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Madras High Court

Report
2011-2014

Madras High Court


Report 2011 - 2014

PROFILE OF SIR THIRUVARUR MUTHUSWAMY IYER - K.C.I.E.


Sir Thiruvarur Muthuswamy Iyer
was born on January 28, 1832, at
Uchuvadi in Tanjore District. His
father Venkatanarayana Sastry lost
his eyesight, when Muthuswamy was
eight years old. So, his childhood was
a grim struggle with poverty. He was
an apprentice under a village karnam
on a princely salary of a rupee per
month. Tahsildar Muthusami Nayak
was largely responsible for giving
him English education. Endowed by
nature with intelligence of a high order,
he applied himself unsparingly to his
studies and attained high academic
distinctions and he worked his way
up until he reached the highest
judicial post open to an Indian. He
was appointed, as a District Munsiff,
and thereafter as a Deputy Collector.
Justice Holloway, who had gifted him a
copy of An Epitome of Alisons History
of Europe, as a token of the high esteem and regard he had for him, had to suggest three
names in 1865 for an appointment as Principal Sudder Amin(Sub Judge), South Canara
at Mangalore and he wrote the name of Muthuswamy Iyer thrice to mark and emphasis
the exclusiveness of his choice. Muthuswamy Iyer studied for his B.L. examination when
he was police Magistrate at Egmore, and passed in the first class. In April 1870, he was
appointed the Third Judge, Court of Small Causes, Madras. In July 1878, when he was
barely 46, he was appointed as Acting Judge, High Court of Madras. He was the first
Indian to be elevated to that high office, to which, there was opposition from a section of
Europeans stating that it was an innovation to appoint an Indian to the highest Court in the
land, and that the experiment was bound to bring down its prestige. But, the success of
Muthuswamy Iyer as a Judge was so phenomenal that the place of Indians on the Bench
became assured for all times. He was confirmed in 1883, and he held that office till his death
which occurred on the 25th of January, 1895. His marble statue, erected at the instance of
the Chief Justice Sir Arthur Collins adorns the High Court buildings occupying a commanding
position within the buildings. The centenary of his birth was celebrated in February, 1932 with
considerable enthusiasm by the members of the Bar at Madras, under the presidency of
C.V.Kumaraswami Sastri.

Sama Neeti Kanda Cholan

Editorial Board

Justice S.Nagamuthu

Justice P.N.Prakash

Justice Pushpa Sathyanarayana

Acknowledgement

This beautiful report, in its present form, with its classic compilation would
not have been in our hands, without the able assistance rendered by the dedicated
team of officers and staff of this Registry to this Editorial Board, with enormous
support from all quarters of this Registry.
We do not mince words in placing on record, our deep appreciation and
patting for the flawless work done by the said team of officers and staff of this
Registry.
When it comes to any follies anywhere in this report, we have no hesitation
to claim and take the responsibility of the same onto us.
Editorial Board
Editorial Board:
Justice S.Nagamuthu
Justice P.N.Prakash
Justice Pushpa Sathyanarayana

Team of Officers and Staff Members who assisted the Editorial Board
Mr. P. Kalaiyarasan, Registrar General
Mr. V.Nallasenapathy, Official Assignee
Mrs. C.B.Meena, Deputy Registrar (Appellate Side)
Mr. S.Vijayakumaar, Assistant Registrar (Admin), Madurai Bench
Mr. T.N. Dhanunjaya Rao, Assistant Registrar (Admin.II)
Mr. C.Muralidharan, Court Manager - I
Mr. J.Prabhu, Court Manager - II
Mr. H.Narayanan, Section Officer
Mr. M.Vetrivel, Technical Assistant
Mr. K.Gopinath, Assistant Section Officer
Mr. S.Rajendran, Assistant
Designed at
Sign Ghuru
Old No. 123/1, New No. 137,
T.T.K. Road, Alwarpet, Chennai - 600 018
E-Mail : sridhar@signghuru.in
Printed at
Gnanodaya Press
461, Nandanam,
Chennai - 600035.
E-Mail : kumaar@gnanodaya.com
Published by
High Court of Madras.
www.hcmadras.tn.nic.in
All Rights Reserved
No part of this publication be reproduced, transmitted or copied in any form,
mechanical, electronic or otherwise, without the prior permission of the Madras High Court.

Index ...
Part A
From The Desk of The Chief Justice

Profile Of The Honble Judges As On 31.12.2014

11

Advocates General Of Tamil Nadu During 2011 - 2014

31

Living Legends Of The Bar

32

Full Benches Constituted During 2011-2014

33

Stare Decisis - March Of Law

35
Part B

From the Desk of the Registrar General

68

Registry

69

Working Strength Of District Judiciary In The State Of Tamil Nadu

71

Jurisdiction

76

Statistics

77

Constitution Of Courts

79

Infrastructure Development

85

Budget

90

The Xiii Finance Commission

91
Part C

Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority

102

Union Territory Of Puducherry Legal Services Authority (State Authority)

119

Tamil Nadu Mediation And Conciliation Centre

128

Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy, Chennai

134

Part D
Innovative Reforms Marching Towards Excellence

150

Implementation Of E-Courts Project

158

Process Re-Engineering:

159

Model Courts

164

Photo Gallery

168

Looks Young Though 150 Years Old

Madras High Court

R e p ort 2011-2014

Part A

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

The Chief Justice of India

Honble Mr. Justice H.L. Dattu


Madras High Court

of

R e p ort 2011-2014

From the Desk

The Chief Justice

he sesqui-centennial institution that

like progress

is the Madras High Court is one of the

charts,

earliest established High Courts of Judicature

giving

in the country under the Queens Charter,

glimpse

alongside the Bombay and Calcutta High

of

Courts. What could be more pleasurable,

we have managed to achieve and also

yet humbling and onerous at the same time

throws light on the future vision towards

than to be at the helm of affairs of this

which we have set sail. With this unenviable

historic Temple of Justice! It is even more

objective in mind, the Editorial Committee,

delightful to present the Madras High Court

comprising of my Brother and Sister Judges,

Report for the period 20112014.

have set out on a journey to recollect and

The

greatness

of

any

institution

is

reflected by its glorious past, as much as


the novel initiatives it brings to the fore in
its day-to-day functioning that keep the flag
of institution flying high. In this era of short

what

record the past achievements of one of the


most illustrious institutions in the annals
of Indian Judiciary in the recent past and
also to lay bare the future vision, which is at
various stages of implementation.

shelf life, one cannot remain content with

The first and foremost task of any

the past laurels, but move forward eying

judicial institution, more so of a High

larger objectives, and an institution which

Court of repute like ours, is dispensation of

rises upto this challenge is bound to excel

justice. With a battery of eminent jurists

and enhance its reputation.

The Madras

and doyens in the legal profession having

High Court, with the rich history behind it,

adorned this institution in the past this

has been striving hard towards balancing

Court has the distinction of contributing a

tradition and at the same time, not losing out

number of Judges to the highest court of

in the race to keep abreast with modernity.

the land the onus is increasingly more

It is true that great deeds indeed remain


etched in the eons of history. I personally feel
that histories of great institutions should be
preserved in record form for the posterity
to cherish and reflect. Periodic reports are

on the present generation to maintain the


high standards that have been set by our
illustrious predecessors. I am glad that the
Madras High Court has been earnest in its
quest to maintain such high standards.

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

As far as the statistics are concerned,

cases, and incentives in the form of credit

there has been a steady trend in disposal

points are also awarded to judicial officers

of cases by our High Court. While the total

for disposal of such old cases.

number of cases disposed of at the Principal


Seat and the Madurai Bench combined
was 2,40,767 in the year 2011; it was
2,46,200 in the year 2012; and in the year
2013, it was 2,31,817; while the figure
was 2,35,087 in the year 2014.

It was

found that the earlier practice of including


Interlocutory

Applications

(labelled

Miscellaneous Petitions) for arriving at the


disposal/pendency figure did not reflect the
actual numbers. Hence, commencing July
2014, it was decided to take into account
only the main cases, as is the practice in
other Courts, for the purpose of arriving
at the disposal/pendency statistics, and
so calculated, the pendency of cases upto
December 2014, excluding M.P.s, stood at
1,79,287.

It is heartening to know that

despite the dwindling strength of Judges,


the statistics reflect a steady progress in
the disposal rate. Not just quantitatively,
there has been a better output even in terms
of quality, with wide ranging issues having
been given a quietus.
In its endeavour to make access to justice
a reality, our High Court has stepped up the
accelerator to fast-track disposal of cases
relating to the most vulnerable sections of
the society like women, children, elderly and
differently-abled, as also targeting cases of
specific branches/enactments. Long pending
old cases are receiving urgent attention like
never before, what with the High Court as
well as the Subordinate Courts dedicating
one full day exclusively for disposing of old

Madras High Court

Ours is one of the few High Courts which


has been successfully able to blend itself with
todays technological advancements vis-vis computerization of the entire judicial
setup,

yet

maintaining

our

traditional

background. The Home Page of the Madras


High Court Website has been completely
revamped, making it more user-friendly.
The Citizens Charter, which gives a birds
eye view of the High Court Campus and the
Case Status Bar, which updates the details
of cases as they are heard/disposed of in
each Court Hall enabling litigants/lawyers
to keep a track of their case, are recent
additions. There is instant uploading of all
Daily Orders/Judgments on the High Court
website for perusal/download of the general
public, which facility was until recently
restricted only to important judgments.
The High Court is also offering SMS service
facility, passing on vital information to
advocates regarding their cases.
A new Case Information System has
been put in place, consisting of Flat Panel
TVs put up at various spots within the High
Court Campus. User-friendly Touch Screen
Information Kiosks have been installed at
vantage locations inside the High Court
compound,

providing

vital

information

to the litigant/general public. To go with


it, Digital Signage Boards are erected at
prominent points, guiding litigant public
and first time visitors to the Court with
appropriate directions.

R e p ort 2011-2014

The concept of Paperless Courts is being


explored.

Biometric Security System has

a congenial working atmosphere to all


concerned.

Pursuant thereto, five new

been introduced for regulating the entry and

buildings have recently been inaugurated

exit of the members of the Registry, besides

for various purposes like the High Court

the Web Payroll System and Personnel

Auditorium,

Information System.

Officers Chambers, Advocates Canteen

Efforts are on, in

conjunction with the State Government, for


complete digitization of case records. The
traditional rack system used for filing/
storing records is being done away with,
being replaced by Compactors.

High

Court

Museum,

Law

and Police Control Room.


Pursuant to the renovation and restoration
of the heritage sites in the court premises,
Heritage Tours are being organized in
the High Court premises, which have

The State Subordinate Judiciary, which

received tremendous response from visitors

is a vital cog in the wheels of judicial

interested in the historic and architectural

administration, can also boast of full

excellence of this magnificent edifice.

computerization.

complete

digital

database of cases pending and disposed


of across the State is being maintained
centrally. All Courts/Judicial Officers have
been provided with Computers/Laptops with
high speed Broadband Connections and the
requisite legal software catering to their
needs.

All the Subordinate Courts in the

State are well connected with the High Court


through the upgraded Video Conferencing
Facility.
indicative of the fact that the High Court
adept

at

assimilating

technological

advancements in its fold and also indicative


that it is alive to the needs of the general
public, and it goes to show that the e-Court
Project is being implemented in the State
of Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of
Puducherry in its full vigour.
Special emphasis is also laid in extending
the requisite infrastructure and bettering
the existing infrastructure so as to provide

revamped

Comprehensive

Security

System has been put in place, providing


round-the-clock security cover for the High
Court premises, regulating the parking of
vehicles within the High Court premises
and controlling traffic in and out of the
High Court.

It is planned to install CCTV

Cameras at prominent locations like Court


Halls, Record Rooms, various Sections of the
Registry and also the corridors of the High
Court.

These features are recent additions,


is

The Madras High Court Mediation &


Conciliation Centre, which is now a decade
old, is taking giant strides and has become
a pioneer of sorts for other High Courts to
emulate. The Madras High Court Arbitration
Centre is coming up, on the lines of the
Delhi and Chandigarh model, for exploring
the hitherto unchartered territory of courtannexed arbitration.
As regards Legal Aid Movement, the
Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority
has

been

spearheading

the

pendency

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

reduction campaign by adopting innovative

Subordinate level by conducting selection

methodologies like conducting Continuous

of Civil Judges, and all vacancies in Tamil

Lok Adalats within the High Court premises

Nadu and Union Territory of Puducherry are

on all working days, presided over by

being filled up. The vacancies at the High

retired Judges of the High Court, apart

Court are also expected to be filled up soon,

from holding Mega Lok Adalats from time to

and once the strength reaches its full tilt, it

time in order to reduce pendency at various

is expected that the various measures taken

levels.

The disposal figures, which speak

by the High Court would gain an upwards

for themselves, have been outstanding, with

momentum and this, in turn, would achieve

regard to the number of cases disposed, as

the avowed objective of dispensing justice in

also the quantum of compensation awarded.

a speedy and effective manner.

This has paved the way for a remarkable


distinction of our High Court maintaining
first position in two consecutive National
Mega Lok Adalats.

With the advent of

Multi Utility Vans for Propaganda of Legal


Literacy Programmes, justice is literally
being delivered at the doorsteps of litigant
public.

I must say that all the above is only a


fruition of the joint effort of my Brother/
Sister

Judges,

Members

of

various

Committees, Members of the Bar and


Members of the Registry, and it is expected
that the same amount of co-operation
would be forthcoming from all of them in
future years to come, for upholding the

In the matter of imparting legal education

majesty of this wonderful Temple of Justice

and training, the Tamil Nadu State Judicial

and subserving the common cause of

Academy, under the aegis of the National

administration of justice.

Judicial Academy, is contributing in its


own unique way by conducting training
programmes and refresher courses on
various facets of law, not just to judicial
officers, but also for advocates and legal

I express my appreciation and sincere


gratitude to the Members of the Editorial
Committee for putting up the compilation in
the form of this Annual Report.

personnel from the subordinate judiciary as


well as other fields.
The area of concern, however, remains
the vacancy position, both at the High
Court level and at the Subordinate Court

(Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul)

level. By taking measures on a war footing


in consultation with the Tamil Nadu Public
Service Commission, the High Court expedited
the process of filling up of vacancies at the

Madras High Court

R e p ort 2011-2014

The Chief Justice of High Court of Madras

Honble Mr. Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul


9

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Mr. Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul, born on December 26, 1958. Studied in
Modern School, New Delhi till 1976 and Graduated in Economics (Hons.) from St.
Stephens College, Delhi University in 1979. Obtained LL.B. Degree from Campus
Law Centre, Delhi University in 1982. Enrolled as an Advocate with Bar Council of
Delhi on July 15, 1982. Practised in Delhi High Court mainly in Commercial, Civil,
Writ, Original and Companies jurisdictions of the High Court of Delhi and the Supreme
Court of India. The cases also involved appearances before MRTP Commission,
Company Law Board, Debt Recovery Tribunal and Arbitrators apart from the other
nature of litigation including Constitutional, Banking, Finance and Insurance, Customs
and Excise, MRTP, Real Estate, Administrative, Co-operative, Commercial, Service,
Telecommunication, Anti- Dumping Laws, etc. Remained Advocate-on-Record of the
Supreme Court of India from 1987 to 1999 and designated as Senior Advocate in
December, 1999. Appointed Senior Counsel for the Delhi High Court and for the Delhi
University, Senior Panel of Union of India and Additional Senior Standing Counsel for
DDA. Elevated as Additional Judge of the High Court of Delhi on May 03, 2001 and
was appointed as a permanent Judge on May 02, 2003. His Lordship has been invited
to a number of national and international seminars and workshops as Chairman or
Member of Sessions and presented a number of papers with articles published in
various Journals. His Lordship was elevated as the Acting Chief Justice of Delhi High
Court w.e.f. 23.09.2012 to 25.09.2012 and then elevated as the Chief Justice of Punjab
and Haryana High Court w.e.f. 01.06.2013. His Lordship assumed charge as the Chief
Justice, Madras High Court on 26.07.2014.

Madras High Court

10

R e p ort 2011-2014

PROFILE OF THE HONBLE JUDGES as on 31.12.2014


Honble Mr. Justice Satish Kumar Agnihotri
Born on : 01.07.1956
Elevated as a Judge of Chhattisgarh High Court on 05.05.2005
Assumed office of the Judge High Court of Madras on 26.09.2013
Functioned as Acting Chief Justice of the Madras High Court from
13.02.2014 to 26.07.2014

Honble Mr. Justice M. Jaichandren


Born on : 25.02.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 10.12.2005

Honble Mr. Justice V. Dhanapalan


Born on : 01.06.1953
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 10.12.2005

Honble Mr. Justice R. Sudhakar


Born on : 14.02.1959
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 10.12.2005

Honble Mr. Justice S. Tamilvanan


Born on : 06.02.1954
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 10.12.2005

11

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Mr. Justice V.Ramasubramanian


Born on : 30.06.1958
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.07.2006

Honble Mr. Justice S. Manikumar


Born on : 24.04.1961
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.07.2006

Honble Mr. Justice A. Selvam


Born on : 05.04.1956
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.07.2006

Honble Mr. Justice P.R. Shivakumar


Born on : 12.05.1954
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 18.09.2006

Honble Mr. Justice S. Nagamuthu


Born on : 31.05.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 22.03.2007

Honble Mr. Justice S. Palanivelu


Born on : 11.05.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 22.03.2007

Madras High Court

12

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Mr. Justice K.K.Sasidharan


Born on : 28.10.1957
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 12.11.2007

Honble Mr. Justice M. Venugopal


Born on : 07.05.1957
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 12.11.2007

Honble Mr. Justice R. Subbiah


Born on : 21.06.1959
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 24.03.2008

Honble Mr. Justice M.Sathyanarayanan


Born on : 10.06.1959
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 23.04.2008

Honble Mr. Justice R.S. Ramanathan


Born on : 16.06.1953
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice B. Rajendran


Born on : 01.04.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

13

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Mr. Justice D. Hariparanthaman


Born on : 17.03.1954
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice C.T. Selvam


Born on : 09.02.1957
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice C.S. Karnan


Born on : 12.06.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice N. Kirubakaran


Born on : 21.08.1959
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice M.M. Sundresh


Born on : 21.07.1962
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice T.S.Sivagnanam


Born on : 16.09.1963
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Madras High Court

14

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Mr. Justice M. Duraiswamy


Born on : 22.09.1960
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice T. Raja


Born on : 25.05.1961
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Selvi. Justice R. Mala


Born on : 15.03.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mrs. Justice Aruna Jagadeesan


Born on : 26.03.1953
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 31.03.2009

Honble Mr. Justice T. Mathivanan


Born on : 28.05.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 17.02.2010

Honble Selvi. Justice K.B.K.Vasuki


Born on : 09.09.1953
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 17.02.2010

15

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Mr. Justice K.Ravichandrabaabu


Born on : 14.10.1958
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 20.12.2011

Honble Mr. Justice P.Devadass


Born on : 15.05.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 20.12.2011

Honble Mr. Justice R.Karuppiah


Born on : 07.04.1953
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 20.12.2011

Honble Mrs.Justice S.Vimala


Born on : 11.01.1957
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 20.12.2011

Honble Mr. Justice P.N.Prakash


Born on : 12.01.1961
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Mrs.Justice Pushpa Sathyanarayana


Born on : 28.02.1960
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Madras High Court

16

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Mr. Justice K. Kalyanasundaram


Born on : 27.05.1960
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Mr. Justice S. Vaidyanathan


Born on : 17.08.1962
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Mr. Justice R. Mahadevan


Born on : 10.06.1963
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Mr.Justice V.S. Ravi


Born on : 20.05.1954
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Mr. Justice G. Chockalingam


Born on : 01.04.1955
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 25.10.2013

Honble Selvi Justice V.M.Velumani


Born on : 06.04.1962
Elevated as Judge, High Court of Madras on 20.12.2013

17

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

His Excellency Mr. Surjit Singh Barnala, Governor of Tamil Nadu


Administering Oath of Office to the Honble Mr. Justice M.Yusuf Eqbal
as Chief Justice of High Court of Madras on 11.06.2010

His Excellency Dr. K. Rosaiah, Governor of Tamil Nadu


Administering Oath of Office to the Honble Mr. Justice R. K. Agrawal
as Chief Justice of High Court of Madras on 24.10.2013

Madras High Court

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R e p ort 2011-2014

His Excellency Dr. K. Rosaiah, Governor of Tamil Nadu


Administering Oath of Office to the Honble Mr. Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul
Assumed Office of the Chief Justice of High Court of Madras on 26.07.2014

19

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Proud son of this great soil The First Chief Justice of India from Tamil Nadu
Honble Mr. Justice P.Sathasivam was born on
27.04.1949, to Palaniswamy and Natchiammal at
Kadappanallur near Bhavani in Erode District, Tamil
Nadu. His Lordship graduated from Government
Law College, Chennai after completing BA degree
from Ayya Nadar Janaki Ammal College, Sivakasi.
His Lordship enrolled as an advocate on 25th July
1973 at Madras. His Lordship was then appointed
to the post of Additional Government Pleader and
later as the Special Government Pleader in the
Madras High Court. His Lordship was appointed
as a permanent Judge of the Madras High Court
on 8th January 1996 and transferred to the Punjab
Honble Mr. Justice P.Sathasivam
and Haryana High Court on 20th April 2007. His
Former Chief Justice of India
Lordship was elevated to the post of Judge of the
Supreme Court on 21st August 2007. His Lordship
was elevated as the Chief Justice of India on 19th July 2013. During His Lordships tenure as
Chief Justice of India, His Lordship was the Chairman of the General Council of the Gujarat
National Law University. His Lordship succeeded Mrs.Sheila Dikshit as the Governor of
Kerala on 05th September 2014.
His Lordship authored several path-breaking judgments including the Reliance Gas
Judgment (May 2010), wherein he emphasised the use of natural resources through public
sector undertakings. His Lordship observed that in a national democracy like ours, the
national assets belong to the people and the Government owns such assets for the
purpose of developing them in the interests of the people. His Lordship also delivered
the verdict in the controversial triple-murder case of Stains and upheld the conviction of
Dara Singh. On 19th April 2010, His Lordship delivered the judgement in the Jessica Lal
murder case of 29th April 1999. Along with Justice B.S.Chauhan, His Lordship delivered the
judgement in the 1993 Mumbai blasts case, sentencing Bollywood actor Sanjay Dutt to five
years imprisonment under the Arms Act. Dutt was asked to serve out the remainder of his
sentence.

Madras High Court

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R e p ort 2011-2014

Strength of Judges, High Court of Madras

Sanctioned
Strength of
J u d g e s

21

60
Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Permanent Judges - 45
Additional Judges - 15

Strength of
Judges as on
31.12.2014

Madras High Court

43
22

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Mr. Justice F.M.Ibrahim Kalifulla was born on


23rd July 1951, in Karaikudi, Sivagangai District, Tamil
Nadu, His Lordship enrolled as an advocate on 20th
August 1975, after which His Lordship began practicing
labour law in the law firm of T.S. Gopalan & Co. On 2nd
March 2000, His Lordship was appointed as a Judge of
the Madras High Court. In February 2011, His Lordship
became a member of the High Court of Jammu and
Kashmir and was appointed to serve as the Acting Chief
Justice two months later. In September 2011, His Lordship
was named as the Chief Justice of High Court of Jammu
and Kashmir. His Lordship was appointed as a Judge of
The Supreme Court of India and sworn in 2nd April 2012.

