for final action. • Individuals who apply under this rule may not be considered for degrees with honor at graduation. • There shall be no physical obliteration of any part of the student’s record.

Honors Program
The CPACS Honors Program provides expanded educational opportunities for highly motivated students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. All students entering or enrolled in any undergraduate program within CPACS may apply for membership to the CPACS Honors Program. The Division of Continuing Studies has its own Honors Program; refer to the section “Division of Continuing Studies” on page 196. Honors credits are earned by contracting courses with instructors; such courses require additional assignments. All existing CPACS courses may carry honors credit by means of contract. If interested please contact the CPACS Honors Coordinator or see an academic adviser.

Choice of Catalog Policy
A student registering in the College of Public Affairs and Community Service for the first time may, except for the limitations described below, complete work for the degree according to the requirements of: • the catalog in effect the year the student enters the College; or • the catalog current at the time the student applies for the degree. Students entering the College for the first time in the summer will be subject to the catalog for the academic year immediately following. Failure to complete the requirements for the degree within seven years after the date the student first enters the College will subject the student to graduation under the requirements of a later catalog to be approved by the Dean. The College reserves the right to institute and make effective, after due notice, during the course of a student’s work toward a degree, any new ruling which may be necessary for the general good of the College and to substitute courses currently offered for those no longer offered. The Division of Continuing Studies has its own catalog policy. Refer to the section “Division of Continuing Studies” on page 196 for catalog requirements.

Dean’s List
Students enrolled in the College of Public Affairs and Community Service who maintain a GPA of 3.5 or better while carrying 12 hours or more of graded coursework will earn the distinction of being placed on the Dean’s Honor List at the end of each semester. These students are honored by the University and the College annually at the Honors Day Program, which is usually held during the spring semester.

AVIATION INSTITUTE, SCHOOL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
The University of Nebraska at Omaha Aviation Institute (UNOAI) is committed to providing undergraduate students with a quality education in aviation. This dedicated effort is directed toward aiding the United States in retaining its world aviation leadership. In addition, the Aviation Institute strives to maintain and support local and national aviation/aerospace systems, promote the development of improved systems, and increase the awareness and knowledge of aviation among the general public. Faculty and students are provided the opportunity to participate in research and community service that will contribute to the accomplishment of this mission. The demand for well trained people will increase as the aviation industry undergoes major expansion in the years ahead. The Aviation Institute is responding to these local, state, regional, national and international aviation needs by offering a comprehensive aviation education. The aviation curriculum consists of courses in airline operations, aviation meteorology, airport master planning, aviation safety,

Grade Appeals Procedure
Students who wish to appeal a grade which they feel was capriciously or prejudicially given shall first discuss the matter with the instructor within 30 days of the final course grade being posted. If the matter is not resolved, the student must meet with the department/school Chair/Director. If a satisfactory agreement cannot be

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE
aviation administration, aviation law, aviation history, numerous flight courses and more. The UNOAI program will prepare students to receive a bachelors degree in aviation that will qualify them for several different positions in areas such as airline management/marketing and administration, airport planning and administration, commercial pilot, environmental and regional planning, airline education and training, etc. In addition, transfer programs exist with many regional colleges and include the opportunity for avionics, airframe, and powerplant certification. The Aviation Institute is a division of the department of public administration in the College of Public Affairs and Community Service (CPACS). Please refer to the CPACS general requirements. It is important for all students to review the “Core Curriculum of All Colleges” section in this catalog for the University’s general education requirements. Mission Statement: The Aviation Institute maintains preeminent standing in collegiate aviation through the provision of superior education, research, service, and community engagement initiatives. The Institute advocates the continuous development of aviation and aerospace while enhancing safety and the overall integration of the broader transportation system. Goals: 1. Provide an academic program that emphasizes the public and private sector interface between the airport, fixed-base service provider(s), air carrier industry, and public regulatory environments. 2. Provide a professional pilot program that incorporates leading edge technology and state-ofthe-art educational practices. 3. Contribute to the advancement of aviation and aerospace through internationally recognized research and externally funded programs. 4. Promote increased awareness and knowledge of aviation among the general public through many service programs and community engagement opportunities Elements of the Aviation Institute: A high-quality aviation undergraduate program focused on aviation administration and a state-of-the-art flight training program.

