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best left to the reader. A word of warningmaybe sounded.

Personally I am veryfond of letters,but any large collection


read en masse is apttocreate a false impression. A recipient
gets his own, at intervals. T h e write; knows this. ' But, and
this is especially true when there is any marked idiosyncrasy of
style or pose o r even whimsy, a great number read at once tends
tooveremphasize the mere idiosyncrasies, andtogivea
somewhatunfairandfalse
impression. A reading of theseletters
in my mind the oldquestion of
and of the"Education"raises
what is the best presentation of any man-his letters, his autobiography, or a biography? In Adarns's case I am inclined to
thinkthatthegenuineportraitawaitsthebiographer,butthe
subject will test a man's qualbties to the utmost as gentleman
and scholar. The motto over the dark portal in Dante may well
be pondered by others.MeanwhileMr.Ford,who
is so eminently both, has given those of us who are interested in one of
the most significant personalities in American life and letters a
volumecomparableinimportanceonlytothe"Education"
itself.
JAMES TRUSLOW
ADAMS

Introducing Franz Kafka

THE COMING O F THE WAR: 1914


by BERNADOlTE
Hlstory

E. SCHMITT,

edrtor of

the

Journal of Modern

A n exhaustive and critical study, the fullest yet written in


any language, OF the five weeks from Sarajevo to the outbreak of the W o r l d
War. "Wlthoutquestlon one of the major achlevements OF American
A n epochal and authoritative study. The tone of auhrstorians.
by careful detailed analysis of every
thority is kept throughout.
E. Shotwell, Columbra Unrver~/ty.
scrap OF evidence avallable."--Jarnes
Two volumes, boxed, $10.00

. ..

..

THE PATH TO PEACE


by

NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER,

President of Columbia Unrversiry

OF

essays and addresses on international peace contams, with other Important statements, President Butler's notable address before the Relchstag in Berlm and the text OF the annual Richard Cobden lecture.
$9.50

This volume

THE REALM O F MATTER


by GEORGE SANTAYANA

T h e C d s t k . By FranzKafka.TranslatedfromtheGerman

The Second Volume of the Series, "The Realms of Being"

Santayana here comes to grtp wtththe actual, cause-and-effect world,


end, In hls famous poetical prose, reveals the terms upon which our
imaginative life can flourish by the side OF the inevitable materlal
compulsions.
$3.50

A. Knopf. $2.50.
by EdwinandWillaMuir.Alfred
N timemuch is sureto be written of FranzKafka,for
he is inevitably sure of a place, if only on the strength of
this posthumous unfinished novel,
among
the foremost
writers of our time. On the occasion of his introductionto
the American public, however, one can hopesimply to recomof thatdiscriminatingminorityto
mendhimtotheattention
whom essentially his appeal is limited and who will eventually
construct his fame for him.
I n the first place, it is difficult to do more than recommend
"TheCastle,'' because time and manyrereadings a3e required
a few pages oneappreclatesthatits
tounderstandit.After
village which in
hero,known simply as K., hasarrivedata
spite of its inns andtelephones
is timeless andunreal;that
,-he castle vhich towers above the village is not a castle at all;
that K.'s desire-and inability-to
reachthecastlearethe
expression of areligiousstruggleanddefeat;thatthe
endless
minutiae of his relations with castle "officials" constitute by
no means asatire on bureaucracy, asthey might seem to do,
butareinstead
a minutelyexact description of certain theoof
logical realities which demand anextraordinaryamount
patienceanddelicacy
to be 'perceived. And a i the end of the
book one is so unusually impressed by its solidity of conception
andexecutionthatalthoughitsinnermeaning
is still not
entirely d e a r , one feels that with time and
reflectionone could
come toanunderstanding
of everyportion
of itsri&
and
intricate symbolism.
"TheCastle,"then,
is anallegory;butit
is also a remarkably bold, orig'inal, confident, well-madework of art. Its
symbolism is by no meanscut-and-dried,butalwaysconcrete
and mysterious. Its mysteriousness,moreover,bearsasubtle
of the predicament in which the
relation to the mysteriousness
hero finds himself. K. comes to the village a stranger,and
discovers that everyone is familiar with the laws of the castle,
and resigned tothem, excepthimself. He has t o learn each of
them painfully fromtheregularinhabitants.
No obedience is
is given no orders;he
coqmanded of him by the castle-he
is evenprovided for and cheered on-but after a while, of his
own free will, he begins to desire to lose his independence and
t o obey. Slowlyherelinquishesall
hope of everreachingthe
castle, and seeksonly to find a place andacalling for himself
in the village. H e camethereto
be alandsurveyor,but
he
is willingtostay
on as thejanitor
of the school. (In his

JOHN MARSH,
PIQNBER
by

GEORGE D. LYMAN

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JOHN D E W

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lustrated.