Honble Mr. Justice C. Nagappan, hails from Karur, Tamil Nadu. His Lordship was born
on 4th October 1951 and had His Lordship school education at Karur. His Lordship did
his Pre-University Course in St.Josephs College, Trichy and completed B.Sc. Degree in
Chemistry at Madura College, Madurai. His Lordship studied Law Course in Madras Law
College and secured Third Rank in the Final University Examination in April, 1974. His
Lordship did M.L. Course in Criminal Law and secured First Rank in 1977. His Lordship
practiced as Junior Advocate under K. Parasaran, Former Attorney General of India. His
Lordship was a Part-Time Professor in Madras Law College for 7 years. His Lordship
was directly recruited as District and Sessions Judge
in 1987 and worked as District and Sessions Judge at
Cuddalore, Salem and Coimbatore. Thereafter, worked
as the Special Officer, Vigilance Cell, Madras High Court.
His Lordship was elevated as a Judge of The Madras High
Court on 27.9.2000 and appointed as a permanent Judge
on 20.09.2002. His Lordship was then further elevated as
the Chief Justice of the Orissa High Court and sworn in
on 27.02 2013. His Lordship was appointed as a Judge of
The Supreme Court of India and sworn in on 19.09.2013.

23

Honble Mr. Justice C.Nagappan

Honble Mr. Justice F.M.Ibrahim Kalifulla

SITTING JUDGES OF SUPREME COURT OF INDIA


FROM THE HIGH COURT OF MADRAS

Madras High Court

Honble Mr. Justice M.Y.Eqbal was born on 13th


February 1951 and completed B.Sc. Examination from
Ranchi University in the year 1970 and obtained LL.B.
Degree in 1974 with Distinction (Gold Medalist). His
Lordship enrolled as an Advocate in 1975 and initially
practised exclusively in civil side in civil courts, Ranchi.
Shifted practice to Ranchi Bench of the Patna High Court
in 1986 and became Government Pleader in the Ranchi
Bench of Patna High Court in 1990. In 1993 His Lordship
became Government Advocate in the High Court. In these
periods practised in civil, criminal, Constitutional and
tax matter. Also worked as retained Counsel and Legal
Adviser of almost all the Banks, Insurance Companies, Electricity Board, Housing Board,
University and other Government and semi Government Undertakings. Appointed as
permanent Judge of the Patna High Court on 9th May 1996. By Notification dated 14th
November 2000 became the Judge of the Jharkhand High Court. His Lordship was the
Chief Justice of the Madras High Court from 11th June 2010 to 21st December 2012 and
elevated as Judge of Supreme Court of India on 24th December 2012.

Honble Mr. Justice Rajesh Kumar Agrawal hails from Uttar Pradesh. His Lordship
was born on 05th May, 1953. His Lordship did his graduation in Law from Allahabad
University. His Lordship enrolled as Advocate on 14.08.1976. Joined the chamber of his
father Sri Raja Ram Agrawal, Senior Advocate and former Advocate General of Uttar
Pradesh on Civil side and dealt with Constitutional, Company, Service, Educational and
Taxation matters. Worked as Standing Counsel of the
Income Tax Department of the Government of India.
Served a number of corporations and institutions as their
Standing Counsel. His Lordship was Joint Editor of U.P.
Tax Cases. His Lordship was elevated as permanent
Judge of the Allahabad High Court on 05.02.1999. His
Lordship assumed office as Acting Chief Justice, High
Court of Madras on 07.02.2013 and Assumed office as
Chief Justice, High Court of Madras on 24.10.2013. His
Lordship was appointed as a Judge of the Supreme Court
of India and sworn in on 17.02.2014.

Honble Mr. Justice R.K.Agrawal

Honble Mr. Justice M.Y.Eqbal

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Madras High Court

24

Honble Mrs. Justice R.Banumathi

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Mrs. Justice R. Banumathi was born on


20.07.1955 is a sitting judge of the Supreme Court of
India. Earlier Her Lordship had served as the Chief
Justice of Jharkhand High Court and Judge at Madras
High Court. Her Lordship had joined Tamil Nadu Higher
Judicial Service in 1988 as a direct recruit district judge.
As a sessions judge, Her Lordship dealt with number of
landmark cases and also headed one-person commission
on police excess by STF in Chinnampathy village in
Coimbatore district in 1995-1996. In April 2003, after
serving at various posts in the subordinate judiciary, Her
Lordship was then elevated as judge of the Madras High
Court. There Her Lordship dealt with many important cases including a ban on Jallikattu
or bull fight. The verdict paved the way for formulating regulations relating to Jallikattu. In
November 2013, Her Lordship was transferred to the Jharkhand High Court and appointed
as Chief Justice of that court at the same time. Within a matter of months, in August 2014,
Her Lordship was elevated to the Supreme Court of India. Her Lordship is the second
woman sessions judge to rise to the countrys highest court.

Honble Mr. Justice D.Murugesan was born in Cumbum Pudupatti,


Theni District, Tamil Nadu on the 10th June, 1951 and
His Lordship completed Bachelor of Science Degree
course from Thaigarajar College, Madurai in 1972. His
Lordship completed Bachelor of General Law course from
the Madras University in 1974 and was a gold medalist
with first rank in Bachelor of Law degree course from the
same University in 1975. His Lordship joined the legal
profession the same year. As an advocate His Lordship
honed his skills under the guidance of eminent seniors like
Mr.K.K.Venugopal and Mr.Rangarajan Kumarmangalam.
During His Lordships illustrious legal career, served as the
Standing Counsel for Madras University, the Corporation
25

Honble Mr. Justice D.Murugesan

CHIEF JUSTICES ELEVATED FROM THE HIGH COURT OF MADRAS

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Mr. Justice N. Paul Vasanthakumar was Born on


15.03.1955. Passed M.A., M.L. Enrolled in the year 1980.
Was Junior to Late Mr. T. Martin. Was given a Honorary
post of member in Ecclesiastical Synod Courts, C.S.I.
Specialist in Service Law, Labour Law and Education
matters. Held the post of Senior Standing Counsel for
Tamil Nadu Public Service Commission and also Standing
Counsel for Central Government. Appointed as Additional
Judge of High Court of Madras on 10.12.2005 and as
Permanent Judge on 20.04.2007. His Lordship elevated
as Chief Justice of High Court of Jammu and Kashmir on
02.02.2015

Honble Mr. Justice N. Paul Vasanthakumar

of Chennai and Selection Committee for MBBS, P.G. and Super Speciality courses from
1994-2000. He also served as the Special Government Pleader and Government Pleader
for the Government of Tamil Nadu from 1994 to 2000. His Lordship was appointed as a
Judge of the Madras High Court on the 2nd March, 2000. During His Lordships tenure of
more than 12 years in the Madras High Court, His Lordship disposed of more than 1.30 lakh
cases. His Lordship also presided over various Administrative Committees, served as the
Chairman of COFEPOSA Board and the President of Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy
for over a period of three years. His Lordship was elevated as Chief Justice of Delhi High
Court on 26th September 2012 and His Lordship took several important decisions including,
among others, implementation of Right to Education from nursery classes to ensure equal
opportunity to students of all sections, ban on sale of junk food in schools, reforms in Tihar
jail, more night shelters for homeless, periodical surprise check of fruits and vegetables in
city markets for pesticides residue, suo motu cognizance of the December 16 Delhi gang
rape and setting up of a special court for day-to-day hearing of the case for expeditious
trial, directions to all lower courts to hold day-to-day hearings of sexual assault cases and
directions to all private hospitals to admit victims of heinous crimes like rape and murder.
His Lordship assumed office as Member of the National Human Rights Commission on the
21st September, 2013.

Madras High Court

26

R e p ort 2011-2014

List of Honourable Chief Justices of This High Court


2011 - 2014
Sl.No. Name of Honble The Chief Justice

Period as Chief Justice


From

To

1.

Justice M. Yusuf Eqbal

11.06.2010 21.12.2012

2.

Justice Rajesh Kumar Agrawal

24.10.2013 12.02.2014

3.

Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul

26.07.2014

Honble The Chief Justices of High Court of Madras


Elevated as Honble Judges of Supreme Court of India
during 2011 - 2014
Name of the
Honble The Chief Justice

Sl.No

Period served in
the Madras High
Court

Elevated as Judge,
Supreme Court of
India on

1.

Justice M. Yusuf Eqbal

11.06.2010 to
21.12.2012

24.12.2012

2.

Justice Rajesh Kumar Agrawal

24.10.2013 to
12.02.2014

17.02.2014

List of Honourable Acting Chief Justices of


This High Court 2011 - 2014
Sl.No.

27

Name of Honble Judge

Period as Acting Chief Justice


From

To

1.

Justice Elipe Dharma Rao

22-12-2012

06-02-2013

2.

Justice Rajesh Kumar Agrawal

07-02-2013

23-10-2013

3.

Justice Sathish Kumar Agnihotri

12-02-2014

25-07-2014

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Honble Judges of Madras High Court presently serving in


Other High Courts.
Sl.No

Name of Honble
Judge

Serving in

1.

Justice M. Jeyapaul

High Court of Punjab and Haryana,


Chandigarh w.e.f 28.10.2010

2.

Justice K. Kannan

High Court of Punjab and Haryana w.e.f.


05.11.2008

Justice Raja Elango

High Court of Judicature at Hyderabad for the


State of Telangana and the State of Andhra
Pradesh w.e.f. 25.03.2010

3.

Madras High Court

28

R e p ort 2011-2014

Honble Judges Served and Retired


During the period from 2011-2014, with the Date of Retirement

Justice Elipe Dharma Rao


14-07-2013

Justice M.Chockalingam
16-02-2011

Justice K.Mohan Ram


27-05-2012

Justice P. Jyothimani
25-10-2012

Justice Chitra Venkataraman


21.04.2014

Justice K.N.Basha
13-05-2013

Justice P.P.S. Janarthana Raja


20-01-2013

Justice K. Suguna
09-10-2013

Justice S. Rajeswaran
31.10.2014

29

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Justice Vinod K.Sharma


24-05-2013

Justice K.Venkataraman
08.05.2013

Justice K. Chandru
08-03-2013

Justice G. Rajasuria
22-08-2013

Justice T. Sudanthiram
14-08-2013

Justice V.Periya Karuppiah


04-10-2012

Justice G.M.Akbar Ali


22.11.2014

Justice A.Arumugha Swamy


27.04.2014

Justice M. Vijayaraghavan
16-11-2013

Madras High Court

30

R e p ort 2011-2014

Advocates General of Tamil Nadu during 2011 - 2014


Sl.No. Name of the Advocate General
1.
2.
3.

Mr. P.S. Raman


Mr. A.Navaneethakrishnan
Mr. A.L.Somayaji

Period
From
30-07-2009
29-05-2011
08-03-2013

To
19-05-2011
07-03-2013
-

Pattabhi Sundar Raman was born on November 7, 1960.


His father was an Indian lawyer V.P. Raman, who has served
as the Advocate-General of Government of Tamil Nadu from
1977 to 1979. He did his schooling in Vidya Mandir, Chennai
and graduated in Commerce from Loyola College, Chennai and
he has obtained his Law Degree from the Madras Law College.
He started practicing as a lawyer in 1985 and founded the law
firm Raman and Associates in the year 1991. Raman practiced
in the Madras High Court and the Supreme Court of India, and
in September 2004, he was designated as Senior Advocate of
the Madras High Court. On June 11, 2006, he was appointed
as Additional Advocate-General of Tamil Nadu and became the
Advocate-General of Government of Tamil Nadu on 30.07.2009
and he held office till 19.05.2011.
Mr.A.Navaneethakrishnan was born on 18.05.1956 at
Ponnappur West in Orathanadu Taluk of Thanjavur District
Hailing from a typical agricultural family, he had his collegiate
education from A.V.V.M. Sri Pushbam College, Poondi and he
took his Law Degree from the Madras Law College. Intially
started his practice in Mofussil Bar of Thanjavur, he soon shifted
his practice to Chennai. He was a member of the TNPSC and
later was appointed as the Advocate General of Tamil Nadu on
29-05-2011. Subsequently he was appointed as the Chairman
of TNPSC and then elected as Member of Parliament, Rajya
Sabha from Tamil Nadu.
Mr.A.L.Somayaji was a lawyer of higher order and having
a wider experience in Constitutional issues as well as labour
matters. He has having a strong grounding in labour issues
having worked under renowned stalwarts under M/s. Aiyar
Dolia. He had held the post of Additional Advocate General of
Tamil Nadu. He was appointed as Advocate General of Tamil
Nadu on 08-03-2013.

31

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Living Legends of the BAR

Mr.K.Parasaran was born on October 9, 1927 at


Sri Rangam as the son of Kesava Iyengar, a doyen
of Madras Bar. He passed his S.S.L.C. in the year
1942 from Hindu High School, Triplicane, Chennai
and completed his graduation from Presidency
College, Chennai in the year 1944. He went on
Mr.K.Parasaran
to complete his Degree in Law from Madras Law
College in 1949. He had been awarded Justice C.V. Kumarasamy Shastri Sanskrit Medal in
B.A., and Justice Sri V.Bhashyam Iyengar Gold Medal in Hindu Law in B.L., He was also the
recipient of Justice K.S.Krishnaswamy Iyengar Medal in the Bar Council examination. Mr.
K.Parasaran enrolled in the Supreme Court of India in 1958 and he was appointed Central
Government Senior Standing Counsel in the Madras High Court in 1971. On 17.06.1976, he
was appointed Advocate General of Tamil Nadu, but he resigned after a year in June 1977.
He was appointed as Solicitor General of India in February 1980 and he held that post from
06th March 1980 to 08th August 1983. Since then to November 1989 he was appointed
as Attorney General of India. Mr.Parasaran was awarded an Honounary Degree of Doctor
of Laws from Annamalai University in 1989. He has been nominated as a Member of the
National Commission for Review of Working of the Constitution. In the year 2003, he was
awarded the Padma Bushan by the President of India and Padma Vibushan in the year
2011. In June 2012, he was nominated to the Council of States (Rajya Sabha).
Mr.K.K.Venugopal, Senior Advocate was born on
6th September 1931. He is the son of the illustrious
MK.Nambiar, Advocate who famously defended
the right to life and personal liberty in AK.Gopalan
Vs. State of Madras. He completed his law degree
from Raja Lakhamgouda Law College, Belgaum
Mr.K.K.Venugopal
Karnataka. He enrolled as an advocate in January
1954. In 1972, he was designated as Senior Counsel by the Supreme Court of India. He
was appointed the Additional Solicitor General of India from 1979 to 1980. In 1995, he was
appointed as President of SAARAC LAW. In 1996, he was appointed as the President of
Union Internationale des Avocats. He has also been appointed as Vice President of Bar
Association of India. He is the Member of Executive Council and the General Council of the
West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, Calcutta. He is also a Prestigious
Member of NALSAR, Hyderabad. He has also been conferred with Padma Bushan in 2002
by the President of India. In the year 2015 he was awarded Padma Vibushan.
Madras High Court

32

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FULL BENCHes Constituted DURING 2011-2014


Principal Seat of Madras High Court
MONTH &
YEAR

CORAM

April
2011

The Chief Justice, Justice P.Jyothimani & Justice T.S.Sivagnanam

July
2011

Justice Chitra Venkatraman, Justice P.P.S.Janarthana Raja &


Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar

July
2011

The Chief Justice, Justice P.Jyothimani & Justice T.S.Sivagnanam

August
2011

Justice K.N.Basha, Justice T.Sudanthiram & Justice S.Nagamuthu

August
2011

The Chief Justice, Justice P.Jyothimani & Justice T.S.Sivagnanam

March
2012

Justice Elipe Dharma Rao, Justice D.Murugesan & Justice M.Venugopal

September
Justice Elipe Dharma Rao, Justice D.Murugesan & Justice M.Venugopal
2012
November
2012

Justice R.Banumathi, Justice P.R.Shivakumar & Justice S.Nagamuthu

April
2013

Justice Elipe Dharma Rao, Justice S.Rajeswaran & Justice M.Venugopal

April
2013

The Acting Chief Justice, Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar &


Justice M.Sathyanarayanan

September The Acting Chief Justice, Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar &


2013
Justice M.Sathyanarayanan
January
2014
April
2014
August
2014

Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar, Justice R.S.Ramanathan &


Justice K.Ravichandrabaabu
Justice S.Rajeswaran, Justice R.Subbiah & Justice R.S.Ramanathan
Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar,Justice R.S.Ramanathan &
Justice K.Ravichandrabaabu

September
Justice S.Rajeswaran, Justice R.Subbiah & Justice R.S.Ramanathan
2014

33

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

FULL BENCHes Constituted DURING 2011-2014


Madurai Bench of Madras High Court
MONTH &
YEAR
July
2011

CORAM
The Chief Justice, Justice P.Jyothimani & Justice T.S.Sivagnanam

September
2011

Justice P.Jyothimani & Justice M.Duraiswamy & Justice Aruna Jagadeesan

December
2012

Justice K.N.Basha, Justice T.Sudanthiram & Justice P.Devadass

August
2013

Justice N.Paul Vasanthakumar, Justice T.Mathivanan & Justice P.Devadass

November
2013

Justice M. Jaichandren, Justice S. Nagamuthu & Justice M.Venugopal

November
2013

Justice M. Jaichandren, Justice M.Venugopal & Justice T.Raja

January
2014

Justice R.Sudhakar, Justice S.Tamilvanan, Justice A.Selvam,


Justice M.Sathyanarayanan & Justice B.Rajendran

February
2014

Justice R.Sudhakar, Justice S.Tamilvanan, Justice A.Selvam,


Justice M.Sathyanarayanan & Justice B.Rajendran

September
2014

Justice M.Jaichandren, Justice K.K.Sasidharan & Justice R.Mahadevan

Madras High Court

34

R e p ort 2011-2014

Stare Decisis - March of Law


2011 -2014
In the ever expanding universe, nothing can be static. Law is no exception. Law may
apparently appear to be dormant and sleeping in hide bound books but it silently undergoes
metamorphosis and manifests in manifold dimensions at the hands of adroit Judges. We
concluded the previous edition of the March of Law with the following words, Therefore,
we make every endeavour to take the law to the next level, so as to serve humanity best.
In keeping with this assurance the Madras High Court has indeed elevated the legal
discourse to the next higher level. What we have given hereunder is not exhaustive, for, the
number is so high that it became a daunting task for us to pick and choose from the best for
accommodating them within the allotted space. Now, let us begin our journey.

No God demands that people should fight over worshiping. The divisiveness in the
society to an extent that even over the issue of worshiping in temples, there is
a fight. If people can not peacefully worship, then the temple would have to be
locked. With these observations, the First Bench of this Court in E.Saman v. District
Collector [W.P.No.20464 of 2014 dated 24.11.2014], upheld the decision taken by
the Administrator of a temple in locking the same as peace was disturbed on account
of fight between two groups. This judgment reflects the displeasure of this court in
the deep rooted caste system which many a times, is the cause for disturbance to
peace and tranquility.

2.

In Uthapuram Village, in Madurai District, a wall was erected dividing the habitations
on the basis of caste preventing one group from entering into the habitations of
the other group. It was a case of human wall erected on the basis of colour, creed
and caste. The Madurai Bench of this Court stepped into the issue as a result of
which a Historic agreement was reached between the parties allowing entry of the
Scheduled Caste people of the village in temples. Dealing with Social Justice and
Equality, the Madurai Bench of this Court in Murugan v. State of Tamil Nadu [(2012)
2 CTC 561], following the decision of the Honble Apex Court in Lata Singh v. State
of U.P. [(2006 (5) SCC 475], cursed the cancerous growth of the caste system.
This Court also held that if will of the people is strong, solutions can be found in the
absence of State intervention besides observing that Wall (Caste) divided but Will
(power) united.

35

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

3.

An interesting question, whether a Hindu by birth belonging to a Backward Class


community on conversion to Islam as Labbai Muslim, can continue to claim the status
of Backward Class? was examined by this court in MU.Aariffaa v. The Secretary
to the Government, (P & AR Department), Fort St. George, Chennai, 2014 (3) MLJ
467. After having made a scientific analysis of various judgments on reservation,
more particularly, the much celebrated case in Indra Sawhney Vs. Union of India
reported in 1999 Supp (3) SCC 217 and after taking note of the need for establishing
a casteless society, this court held that the denial of Backward Class community
certificate to the converted Muslims amounts to deprival of the fundamental rights
guaranteed to them under Articles 15(4) and 16(4) of the Constitution of India.
Accordingly, this court held that the community certificate issued to the candidate is
legally valid.

4.

The people of this country are guaranteed a peaceful and dignified life. In the event,
the most cherished fundamental right to life guaranteed under Article 21 of The
Constitution of India is infringed even by a judicial order of a court, this High Court
would certainly go to the rescue of the victim. On a complaint of a young woman,
who allegedly became pregnant on account of sexual exploitation by a boy of her
age, a case was registered against the boy. The boy and the girl, after medical
examination, were produced before the jurisdictional Magistrate. The Magistrate,
showing gross negligence, remanded both the accused as well as the victim to
judicial custody. Thus, the poor victim was incarcerated for seven days for no offence
committed by her. She filed a writ petition complaining of violation of her right to life
under Article 21 of The Constitution of India. The Magistrate took the defence that
under Section 3(2) of The Judges Protection Act, 1985, she is immuned. Rejecting
the said plea and holding that there was serious infringement of her fundamental
right, this court held that The Judges Protection Act, 1985, would not deter this
court from exercising its writ jurisdiction and eventually directed the government
to pay Rs.1,00,000/- [Rupees One Lakh only] as compensation to the victim. [vide
S.Velankanni v. Chitradevi, Sub Inspector of Police, All Women Police Station,
Dharmapuri and 4 others 2013 - 2 - L.W. (Crl.) 82]. Equally, it is the States obligation
to protect the properties of the citizens as well. While considering the Doctrine of
Vicarious Liability in a petition under Article 226 of the Constitution of India, the
Madurai Bench of this Court held that when the State fails to protect the life and
properties of its citizens, the State cannot take sovereign immunity as a defence

Madras High Court

36

R e p ort 2011-2014

and the State is liable to pay compensation to the victims. During an agitation
by a political party, some miscreants caused extensive damage to the properties
of the citizens. Applying the doctrine of vicarious liability this court directed the
State to pay compensation to the victim and also gave liberty to the Government
to recover the amount from the miscreants by invoking the provisions of The Tamil
Nadu Public Property [Prevention of Damages and Loss] Act, 1992. [vide Ganesan
v. State of Tamil Nadu [(2012) 2 CTC 848].
5.