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Humanities and Fine Arts..............................................12 Natural & Physical Sciences .........................................13 Behavioral and Social Sciences....................................12 Aviation Major Core ......................................................24 Air Transport Administration Specialization ..................27 Electives........................................................................28 Total .................................................................................125

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AVIATION, CONCENTRATION IN PROFESSIONAL FLIGHT. (BAV, AVN) COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Courses include a comprehensive general studies program outlined by the College of Public Affairs and Community Service, a core of aviation courses, flight training from the Private Pilot Certificate to the Certified Flight Instructor Certificate and beyond, and electives. General Degree Requirements Area Credit Hours English ............................................................................9 Humanities and Fine Arts..............................................12 Natural & Physical Sciences .........................................13 Behavioral and Social Sciences....................................12 Aviation Major Core ......................................................24 Professional Flight Specialization .................................29 Electives........................................................................26 Total .................................................................................125

Expected Academic Performance
For purposes of meeting general education requirements, distribution requirements, and prerequisite requirements for courses, a grade of “C-” performs the role of a grade of “C”, and a grade of “D-” performs the role of a grade of “D”. A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) must be earned in each of the required courses within the major area of study.

AIR TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION
The Air Transport Administration area of concentration is conferred under the Bachelor of Science in Aviation (B.A.V.) degree program. This option is oriented toward the public/private sector interface of individuals looking for administration careers. Potential career opportunities exist within the Federal Aviation Administration, Transportation Security Administration, National Transportation Safety Board, state aviation organizations, local and regional aviation organizations, airport administration, fixed-based operators, aviation consulting firms, airline operations, flight department operations, aircraft manufacturing companies, aviation marketing firms, and non-profit organizations such as Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association, National Business Aviation Association, and the Experimental Aircraft Association. The Air Transport Administration specialization gives the student the opportunity to gain knowledge in several aspects of the aviation and aerospace industry. Students will take specific classes in areas of general aviation, airport planning, statistical analysis, security, and airline operations. Students will also have the opportunity to become involved in an internship or cooperative education experience. This experience will expose students to working in an area that relates to their potential career path; both local and national programs are available. Students who are looking to work in these highly competitive and regulated areas should choose the Air

Accreditation
The UNO Aviation Institute’s Bachelor of Science in Public Administration- aviation administration specialization is accredited by the Council on Aviation Accreditation.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AVIATION, CONCENTRATION IN AIR TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION. (BAV, AVN) COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The curriculum includes a comprehensive general studies program outlined by the College of Public Affairs and Community Service, a core of aviation courses, specialized courses in air transport administration, and electives. General Degree Requirements Area Credit Hours English ............................................................................9

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FOR NON-TRADITIONAL AND TRANSFER STUDENTS
As an alternative for non-traditional and transfer students 21 years of age or older, the Division of Continuing Studies offers the Aviation Administration and Aviation Studies areas of concentration in the Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree program. This program provides maximum opportunity for the acceptance of transfer credits. Students entering this program with Federal Aviation Administration pilot or maintenance certificates or qualified military training courses may receive academic credit for prior experience. It is important for all students to review the “Core Curriculum of All Colleges” section in this catalog for the university’s general education requirements. See the Aviation Institute academic adviser to determine if this option is best suited for your needs. A specialized transfer program in avionics, aircraft maintenance, and preaviation is available through agreements with Western Nebraska and Iowa Western Community Colleges.

Transport Administration specialization program for their course of study.

PROFESSIONAL FLIGHT CONCENTRATION
The Aviation Institute offers flight training from private pilot to certified flight instructor. Flight training is closely coordinated through local flight schools. Students who successfully complete any of the training under UNO requirements courses will receive appropriate academic credit. Students who plan on enrollment in a flight training course should be able to successfully complete a second class aviation medical examination conducted by an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner accordance with Federal Aviation Regulation Part 67, Medical Standards and Certification. Flight costs are paid directly to the flight provider where you conduct your training and are in addition to regular University tuition and fees. Approximate costs for flight training are available in the Aviation Student Handbook. Costs for each training phase are based on the average number of hours required by the FAA for that particular phase. If a student requires additional flying or ground training to complete a particular training phase course, the student will be obligated to pay for the extra training. Additional financial aid is available for flight training, but does not cover 100% of flight training costs. Flight training schedules are arranged by the student and flight instructor at each flight center. Students are responsible for contacting the flight training provider and establishing a schedule that will allow for completion of course requirements within the time allowed. It is suggested that students plan to fly three times a week. Instructors are available day, night, and weekends. For a current list of flight providers, see the Aviation Institute Web site at ai.unomaha.edu. Consult with an aviation academic adviser for additional information.

NASA NEBRASKA SPACE GRANT CONSORTIUM
The Aviation Institute is home to the NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC), a part of the NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The primary goal of the program is to strengthen the future workforce in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. NASA fellowships are competitively awarded to undergraduate and graduate students across Nebraska participating in STEM research or workforce development activities. Some of the programs funded by