412

T h e Nation

-v0

L.

..J .L,

U.

excellent postscript Herr Max Brod, Kafkas literary executor,


remarksthattheprimitive
need to be rooted in a homeand
a calling, andto become amember of acommunityhadfor
Ilafka a religious significance, being simply therightlife,
of K.s
the right way.) There is not space to telltherest
history, but, briefly, The Castle might be described as the
of the perceptions of a soul.
record of alifeinterms
Biography
Perhaps the mostInteresting and valuable message ofthis
religious novel, so decidedly a product of the twentieth century,
TUNDRA
By THE EDINGTONS
is that of humility. With what relentless a r t is this unpopular
T h e experiences of U. S. Deputy Marshal Hansen of
theme developed anddriven home! So sternly is the godless
Alaska-a great story of dogs and a man on Alaskan
modernreaderreminded
of K.s irremediable lowliness (and
trails.
$2.50
his own)thatmorethan
once, caught helplessly in anet of
disagreeabletruth, he actually loseshis temper. There was a
GIANTS of the OLD WEST
fine balance in Kafkabetween the artistandthemoralist.
B y FREDERIGE R,B E U W O L T
Perhapsitshould
be statedthatKafkawas
a GermanBohemianJew,and
died of tuberculosisin 1925 a t theage of
Sketches of colorful leaders in the opening of the West,
forty-two. I t is fortunatefor
his reputationthat
his work
menwhomhistoryhasthusfarstrangely
neglected.
has been championed by two such understandingcriticsas
Illustrated.
$2.00
H e r r Brodand Mr. Edwin Muir. The essays thattheyhave
contributedtothisvolumeadd
considerably to ones appreciaTravel and Adventacre
tion of it. Let us hope that they will soon permit us to see
theothertwoposthumous
novels, theshortstories,andthe
V A G A B O N D D E L U X E fragments. deleted
GERALD
SYKES
2

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When writing

Memoirs of anInfantry Officer. By Siegfried Sassoon. Coward-McCann. $2.50..


HE war never robbed Siegfried Sassoon of his consciousness of himself as an individual. Evenduringthefirst
years,when hewished i t ,to beagreat
experience, it
never completely absorbed him nor stripped him of his identity.
I t never made him anything but a nominal member of the army.
Under its pressure the diffident, sensitive fox-hunting man (who
continues in this sequel to Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man to
representSassoon) became athoughtful,determinedobjector
to the prolonged and futile slaughter of men. T h a t the officials
were moved to receive and treat his one outburst of censure as
theresult of shell-shock in no way modifies theforce of the
gesture.
Looking backward Sassoon permits himself only the quietest
kind of sarcasm. As in Memoirs of aFox-HuntingMan,
his dull meaning is left to inference, to be searched out of the
richly coloredpicturesand
easy flow of wordsorwithinthe
clear, dbrief characterizationswhichconstitutehis
style. A
countrygentlemantakestime
[between bomb-throwingtonote
flowers, to
the changes in the seasons, to identify the birds and
watch the sky for portents about the weather, to read, to think
a greatdealaboutKent
and Sussex, even tohuntwhenthe
occasion arose. The result is a book about the war depending
for its quality on none of the essentials which most of the recent
w a r books emphasize. There is no moreaboutsexthanin
Journeys End, no loud bitterness, no coarseness, no exaggeratedattitudesor
emotions. Death,suffering,andhorrorare
mentioned withmild cynicism: . . thereisnothingremark. . There is
able aboutadead
body in aEuropeanwar
nothingremarkable,froma
soldiers point of view, perhaps,
about a young man who patroled No Mans Land alone in order
toresttheexhaustedsoldierswhohad
been orderedto do it,
butthere Is somethingremarkableinthefactthatthatsame
young man becameconvinced that the whole carnage was
unnecessary. Sassoons detachment, together with his acuteness as
a poet, gives his book an unusual, composite unity. T h e w a r
nevergrewin
hismind ,beyond thefigure of amonstrous intruder among the normal ways of men and their universe.

THE STORY OF INFANCY

Disillusion, Late and Early

lo

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