Our natural resources are the national assets. There was public outcry that there
were large scale illegal mining of sand and granites in the State. Such illegal miners
took a strange plea that in respect of the offences committed under The Mines and
Minerals [Development and Regulation] Act, 1957 as well as the Indian Penal Code,
1860, the police has no power to register a case and to investigate. A Division Bench
of this court in Sengol v. State, 2012 (2) CTC 369, rejected the said plea and held
that if the act of the accused constitutes offences under The Indian Penal Code,
1860 as well as under the provisions of The Mines and Minerals [Development and
Regulation] Act, 1957, registration of a case both under the provisions of the Indian
Penal Code, 1860 and The Mines and Minerals [Development and Regulation] Act,
1957 is not illegal and the police shall file police report in respect of the offences
punishable under the Indian Penal Code and in respect of offences punishable under
The Mines and Minerals [Development and Regulation] Act, 1957, the police officer
may file a separate complaint provided he has been so authorized under Section 22
of The Mines and Minerals [Development and Regulation] Act, 1957. The contrary
views taken by the different High Courts in this regard were overruled and the view
taken by this court was affirmed by the Supreme Court in State of NCT of Delhi
v. Sanjay, 2015 AIR SC 75 [Criminal Appeal No.499 of 2011 by judgment dated
04.09.2014]. After the above judgment in Sengols case several cases have been
registered against the illegal granite and sand miners. Cracking down on the alleged
illegal mining, a Division Bench presided over by the Chief Justice, on a Public
Interest Litigation filed by one Mr.Traffic Ramaswamy in W.P.No.16841 of 2014 has
appointed an IAS officer as a Special Officer to probe all granite mining contracts
and the license given to various private companies to find out as to whether there
was any misuse. This order has brought cheers among the public.

6.

Preserving our national resources is the need of the hour. A Division Bench of this
Court, in M. Palanisamy vs. The State of Tamil Nadu, rep by its Secretary, Industries

37

Madras High Court

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Department, Fort St. George, Chennai and others , 2012 (4) CTC 1, expressed
its anguish that excessive in-stream sand-and-gravel mining from river beds and
like resources causes the degradation of rivers. In-stream mining lowers the stream
bottom, which leads to bank erosion. Depletion of sand in the stream-bed and along
coastal areas causes the deepening of rivers and estuaries and enlargement of river
mouths and coastal inlets. It also leads to saline-water intrusion from the nearby
sea. The effect of mining is compounded by the effect of sea level rise. Any volume
of sand exported from stream-beds and coastal areas is a loss to the system. There
cannot be any two opinions that natural resources are the assets of the nation and
its citizens. Article 48A of the Constitution requires that the State shall endeavour to
protect and improve the environment and safeguard the forests and wild life of the
country. Similarly, Article 51A enjoins a duty upon every citizen to protect and improve
the natural environment including forests, lakes, rivers and wild life, and to have
compassion for all the living creatures. The court, therefore, held that the obligation
of all concerned, including the Central and the State Governments, is to conserve
and not waste such valuable resources. In view of the constitutional provisions, the
Doctrine of Public Trust has become the law of the land. The said doctrine rests on
the principle that certain resources like air, sea, waters and forests are of such great
importance to the people as a whole that it would be highly unjustifiable to make
them a subject of private ownership. After having expressed the said concern, the
Division Bench upheld the constitutionality of Rule 38-C inserted by the State to the
Tamil Nadu Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 1959 for the purpose of bringing and
restricting the illegal mining operation, transportation and storage of minerals. This
judgment has virtually restored complete control of mining activities in the State to
a greater extent.
7.

While preserving the natural resources, the developmental activities can not
be taken to the back seat. When an issue on a proposed developmental activity
affecting preservation of environment/water sources is raised, undoubtedly, no court
would ever allow a developmental activity to take place at the cost of putting at brink
safeguards to the water sources or the environment. However, when the court is
satisfied with sufficient and adequate materials that a developmental activity may
not affect the ecological balance or preservation of water sources and that, with the
advantage of innovative technology, no detriment would result to the water sources
or ecology, there may not be any impediment to allow such project to proceed and
have its completion for the use and benefit of the public at large. When the National

Madras High Court

38

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Highways Authority of India started to lay the road across certain water bodies and
rivers, it was an issue before this court in National Highways Authority of India through
Project Director v. Secretary to Government, Public Works Department, (2014) 1
MLJ 644 wherein after balancing between development and the risk of detriment to
ecological balance and preservation of water sources, this court after having regard
to the undertaking from NHAI not to in any manner disturb the ecological balance
and water sources permitted the NHAI to complete the remaining project without
contravening the undertaking given to the court in respect of preservation of water
bodies.
8.

The right to exist on par with human beings, though is conferred upon the animals
through legislation, yet, when the existence and the right of the animals are infringed,
it is only through human beings, such rights could be extended on the affected
animals. In this context, when an injury or infringement on the rights of the animals
was noticed, this Court deemed it just to seize the opportunity to render justice to
the poor animals, which could not plead and initiate action. When permission was
sought to conduct cock-fight as a part of community festival, this court, applying the
provisions of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1950 and taking note of the
sufferings of the birds in the cock-fight, declined to grant permission for such cockfight and also suggested to the Government to prohibit cock-fight. While doing so,
this court quoted the father of the Nation who said The greatness of a nation and
its moral progress can be measured by the way in which its animals are treated.
[Vide S.Kannan v. The Commissioner of Police, Madurai City,Madurai, 2014 (3)
CTC 676].

9.

When we are prepared to protect even the rights of animals, we cannot show
Nelsons eye to the plight of our own brothers / sisters The transgenders. The
Transgenders, need the empathy of all, unfailingly. The transgender people are
considered neither as males nor as females for the purposes of employment and
they are put to lot of humiliation and ridicule. When a girl, who was born and brought
up and also recognized by this country as a girl, was discharged from the police
service branding her as a transgender, this court held that she shall be treated as a
woman for all purposes as she has been so recognized by the society and ordered
restoring her to service. This court distinguished the sex in the field of human biology
and the sex in the field of human psychology. This judgment is a great boon to the
transgender community [vide Nangai v. Superintendent of Police, Karur, 2014 (1)

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CWC 678 : 2014(4) LW 364 : 2014(3) CTC 497: 2014(4) MLJ 12 : 2014(3) KLT 22
(SN) (C.No.24)].
10. Surrogacy has come as a boon for the couple who yarn for a child. When the
surrogate mother carries the child in her womb, she also needs rest and medical
attention, both before and after delivery. Similarly, the biological mother also needs
time to spend with the child to look after. Whether a mother, who obtained child
through surrogacy, is entitled to Maternity Leave was answered by this Court in the
affirmative in K.Kalaiselvi v. Chennai Port Trust (2013 (2) CTC 400) by holding that
the purpose of the Rule is to facilitate bonding between the child and the parents and
that the Rule is applicable in case of adoptive mothers also and hence, surrogate
mother is entitled to Maternity Leave for child care.
11. The High Court, being an institution to protect the welfare of the poor, was confronted
with a question whether for granting educational loan to the students, the prerequisite
is that the candidate should have secured 60 marks in the qualifying examination.
The court held that it is not necessary and it is suffice that the candidate had
secured minimum qualifying marks for admission. This has paved way for many
poor students in the State to join Professional Colleges on the strength of the
educational loans. [vide Branch Manager, Indian Overseas Bank v. A. Ravi, 2014
(4) CTC 363].
12. This court, taking note of suyamarithai form of Hindu Marriage, which are valid in
the State of Tamil Nadu, held that a valid marriage does not necessarily mean that
all the customary rights pertaining to the married couple are to be followed and
subsequently solemnized. This court further expressed its view that if a woman aged
18 or above has sexual relationship with a man, aged 21 or above, and during the
course of such relationship, if the woman becomes pregnant, she would henceforth
be treated as the wife and the man would be treated as the husband. Even if the
girl does not become pregnant after having such sexual relationship with a man but
if there is strong documentary evidence to show the existence of such relationship
then also the couple involved in such acts would be termed as wife and husband.
This court further went on to declare that even after such a sexual relationship, if
both decide to separate due to difference of opinion, the husband cannot marry
without getting a decree of divorce from the Court of law against the wife. So far
as the choice of the youths in choosing their life partner, this court held that if a

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bachelor has completed 21 years of age and a spinster 18 years of age respectively
then they acquire the freedom of choice as guaranteed by the Indian Constitution.
[Vide Aysha v. Ozir Hassan (2013) 3 LW 870 : (2013) 4 CTC 90 : (2013) 2 MWN (Cri)
254 : (2013) 5 Mad LJ 31].
13. There was an alarming situation at the hands of land grabbers and anti-social
elements resorting to white collar crimes looting away the valuable landed properties
through different novel methods. Between 03.11.2011 and 18.10.2012, the District
Registrars have received 3400 complaints and the Inspector General of Registration
received 2751 such complaints of fraud. The Inspector General of Registration
issued a circular to the registering officers to order annulment of a document by
following three vital steps viz., (a) the District Registrar has to conduct an enquiry
on complaints of fraudulent registrations; (b) if fraud is proved, the Registering
Officer is directed to file FIR as per Section 83 of the Act; and (c) the Registering
Officer also has to make an endorsement by way of note of annulment in relevant
books as per the settled principle of law that once fraud in unraveled, act of fraud
become non-est. This circular was challenged in a batch of writ petitions before
the Madurai Bench in Ramasamy v. State of Tamil Nadu, rep. by its Secretary ,
Revenue Department and others, 2014 (4) CTC 627. This court held under Section
68 (2) of The Registration Act, the registrar shall have authority to issue any order
consistent with this Act which includes an order of annulment. The circular of the
Inspector General of Registration is only in tune with Section 68(2) of the Act which
will not amount to exceeding the power of the Inspector General of Registration as
simply filling up an existing vacuum till the legislature chooses to make appropriate
laws does not amount to taking over the functions of the legislature. The said circular
is only an interim measure to fill up the lacunae in dealing with the menace of the
fraudulent transactions till a suitable rule is brought in or inserted in the statute and
thus it is valid.
14. A Division Bench of this Court, in R. Muthukrishnan v. Union of India [2014 (2)
CTC 673] (DB), in a Public Interest Litigation filed challenging the Direct Benefit
Transfer Scheme for Liquefied Petroleum Gas announced by the Union of India,
while answering the preliminary issue framed as to whether an Advocate is entitled
to argue in a Public Interest Litigation with his robes, held that in a case where the
Advocate himself is the litigant, he shall not be entitled to any rights and privileges as
an Advocate while appearing in person for his own cause. The Bench also observed

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that a person cannot appear or plead before a Court of law in dual capacity, one as
party and the other as Advocate and when an Advocate is appearing as Party-inperson, he is bound to maintain norms and decorum of legal profession.
15. Madurai Bench of this court was born in 2004. Some time later, a reasonable doubt
arose in respect of the territorial jurisdiction of the Principal Bench and Madurai
Bench. This issue was referred to a Full Bench in B.Stalin v. The Registrar, Supreme
Court of India, New Delhi and others (2012) 4 CTC 113 : (2012) 5 MLJ 655 : AIR
2012 Mad 259: (2012) 3 LW 489. The Full Bench answered the reference stating
that the Chief Justice of the High Court is the Master of the Rolls and, therefore, he
alone is the competent authority to decide the posting of the matters either before
the Principal Bench or before the Madurai Bench. Referring to the Presidential Order
and following the judgment of the Honble Supreme Court in Rajasthan High Court
Advocates Association Vs. Union of India and others reported in (2001) 2 SCC 294,
the Full Bench held that in case a dispute arises as to whether an individual case or
cases should be filed and heard in the Principal Bench or in the Madurai Bench, the
same should be resolved by applying the test - from which district the case arises,
that is, in which district the cause of action can be said to have arisen. Then, the Full
Bench eventually held that it is the cause of action, either in full or in part, which
decides the territorial jurisdiction between the Principal Bench and the Madurai
Bench in each case.
16. An important question involving a constitutional issue as to whether a Former
Chairman of the State Public Service Commission is debarred from being appointed
as the Advocate General for the State came up for consideration before a Division
Bench in S.Kasiramalingam v. The Chief Secretary, Government of Tamil Nadu and
others, 2012 (5) CTC 819. This court, after having extensively dealt with various
constitutional provisions, more particularly, Article 319 (d) of the Constitution of
India, held that the Office of the Advocate General is not an employment under
the State Government and, thus, there is no constitutional bar for the appointment
of a former Chairman of Tamil Nadu Public Service Commission as the Advocate
General for the State.
17. Separation of powers among the three organs of the Government is an essential
feature of the Constitution. While dealing with the doctrine of separation of powers,
in T.Xavier v. The State of Tamil Nadu, 2012 (3) CTC 802, this court held that when

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an individual is recommended by the selection committee under the Chairmanship of


the State Consumer Commission for the post of the President of District Consumer
Disputes Redressal Forum, under The Consumer Protection Act, 1986 it is for the
State to act on that. The power conferred on the Executive is only to finalize the
name sent by the Selection Committee and not to call upon the judicial authority to
send a panel of names. The appointing authority also cannot appoint a person who
has not been recommended by the selection committee.
18. The Suspension of the Honble Opposition Leader of the Tamil Nadu Legislative
Assembly by the Assembly was under challenge before this court in Vijayakant v.
Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly rep. By its Secretary, 2012 (3) CTC 449 wherein
this court dealt with Article 212(1) of the Constitution of India which imposes a bar
upon any Court to call in question, the validity of any proceedings in the Legislature
of a State, on the ground of any alleged irregularity of procedure. Relying on Raja
Ram Pal v. Honble Speaker, Lok Sabh, (2007) 3 SCC 184, this court held that the
area of powers, privileges and immunities of the legislature, being exceptional and
extraordinary and hence if acts are not to be tested on the traditional parameters
of judicial review, this Court would confine itself to the acknowledged parameters
of judicial review and within the judicially discoverable and manageable standards.
This court further held that a complaint of infringement of fundamental right should
always be examined both at the instance of a member of the House as well as at the
instance of a non member, especially when it results in civil consequences. In other
words, the expressions fundamental right under Article 20 or Article 21 and civil
consequences as dealt with in Raja Ram Pals case should go together. Applying
the said test, this court examined all the contentions and finally held that there were
no grounds made out for the exercise of the power of judicial review.
19. The question, whether a person, who was summoned to appear and show cause
by the Privilege Committee constituted by the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly, is
entitled to be represented along with an Advocate of his choice in the proceedings,
came up for consideration, in E. Edwig v. Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly [2013 (1)
CTC 774]. This Court, after elaborately discussing the provisions of the Advocates
Act empowering Advocates to practice before any Tribunal / Person authorized
to take evidence and considering the provisions of the Constitution relating to
powers, privileges and immunities of the Houses of Parliament and its members

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and Committees, held that in the absence of any statutory impediment, Privilege
Committee of Legislature, empowered to record evidence, cannot deny assistance
of Counsel to aggrieved person.
20. A Public Interest Litigation [PIL] filed by an Advocates Association of this court
seeking a direction to the Registrar General of this Court to issue suitable orders
/ direction to the Print and Electronic Media not to publish any matter relating to
the administration of the High Court without obtaining proper permission from the
Registrar General and also not to publish any matter till the Court passes any
order therein came up for consideration in Madras High Court Practicing Advocates
Association rep. by its President, Elephant G.Rajendran, Chennai-17 v. Registrar
General, High Court of Madras and others, 2012 (3) CTC 225. The Division Bench
was precisely concerned with the restrictions reasonably necessary in the interest
of public order under Article 19(2) or in the interest of the general public under
Article 19(6) of the Constitution of India. The Division Bench commenced its journey
from the earliest case in the State of Madras v. V.G. Row, 1952 SCR 597 : AIR
1952 SC 196 and ended with Rajendra Sail Vs. Madhya Pradesh High Court Bar
Association, AIR 2005 SC 2473. This court reminded the members of the press
that the primary function of the press is to provide comprehensive and objective
information of all aspects of the countrys political, social, economic and cultural
life. It has an educative and mobilising role to play. It plays an important role in
moulding public opinion and it can be an instrument of social change. But it has to
be remembered that this freedom of press is not absolute, unlimited and unfettered
at all times and in all circumstances as giving an unrestricted freedom of speech and
expression would amount to an uncontrolled license. If it were wholly free even from
reasonable restraints it would lead to disorder and anarchy. The freedom is not to be
misunderstood as to be a press free to disregard its duty to be responsible. In fact,
the element of responsibility must be present in the conscience of the journalists.
In an organized society, the rights of the press have to be recognized with its duties
and responsibilities towards the society. Public order, decency, morality and such
other things must be safeguarded. The protective cover of press freedom must not
be thrown open for wrong doings.
21. On the contempt jurisdiction this court took serious note of a resolution passed by a
Municipal Corporation Council condemning the judgment of the trial court in Karanata
convicting the then Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu. In R.S.Bharathi v. The State of Tamil

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Nadu, rep. by its Chief Secretary to Government, Fort St. George, Chennai, and
others [W.P.No.26733 of 2014 dated 18.12.2014], this court recapitulated the broad
guidelines for punitive action for contempt. During the course of the proceedings,
the Mayor of the Municipal Corporation expressed her deep regret and apology for
the offensive and derogatory remarks made against the judiciary, more specifically
the Judge concerned. She had also undertaken to give publicity to her regret and
unconditional apology and to issue press statements expressing her regrets. This
Court accordingly directed her to issue a press release and publish her regret and
unconditional apology in the newspapers, where the item appeared reporting her
earlier conduct and admonished the contemnor.
22. In the field of education , an important question arose as to whether the Private
Unaided Educational Institutions affiliated to CBSE and ICSE Schools are immune
from regulations by the State and the provisions of the Tamil Nadu Private Schools
(Regulation of Collection of Fee) Act, 2009. This issue was examined in the light
of the Right to Free and Compulsory Education Act. After having elaborately dealt
with the issue, a Division Bench held that the State Government is not totally alien
to have control over the schools and further held that appropriate Government
for all the Schools established within the territory of the State is only the State
Government, which can exercise domain over all the Schools including CBSE and
ICSE Schools and accordingly it concluded that the provisions of the Tamil Nadu
Private Schools (Regulation of Collection of Fee) Act, 2009 are applicable to CBSE
and ICSE schools in the State of Tamil Nadu. [Vide Lakshmi School v. The State of
Tamil Nadu 2012 (6) CTC 8] .
23. In M/s.Salem Textiles Limited v. The Authorized Officer, Phonex ARC Pvt. Ltd., 2013
(3) CTC 257, the scope of Section 13(4) of The Securitisation and Reconstruction
of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002 [SARFAESI Act],
came up for consideration in the light of Section 22 of The Sic Industrial Companies
(Special Provisions) Act, 1985 [SICA]. The Full Bench held that once an action is
initiated in terms of Section 13(4) of the SARFAESI Act, by the secured creditors
representing three-fourths in value of the total amount outstanding, the proceedings
before BIFR would automatically abate, in view of the third proviso inserted by Act
54 of 2002 under Section 15(1) of SICA 1985. The secured creditors are not obliged
to seek permission of BIFR under section 22 (1) of SICA, for taking action under
Section 13(4) and for bringing to an end the proceedings before BIFR, provided

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they represent three-fourths in value of the total amount outstanding and they take a
concerted decision to initiate action under Section 13(4) of Securitisation Act, 2002.
24. Constitutionality of Section 17-A (1), 17-A (2) and 17-A (3) of The Industrial Disputes
Act, 1947, which was introduced empowering the State Governments to declare
an award as not enforceable was examined. A learned single Judge of this court
declared that Section 17-A of the Industrial Disputes Act stands struck down so
far as the Union Territory of Puducherry is concerned since, the Andhra Pradesh
High Court in Telugunadu Workcharged Employees vs. Govt of India reported in
1997 (3) ALT 492 had struck it down as unconstitutional. The court took the view
that if once it is struck down by one High Court, then, the said provision disappears
in the statute book for all States and the Central Government. The Union of India
took up the matter on appeal in Union of India v. Textile Tradesmen Association,
(2014) 5 LW 184 : (2014) 6 CTC 427. The Division Bench affirmed the view of the
single Judge and held that the declaration made by the Andhra Pradesh High Court
that Section 17-A of the Industrial Disputes Act is unconstitutional holds good even
today for all States including the Union Territory of Puducherry. The Division Bench
further affirmed the view that Section 17-A of the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947, is
unconstitutional.
25. In Solai Subramanian alias S.Subramanian v. The Chief Secretary, Tamil Nadu
State Government, 2014 (4) CTC 821, applying the provisions of the Tamil Nadu
Official Language Act, 1956 [T.N. ACt 39 of 1956 as amended by Tamil Nadu Act
41 of 1976] this court has held that Tamil Language shall be used for all official
purposes in the State of Tamil Nadu and further held that in the Subordinate Courts,
the proceedings shall be conducted and judgment delivered only in Tamil Language.
26. After the establishment of Madurai Bench , for the first time, a Full Bench of fiveJudges was constituted in J.Alex Ponseelan v. State, 2014 (2) CTC 337 to decide
whether Rule 14(b)(iv) of the Tamil Nadu Special Police Subordinate Service Rules,
1978, is violative of Articles 14 and 16 of The Constitution of India and whether mere
involvement in the criminal case despite the acquittal would be a disqualification for
the post of Grade-II Police Constable. The Larger Bench by majority of 4:1, upheld,
the constitutionality of Rule 14(b)(iv) of the Tamil Nadu Special Police Subordinate
Service Rules, 1978 and also held that a person who has been discharged in a
criminal case is also disqualified for the post.

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27. The Dental Council of India revised B.D.S., course Regulations, 2007, prescribing
three years upper time limit for a student to successfully complete the I year B.D.S.,
University examination, from the date of admission in the course was challenged
before the Madurai Bench of this Court in Nizvy Sunil Prakash v. The Secretary
Dental Council of India (2014 (1) CTC 257) wherein, this Court, after having
analyzed the Dental Council of India Revised B.D.S., Course Regulations, 2007
and The Dentist Act, 1948, held that there was no effective consultation of the State
Governments under Section 20(2) of the Act before the issuance of the regulations,
and thus, the regulation is arbitrary, violative of Article 14 of the Constitution of India
and accordingly this court struck down the said provision in the Regulations.
28. An important question as to whether The Indian Medical Council Act, 1956, The
Dentists Act, 1948 and the the Indian Nursing Council Act, 1947, would prevail
upon the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research
Puducherry Act, 2008 and vice versa came up for consideration before this court
in Miss.Aheli Bal The Director of JIPMER, Puducherry, 2014 WLR 753. The issue
was that a failed student, who could not secure the minimum marks prescribed by
the Institute, challenged the same on the ground that since she had not secured the
minimum marks prescribed under the Graduate Medical Education Regulations,
1997, by The Medical Council of India, in exercise of the power conferred under
The Indian Medical Council Act, 1956, she should be declared to have passed the
said examination. After having made a scientific analysis of these relevant Central
legislations and after having referred to the judgment in Annamalai University,
represented by its Registrar v. Secretary to Government, Information and Tourism
Department and others reported in (2009) 4 SCC 590 this court held that though
the provisions of UGC Act are binding on all Universities, whether conventional or
open , Section 24 of the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and
Research Puducherry Act, 2008 clearly and explicitly in the matter of providing
medical degrees by the JIPMER Institute, excludes the Indian Medical Council
Act, 1956, the Dentist Act, 1948 and the Indian Nursing Council Act, 1947 from
the provisions of the JIPMER Act for granting medical degrees and, therefore, no
provision under the Indian Medical Council Act, 1956 and no regulation or rule framed
under the said Act prescribing any criteria for passing the M.B.B.S. Course or post
graduate medical education course will prevail over the JIPMER Act. Thus, the
court held that the candidate cannot be declared to have passed the examination
based on the minimum marks prescribed by the Regulations, 1997.
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29. The constitutionality of Section 2(1)(o) of Securitisation and Reconstruction


of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002 [in short,
SARFAESI] as well as the guidelines issued by the Reserve Bank of India
pertaining to the classification of accounts as non-performing assets was examined
by a Division Bench in a batch of writ petitions in M/s.Deccan Chronicles Holdings
Limited v. Union of India 2014 (3) CTC 321. Since the constitutionality of SARFAESI
Act, 2002 was already upheld in Mardia Chemicals Limited and others Vs. Union
of India and others, (2004) 4 SCC 311, the Division Bench declined to reopen the
said issue as it is impermissible. The court further held that the definition of non
preforming assets under the master circular and the subsequent categorization of
a sub-standard, doubtful or loss asset would not make the provision ultra vires nor
it would make the norms as unconstitutional. The court further observed that while
exercising the power of judicial review, a good deal of latitude is permissible in case
of economic statutes. Thus, the court adopted dignified reluctance.
30. In N.V.Sankaran Alias Gnani v. State of Tamil Nadu, 2013 (1) CTC 686, Sections
2(1), 3, 4, 6 and 7 of The Tamil Nadu Dramatic Performances Act, 1954 and Rule
4 of the Tamil Nadu Dramatic Performances Rules, 1955 were challenged on the
ground that the definition of the term objectionable performance as defined in
Section 2(1) of the said Act is too vague to be brought within the restriction of Article
19(2) of the Constitution. This court upheld the said challenge and also held that
the power conferred on the State Government under Section 3 as well as to the
Police Commissioner / District Collectors under Section 4 is too wide and highly
discretionary. Thus, the Court held that these provisions are violative of Articles 14
and 19 of the Constitution.
31. The employees working in religious institutions governed by the Tamil Nadu Hindu
Religious and Charitable Endowments Act, 1959 made a claim for gratuity under
The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972 on the pleading that such a temple / religious
institution is an establishment as defined in The Payment of Gratuity Act. The matter
was dealt with by a Full Bench in E.Gopal v. Arulmigu Dhandayuthapaniswamy
Temple, Palani, 2013 (3) CTC 689, wherein the Full Bench held that Section 1(3)
(b) of The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972 is applicable to the religious institutions
and that the provisions of the said Act which form a complete Code by itself will
override the provisions of The Tamil Nadu Hindu Religious Institutions (Officers and
Servants) Service Rules, 1964. Accordingly, the Full Bench answered the question

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that the employees of the temples/religious institutions governed by the Tamil Nadu
Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments Act are entitled for gratuity under The
Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972.
32. The jurisdiction of the Central Administrative Tribunal constituted under The
Administrative Tribunal Act, 1985 to entertain a petition by a non aggrieved against
the selection and appointment of a candidate came up for consideration before a
Division Bench. The petitioner therein, who was in State service, was selected
and appointed to the Indian Administrative Service. That was challenged before the
Central Administrative Tribunal which set aside the selection and appointment. It
was taken before the Division Bench of this court and the Division Bench held that
under Section 19 of the Act, a petition can be filed only by the aggrieved. A person
knocking at the doors of the Tribunal has to satisfy that he has a statutory or a legal
right. Thereafter, the Tribunal has to be satisfied that there has been a breach of
such a legal right. The said breach should be capable of being enforced before
the Tribunal. The respondents must have the corresponding legal duty to remedy
the breach of a legal right of an aggrieved person. Hence, the existence of a legal
right is a condition precedent before the Tribunal decides to invoke its jurisdiction.
[vide D. Jagannathan, IAS, District Collector, Namakkal District v. S. Sattanathan,
Additional Director and others, (2013) 6 CTC 129: (2013) 7 Mad LJ 385].
33. In a challenge to Notification issued under the provisions of Foreign Trade
(Development & Regulation) Act, 1992 read with paragraph 1.2 of the Foreign Trade
Policy, 2009 2014, this Court in Sai Graphic Systems v. Commissioner of Customs
[(2012) 6 MLJ 50] categorised Restricted Category in import of goods and held
used Digital Multifunction Print and Copying Machines will fall under Restricted
Category only prospectively and will not have retrospective effect. This Court, after
having considered the provisions of Foreign Trade (Development and Regulation)
Act, further observed that any imported goods which come under Sub-Clause
2.171(1)(ii) of the Act would fall under Restricted Category only after 05.6.2012
the date of impugned notification.
34. The Power of High Court to punish for contempt of Company Law Board was in
doubt. A Division Bench of this Court in New Bridge Holdings B.V. v. TTK-LIG
Limited [(2012) 3 CTC 524] (DB) held that the phrase courts subordinate to it used
in Section 10 of the Contempt of Courts Act is wide enough to include all courts

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which are judicially subordinate to the High Court even though they are not under
its administrative control under Article 235 of The Constitution of India and thus, the
High Court has power to punish for the contempt of Company Law Board.
35. School dropouts due to various reasons such as poverty, lack of support from the
family, when they grow old realizing the importance of education and to satisfy their
longing for a degree , undergo Under Graduate and Post Graduate courses through
Open University System and with great difficulty they acquire such degrees. Some
of them who applied for the posts included either in Group I or Group II Services
of Tamil Nadu came within the zone of consideration. But, the Tamil Nadu Public
Service Commission, holding that such degrees obtained through Open University
Stream are not equivalent to the degrees obtained by undergoing regular courses
rejected their candidatures. When the aggrieved approached this court in a batch
of writ petitions in P.Raman v. Government of Tamil Nadu, 2014 SCC OnLine Mad
1009 [W.P.No.13054 of 2010, etc., by order dated 21.04.2014], this court held that
the validity of a degree shall not be tested on the anvil of the Government Order,
but the same shall be tested based on the relevant UGC Regulations. The relevant
Regulation framed under Section 26 of the University Grants Commission Act, 1956
is 1985 UGC Regulations and Clause 1 of Regulation 2 of 1985 UGC Regulations
makes it clear that the Open Universities could admit students to the degree course
in the non-formal/distance education mode even if they did not pass +2 examination,
but those students should have passed the entrance test for admission to the degree
course. Taking such a view, this court declared that such graduates are entitled
to be selected for the posts included in Group II services and they should be given
appointment.
36. In exercise of the power conferred on the State Government under Section 23-C
(1) of The Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act, 1957, the Tamil
Nadu Government has issued rules known as The Tamil Nadu Prevention of Illegal
Mining, Transportation and Storage of Minerals and Mineral Dealers Rules, 2011
with a view to prevent illegal mining, transportation and storage of minerals. It
was argued before this court in Sri Veknataramanaswamhy Blue Metals v. District
Collector, (2014) 5 MLJ 397 that as per the said Rules only for transporting the
minerals, transit pass is required as per the said rules and not for mineral products.
Whether the crushed sand powder, crushed stone powder, crushed stones into

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different sizes would make out as mineral products so as to fall outside the purview
of the requirement of transport? This court has held that the quarried stones that
are simply crushed into different sizes, could not be treated as a new mineral
product, as there is no change in the fundamental nature of the mineral and hence,
for transporting the same from one place to another transit pass is required.
37. Transparency has almost become the hallmark of the day. Now, The Right to
Information Act, 2005 is a way forward. When an information under The Right to
Information Act, 2005, was asked for, from an aided college affiliated to Anna
University, the college negatived the request contending that it is not a public
authority as defined in Section 2(h)(d) of the Act. After having analyzed the scope of
the Act in the light of various judgments, this court in Registrar, Thiyagarajar College
of Engineering v. Registrar, Tamil Nadu Information Commission, (2013) 6 MLJ 669
held that since the college is aided by the Government though it is an autonomous
college, it is a public authority falling within the purview of The Right to Information
Act, 2005.
38. Yes, it discriminates. When the son of a deceased employee seeks employment
on compassionate grounds, it is immaterial whether he is married or not; whereas,
it matters in the case of a female. If the daughter of a deceased employee is
married, the Government takes a stand that she is not entitled for employment
on compassionate grounds. In K.Mahalakshmi v. The Secretary to Government,
Department of Revenue and others, [W.P.No.14341 of 2012 dated 17.04.2014] this
court found that it amounts to a serious violation of fundamental rights under Articles
14, 15 and 16 of The Constitution of India and, accordingly, held that it matters not
that she is married when she is considered for compassionate appointment.
39. In Virudhunagar District Bus Owners Assocaition v. The Government of Tamil Nadu
[W.P.No.6216 and 6217 of 2011 dated 31.10.2014] this court held that any levy of
toll / tax / charge or fee cannot be made except with the authority of law. This Court
has also held that the ratification is bad in law. Similarly, any levy for the first time
cannot be imposed with retrospective effect. The fixation of tax with retrospective
effect is bad unless there is an express provision. Therefore, this court struck down
the notification issued by the Government.
40. When a person, without legal qualification, is permitted to handle legal issues, if a
wrong decision is taken because of ignorance of law, it will end up in a legal case
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and cause revenue loss to the Government. At times, the Courts have also come
across cases, where the claims are being contested only to settle personnel scores,
without any legal basis particularly on settled issues. Time and again, this Court
and the Honble Apex Court have impressed upon the Government Departments to
refrain from contesting or filing appeals in all the cases. When the post of Senior
Superintendent [Legal] was sought to be filled up the Tamil Nadu State Transport
Corporation by appointing a Non Law Graduate candidate, this court held that only
persons with the legal back ground shall be appointed. [vide C.Subramani v. The
Government of Tamil Nadu & others, 2014 WLR 266].
41. The statue of a Versatile cine actor was erected on the middle portion of a road
giving raise to a dispute resulting in a pro bono publico, seeking a direction to the
Government of Tamil Nadu to remove the same in P.N.Srinivasan (deceased) v. The
State of Tamil Nadu (2014(1) CTC 561). A Division Bench of this Court issued a
mandamus to the Government of Tamil Nadu to take decision regarding the removal
of statue in the light of the observation that the statue would affect the traffic flow
and the view of the vehicles passing through Dr.Radhakrishnan Salai.
42. In Arpit Jhnwar v. Kamlesh Jain rep. by its Power of Attorney Agent and Manager
D.Lalit Kumar [2012 - 2 - L.W. (Crl) 57], while interpreting the expression Company
in terms of Section 141 of The Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881, this court
held that a Hindu Undivided Family [HUF] is not a company and, therefore, the
members of the Hindu Undivided Family are not liable for punishment for the offence
under Section 138 of The Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881 committed by the
Kartha. At the same time, this court, in M/s.Abraham Memorial Educational Trust
v. C.Suresh Babu, [2012 - 2 - L.W. (Crl.) 196, held that a public charitable trust is a
company in terms of Section 141 of The Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881, and
further held that for the offence under Section 138 of The Negotiable Instruments
Act, 1881 committed by the trust, the trustees, who are actively engaged in the day
to day affairs of the trust are also equally liable. This judgment was confirmed by
the Honble Supreme Court by dismissing the Special Leave Petition in SLP 6763 6764 of 2012 [vide Rajiv Runcie Ebenezer and others v. C.Suresh Babu].
43. Due to the phenomenal increase in the International Arbitrations involving foreign
litigants, foreign law firms and lawyers have started appearing in such proceedings
in India. In A.K.Balaji v. The Government of India, 2012 (2) CTC 1, the question

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whether the practice of legal profession by Foreign Law Firms or any Individual
Foreign Lawyer is illegal and impermissible as per the provisions of The Advocates
Act, 1961 was considered. This court held that Foreign Law Firms or Foreign
Lawyers cannot practice the profession of law in India either on the litigation or nonlitigation side unless they fulfill the requirements of The Advocates Act, 1961 and
the Bar Council of India Rules, however, there is no bar for them to visit India for a
temporary period on a fly-in and fly-out basis for the purpose of giving legal advise
to their clients in India relating to law which is applicable to their country.
44. An order granting interim protection, if could be passed by the Insolvency Court
before the order of adjudication is made was in a pale of doubt. A Full Bench of this
Court, in Ramalingam v. Radha, 2011 (3) LW 769 after having considered the earlier
two conflicting views expressed by two different Division Benches in Sinnaswamy
Chettiar v. Aligi Goundan and others [AIR 1924 Madras 893] and Nallagatti Goundan
v. Ramkana Goundan and others [AIR 1925 Madras 170], held that even before the
final adjudication, an Insolvency Court has inherent power to pass interim order of
protection and, of course, such interim order shall be passed depending upon the
facts and circumstances of each individual case and to meet the ends of justice.
45. The distinction between Section 30 and Section 34 of the Arbitration Act, 1940 was
highlighted in Gayathri Balaswamy v. ISG Novasoft Technologies Ltd., Represented
by The Chairman of the Board, 2014 (6) CTC 602 wherein the court held that the
scope of jurisdiction has been suitably reduced and regulated by Section 34 of the
New Act. A further question arose before the court i.e., whether the High Court
could modify or revise or vary the order in an application filed under Section 34 of
the Act. After having referred to the legal position in the international scenario, more
particularly, in Canada, United States of America and Singapore, this Court took a
pro-active view that the High Court has power under Section 34 of The Arbitration
Act to modify or vary the award passed by the Arbitral Tribunal.
46. The principle of Forum conveniens if could be applied to a writ jurisdiction and
whether the situs of the trade mark registry in Chennai and the name being on its
register would by itself give rise to cause of action to institute a suit in the Madras
High Court came up for consideration before a Full Bench of this court presided
over by the Chief Justice in M/s.Duro Flex Pvt. Limited, represented by its Managing
Director v. M/s.Duroflex Sittings System, 2014 (6) CTC 577. After having a thorough

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survey of various judgments on this subject, the Full Bench concluded that the fact
that situs of jurisdiction of the Trade Mark Registry at Chennai

by itself would

not be sufficient to give rise to a cause of action to institute the suit in the Madras
High Court, though it may be a factor to be taken into account, among the bundle
of facts, for the purposes of determining the situs of the cause of action. On the
question of forum conveniens , the Full Bench held that there is little doubt that the
principles of forum conveniens, though not applicable to civil proceedings, have a
role to play insofar as the consideration of grant of leave or revocation thereof under
Clause 12 of the Letters Patent is concerned. This is irrespective of the fact as to
what expression is used. As observed aforesaid, the balance of convenience is also
forum conveniens. The test applied is of appropriateness or suitability of the forum
which ought to apply, whether it be called forum conveniens or that the jurisdiction
of the Court under Section 20 of the Code of Civil Procedure is different from Clause
12 of the Letters Patent. Thus, the Division Bench expressed the view that the
appropriateness or suitability of the forum would be material for grant of leave or
revocation thereof and to that extent, the principle forum conveniens is applicable.
47. In Venkatachalam and others v. Sengoda Gounder and others, 2014 (6) CTC 216,
when a compromise is recorded, in a civil suit under Order XXIII , Rule 1 of CPC,
whether the entire court-fee could be ordered to be refunded to the litigant came
up for consideration. As per Section 69 of The Tamil Nadu Court-Fees and Suits
Valuation Act, 1955, the litigant is entitled to refund of court-fee if the matter is settled
before the Lok Adalat. This court liberally extended the application of Section 69
of the Tamil Nadu Court-Fee and Suits Valuation Act even to the cases settled and
recorded at the appeal stage under Order XXIII of CPC and held that the High
Court invoking its power under Article 226 of the Constitution of India could order for
refund of the entire court-fee to the litigant. This decision will surely take forward the
object of Section 89 of CPC and it could be said to be a pro-active judgment.
48. In Dr.G.Gopalaswamy v. N. Raghavulu Naidu, 2014 (6) CTC 762 when interim
injunction was sought for against the defendant restraining him from publishing or
sending any petition lowering the image of the applicant in the eye of public and
thereby causing harm to the reputation of the applicant pending disposal of the
suit, this court explained the scope of freedom of speech guaranteed under Article
19(1)(a) of the Constitution of India vis a vis allowable restrictions of the said right
and held that the defendant, being a practicing lawyer having a civil dispute with

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the applicant, should not indulge in making such reckless allegations against the
petitioner tending to lower his reputation as the same would offend the fundamental
rights of the applicant. This court further held that granting injunction against the
defendant would squarely fall within the reasonable restriction as allowed under the
Constitution.
49. Earlier the Supreme Court had held the view that Indian Courts would have
jurisdiction to set aside the Foreign Awards. It was overruled by the Supreme Court
in Bharat Aluminium Co. v Kaiser Aluminium Technical Service Inc., 2012 (5) CTC
615 [SC] and following the same, a Division Bench of this Court declined to interfere
with the Foreign Award. This court further held that a settlement agreement arrived
at subsequently in alteration of the earlier agreement would become an integral part
of earlier agreement containing the arbitration clause and, therefore, despite that
settlement, the arbitration clause shall survive. [Vide Adam & Coal Resources Pvt.
Ltd., v. Interbulk Trading SA, rep. by its Authorized Signatory, (2014) 5 CTC 704 :
(2014) 4 LW 833].
50. While dealing with the limitation prescribed in The Carriage by Air Act, 1972, for
filing a suit for damages, this court held that Article 14 of The Limitation Act, being
a general law, is not applicable, as it stands overridden by the provisions of the
Carriage by Air Act. This court also held that the time spent before the District
Consumer Forum under The Consumer Protection Act, 1986, cannot be excluded
while computing the period of limitation. [M/s M.R.F. Limited v. M/s Singapore
Airlines Limited, (2014) 1 LW 921 : (2014) 5 CTC 296]
51. In Eurotherm India Pvt. Ltd. v. Johnson Lifts Pvt. Ltd. (2014) 3 MWN (Civil) 407 :
2014 (5) CTC 41, a suit was filed for specific performance of contract of sale of the
property situated outside the territorial jurisdiction of the court where the suit was
filed. It was contended that it was a suit for land, and, therefore, as per Sections
16 and 20 of CPC, the court lacked jurisdiction. When it was contended by the
suitor that it was only a simple suit for specific performance of contract, the court
pointed out that as per Section 22 and 28 of the Specific Relief Act, possession
could be obtained latter in execution with or without amending the prayer in the
plaint. Accordingly, this court held that a suit for specific performance is a suit for
land and, therefore, the court within whose territorial jurisdiction the suit property lies
alone has jurisdiction to entertain the suit. Similar view was earlier taken by a single

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Judge of this court in T.Ekambaram v. Bhavani Sagari, 2013 -2 - LW 647 : 2013 (3)
CTC 8.
52. Not long ago, several suits filed before the High Court on the original side were
all later on transferred to City Civil Courts consequent upon enhancement of the
pecuniary jurisdiction of the City Civil Courts necessitating the demand for Additional
Court fee to be paid as per the Tamil Nadu Court Fees and Suits Valuation Act, 1955,
which varies from the High Court Fees Rules, 1956. Since there were conflicting
judgments, the matter was before a Full Bench of this Court in Darsana Bai (died)
v. C.Saroja, 2014 (1)CTC 673. Having noticed the anomalies existing between the
High Court Fees Rules, 1956 and the Tamil Nadu Court Fees and Suits Valuation Act,
1955 in the matter of payment of court fee, the Full Bench suggested for necessary
amendment in the High Court Fees Rules, 1956 in tune with the Tamil Nadu Court
Fees and Suits Valuation Act, 1955 so as to avoid filing of frivolous cases before
the original side of the High Court by inflating the value of the claims. The Court,
eventually, held that there is no need to pay additional court fee when the suits
are transferred from original side of the High Court to the City Civil Court due to
change of pecuniary jurisdiction. But, when the suits are transferred by an order of
the Court, additional court fee has to be paid as per the Tamil Nadu Court Fees and
Suits Valuation Act. The Full Bench also held that Court fee payable under Section
52 of the Tamil Nadu Court Fees and Suits Valuation Act, 1955 is the court fees that
would have been payable if the suit had been filed in the court which passed the
decree. The phrase, first instance as enshrined in Section 52 of the Tamil Nadu
Court Fees and Suits Valuation Act, 1955 means only the Court which passed the
decree and not the Court in which the suit was filed.
53. An Advocate of Madurai Bench of Madras High Court filed a pro bono publico
complaining about the excessive interest charged by non banking financial
companies. [vide Ar. Jayarhuthran v. Union of India, W.P.No.14627 of 2012 dated
14.11.2014]. In that case, this court observed that the rate of interest to be charged
by the company is governed by the terms and conditions of the loan agreement
entered into between the borrower and the NBFCs. However, in order to ensure
transparency in such matters, the NBFCs have been advised by RBI to adopt a
Fair Practices Code, with the approval of their Boards. The NBFCs have also been
advised to lay down appropriate internal principles and procedures in determining
interest rates and processing and other charges. This court finally held that though

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interest rates are not regulated by the Bank, rates of interest beyond a certain level
may be seen to be excessive and can neither be sustainable nor be conforming to the
normal financial practice and accordingly advised NBFCs to lay down appropriate
internal principles and procedures in determining interest rates and processing and
other charges.
54. The scope of Section 149 of CPC was reiterated by this court in Parasuraman v.
Kadhirvel [C.R.P. (PD) No.3222 of 2012 dated 22.07.2014]. In that case, a plaint,
which was returned for certain defects for not having paid the sufficient court-fees
was not represented within fifteen days prescribed in the return order and instead,
it was represented with a delay of 2001 days. An interlocutory application was
filed under Section 149 of CPC to condone the said delay in representation. The
order allowing the said interlocutory application was challenged before this court
under Article 227 of The Constitution of India. This court, after having referred to a
number of judgments of the Supreme Court, held that Section 149 of CPC is only in
respect of deficit of court-fees and the same has got nothing to do with the delay in
representation of the plaint itself. Distinguishing these two aspects, the court held
that representation of the plaint after 2001 days of delay was barred by time and
accordingly, set aside the order of the trial court.
55. The Doctrine of Marz-ul-maut relating to a will allegedly executed by a Mohammedan
came to be dealt with by this court in M.Abdul Hassan v. A.Maimoonamal, (2014) 2
MLJ 449. This court held that if it is pleaded that a Will is affected by the doctrine
of marz-ul-maut, when the execution of the document is admitted and the mental
capacity of the executor is also admitted then the only question to be considered
is whether the executant was under the pressure of death or in contemplation of
death. This court further held that the plea that the executant was not in a sound
disposing state of mind, to execute the Will and the plea that the will was affected by
the doctrine of Marz-ul-maut are mutually contradictory.
56. In Pushpa v. K.H.Raviendrran [(2012) 6 MLJ 368], this court has held that a widow
who gets a property from the estate of her husband as his legal heir under the
Hindu Succession Act, 1956 gets it as an absolute asset and such vested property
shall not be divested because of her re-marriage.

In a suit for partition filed by

the son against his father and three sisters, this Court in K.M.Thangavel vs. K.T.
Udayakumar [2014 (2) CTC 113], considering the various provisions of the Hindu

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Succession Act, 1956 after the Hindu Succession (Amendment) Act, 2005 held that
when a person having an interest in a property of Joint Family governed by Hindu
Mitakshara Law had died before the commencement of the Amendment Act, 2005,
the succession to his interest would have opened on his death. In Arunagiri v. Ayyar
Muthuraja and others, 2014 (1) CTC 73, a Division Bench of this Court dealt with the
cope of Sections 8 and 15 of The Hindu Succession Act, 1956 after the Amendment
Act, 2005. This court held that the property allotted in a partition to a Hindu male
shall be his absolute property over which his sons and daughters shall not have any
right to demand for partition during his life time.
57. Dr. Meera Thinakaran v. State of Tamil Nadu and others [(2012) 2 CTC 759] was a
case where the property was brought for sale under the public auction by the Recovery
Officer attached to Debt Recovery Tribunal, and a Sale Certificate was issued as
provided in Rule 65 of the II Schedule to the Income Tax Act. A question arose,
as to whether stamp duty as per Article 23 of the Indian Stamp Act and surcharge
under Section 116-A of the Tamil Nadu District Municipalities Act should be paid for
registration of the same. This Court, considering various provisions of the Acts and
following the decision of the Honble Apex Court in Municipal Corporation of Delhi v.
Pramod Kumar, held that the provisions of the Tamil Nadu District Municipalities Act,
1920 and Delhi Municipal Corporation Act, 1967 are in pari materia and as such, the
same would be applicable to matters under Section 116-A of the Tamil Nadu Act.
This Court also held that the Recovery Officer under the Recovery of Debts due to
Banks and Financial Institutions Act will fall within the meaning of a Revenue Officer
under Article 18 of the Indian Stamp Act and Certificate of Sale issued by him will
fall within the said provision and so registration is purely optional in respect of such
Certificate issued by the Recovery Officer. Thus, this court held that stamp duty is
to be paid as per Article 18 of the Stamp Act and it is not liable for any subcharge.
58. In Bajaj Alianz General Insurance Co. Ltd., v. C.Ramesh, 2013 (1) TN MAC 325,
the scope of personal accident cover policy was considered. This court held that
Contract of Insurance under the Personal Accident Cover is direct and personal
and it is between the insured and the Insurer, and unlike the claim by the third
parties, the question of indemnifying the insured to pay compensation, on his behalf
to third parties, does not arise. As Personal Accident Cover Policy is intended
for the personal risks of the owner-cum-driver, in the event of injury or death, the
Insurance Company is obligated to pay compensation, directly to the owner-cum-

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driver or the Legal Representatives, as the case may be. Therefore, the principles
of law applicable to third party claims, cannot be made applicable, when there is a
Personal Accident Cover Policy and that the insured, owner-cum-driver or the Legal
Representatives, as the case may be, are entitled to receive compensation, if the
terms and conditions of the Policy, are satisfied and when he has not suffered any
disqualification.
59. Contributory infringement or Ancillary infringement - Will it also amount to
infringement of The Trade Marks Act, 1999 in terms of Section 28 of the Act or not?.
This came to be considered by this Court in Concim Info. Pvt. Ltd., v. Google India
Pvt. Ltd., and others 2012 5 LW 1. In the field of internet , a search engine is an
information retrieval system designed to help find information stored on a system.
When one enters into the net and goes to a search engine, the first page that opens
up on the screen of the computer is the Home Page. The home page contains a
box in which, the person making the search has to type the key words or the search
terms. Just below the box, two options will be indicated. One is an open search
option, which is actually a wild search. Another is a limited search option, indicated
by the phraseology Im feeling lucky. The moment one clicks the keyword in the
open search option, two types of results are thrown open. The results that appear
on the left hand side are known as organic results and those that appear on the
right hand side are known as sponsored links. The information provided on the
left hand side as natural or organic results, is excavated by the search engine from
out of a mine field of data stored in its web pages. When a dispute arose alleging
infringement of trade marks by advertisements posted in the search engines, the
search engine took a plea that he is not responsible for any trade marks infringement
by the advertiser. This court held that the advertiser is liable for infringement of
trade marks. The search engine [Google] is also liable as its act would amount to
contributory infringement or ancillary infringement.
60. The Doctrine of Thrown Away Votes? was elaborately dealt with in a Panchayat
Election Petition. The election of the returned candidate was challenged on the
ground of disqualification suffered by him. This court set aside the election of the
returned candidate since he was so disqualified holding that his nomination should
have been rejected by the Returning Officer. This court, however, declined to declare
the next candidate in line as elected for if there are only two candidates in the fray,
had the returning officer had rejected the nomination of the candidate who has won

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the election, the next candidate alone would have been in the fray and in such an
event, he would have been elected unopposed and therefore, the said candidate
should be declared as elected applying the doctrine, which is known as Thrown
Away Votes. This court further held that the said doctrine cannot be applied when
there are a number of candidates and when the difference in votes between the
candidates is very marginal. The court further clarified that it cannot be presumed
that the electors who voted for the disqualified returned candidate would have voted
for the next candidate or for all the other candidates and therefore, the doctrine of
thrown away votes cannot be applied when there are more than two candidates.
[Vide G.Velmurugan v. Soundaravalli and others, 2014 (5) CTC 304].
61. The proceedings conducted by the Juvenile Justice Board in gross violation of the
provisions of The Juvenile Justice [Care and Protection of Children] Act, 2000,
The Juvenile Justice [Care and Protection of Children] Rules, 2007 and The Tamil
Nadu Juvenile Justice [Care and Protection of Children] Rules, 2001 was quashed
by this court in Idukkan v. The Inspector of Police, B-2, Esplanade Police Station,
Chennai [2012 - 2 - L.W. (Crl.) 121 and this Court issued various guidelines for the
investigation, custody of juveniles in conflict with law and conduct of the proceedings
before the Juvenile Justice Board.
62. The question whether a Chief Judicial Magistrates has got power to pass order
for taking possession under Section 14 of The Securitisation and Reconstruction
of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interest Act, 2002 [in short,
SARFAESI] was referred to a Full Bench of this Court in K.Arockiyaraj v. The
Chief Judicial Magistrate, Srivilliputhur, Virudhunagar District, in which, 2013 - 4
- L.W. 485 wherein the Full Bench held that such power is vested only with Chief
Metropolitan Magistrate [CMM] in Metropolitan Areas and District Magistrates
[Executive Magistrates] in other areas and that the Chief Judicial Magistrates [CJMs]
have no power at all to pass such orders.
63. Whether there is any prohibition or not for the court to order the default sentence of
imprisonment imposed for the non payment of fine amount also to run concurrently
was answered by a Division Bench of this Court in Donatus Tony Ikwansui, 2013
(2) CTC 1. After having extensively dealt with Sections 31 and 427 of Cr.P.C. and
Section 64 of IPC, the Full Bench held that the default sentence imposed by a
criminal court cannot be ordered to run concurrently with the substantive sentence.

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64. The scope of Innocent passage clause recognized by Articles 18 and 19 of the
United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) (1982) was dealt
with by the Madurai Bench of this Court in Mariya Anton Vijaya v. The State) (2014
(2) L.W (Crl.) 545). Factually speaking, a ship was found anchored within the
territorial Waters of India with arms. The arms were brought from United Kingdom.
A case was registered under the Arms Act (1959) and the Essential Commodities
Act (1955). The owner, the Captain and the Crew of the Ship were all prosecuted.
Some accused who supplied food and diesel to them from Indian soil were also
prosecuted along with them. The accused moved the Madurai Bench for quashing
the case. The Court dealt with the Territorial Waters, Continental Shelf, Exclusive
Economic Zone and other Maritime Zones Act (1976) together with Articles 18
and 19 of (UNCLOS) (1982) and found that the vessel had the Right of innocent
passage and accordingly, held that there was no offence committed under Section
27(1)(a) to (d) of the Arms Act. The Court also found that only the Captain and yet
another Indian were liable to be prosecuted, that too, under Section 7(1)(a)(ii) of
the Essential Commodities Act for having violated The Motor Spirit and High Speed
Diesel [Regulation of Supply, Distribution and Prevention of Malpractices] Order,
2005.
65. An young girl was attempted to be sexually exploited by her own father and in order
to protect her modesty, she used a weapon which became handy to her and killed
him. When she was prosecuted for an offence under Section 304(ii) of IPC, this
court quashed the proceedings holding that the right of private defence of body
which extends to cause the death is not a matter to be gone into only at the time of
trial, but, at the time of investigation as well. This court felt that allowing the girl to
undergo the ordeal of trial would amount to violation of her human rights. Thus, this
court protected the dignity of the girl. [vide Anuj Jermi , 2012 (3) MWN (Crl) 161:
2012 (5) CTC 433].
66. Unreasonable boycotts of courts by the Advocates have been declared as illegal.
But, in practice , it happens frequently in this State. Advocates of both sexes,
become victims of crime and when they come to the Court for giving evidence for the
prosecution, can the Judge send them away on the score that the defence counsel
is not present? The answer is an emphatic No. What applies to lawyers should

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apply to others too. If a Judge records evidence in chief even without ascertaining
whether the accused had engaged a counsel or not, then the issue takes a different
form and the trial Court can be faulted if it is found that the accused had not even
engaged a counsel. But, this will not be violative of Article 21 of the Constitution
of India which mandates that the accused should have fair trial and that the trial
court cannot record the examination-in-chief of witnesses who are in attendance, in
the absence of defence counsel, even when there is boycott of Courts. A Division
Bench of this court in Yuvaraj v. State, 2014 (6) CTC 653 has further held that these
aspects are left to the best discretion of the trial Court Judges, who will bear in mind
the rights of the accused and the victim and would use their discretion judiciously.
67. In Thangaraj @ Thamilarasan v. State of The Deputy Superintendent of Police,
Q-Branch CID, Ramanathapuram Range [Crl.R.C.No.370 of 2014 dated 02.09.2014],
in respect of offences triable in accordance with The Unlawful Activities (Prevention)
Act, 1967 , a question arose as to whether a Judicial Magistrate has got power
to extend the remand of the accused beyond ninety days. This court held that a
comparison of the provisions of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967 and
the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 will make it clear that the legislature intended
to make a distinction between Magistrate referred to in Section 167(2) of the Code
of Criminal Procedure and the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967. This court
held that the term Court as dealt with under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act,
1967 does not mean that it will always mean Sessions Court. The Court means
the Court which does have the power to try the particular offence alleged. Suppose,
all the offences alleged under the Special enactments are triable by a Court of
Magistrate, then, the term Court will, no doubt, be a court of Judicial Magistrate
and in such a case alone, the Judicial Magistrate shall have the power to extend the
period of remand beyond 90 days, as per Section 167(2) Cr.P.C. as amended by the
proviso to Sub Section 2(b) of Section 43-D of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention)
Act, 1967. The court eventually held that since some of the offences in that case were
triable either exclusively by a Court of Session or a Special Court to be constituted
under The National Investigating Agency Act, 2008 , the remand was wholly without
jurisdiction and accordingly, set the accused at liberty.
68. Missing persons and unclaimed bodies are posing real challenge to traditional
policing in the State. The plight of the kith and kin of missing persons was taken note
of by the Supreme Court in Horilal vs. Commissioner of Police, Delhi [vide W.P.(Crl.)

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No.610 of 1996 dated 14.11.2002] wherein the Supreme Court has issued certain
directions to the police as to how to conduct themselves. The Director General of
Police, Government of Tamil Nadu, has also issued necessary instructions based
on the above observations to streamline the cases relating to missing persons and
also another circular in respect of the disposal of the unidentified dead bodies.
The mortuaries in Government Hospitals are often congested as Post-mortem of
unidentified bodies could not be done as preference is always given to serious cases
such as murder, accident, etc. In Pensiliya v. The Commissioner of Police , 2014
- 2 - L.W. (Crl) 628, having taken note of the above serious situation, taking clue
from the order passed by the Government of Karnataka, this court suggested to the
Government of Tamil Nadu to explore the feasibility of permitting Private Medical
College Hospitals to perform autopsies and also suggested to the Railway Board to
issue directions to the Station Masters to disburse at least a sum of Rs.5,000/- to
the Railway Police for disposal of unclaimed bodies found in Railway tracks. This
court further directed that when any unidentified body is found, the Police should
register First Information Report [FIR] under Section 174 of the Code and follow
the Circulars issued and to make a specific request to the Post-mortem Doctor to
determine the age and also collect the Femur Bone and Molar Tooth and hand them
over to them for safe custody for DNA profiling.
69. Prior to 25.12.1983, under the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973, the inquiry by
an Executive Magistrate into the cause of death was not extended to the death of
a person while in the custody of the police. After the Amendment Act 46 of 1983,
the inquiry by an Executive Magistrate into the cause of death of a person while
in the custody of the police was also covered. Again, the Code was amended by
Amendment Act 25 of 2005 by which, the opening words when any person dies
while in the custody of the police were omitted. However, such power was given
to a Judicial Magistrate by inserting sub-section 1A to Section 176 of the Code. The
inquiry under Section 176(1A) of the Code by a jurisdictional Judicial Magistrate is a
magisterial inquiry. But, what should be done on concluding the inquiry is not stated
in the Code. This resulted in great confusion in the minds of the Judicial Magistrates.
This was settled by this court in R.Kasthuri v. State of Tamil Nadu, 2015 (1) MLJ
(Crl) 455 wherein this court held that inquiry under Section 176(1A) of the Code is
in addition to the investigation by the police and, therefore, police shall not stop
conducting investigation despite the inquiry being held by the Judicial Magistrate.
The Statements of witnesses and the report of the Judicial magistrate shall form part
63

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

of the court records and the same could be used by the prosecution or the accused
during trial.
70. In a pathbreaking judgment in P.Visalakshmiamma v. The Director of Schools
Higher Education , 2014 (2) CWC 1, after referring to Section 2 (f) of The Protection
of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005, this court held that the purpose of
enacting such a law is only to make way for maintenance for not only to a legally
wedded wife but also to a second wife or a concubine. The concept of paying
pension to the family members is to enable them to lead a decent life after the life
time of the deceased / pensioner. Considering the plight of the woman, who had
live in relationship with the deceased employee / pensioner, this court directed half
of the family pension to be paid to such a woman.
Self audit and introspection is the hallmark of every organic institution without which
atrophy would befall. Madras High Court is no exception to this natural law. In the words of
Justice H.R.Khanna, Law knows of no finer hour than when it cuts through formal concepts
and transitory emotions to come to the rescue of the oppressed, but unpopular citizen. The
Madras High Court has the unique distinction of having in its campus a Light House for the
guidance of lost seafarers. Though the Light House has become dysfunctional now, yet the
High Court continues to serve as a beacon of light for those in quest of justice. Though we
do not like to end our journey with this, we are constrained by paucity of space. We hope that
the readers would find the other judgments at the click of a button in the computer to reach
the High Courts website Legal light house.

Madras High Court

64

Madras High Court

R e p ort 2011-2014

Part B

67

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

From the Desk of the Registrar General


The Madras High Court is one of the oldest High Courts in the country, with a historic background.
It is indeed an opportunity of a lifetime to head the Registry of this magnificent institution.
The Registry forms the backbone of this institution and it is the Engine Room where the plans
chalked out by the Honble Judges are executed at the ground level. The Officers and Staff Members
of the Registry are an invaluable asset for the institution and they are renowned for their dedication
and sincerity to duty.
Under the dynamic leadership of our Honble the Chief Justice, this Court has embarked upon
an arduous journey of providing succor to the teeming millions of litigants who throng this Temple
of Justice. Under the guidance of His Lordship, ably assisted by the Honourable Judges, our High
Court has been successful in disposing of nearly 8.98 lakhs cases during the period 2011 to 2014.
The Honble Chief Justice has been very keen in getting long pending old cases disposed of at
the earliest, and towards this direction the Registry has taken steps on a war footing to cull out such
cases and getting them listed before their Lordships for disposal, and one full day in a week has been
earmarked for this purpose. The Registry has issued Circulars to Courts at the Subordinate level
to emulate this task, making it clear that such efforts would be rewarded in the form of credit points.
Similar steps have been taken with regard to cases concerning vulnerable sections of the society like
women, children, senior citizens and differently-abled both at the High Court and the Subordinate
Courts level.
In order to give shape to the vision of the Honble Chief Justice on full computerization, the
High Court has undertaken various measures like installing a brand new Case Information Display
System across the High Court; reinvigorating the Madras High Court Website with new features;
uploading all Judgments and Daily Orders on the website; offering SMS facility to advocates on case
status; connecting High Court with all subordinate courts via Video Conferencing etc. To dispel the
impression that the Court is a complex maze of buildings and procedures, Signage Boards have been
erected at vantage points and Touch Screen Information Kiosks have also been put up. Digitization
of case records is a dream of the Honble Chief Justice and all out efforts are being made to fulfill it.
Creating and upgrading infrastructure has been an area of prime concern of His Lordship and
in that direction, five new buildings have been inaugurated, meant for Auditorium, Museum, Law
Officers Chambers, Advocates Canteen and Police Control Room. A Comprehensive Security
System providing security cover and regulating vehicular movement inside the High Court premises,
has been introduced. Care is also being taken to provide a congenial working atmosphere to all
stakeholders. Various staff welfare measures are also being introduced like the Biometric Security
System, Web Payroll System, Personnel Information System and the like.
The High Court Arbitration Centre, which has been the brain-child of the Honble Chief Justice,
has been made functional after being recently inaugurated by the Honble Chief Justice of India.
Along with the High Court Mediation & Conciliation Centre, which is already spearheading the ADR
movement in the country, the High Court Arbitration Centre would take care of the ADR mechanism
in the Madras High Court.
Any institution without the adequate manpower cannot achieve the desired results it sets out to.
On account of the initiative taken by the Honble Chief Justice and the Committee of Honble Judges,
all the vacancies of Judicial Officers are being filled up.
All these are a result of the tireless efforts and the valuable inputs by the Honble Chief Justice
and various Committees of Honble Judges constituted for such purposes and the committed efforts
put in by the Officers and Staff Members of the Registry.
P. Kalaiyarasan

Madras High Court

68

R e p ort 2011-2014

Registrar General And Other Registrars Of Madras High Court Including


Madurai Bench As On 31-12-2014

Mr. P.Kalaiyarasan,
Registrar General, High Court of Madras.

Mr. T.Ravindran,
Registrar (Judicial)
High Court of Madras

Mr. C.V.Karthikeyan,
Registrar (Vigilance)
High Court of Madras

Mr. V. Vijayan,
Registrar (Administration)
High Court of Madras

Mr. C.Kumarappan,
Officer on Special Duty
in the Cadre of District Judge
(IT-cum-Statistics) High Court of Madras

Mr. M.Jothiraman,
Registrar (Administration),
Madurai Bench of
Madras High Court, Madurai

Mrs. K. Indumathi,
Registrar (Management)
High Court of Madras

69

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Mr. B. Hari,
Registrar-cum-Private Secretary to the
Honble The Chief Justice
High Court of Madras

Mr. T.Venkattakrishnan,
Registrar (Judicial)
Madurai Bench of
Madras High Court, Madurai

Madras High Court

Mr. V. Nallasenapathy,
Official Assignee
High Court of Madras

Mr. P.Vadamalai,
Officer on Special Duty
in the Cadre of District Judge
(District Judiciary) High Court of Madras

Mr. T.Chandrasekaran,

Additional Registrar (Vigilance)

High Court of Madras

70

R e p ort 2011-2014

SANCTIONED AND WORKING STRENGTH OF OFFICERS OF


MADRAS HIGH COURT AS ON 31.12.2014
Principal Seat
Madurai Bench
Total
Sanctioned Working
Name of the Post
Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Vacancy
Vacancy
Strength Strength
Strength Strength
REGISTRAR GENERAL
1
1
REGISTRAR
8
8
2
2
Officer on Special Duty
2
MASTER
1
1
JOINT REGISTRAR
4
4
DEPUTY OFFICIAL
1
1
ASSIGNEE
DEPUTY REGISTRAR
12
12
5
5
ASSISTANT REGISTRAR
22
22
11
11
Court Manager
2
1
CHIEF ACCOUNTS OFFICER
1
1
ASSISTANT EDITOR,
2
2
TAMIL LAW JOURNAL
SUB ASSISTANT REGISTRAR
17
14
3
8
4
4
7
LIBRARIAN
1
1
1
1
ACCOUNTS OFFICER
1
1
TOTAL
70
71
3
28
25
4
7

Sl.
No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

STAFF STRENGTH OF THE MADRAS HIGH COURT


(N0N-GAZETTED ESTABLISHMENT) AS ON 31.12.2014
Sl.
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Principal Seat
Madurai Bench
Total
Sanctioned Working
Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Vacancy Vacancy
Strength Strength
Strength Strength
INTERPRETER
5
5
0
0
0
0
0
CO / SO / AE
189
187
2
66
63
3
5
P.S. TO HON'BLE CJ
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
P.A. TO THE HON'BLE JUDGES
163
117
46
48
36
12
58
P.S. TO REGR. GENERAL
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
TECHNICAL ASSISTANT
4
4
0
2
2
0
0
ASST. SECTION OFFICER
267
266
1
75
75
0
1
PERSONAL ASSISTANT
7
1
6
2
0
2
8
PERSONAL CLERK
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
SENIOR TYPIST
22
22
0
3
3
0
0
COMPUTER OPERATOR
40
23
17
25
14
11
28
ASSISTANT
159
124
35
60
55
5
40
TYPIST
128
24
104
55
17
38
142
TELEPHONE OPERATOR
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
READER / EXAMINER
55
54
1
24
22
2
3
XEROX OPERATOR
4
4
0
3
3
0
0
OVERSEER
1
1
0
1
1
0
0

71

Name of the Post

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.
No
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

Name of the Post


HEAD BAILIFF
SERGEANT
DRIVER
JUNIOR BAILIFF
COURT KEEPER
JAMEDAR
GOLLAH
BINDER
RECORD ASSISTANT
RECORD CLERK
LIFT OPERATOR
DUFFADAR
WATCH & WARD
OFFICE ASSISTANT
SWEEPER
SCAVENGER
GARDENER
WATERMAN

Principal Seat
Madurai Bench
Total
Sanctioned Working
Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Vacancy Vacancy
Strength Strength
Strength Strength
1
1
80
24
2
1
1
7
10
62
8
7
50
373
32
11
15
1

1
1
80
22
2
1
1
7
10
62
8
7
48
356
32
7
13
1

0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
17
0
4
2
0

1
1
25
7
2
1
1
3
4
15
3
4
36
120
15
12
13
1

1
1
25
6
2
1
1
3
4
14
3
4
29
117
15
12
13
1

0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
7
3
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
9
20
0
4
2
0

RECRUITMENT IN RESPECT OF Staff Members in


Madras High Court Service
Sl.
No.
1
2
3
4
5

Name of the Post


P.A.TO THE HONBLE JUDGES
PERSONAL ASSistant
COMPUTER OPERATOR
ASSISTANT
TYPIST

Addressed to
TNPSC
56
7
28
37
139

Vacancy as
on 31.12.2014
58
9
28
41
143

The Tamil Nadu Public Service Commission was entrusted to take steps to fill up the
posts on behalf of High Court Madras and the process of recruitment is underway.

Madras High Court

72

R e p ort 2011-2014

Sanctioned and Working strength of District Judiciary in the


State of Tamil Nadu
As on 31.12.2011:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

122

101

21

Additional District Judge, Fast


Track Court on Ad-hoc basis

49

43

Senior Civil Judge

211

201

10

Civil Judge

479

405

74

As on 31.12.2012:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

172

141

31

Senior Civil Judge

214

214

NIL

Civil Judge

513

512

As on 31.12.2013:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

199

164

35

Senior Civil Judge

233

229

Civil Judge

540

480

60

As on 31.12.2014:
Cadre

73

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

214

214

Nil

Senior Civil Judge

240

193

47

Civil Judge

543

469

74
Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sanctioned and Working strength of District Judiciary in the


Union Territory of Puducherry
As on 31.12.2011:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

Senior Civil Judge

Nil

Civil Judge

As on 31.12.2012:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

Senior Civil Judge

Nil

Civil Judge

Nil

As on 31.12.2013:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

Senior Civil Judge

Nil

Civil Judge

Nil

As on 31.12.2014:
Cadre

Sanctioned Working
Vacancy
Strength
Strength

District Judge

Nil

Senior Civil Judge

Civil Judge

Nil

Madras High Court

74

R e p ort 2011-2014

RECRUITMENT OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS IN THE


TAMIL NADU STATE JUDICIAL SERVICE
1. During 2012, recruitment was made to 178 Civil Judges in the Tamil Nadu State Judicial
Service, for the vacancies arose between the period 2009 and 2012.
2. 23 District Judges (Entry Level) were recruited by Direct Recruitment during the month
of March 2014.
3. Steps have been taken to fill up the 162 vacancies in the cadre of Civil Judge by
direct recruitment in the Tamil Nadu State Judicial Service. The Tamil Nadu Public
Service Commission, Chennai, conducted the Written examination on 01.11.2014 and
02.11.2014. The results of the aforesaid examination are awaited (as on 31-12-2014).
RECRUITMENT OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS IN THE
PUDUCHERRY JUDICIAL SERVICE
Steps have been taken to fill up the 8 vacancies in the cadre of Civil Judge by direct
recruitment in the Puducherry Judicial Service. The High Court of Madras has conducted the
Written examination and the results of the aforesaid examination are awaited.

75

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

JURISDICTION
PRINCIPAL SEAT OF MADRAS HIGH COURT (19 Districts
of Tamil Nadu & Union Territory of Puduchery)

Tiruvallur
Chennai
Vellore
Kanchipuram

Krishnagiri
Tiruvannamalai

Dharmapuri
Viluppuram

Puducherry

Salem
Nilgiris

Cuddalore

Erode
Namakkal

Perambalur
Ariyalur

Coimbatore

Nagapattinam

Tiruchirappalli
Karur

Tirupur

Thanjavur

Dindigul

Theni

Madurai

Tiruvarur

Pudukkottai

Sivaganga

Virudhunagar
Ramanathapuram

Thoothukudi
Tirunelveli

MADURAI BENCH OF MADRAS HIGH COURT,


MADURAI (13 Districts)

Kanyakumari

Madras High Court

76

R e p ort 2011-2014

STATISTICS
Institution and Disposal of cases for the years 2011, 2012, 2013 & upto June 2014
include both Main and Miscellaneous cases in all categories. As per the Direction of the
present Honble The Chief Justice of the High Court of Madras, the Registry is taking into
consideration only the Main Cases in all Categories for the purpose of Institution and as
well as Disposal.
For the year 2014 (From July 2014 to December 2014) 69,202 main cases (both Civil and
Criminal) were disposed out of 3,32,771 cases
Statement Showing Institution, Disposal And Pendency Of Civil &
Criminal Cases Of Pricipal Seat Of High Court Of Madras And
Madurai Bench Of Madras High Court Madurai
Civil cases

Criminal cases

Total
pendency
of civil and
criminal
Institution Disposal Pendency Opening Institution Disposal Pendency
cases at
the end of
the year

Sl.
No.

Year

2011

401377

185401

170942

415836

46791

80934

69825

57900

473736

2012

415836

190225

168992

437069

57900

82613

77208

63305

500374

2013

437069

197048

143734

490383

63305

91874

88083

67096

557479

2014
(Jan to
June)

490383

97038

71616

515805

67096

45125

38469

73752

589557

2014
(July to
Dec)

220215

44175

35476

228914

35599

32782

33726

34655

263569

Opening

Note (i) Statement showing the institution, disposal and pendency including main and miscellaneous cases
upto June 2014

(ii) As per direction of Honble Administrative Committee dt. 10.11.2014, from July, 2014 onwards main
cases (Civil & Criminal) alone taken into account for institution, disposal and pendency of cases.

77

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Statement Showing Institution, Disposal And Pendency Of Civil & Criminal Cases Of
Subordinate Courts In The State Of Tamil Nadu
Civil cases

Sl.
No.

Year

Opening

Criminal cases

Total
pendency
of civil and
criminal
Institution Disposal Pendency Opening Institution Disposal Pendency
cases at
the end of
the year
929156
963700
715702
491124
669013
692590
467547
1183249

2011

750246

2012

715702

921450

858516

778636

467547

627654

641368

453833

1232469

2013

778636

969355

904787

843204

453833

930547

939269

445111

1288315

2014
(Jan To
June)

843204

467120

439193

871131

445111

595823

596392

444542

1315673

2014
(July To
Dec)

572923

197880

156051

614752

444542

736951

757425

424068

1038820

Note (i) Statement showing the institution, disposal and pendency including main and miscellaneous cases
upto June 2014

(ii) As per direction of Honble Administrative Committee dt. 10.11.2014, from July, 2014 onwards main
cases (Civil & Criminal) alone taken into account for institution, disposal and pendency of cases.

Statement Showing Institution, Disposal And Pendency Of Civil & Criminal Cases Of
Subordinate Courts In The Union Territory Of Puducherry
Civil cases

Criminal cases

Total
pendency
of civil and
criminal
Institution Disposal Pendency Opening Institution Disposal Pendency
cases at
the end of
the year
17786
18729
13490
11393
26779
24957
13215
26705

Sl.
No.

Year

2011

14433

2012

13490

18965

17969

14486

13215

17170

15930

14455

28941

2013

14486

18512

15885

17113

14455

15775

16594

13636

30749

2014
(Jan to
June)

17113

8783

7852

18044

13636

7803

7179

14260

32304

2014
(July to
Dec)

11692

6328

5768

12252

14260

10639

12720

12179

24431

Opening

Note (i) Statement showing the institution, disposal and pendency including main and miscellaneous cases
upto June 2014

(ii) As per direction of Honble Administrative Committee dt. 10.11.2014, from July, 2014 onwards main
cases (Civil & Criminal) alone taken into account for institution, disposal and pendency of cases.

Madras High Court

78

R e p ort 2011-2014

CONSTITUTION OF COURTS

Courts sanctioned by the Government and Constituted


Between 2011 and 2014
Sl.No.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

79

Name of the
District
Ariyalur

Chennai

Coimbatore

Cuddalore

Dharmapuri

Dindigul

No. of
Courts
1

Date of
inauguration
24.9.2011

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Ariyalur in the cadre


of District Judge at Ariyalur

3.8.2013

Special Court for trial of cases under Prevention of


Corruption Act at Chennai

13.10.2011

2 Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at Chennai


in Egmore unit.

12.3.2012

Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at Chennai in


Saidapet unit.

14.3.2012

Two Special Court (Court of Small Causes) in the


cadre of Sub Judge to deal with MCOP cases at
Chennai

9.4.2013

Fast Track Court (Magisterial level) at Chennai

9.4.2013

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Chennai in


George Town unit.

9.4.2013

Two Fast Track Courts Magisterial level at


Coimbatore

13.8.2011

Special Court for trial of cases under Prevention of


Corruption Act at Coimbatore

13.8.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at


Coimbatore.

22.7.2012

Special Court to deal with MCOP cases at


Coimbatore

22.7.2012

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Coimbatore

13.3.2013

One Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to


deal with LAOP cases and one Special Court in the
cadre of Sub Judge) to deal with MCOP cases at
Cuddalore

2.3.2013

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Cuddalore.

13.7.2013

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at Cuddalore

30.12.2013

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Dharmapuri

21.8.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at


Dharmapuri

20.8.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Dharmapuri in the


cadre of District Judge at Dharmapuri

20.8.2013

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and one Special Court in the cadre of Sub Judge to
deal with MCOP cases at Dharmapuri

5.7.2014

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Palani

13.8.2011

Name of the Court


District Court at Ariyalur

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.No.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

Name of the
District

Erode

No. of
Courts

Date of
inauguration

one Special Court at Dindigul to deal with MCOP


cases (in the cadre of Sub Judge)

30.5.2012

Sub Court at Vedasandur

28.10.2012

Ten Mobile Courts one each at Kancheepuram,


Villupuram, Coimbatore, Tiruchirappalli, Madurai,
Namakkal, Salem, Erode, Dindigul and Tirunelveli

10

30.10.2012

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Dindigul in the cadre


of District Judge at Dindigul

21.7.2013

Two Fast Track Courts Magisterial level at Erode

1.7.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Erode.

5.12.2012

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Erode in the cadre of


District Judge at Erode

14.9.2013

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and one Special Court in the cadre of Sub Judge to
deal with MCOP cases at Erode

14.09.2013

1.7.2011.

Two Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at


Nagercoil

09.05.2012.

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Chengalpattu

26.4.2013.

District Munsif-cum-Judicial Magistrate Court


at Boothapandi by converting existing Judicial
Magistrate Court, Boothapandi

1.6.2012

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Nagercoil in the


cadre of District Judge at Nagercoil

30.11.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Karur

19.11.2011

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Karur in the cadre of


District Judge

14.12.2013

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at Karur

14.12.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Hosur

18.9.2011

Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge and in


the cadre of Sub Judge) to deal with MCOP cases at
Kirshnagiri

3.2.2013.

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Krishnagiri

3.2.2013.

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Krishnagiri in the


cadre of District Judge at Krishnagiri

21.9.2013

One Additional District and Sessions Court at Hosur.

25.01.2014

Sub Court, Uthangarai

25.01.2014

Two Additional Special Courts at Madurai for trial of


NDPS Act cases

28.3.2011

Special Court for trial of Prevention of Corruption Act


cases at Madurai

03.10.2011

Two Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at


Madurai

26.6.2012

Name of the Court

Kancheepuram @
Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Alandur
Chengalpattu

Kanniyakumari @
Nagercoil

Karur

Krishnagiri

Madurai

Madras High Court

80

R e p ort 2011-2014

Sl.No.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

81

Name of the
District

Nagapattinam

Namakkal

Name of the Court

No. of
Courts

Date of
inauguration

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and one Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to
deal with MCOP cases at Madurai.

24. 4.2013.

District Munsif-cum-Judicial Magistrate Court,


Peraiyoor

02.12.2013

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Madurai.

06.12.2013.

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at Madurai

06.12.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at


Mayiladuthurai in Nagapattinam District

16.05.2012.

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at


Nagapattinam.

17.05.2012.

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Nagapattinam in the


cadre of District Judge at Nagapattinam

01.10.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at


Tiruchengode in Namakkal District

01.04.2012.

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Namakkal

9.3.2013.

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Namakkal in the


cadre of District Judge at Namakkal

30.11.2013

12.2.2011

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Coonoor

22.4.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Nilgiris at


Uthagamandalam

19.1.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Nilgiris in the cadre


of District Judge at Nilgiris

12.9.2013

Judicial Magistrate Court at Pandalur

1.11.2014

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Perambalur

9.3.2013.

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at


Perambalur

01.02.2014

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at


Ramanathapuram

5.12.2012

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Ramanathapuram in


the cadre of District Judge at Ramanathapuram

23.8.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Attur

7.1.2012

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and two Special Courts (in the cadre of Sub Judge)
to deal with MCOP cases at Salem

16.2.2013.

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Salem

16.2.2013.

Fast Track Court (Magiserial level) at Omalur

27.4.2013

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at Salem

05.10.2013

Special Court for trial of cases under the Prevention


of Corruption Act at Salem.

10.01.2014

The Nilgiris @
District Munsif Court, Coonoor
Udhagamandalam

Perambalur

Ramanathapuram

Salem

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.No.
19.

20.

21.

22.

23.

24.

Name of the
District
Sivagangai

Thanjavur

Theni

Thoothukudi

Tiruchirappalli

Tirunelveli

Madras High Court

No. of
Courts

Date of
inauguration

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Karaikudi

17.08.2012.

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Sivagangai in the


cadre of District Judge at Sivagangai

09.10.2013

Special Court for trial of cases under the Prevention


of Corruption Act at Sivagangai

14.02.2014

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Thanjavur

21.4.2011.

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Thanjavur

7.3.2013.

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and one Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to
deal with MCOP cases at Thanjavur

11.08.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Thanjavur in the


cadre of District Judge at Thanjavur

11.08.2013

Fast Track Court (Magisterial level) at Pattukottai.

30.11.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Theni

10.09.2011

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at


Uthamapalayam

05.11.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Theni

3.1.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Theni in the cadre of


District Judge at Theni

9.11.2013

Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at Thoothukudi

30.6.2012

Fast Track Courts at Magisterial Level at Kovilpatti in


Thoothukudi District

30.6.2012

District Munsif Court at Tiruchendur by converting


the existing Principal District Munsif-cum-Judicial
Magistrate Court, Tiruchendur

2.8.2012

Separate Judicial Magistrate Court at Tiruchendur


by converting the existing Additional District Munsif
Court, Tiruchendur

2.8.2012

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at


Thoothukudi

9.1.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Thoothukudi in the


cadre of District Judge at Thoothukudi

19.9.2013

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and one Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to
deal with MCOP cases at Tiruchirappalli.

24.2.2013.

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Tiruchirappalli.

22.09.2013.

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at


Tiruchirappalli

22.9.2013

Special Court for trial of Prevention of Corruption Act


cases at Tiruchirappalli

14.10.2011

One Special Court in the cadre of Sub Judge to deal


with MCOP cases at Tirunelveli

23.3..2013.

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Tirunelveli

24.11.2012

Name of the Court

82

R e p ort 2011-2014

Sl.No.

25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

83

Name of the
District

Tiruppur

Tiruvallur

Tiruvannamalai

Tiruvarur

Vellore

No. of
Courts

Date of
inauguration

Additional Mahila court (in the cadre of Judicial


Magistrate) at Tirunelveli

23.3.2013.

Special Court for trial of cases under the Prevention


of Corruption Act at Tirunelveli

22.12.2014

District Court at Tiruppur

14.7.2012

Chief Judicial Magistrate Court at Tiruppur by shifting


I Addl. Sub Court, Tiruppur

14.7.2012

Fast Track Court at Tiruppur

14.7.2012

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Tiruppur

14.7.2012

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Tiruppur in the cadre


of District Judge at Tiruppur

18.9.2013

One Additional Sub Court at Tiruppur from the 13th


Finance Commission grants in aid.

09.06.2014

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Thiruvallur

6.1.2012

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Poonamallee

01.08.2012.

Special Court for Land Grabbing cases at Tiruvallur

7.1.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Tiruvallur in the


cadre of District Judge at Tiruvallur

15.11.2013

Fast Track Court (Magisterial level) at Ambattur.

30.10.2014

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Tiruvannamalai

1.7.2011.

Separate District Munsif Court at Cheyyar by


converting the existing Principal District Munsifcum
Judicial Magistrate Court No.I, Cheyyar

20.9.2012

One Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to


deal with MCOP cases at Tiruvannamalai

26. 6.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Tiruvannamalai in


the cadre of District Judge

09.04.2014

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at


Thiruthuraipoondi

12.5.2011

Constitution District Munsif-cum-Judicial Magistrate


Court at Valangaiman by converting the Principal
District Munsif Court, Valangaiman

2.7.2011

District Munsif-cum-Judicial
Magistrate Court at
Needamangalam by shifting the existing Additional
District Munsif Court, Valangaiman.

2.7.2011

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Tiruvarur in the


cadre of District Judge at Tiruvarur

10.11.2013

Fast Track Court at Magisterial Level at Vellore

05.11.2011

Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to deal


with LAOP cases at Arakkonam

24.1.2013.

One Special Court (in the cadre of Sub Judge) to


deal with LAOP cases at Vellore.

23.02.2013

Separate Motor Accident Claims Tribunal at


Tirupattur in Vellore District

23.02.2013

Name of the Court

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.No.

Name of the
District

Name of the Court

No. of
Courts

One Additional District Munsif Court at Tirupattur by


converting the existing Judicial Magistrate Court No.II
at Tirupattur

30.

31.

Villupuram

Virudhunagar @
Srivilliputhur

Madras High Court

Date of
inauguration
6.4.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Vellore in the cadre


of District Judge at Vellore

31.8.2013

Sub Court at Arakkonam

14.03.2014

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Kallakurichi

29.7.2011.

One Special Court (in the cadre of District Judge)


and two Special Courts (in the cadre of Sub Judge)
to deal with MCOP cases at Villupuram

14.12.2013

One Fast Track Mahila Court at Villupuram in the


cadre of District Judge

14.12.2013

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at Villupuram

14.12.2013

Special Court for trial of cases under the Prevention


of Corruption Act at Villupuram

14.12.2013

Fast Track Court Magisterial level at Srivilliputhur

22.4.2011

Special Court for Land Grabbing Cases at


Virudhunagar

27.7.2013

84

R e p ort 2011-2014

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT
The concept of infrastructure plays a vital role in a civilized society. Improper or inappropriate
or inadequate infrastructure of judicial mechanism can, at times, hamper or undermine the
very mechanism itself and also lead to avoidable misgivings. With a view to obviate such
a possibility and to maintain decent standards and in order to upgrade and augment the
infrastructure of Subordinate Courts, on the initiative taken and the keen interest shown
by our Honble The Chief Justices in identifying the requirement, the Government of Tamil
Nadu have positively responded by sanctioning the requisite funds for provision of following
infrastructure and construction of court buildings and Judicial Officers Quarters.
Name of the District

Newly constructed court


buildings and Judicial Officers
quarters

1.

Coimbatore

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Mettupalayam

219.00

22.11.2014

2.

Cuddalore

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at
Panruti

237.22

06.03.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Cuddalore

1002.00

26.03.2012

Construction of Quarters for Sub


Judge at Dharmapuri

27.95

18.06.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Pennagaram

178.96

04.02.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Palacode

288.86

15.03.2014

SI.
No.

3.

85

Dharmapuri

`
Cost Estimate Inaugurated on
(In lakhs)

4.

Dindigul

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Palani

382.59

27.10.2012

5.

Erode

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at
Erode

542.00

09.04.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Bhavani

527.86

21.04.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Kangeyam

288.90

14.07.2012

6.

Kancheepuram @
Chengalpattu

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at
Alandur

473.10

01.07.2011

7.

Kanniyakumari @
Nagercoil

Construction of Combined
Court Building at
Padmanabhapuram

447.00

21.04.2012

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

SI.
No.

8.

Name of the District

Karur

Newly constructed court


buildings and Judicial Officers
quarters

`
Cost Estimate Inaugurated on
(In lakhs)

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Kuzhithurai

563.86

06.04.2013

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters, Karur

1000.00

19.02.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Kulithalai

410.54

08.06.2013

9.

Nagapattinam

Construction of Court Building


and Quarters for Judicial Officers
at Vedaranyam

201.82

24.05.2013

10.

Namakkal

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at
Namakkal

1056.00

23.01.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Tiruchengode

529.10

01.04.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Rasipuram

464.76

14.07.2012

11.

Perambalur

Construction of Combined Court


Buildings at Perambalur

936.00

07.02.2009

12.

Pudukkottai

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Aranthangi

415.00

15.09.2013

13.

Ramanathapuram

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Paramakudi

240.00

12.02.2014

14.

Salem

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Sankari

562.00

29.01.2012

Construction of Quarters for


Presiding Officer, Labour Court at
Salem

57.41

30.05.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Attur

695.97

13.10.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Omalur

303.20

11.04.2013

15.

Sivaganga

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Sivaganga

874.93

09.10.2013

16.

Thanjavur

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Kumbakonam

997.00

17.03.2013

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Thiruvaiyaru

191.65

26.06.2013

Madras High Court

86

R e p ort 2011-2014

SI.
No.

Name of the District

Newly constructed court


buildings and Judicial Officers
quarters

17.

Theni

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Uthamapalayam

517.35

05.11.2011

18.

Thoothukudi

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Thoothukudi

888.00

01.04.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Tiruchendur

260.60

31.03.2013

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Valliyoor

469.73

15.04.2012

Construction of Additional
Property room at Palayamkottai

38.70

23.03.2013

19.

87

Tirunelveli

`
Cost Estimate Inaugurated on
(In lakhs)

20.

Tiruvallur

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at
Poonamallee

373.00

12.09.2011

21.

Tiruvannamalai

Combined Court Buildings and


Judicial Officers Quarters at Arani

397.00

27.02.2011

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Tiruvannamalai

1451.44

23.08.2014

22.

Tiruvarur

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Tiruvarur

1085.40

30.06.2012

23.

Vellore

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Arakkonam

282.80

11.03.2012

Construction of Quarters for Sub


Judge and District Munsif at
Gudiyatham

43.54

29.06.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Ambur

230.75

06.10.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Katpadi

321.99

16.12.2012

Construction of Combined Court


Building at Ranipet

365.00

16.12.2012

24.

Villupuram

Construction of three post


attached quarters at Villupuram

85.50

14.06.2012.

25.

Virudhunagar

Construction of Combined Court


Building and Quarters for Judicial
Officers at Aruppukkottai

383.00

07.04.2012

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

WORK UNDER PROGRESS FOR COURT BUILDINGS AND


JUDICIAL OFFICERS QUARTERS
SI.
No.

Name of the
District

Newly constructed court buildings and


Judicial Officers quarters

`
Cost Estimate
(In lakhs)

1.

Coimbatore

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Valparai

285.49

2.

Cuddalore

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tittagudi

483.50

3.

Kanniyakumari @
Nagercoil

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Eraniel

265.43

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Nagercoil

1550.47

4.

Krishnagiri

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Denkanikottai

177.66

5.

Nagapattinam

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Mayiladuthurai

1041.60

6.

Ramanathapuram

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tiruvadanai

187.43

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Mudhukulathur

497.31

7.

Salem

Construction of Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Mettur

496.72

8.

Sivagangai

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at llayangudi

206.51

9.

Thanjavur

Quarters for Judicial Officers at Thanjavur

149.47

10.

Theni

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Periyakulam

653.76

11.

Thoothukudi

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Vilathikulam

155.04

12.

Tiruchirappalli

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tiruchirappalli

2264.81

13.

Tirunelveli

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Sankarankoil

381.47

14.

Tiruvallur

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tiruvallur

1227.66

15.

Villupuram

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tindivanam

1731.69

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Kallakurichi

754.22

Combined Court Building and Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Gingee

930.00

Madras High Court

88

R e p ort 2011-2014

PROPOSALS SANCTIONED FOR CONSTRUCTION OF COURT BUILDINGS AND


JUDICIAL OFFICERS QUARTERS
SI.
No.
1.

Chennai

Newly constructed court buildings and


Judicial Officers quarters

`
Cost Estimate
(In lakhs)

Combined Court Building at Egmore

1088.67

post attached Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Saidapet

368.00

2.

Cuddalore

Court Building at Portonovo

268.00

3.

Dindigul

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Dindigul

3709.85

4.

Erode

Court Building and Quarters for Judicial


Officers at Kodumudi

352.00

5.

Karur

post attached Quarters for Judicial Officers


at karur

173.50

6.

Nagapattianam

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Sirkali

530.20

7.

Tiruchirappalli

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Musiri

470.80

Combined Court Building at Thuraiyur

375.03

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Sivagiri

307.45

post attached Quarters for Judicial Officers


at Tirunelveli

613.80

8.

Tirunelveli

9.

Tiruvannamalai

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Cheyyar

772.90

10.

Tiruvarur

Combined Court Building at


Thiruthuraipoondi

368.50

11.

Villupuram

Combined Court Building and Quarters for


Judicial Officers at Ulundurpet

1068.13

12

89

Name of the
District

Virudhunagar

Central Record room at Villupuram

29.70

Combined Court Building at Sattur

382.80

Madras High Court

Madras High Court


5,25,90,48,000

District Judiciary
and Legal Services
Authority

Total

94,95,53,000

High Court Madras


and Madurai Bench
of Madras High
Court

6,20,86,01,000

Allocation
(`)

Head of
Department

Sl. No.

2011-12

6,16,97,92,000

5,17,14,06,000

99,83,86,000

Expenditure
(`)

2011-12

5,97,70,69,000

4,99,26,11,000

98,44,58,000

Allocation
(`)

2012-13

5,96,18,85,000

4,95,09,98,000

1,01,08,87,000

Expenditure
(`)

2012-13

6,66,74,02,000

5,60,62,21,000

1,06,11,81,000

Allocation
(`)

2013-14

ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE - JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT


DETAILS OF ALLOCATION AND EXPENDITURE
FROM 2011-12 TO 2014-15

BUDGET

6,57,60,00,000

5,45,27,56,000

1,12,32,44,000

Expenditure
(`)

2013-14

7,83,33,00,000

6,59,06,97,000

1,24,26,03,000

Allocation
(`)

2014-15

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

90

R e p ort 2011-2014

THE XIII FINANCE COMMISSION


A GRANT OF RS.252.44 CRORES WAS ALLOCATED
TO THE STATE OF TAMIL NADU FOR THE PLAN PERIOD 2010-2015
Sl. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

COMPONENTS
Morning/Evening Courts
Lok Adalat and Legal Aid
Training of Judicial Officers
Training of Public Prosecutors
Heritage Court Buildings
State Judicial Academy (Construction
of Regional Academy at Coimbatore
and Madurai)
ADR Centres
Court Managers
Grand Total

Amount Allocated
` (in Crores)
123.54
14.83
12.35
7.41
22.24
15.00
40.76
16.30
252.44

I. MORNING / EVENING / HOLIDAY / SPECIAL COURTS


Under the 13th Finance Commission Grants, the Government of India have allotted
Rs.123.54 Crores for the above component for the plan period 2010-2015 and the Government
of Tamil Nadu, on the proposals of the High Court, have sanctioned the following courts:
Sl. No.

2.

91

Courts Sanctioned
29 Special Court viz., 8
Special Courts in the cadre
of District Judges to deal
with MCOP cases, 4 Special
Courts in the cadre of Senior
Civil Judge to deal with LAOP
cases and 17 Special Courts
in the Cadre of Senior Civil
Judge to deal with MCOP
cases.
One Special Court in the
cadre of District Judge and
one Special Court in the cadre
of Sub Judge at Dharmapuri to
deal with MCOP cases

Orders issued by the


Government

G.O.Ms. No.79,
Home (Cts.II) Dept.,
dated 13.01.2012

G.O.Ms.No.782 Home
(Cts.II) Dept., dated
3.10.2013

Amount sanctioned
` (in crores)

49.2144

1.0763

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl. No.
3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Orders issued by the


Government
G.O.Ms.No.576 Home
A separate Motor Accident
Claims Tribunal at Tirupattur in (Cts.II) Dept., dated
24.7.2012
Vellore District
G.O. Ms. No.40,
Additional Sub court at
Home (Cts.III) Dept.,
Tiruppur.
dated 20.01.2014
G.O.Ms.No.27 Home
(Cts.II) Dept., dated
10.01.2011 (for 90
Evening courts)
G.O.Ms.No.523
121 Evening Courts
Home (Cts.II) Dept.,
dated 17.7.2013 (31
Evening Courts in
the Districts except
Perambalur)
2 Special courts in Villupuram
G.O.Ms.No.793 Home
and Sivagangai for exclusive
(Cts.II) Dept., dated
trial of cases registered under
7.10.2013
SC/ST (POA) Act, 1989.
G.O.Ms.No.783 Home
Holiday Family Courts at
(Cts.II) Dept., dated
Chennai.
3.10.2013
G.O.(Ms.) No.110,
Home (Courts II)
Additional Family Court at
Department, dated
Coimbatore.
14.02.2013
Constitution of 13 Family
Courts one each at Dindigul,
Erode, Tirunelveli, Sivagangai, G.O.(Ms) No.516,
Home (Courts
Tiruvallur, Chengalpattu,
II) Department,
Villupuram, Vellore,
dated16.07.2013.
Tiruchirappalli, Dharmapuri,
Tiruvarur, Virudhunagar and
the Nilgiris.

Madras High Court

Courts Sanctioned

Amount sanctioned
` (in crores)
0.5288

0.3727

5.2668
(3.9240 + 1.3428)

1.6926

0.5454

1.33

8.0671

92

R e p ort 2011-2014

II. LOK ADALAT AND LEGAL AID


Under the 13th Finance Commission Grants, the Government of India have allotted
Rs.14.83 Crores for the above component for the plan period 2010-2015 and the Government
of Tamil Nadu have released the following funds based on the Action Plan of the Tamil Nadu
State Legal Services Authority.

Sl.No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Financial
Year

G.O. No. & date

G.O.Ms.No.11 Home (Courts IV)


Department, dated 06.01.2011
G.O.Ms.No.51 Home (Courts IV)
2011-2012
Department, dated 09.01.2012
G.O.Ms.No.486 Home (Courts IV)
2012-2013
Department, dated 27.06.2012
G.O.Ms.No.453 Home (Courts IV)
2013-2014
Department, dated 05.07.2013
G.O.Ms.No.703 Home (Courts IV)
2014-2015
Department, dated 18.09.2014
2010-2011

Amount
Sanctioned
`
1,48,30,000/2,96,60,000/2,96,60,000/2,96,60,000/2,96,60,000/-

III. TRAINING OF JUDICIAL OFFICERS


Under the 13th Finance Commission Grants, the Government of India have allotted
Rs.12.35 Crores for the above component for the plan period 2010-2015 and the Government
of Tamil Nadu have released the following funds based on the Action Plan of the Tamil Nadu
State Judicial Academy.

Sl.No.

Financial
Year

1.

2010-2011

2.
3.
4.
5.

93

G.O. No. & date


G.O.No.23,Home (Cts.I) Dept., dt.07.01.11

G.O.No.524, Home (Cts.I) Dept., dt.


11.07.2012
G.O.Ms.No.209 Home (Courts-I) Department
2012-2013
dated 28.03.2013
G.O.Ms.No.1143 Home (Courts-I)
2013-2014
Department dated 12.12.2013
G.O.Ms.No.446 Home (Courts-I) Department
2014-2015
dated 25.06.2014
2011-2012

Amount
Sanctioned
`
2,47,00,000/2,47,00,000/2,47,00,000/2,47,00,000/2,47,00,000/-

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IV. TRAINING TO PUBLIC PROSECUTORS


Under the 13th Finance Commission Grants, the Government of India have allotted
Rs.7.41 Crores for the above component for the plan period 2010-2015 and the Government
of Tamil Nadu have released funds based on the Action Plan of the Director of Prosecution,
Chennai.

A sum of Rs.78,87,000/- is sanctioned in G.O.No.Ms.35, Home (Cts.VI), Dept.


dt.12.01.2011 for giving training to the 645 Prosecutors (both regular and tenure) in
Tamil Nadu at the Anna Institute of Management, Chennai.

A sum of Rs.4,83,750/- is sanctioned in G.O.(MS) No.129, Home (Courts-VI)


Department, dated 09.02.2012 for provision of Mobile Law Software to 645 Public
Prosecutors in the State.

A sum of Rs.8,95,670/- is sanctioned in G.O.(Ms)No.205, Home (Courts-VI)


Department, dated 07.03.2012 for purchase of Law Books to the Prosecution
Department.

A sum of Rs. 84,25,300/- is sanctioned in G.O.Ms.No.276 Home (Courts VI)


Department dated 07.05.2013 for purchase of Law Books to the Prosecution
Department.

A sum of Rs. 2,65,54,397/- is sanctioned in G.O.Ms.No.938 Home (Courts VI)


Department dated 30.10.2013 for Providing of Laptops and Printers to the Regular
Cadre Prosecutors of the Prosecution Department.

A sum of Rs.69,25,800/- is sanctioned in G.O.Ms.No.938 Home (Courts VI)


Department dated 30.10.2013 for imparting 5 days computer training programme to
390 regular cadre Prosecutors.

A sum of Rs.29,69,070/- is sanctioned in G.O.Ms.No.938 Home (Courts VI)


Department dated 30.10.2013 for provision of online Journal to Regular Cadre
Prosecutors.

V. HERITAGE COURT BUILDINGS


Under the 13th Finance Commission, the Government of India have allotted Rs.22.24
Crores for the period 2010-2015.

A sum of Rs.22.24 Crores has been allocated by the 13th Finance Commission
Grants towards Maintenance and Conservation of Heritage Court Buildings in the
State of Tamil Nadu.

The Honble Monitoring Committee resolved to accept in principle the proposal


of M/s.Indian National Trust for Architectural and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) to
renovate the five Court Buildings viz.,

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i. Metropolitan Magistrate Court building at George Town, Chennai;


ii. Court of Small Causes, High Court Campus, Chennai;
iii. Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Court (Heritage Building) in C.M.M.Court
Buildings at Egmore;
iv. Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Court (Heritage Building) in C.M.M.Court Buildings
at Egmore, and
v. Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Court (M.M.) Building located inside the M.M.Court
Campus, Saidapet, Chennai at an estimated cost of Rs.22,21,48,364/- and a
proposal was sent to the Government with a request to release the funds.

The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O.Ms.No.971, Home (Courts-III) Department,


dated 14.11.2013 have sanctioned a sum of Rs.22,21,48,365/- for conservation and
restoration of above five Heritage Court Buildings in Chennai City.

On the recommendation of the High Court and in the light of the orders of the Honble
High Court of Madras in W.P.No.249/2011, dated 29.10.2014, the Government have
sanctioned a sum of Rs.17,20,00,000/- from and out of Rs.22.21 crore sanctioned in
the G.O.Ms.No.971, Home (Courts-III) Department, dated 14.11.2013 for Restoration
/ Rehabilitation of the High Court Main Building, Small Causes Court Building inside
the High Court Campus and Metropolitan Magistrate Court Building, George Town,
Chennai.

VI. STATE JUDICIAL ACADEMY


(Construction of Regional Judicial Academy at Coimbatore and Madurai)
Under the 13th Finance Commission Grants, the Government of India have allotted
Rs.15.00 Crores for the period 2010-2015.

The Government of Tamil Nadu in the G.O.No.1017, Home (Cts.I) Dept.,


dt.09.12.2010, have sanctioned a sum of Rs.17 Crores, towards construction of
Regional Centres of State Judicial Academy at Coimbatore and Madurai each at an
expenditure of Rs.8.50 Crores, by utilizing the sum of Rs.15 Crores allocated under
the 13th Finance Commission Grant and a sum of Rs.2 Crores as additional grant
from State Funds.

The Construction work is nearing completion.

VII. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) CENTRES


The 13th Finance Commission has allocated a sum of Rs.40.76 Crores to the State
of Tamil Nadu under the head Alternate Disputes Resolution (ADR) Centre. Based on
the directions of the Honble Monitoring Committee, the Registry has proposed that after

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earmarking Rs.30.00 Crores for putting up Alternate Disputes Resolution Centres in all 30
Judicial Districts in the State, the remaining amount of Rs.10.76 Crores is decided to be
spent for the purpose of giving specialized training to the Mediators, Judicial Officers and
Advocates in Mediation.

The Government of Tamil Nadu have sanctioned a sum of Rs.4,20,00,000/- for


construction of ADR Centre for Chennai District (viz., Rs.1 crore from the fund
allocated under the 13th Finance Commission Grant and Rs.3.20 crores, additionally
from State Funds, vide G.O.Ms.No.346 Home (Courts-IV) Dept, dated 29.06.2011.

The Government of Tamil Nadu have sanctioned a sum of Rs.29,00,00,000/- for


construction of ADR Centres at 29 Judicial Districts in the State of Tamil Nadu vide
G.O.Ms.No.137 Home (Courts-IV) Dept, dated 14.02.2012.

The Public Works Department, Government of Tamil Nadu has taken initiative steps
for the construction of ADR Centres in 30 Judicial Districts of Tamil Nadu as on
28.02.2013. The status of ADR Centres are as follows:

13 Alternate Disputes Resolution (ADR) Centres inaugurated

2 Ready for inauguration

10 under construction

5 Construction yet to be commenced


TRAINING TO THE MEDIATORS, JUDICIAL OFFICERS
AND ADVOCATES ON MEDIATION

Under the 13th Finance Commission, the Government of India have allotted Rs.10.76
Crores for the period 2010-2015, out of Rs.40.76 Crores sanctioned to ADR Centres.
2010-2011

The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O.No.12,Home (Cts.IV) Dept.,dt.06.01.11,


have sanctioned a sum of Rs.1,07,60,000/-, for the year 2010-2011, towards the
scheme entrusting the job of provision of specialized training to the Mediators,
Judicial Officers and Advocates in Mediation.

One day refresher course for 93 mediators was held in the Principal Seat at Madras
High Court and Madurai Bench of Madras High Court.

An advanced training programme for 36 mediators was held at Madras. Mediation


Orientation Programme was held in all the 30 districts in Tamil Nadu wherein, 2,619
Advocates and 519 Judicial Officers have participated.

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2011- 2012

The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O.Ms.No.132 Home (Cts.IV), Department,


dated 10.02.2012, have sanctioned a sum of Rs. 1,71,43,000/- after adjusting an
unspent amount of Rs.83.07 lakhs, sanctioned during the year 2010-2011 from and
out of the approved amount of Rs.2,54,50,000/-.

Accreditation Certificates was given to 41 Mediators of Tamil Nadu Mediation and


Conciliation Centre who have rendered two years of pro-bono service in mediation,
by Honble Mr. Justice Markandey Katju, thenJudge Supreme Court, India on
26.08.2011.

Trainers Training Programme was conducted by Mr.Rahim Shamji, Barrister &


Mediator Director of Civil / Commercial Education & Training & International Projects,
United Kingdom, wherein 25 Advocates / Mediators were trained as Trainers

Special Skills on Mediation Training Programme was conducted by Mr.Greg Releyea,


Trainer, Institute for the Study and Development of Legal Systems (San Francisco,
CA) wherein, 116 Advocates / Mediators participated.

The Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre has started repeat orientation
programmes for the members of the Bar and on 25.02.2012 a repeat orientation
programme was conducted for the members of the bar of the Union Territory of
Puducherry and another programme was conducted on 10.03.2012.

A Referral Judges Programme was conducted for the Judicial Officers of Puducherry
on 25.02.2012 at Puducherry.

2012- 2013

Basic Mediation Training Programme conducted for 40 Advocates from the Madurai
District.

Referral Judges Programme for 23 Judicial Officers from the District of Tiruchirappalli.

Honble Chief Justice, Members of the Honble Monitoring Committee and


Co-ordinators from the Districts participated in the National District Level Seminar
on Mediation on 10.11.2012 at New Delhi.

2013- 2014

97

The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O.No.777,Home (Cts.IV) Dept.,dt.01.10.2013,


have sanctioned a sum of Rs.2,65,20,000/-, for the year 2013-2014, towards the
scheme entrusting the job of provision of specialized training to the Mediators,
Judicial Officers and Advocates in Mediation.

Basic Mediation Training Programme conducted for 172 Advocates.

Awareness programme was conducted for 119 Advocates from the District of Chennai
and for the 220 students of the Dr.Ambedkar Govt. Law College at Chengalpattu.

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The Government of Tamil Nadu was addressed to permit to incur the unutilized
amount of 2,52,99,354/- for the financial year 2014 - 2015 and the Government vide
letter No.38925/Cts.IV/2014-3, dated 20.08.2014 have permitted to incur the same.

VIII. COURT MANAGERS

The Government of Tamil Nadu have accorded sanction for creation of 35 posts of
Court Managers in the G.O.Ms.No. 202, Home(Cts.V) Dept., dt.23.03.2011 and in
G.O.Ms.No. 507, Home(Cts.V) Dept., dt.23.03.2011.

All the posts of Court Managers were filled up in the month of January 2013.
Sl.No.
1
2
3

Place of Posting
Principal Seat at Madras
Madurai Bench
One post each in 32
Judicial District
Total

No of posts
2
1
32
35

Considering the nature of work performed by the Court Managers, the Government
of Tamil Nadu have sanctioned the following infrastructure to the Court Managers
for their effective functioning.
i. The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O. Ms. No. 942 Home (Courts-V)
Department dated 30-10-2013 have sanctioned 35 posts of Typist and 35
posts of Office Assistant on a consolidated pay of Rs.12000/- and Rs.8000/respectively, for assisting the Court Managers.
ii. The Government of Tamil Nadu in G.O.Ms.No.195, Home (Courts-V)
Department dated 26-02-2014, have sanctioned 35 Laptops along with 10 GB
3G data cards for the use of Court Managers.

The Court Managers in the Districts primarily act as Executive Officers of the Courts,
sharing the burden of the Judicial Officers on their administrative side.

Court Managers of the High Court are acting as liaison officers with the State
Government to pursue the pending matters with the Government and the District
Court Managers are coordinating with the district administrative officers for getting
things done on the District level matters.

Court Managers at High Court are coordinating with Court Managers functioning
in various High Courts in the country and getting information/statistics for various
purposes including the best practices followed in other High Courts.

The High Court has recommended to the State Government for the continuation of
the post of Court Manager from 01.04.2015 onwards and the orders of the State
Government are awaited.

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Part C

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TAMIL NADU STATE LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY


NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY

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I. ACTIVITIES OF THE STATE LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY


COUNSELLING:
There are 29 District Legal Services Authorities, 150 Taluk Legal Services Committees
and 2 High Court Legal Services Committees functioning in the State of Tamil Nadu with
attached Counseling Centres. Panel lawyers are deputed as Counsellors to render legal
advice and legal assistance.
CENTRE FOR WOMEN: (Pre-Litigation)
Centres exclusively to deal with the issues concerning women have been opened by the
Authority all over Tamil Nadu. In the City of Chennai alone, three Centres for Women are
actively functioning. Women lawyers are posted regularly in those centres to deal with the
grievances of women compassionately.
MEDIATION CENTRES: (Pre-Litigation)
Mediation Centres are functioning in a selected place like Panchayat Office, Schools
etc. Staff members along with panel lawyers are deputed during weekends to attend the
Mediation Centres. Applications received in Mediation Centre from the litigant public are
disposed of on the spot and if immediate relief is not possible, the applications are brought
to the nearest Legal Aid committee for being processed.
LEGAL LITERACY AND AWARENESS:
The Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority is conducting Legal Literacy and Awareness
Camps in a conventional manner where the Judicial Officers, Advocates and NGOs used to
attend the gathering in a particular place of a village on a specified date. The applications
received in those camps are forwarded to the nearest Legal Services Committee for being
processed. In order to create awareness to the people in grass root level, the Scheme
of Micro Legal Literacy and Awareness Camps have been designed and circulated to the
District Authorities and Taluk Committees.
MICRO LEGAL LITERACY CAMPS:
The Scheme was launched on 27.07.2007. As directed by National Legal Services
Authority, the Chairmen of the District Legal Services Authorities and Taluk Legal Services
Committees were instructed to form a team consisting of 6 responsible persons for the
purpose of visiting places like Jails, Hospitals, Melas, Festival Places, Religious Places,
Schools, Colleges, Labour Colonies, Market Places, Pilgrim Centres, Hutments and Slum,
on every Saturday, Sunday and on all public holidays to make awareness among the public.

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NATIONAL RURAL EMPLOYMENT GUARANTEE SCHEME:


As instructed by NALSA, in its letter dated 03.02.2009 this Authority had issued
instructions to organize Legal Awareness Camps pertaining to National Rural Employment
and Guarantee Act regularly.
174 Camps on the above subject were conducted from January to December 2011, 222
camps from January to December 2012, 312 camps From January to December 2013 and
220 Camps From January to December 2014 in the State of Tamil Nadu.
LEGAL LITERACY THROUGH FOLK SONGS AND VILLUPATTU:
As part of the Legal Literacy and awareness programme, Villuppattu, a traditional folklore
of Tamil Nadu performed by famous artist Kalaimamani Subbu Arumugam is exhibited
through electronic media from the year 2002. The songs and educative villupattu played
in the legal literacy camps attracted large crowd. The public at large and the advocates
exhibited much interest in hearing them and they purchased the cassettes for their personal
use. Lyrics in the style of folk songs carrying the message of various Laws, Enactments and
Schemes on Lok Adalat sung by various famous playback singers viz. Padmashri Yesudoss,
Vani Jayaram, Unnikrishnan, Mahanadhi Shobana, and Sirkali Siva Chidambaram were
recorded and are being played at the venue where legal literacy programmes were organized
from the year 2003.
VIDEO AND AUDIO CASSETTES FOR PUBLICITY:
The video and audio C.Ds and cassettes containing the substance of the various laws
were prepared with the funds provided by Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited for creating
awareness among the public.
RELEASE OF BOOKLETS IN VERNACULAR LANGUAGE:
In order to enlighten the general public, the basics of various beneficial enactments were
prepared and published by the State Legal Services Authority in the form of booklets. The
following booklets titled as the State Legal Services Authority published Legal Literacy and
awareness series. Further on 20.08.2013 in a function, opening of A.D.R. Centre at Chennai
15 books on various subjects were released.
That apart, as part of legal literacy and awareness campaign, the Tamil Nadu State
Legal Services Authority has released a booklet in vernacular language under the caption
SATTAPPANIGAL MUTHAL KAIYEDU in question-and-answer form.

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FILM ON LOK ADALAT:


A short film on Lok Adalat highlighting the benefits of the Lok Adalat has been produced
and released by the Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority. The film is being screened
in almost all the functions of the Legal Services Authority as a prelude to the function. The
source of dispute, the psychological impact it created in the minds of the disputants, the
yearning for amicable solution sought for by the agriculturist, the ill-intention of the other
elite breed to elongate the dispute through the court of law, the accidental meeting by the
disputants with the District Authority personnel and the efforts taken by them to conciliate the
matter effectively and the solution provided by the Legal Services Authority for the disputes,
have been commendably pasteurized in the film.
DOCUMENTARY FILM ON THE ACTIVITIES OF LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY:
In order to further enlighten the people of the various beneficial enactments passed
by the Central and State Governments as well as the various programmes and schemes
implemented by the Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority, through legal literacy
and awareness, a 30 minutes documentary film Access to Justice for All in English and
Anaivarukkum Samaneethi in vernacular language was produced and released by the
Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority.
LEGAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH LEGAL AID CLINICS:
Legal Aid Clinics are also functioning in Law Colleges, across the State. In the State of
Tamil Nadu, 1,012 Legal Aid Clinics are functioning . A Legal Aid Clinic is also functioning
for mentally disabled persons at Mugappair.
The nature of functioning of the above Legal Aid Clinics is that a panel lawyer is deputed
to each Legal Aid Clinic on rotation for a specified period.
LEGAL AID CLINCS IN VILLAGE PANCHAYATS:
(Village Legal Care and Support Centres)
As per the directions of the National Legal Services Authority, Legal Aid Clinics are
established in all Villages, or for a cluster of Villages. Panel Advocates and Para Legal
Volunteers will be present in such clinics. They will give legal advice and they will refer
the deserving cases to the Taluk Legal Services Committees and District Legal Services
Authorities. A legal aid clinic is functioning in Juvenile Justice Board at Chennai. Up to
31.12.2014, we have opened 921 Village Legal Care and Support Centres. We have also
special legal aid Clinics for HIV/AIDS patients in some Hospitals.

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LEGAL LITERACY CLUBS:


190 Legal Literacy Clubs/Legal Aid Clubs are functioning in schools and Colleges in the
Districts to create legal awareness among the public living in nook and corner in villages.
The panel lawyers are deputed to these clubs once in a month for briefing the students about
salient features of important laws. The purpose is to educate students, in basic laws involved
in day-to-day life and persuade them to spread legal awareness among their neighbours.
GRAMA SABHA ASSEMBLY IN VILLAGES:
In order to bring justice at door-steps, we arrange meetings of Grama Sabha in consultation
with them. One staff from the Legal Services Authority/Committee and an Advocate will
attend the meeting. Local Problems will be discussed there and proper legal advice will be
given. If necessary other legal assistance will also be rendered through the Authorities/
Committees.
HELP LINE:
In Satta Udhavi Maiyam of Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority Building, a Legal
Aid help line and a toll free help line are functioning. The Advocates are deputed on all
working days to attend the calls and to give opinion both morning and evening by turn.
Help Line No: 25342441
Toll Free No.1800 4252 441
LEGAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS:
The Legal Services Authority has not neglected any sections of the society who are in
distress. The most neglected and isolated sections of the persons living with HIV/AIDS,
while their own family members themselves rejected those persons, the Legal Services
Authority has come to the rescue of them in order to get the legitimate rights under the
Act. On 16.09.2006 the Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority in association with
Tamil Nadu Aids Control Society, Chennai, has organized workshop and a Legal Aid Clinic
was inaugurated in Namakkal District. Besides this, a village called Pothanur in Namakkal
District, where in a large scale of people living with HIV/AIDS are living, was adopted by the
District Legal Services Authority, Namakkal, so as to enable the people to avail the facilities
of both medical and legal assistance.
Legal Aid Clinics for people living with HIV/AIDS were opened and are functioning
at Government Hospital, Dindigul, Cuddalore, Madurai, Tirunelveli, and Paramathi at
Namakkal Dist. Further legal Aid Clinics are functioning at Government Hospital, Chennai,
Dharmapuri, Villupuram, Krishnagiri, Salem, Tiruchirappalli, Tiruppur, Karur, Theni,

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Thoothukkudi, Chengalpattu, Kanyakumari, District. Perambalur, Vellore, Pudukottai,


Thanjavur, Tiruvannamalai, Srivilliputhur, Erode and Ramanathapuram Districts. The panel
lawyers are being deputed to hear the grievances of the persons living with HIV/AIDS and
on receipt of applications necessary steps are being taken on those petitions.
LEGAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PRISONERS:
The Legal Services Authority has also extended its services to the under trial prisoners
and the convict Prisoner and the provision of legal assistance commences from the time of
their arrivals till the filing of appeal before the Supreme Court. A Legal Aid Cell for Convicted
Prisoners is functioning at Puzhal, Prison Complex, Chennai. The Legal Aid Cells for
Prisoners are functioning in Vellore, Madurai, Trichirappalli, Cuddalore, Salem, Tirunelveli
and Coimbatore. Further, Duty Counsel is being deputed in all the Central prisons, Sub Jails
and Special Cell for Women regularly to interview the prisoners and register their grievances
and to provide the legal assistance in accordance with law.
LEGAL AID COUNSEL SCHEME:
The Panel Lawyers are being deputed to all the Magistrate Courts daily to provide legal
assistance to the under trial prisoners who are brought to the court for remand, to move bail
for them etc.
PARA LEGAL VOLUNTEERS SCHEME:
As per the directions of the National Legal Services Authority Para-legal Volunteers are
identified for the purpose of imparting Legal Awareness to various target groups of Para
legal volunteers who in turn bring legal awareness to all sections of the people. Para Legal
Volunteers will be engaged in all the legal aid clinics. They will also be engaged in the front
office of the ADR Centre.
As per the Scheme, the National Legal Services Authority has instructed to identify 100
Para Legal Volunteers in each District Legal Services Authority, 50 Para Legal Volunteers in
each Taluk Legal Services Committee.
No. of Para Legal Volunteers so far identified

(December 2014) : 7,330

No. of Para Legal Volunteers so far trained

(December 2014) : 4,463

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II. LOK ADALATS:


The State Authority, District Authorities, Taluk Committees and High Court Legal Services
Committees are empowered to organize Lok Adalat as per section 19 of Legal Services
Authorities Act, 1987.
CONTINUOUS LOK ADALAT FOR HIGH COURT CASES:
The High Court Legal Services Committee hitherto was organizing Lok Adalat twice a
week. Apart from Motor Accident Appeals, certain other categories like Writ, Matrimonial
appeals, Land Acquisition cases, etc. are taken up for consideration and settled before such
Lok Adalat. The retired judges of the Honble High Court with two other members preside
over the Lok Adalat.
Now, in order to make the Lok Adalat continuous and permanent one, two separate courts
are established in the principal seat of the High Court, Madras and also Lok Adalats are
organized in the District headquarters every month, presided over by the sitting Judges of
High Court.
LOK ADALAT FOR MOTOR ACCIDENT CASES PENDING BEFORE THE VARIOUS
TRIBUNALS OF THE SMALL CAUSES COURT, CHENNAI:
Lok Adalat for Motor Accident Claims cases which are pending before various Tribunals
of the Court of Small Causes, Chennai was conducted.
In the State of Tamil Nadu 4,966 Adalats were held, in which 78,291 cases were settled
for an award of Rs.701,34,40,251.95 in the year 2012,
5,733 Adalats have been held in which 14,59,974 cases have been settled for an award
of Rs. 1840,55,11,674.57 in the year 2013.
5,613 Adalats have been held in which 40,58,694 cases have been settled for an award
of Rs.3391,99,69,293.00 from January to December 2014.
PENSION ADALAT:
Pension Adalat is conducted by the State Authority to assist the retired people to get relief
presided over by the Honble Retired Judge of the Madras High Court with two members.
The Government has also appointed a Nodal Officer to monitor so as to enable the various
Departments to participate in the Lok Adalat and to represent their views to assess the
eligibility of the grievances of retired persons
So far, 206 Pension Adalats were conducted and through which, 997 retired pensioners
have been benefited till December 2014.

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PRISON ADALAT:
Prison Lok Adalats are functioning every Friday in central prisons. Such Adalats are being
held at Central prisons, Chennai, Madurai, Trichy, Vellore, Cuddalore, Salem, Tirunelveli,
Coimbatore and in special prison for women at Vellore. The functioning of Prison Adalats
has reduced not only the pendency of cases but also the prison population. A Legal Aid
Clinic is functioning in the Central Prison, at Puzhal in Chennai in Prison I, II, and Special
Prison for Women.
So far, 3,469 Prison Adalats were conducted and those Adalats had disposed of 18,198
cases till December 2014.
National Lok Adalat on 23.11.2013 and State Mega Lok Adalat on 12.04.2014 and again
a National Lok Adalat on 6.12. 2014 were held.
On 23.11.2013 , 808 Adalats were organized in this State, in which 16,29,843 Cases
were referred, out of which 13,77,252 cases were settled. The amount awarded is
Rs.1140,32,91,487.00.
On 12.04.2014, 168 Adalats were conducted throughout the State, in which 15,08,767
Cases were settled, with an award of Rs. 939,40,45,686.00
On 06.12.2014, 181 Adalats were conducted throughout the State, in which 24,73,212
Cases were settled, with an award of Rs.2081,48,73,918.00.
PERMANENT LOK ADALAT FOR PUBLIC UTILITY SERVICES U/S.22-B OF THE ACT:
The Government of Tamil Nadu in its G.O. Ms.No.366, Home (Courts-IV) Department
dated 16.05.2014 has sanctioned Staff and infrastructure for establishment of Permanent
Lok Adalat in all the 32 Districts in the State of Tamil Nadu for public Utility Services as
directed u/s22-A (b) of the Legal Services Authorities (Amendment) Act, 2002.
On receipt of the above Orders from the Government of Tamil Nadu, the Tamil Nadu State
Legal Services Authority issued Proceedings Notification in TNSLSA No.4680/E/2009 dated
05.06.2014 for publishing the said notification in the Tamil Nadu Government Gazette,
Establishing Permanent Lok Adalat for public Utility Services as per the Act. The Permanent
Lok Adalat shall commence functioning on the assumption of Chairman and Members of the
Permanent Lok Adalat.
ALTERNATIVE DISPUTES RESOLUTION CENTRES:
A.D.R. Centres in 15 districts viz. Chennai, Vellore, Krishnagiri, Salem, Theni, Tiruvarur,
Madurai, Namakkal, Cuddalore, Ramanathapuram, Dindigul, Trichirappalli, Villupuram,
Tiruvannamalai and Kanchipuram @ Chengalpattu have been opened and are functioning.

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Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

In 8 Districts viz. Nagapattinam, Sivaganga, Perambalur, Tiruvallur, Tirunelveli,


Thoothukkudi, Kanyakumari and Srivilliputhur constructions are over. In 2 districts viz.
Erode and Thanjavur construction work is under progress and in remaining 5 districts viz.
Pudukottai, Karur, Coimbatore, Dharmapuri and Nilgiris steps are being taken to make
constructions.
TELECAST OF NEETHI MANDRA SEYTHIGAL (NEWS FROM COURTS):
NEETHI MANDRA SEYTHIGAL (NEWS FROM THE COURTS), a 25 minutes sponsored
programme by the Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority is being telecasted from
30.09.2007 on every Sunday at 7.30 a.m. in Pothigai Channel in Doordarshan. This
Programme was extended for a further period of 52 weeks from 30.11.2014.
Functioning of Courts, various programmes and functioning of Tamil Nadu State Legal
Services Authority are being informed. Individual/Group/Panel discussions are being held.
Court News, Latest and important Judgement of Honble Supreme Court, Honble High Court
which require public attentions are also telecasted in the programme.
MOBILE VAN:
In propogation of Legal Aid Schemes / Programmes framed under the Legal Services
Authorities Act, as a part of publicity campaign in the State, Mobile Vans are being used.
Mobile vans are also used for conducting mobile Lok Adalats, legal awareness camps and
screening of publicity films using LCD Projector.
SPECIAL NEWS LETTER:
The Tamil Nadu State Legal Services Authority has released Special News Letter which
consists of Achievements and Activities of the Legal Services Institutions in Tamil Nadu.
FULL TIME SECRETARy:
The Government of Tamil Nadu has sanctioned 10 posts of full time Secretary in the
cadre of Civil Judges, (Senior Division) now re-designated as Senior Civil Judges in G.O.Ms.
No.1258, Home (Courts-IV) Department dated 29.12.2006.
For the above posts, 7 out of 10 posts were filled up by the Honble High Court, Madras
on deputation basis and they are functioning in our State.
Further, this Authority has addressed the Government through the Honble High Court,
Madras for sanction of 20 posts of full time secretaries for the remaining districts orders of
the Government are awaited.

Madras High Court

110

R e p ort 2011-2014

STATEMENT SHOWING THE NUMBER OF LOK ADALATS HELD,


CASES SETTLED AND AMOUNT AWARDED INCLUDING,
SPECIALISED LOK ADALATS, FOR THE PERIOD
FROM 2011 TO 2014
ABSTRACT

AMOUNT
AWARDED
RS.

79,714

476,31,44,720 .00

4,966

78,291

701,34,40,251 .95

2013

5,733

14,59,974

1840,55,11,674 .57

2014

5,613

40,58,694

3391,99,69,293 .00

ADALATS
HELD

CASES
SETTLED

2011

5,188

2012

YEAR

P.

NUMBER OF LEGAL LITERACY AND AWARENESS CAMPS HELD IN THE STATE


FOR THE PERIOD FROM 2011 TO 2014

PERIOD

NUMBER OF
LEGAL LITERACY
AND AWARENESS
CAMPS HELD

NUMBER OF
APPLICATIONS RECEIVED
IN THE CAMP

2011

3,882

30,384

2012

3,709

22,195

2013

4,145

15,848

2014

3,025

11,979

LEGAL AID CLUB


As per the National Legal Services Authority (Legal Aid Clinics Scheme ) 2010, Legal
Literacy Clubs/Legal Aid Clubs have been set up by the District Legal Services Authorities
and Taluk Legal Services Committees for the benefit of the under privileged among the
students: :
No. of Legal Aid Clubs in Schools

145

No. of Legal Aid Clubs in Colleges

45

111

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

DETAILS OF PRISON ADALATS AND JAIL ADALATS


CONDUCTED AND CASES DISPOSED OF IN THE
CENTRAL PRISON AND SUB JAILS IN TAMIL NADU
FROM 2011 TO 2014
MONTH

Adalats Held

Cases Referred

Cases Disposed

2011

513

2,200

1,047

2012

55

228

125

2013

68

1,973

1,498

2014

78

2,909

2,265

Legal Services Rendered


From 2011 to 2014
MCOP

Crl.
Trial

Bail

Crl.
Appeal

Year

Non Judicial

Civil

Matrimonial

2011

28,531

11,315

2,554

307

10,084

4,528 1,049

2012

23,734

11,042

2,622

245

10,847

4,187 1,148

2013

16,867

11,811

2,636

692

12,539

4,269 854

2014

13,192

13,419

2,661

445

15,392

4,448 984

Statement showing Number of Legal and Non Legal applications


received and disposed of during the Period
from 2011 to 2014

Madras High Court

Year

Non Judicial

Civil

2011

28,531

11,315

2012

23,734

11,042

2013

16,867

11,811

2014

13,192

13,419

112

R e p ort 2011-2014

Statement showing Number of Pension Adalat Held,


Petitions received and disposed of during the Period
from 2011 to 2014
YEAR

ADALATS
HELD

TAKEN

AWARD AMOUNT
RS.
P.

2011

11

426

70

67,35,116 .00

2012

11

406

59

95,69,780 .00

2013

11

478

58

85,02,291 .00

2014

11

892

154

4,46,55,572 .00

SETTLED

NATIONAL LOK ADALAT HELD ON 23.11.2013


S.NO.

113

DISTRICTS

ADALATS

TAKEN

SETTLED

AWARD AMOUNT

RS.
P.

Chennai

3,82,147

3,73,981

339,85,00,383 .00

Chengalpattu

1,54,788

1,16,839

54,33,99,798 .00

Coimbatore

17,458

13,922

71,98,07,494 .00

Cuddalore

19,391

18,177

36,69,20,564 .00

Dindigul

30,584

28,215

12,63,48,570 .00

Erode

86,435

82,744

23,55,98,358 .00

Kanyakumari

5,942

4,802

8,28,76,572 .00

Karur

6,919

2,824

87,53,91,279 .00

Krishnagiri

10

32,443

18,823

34,61,73,356 .00

10

Madurai

3,14,254

1,57,637

58,41,08,413 .00

11

Nagapattinam

18,610

13,020

13,25,83,075 .00

12

Namakkal

11,657

10,519

29,98,23,209 .18

13

Nilgiris

11,437

10,593

3,42,65,311 .00

14

Perambalur

12,186

7,767

13,14,35,912 .00

15

Pudukottai

22,481

16,001

7,86,40,497 .00

16

Ramanathapuram

7,544

3,758

4,83,51,205 .00

17

Salem

36,200

21,224

23,55,31,617 .00

18

Sivaganga

18,777

15,752

12,87,74,913 .89

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

S.NO.

DISTRICTS

ADALATS

TAKEN

SETTLED

AWARD AMOUNT

RS.
P.

19

Thanjavur

43,261

25,352

35,46,12,742 .00

20

Theni

34,422

32,523

13,31,31,500 .00

21

Tiruvallur

94,208

88,485

24,31,37,021 .00

22

Tiruvarur

10,739

5,768

9,59,95,715 .00

23

Trichirappalli

39,569

29,136

20,15,21,698 .00

24

Tirunelveli

35,545

33,601

20,78,96,983 .00

25

Tiruvannamalai

24,861

15,661

24,15,44,807 .00

26

Thoothukkudi

6,886

4,450

6,57,63,701 .00

27

Vellore

11

17,300

10,543

35,90,05,562 .00

28

Villupuram

42,763

39,110

61,36,64,777 .00

29

Virudhunagar

35,816

32,482

6,97,92,510 .00

3,339

428

22,58,86,712 .00

761

80

3,41,45,836 .00

2,60,601

1,43,035

18,86,61,396 .00

175

18,39,324

13,77,252

1140,32,91,487 .07

30
31
32

HCLSC,
CHENNAI
HCLSC,
MADURAI
SLSA
GRAND TOTAL

STATE MEGA LOK ADALAT - 12.04 2014


S.NO.

DISTRICTS

ADALATS

TAKEN

SETTLED

AWARD AMOUNT

RS.
P.

CHENNAI

3,98,939

3,91,650

362,47,15,620 .00

CHENGALPATTU

1,26,935

1,20,343

39,03,51,361 .00

COIMBATORE

45,000

33,837

72,01,14,225 .00

CUDDALORE

25,851

24,199

32,01,27,191 .00

DINDIGUL

34,000

31,547

6,72,40,468 .00

ERODE

82,175

81,123

39,62,07,472 .00

KANYAKUMARI

10,662

6,491

2,41,32,751 .00

KARUR

9,057

7,695

11,49,79,554 .00

Madras High Court

114

R e p ort 2011-2014

S.NO.

DISTRICTS

TAKEN

SETTLED

AWARD AMOUNT

RS.
P.

KRISHNAGIRI

26,647

16,740

14,63,47,003 .00

10

MADURAI

2,21,468

2,16,909

24,98,74,329 .00

11

NAGAPATTINAM

32,000

28,688

6,12,50,807 .00

12

NAMAKKAL

12,738

10,372

14,90,30,857 .00

13

NILGIRIS

4,079

2,489

4,66,45,393 .00

14

PERAMBALUR

6,983

5,316

5,04,94,100 .00

15

PUDUKOTTAI

8,600

8,120

5,02,16,220 .00

16

RAMNAD

9,553

7,217

2,63,89,275 .00

17

SALEM

14,944

13,126

8,48,23,946 .00

18

SIVAGANGA

14,365

9,260

3,91,60,264 .00

19

THANJAVUR

41,262

31,517

15,20,27,848 .00

20

THENI

27,500

27,931

8,04,93,710 .00

21

TIRUVALLUR

2,21,875

2,14,374

70,93,69,236 .00

22

TIRUVARUR

8,938

6,837

4,23,94,116 .00

23

TRICHY

45,720

31,203

11,83,85,702 .00

24

TIRUNELVELI

59,927

58,990

15,22,88,160 .00

25

TIRUVANNAMALAI

23,187

11,538

9,06,73,860 .00

26

THOOTHUKKUDI

27,243

25,327

3,47,39,508 .00

27

VELLORE

10

34,000

29,390

28,31,97,903 .00

28

VILLUPURAM

35,000

38,132

45,19,07,015 .00

29

VIRUDHUNAGAR

16,809

14,211

8,37,35,017 .00

30

HCLSC, MADRAS

1,383

141

7,44,28,927 .00

31

HCLSC, MADURAI

821

98

3,83,80,859 .00

32

STATE
AUTHORITY

29,000

3,956

30,29,22,989 .00

16,56,661

15,08,767

939,40,45,686 .00

Total

115

ADALATS

168

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

PRISON ADALAT HELD ON 07.09.2014


STATEMENT SHOWING NUMBER OF CASES TAKEN,
SETTLED AND NUMBER. OF PERSONS BENEFITTED.
S.No.

Name of the
District

No. of
cases
taken

No. of
cases
settled

No. of Beneficiaries
Men

Women

Total

Chennai

273

267

226

228

2.

Chengalpattu

298

269

179

11

190

3.

Coimbatore

43

43

39

39

4.

Cuddalore

155

141

75

81

Dindigul

45

28

28

28

6.

Erode

53

39

39

39

Kanyakumari

94

71

71

71

8.

Karur

9.

Krishnagiri

36

13

13

13

10

Madurai

27

23

23

23

11.

Nagapattinam

97

80

80

80

12

Namakkal

15

--

--

13.

Nilgiris

42

10

10

10

14

Perambalur

--

--

--

--

15.

Pudukottai

16

--

--

--

--

16

Ramanathapuram

18

16

11

11

17

Salem

526

455

446

455

18

Sivaganga

19

Thanjavur

32

20

Theni

26

11

11

11

21.

Tiruvallur

304

304

296

296

22.

Tiruvarur

22

10

10

10

23

Tiruchirappalli

56

54

48

48

Madras High Court

116

R e p ort 2011-2014

Name of the
District

S.No.

No. of
cases
taken

No. of
cases
settled

180

No. of Beneficiaries
Men

Women

Total

124

124

124

24

Tirunelveli

25

Tiruvannamalai

--

--

--

--

--

26

Thoothukkudi

27

Vellore

55

48

40

40

28.

Villupuram

80

69

25

25

29

Virudhunagar

---

---

---

--

--

2,508

2,092

1,809

28

1,837

Total

TAMIL NADU STATE LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY


NATIONAL LOK ADALAT ON 6.12.2014
S.No.

PRE-LITIGATION

Name of the
District

REFERRED

SETTLED

AMOUNT

REFERRED

SETTLED

AMOUNT

4,64,450

8,52,60,336 92,694

92,694

1136,93,43,018

75,364

2,50,48,071 37,073

37,073

80,22,90,611

459

15,92,84,608 27,275

27,275

58,44,97,790

Chennai

Chengalpattu

Coimbatore

459

Cuddalore

12,376

10,847

18,39,29,265 24,526

23,884

29,78,10,034

Dindigul

7,468

7,468

17,14,73,728 37,879

37,879

9,79,88,399

Erode

68,343

68,343

8,05,46,685 58,585

58,585

30,78,12,032

Kanyakumari

7,315

913

6,37,86,201 13,351

12,835

4,34,72,614

Karur

676

676

7,00,69,983 18,081

14,079

11,41,37,415

Krishnagiri

7,333

898

12,41,70,967 10,953

9,069

6,06,03,547

10

Madurai

2,52,147

16,34,85,568 58,826

23,197

45,40,74,301

11

Nagapattinam

2,854

810

3,29,17,175 32,887

30,763

4,47,63,194

12

Namakkal

3,834

3,834

1,11,92,567 57,288

52,882

7,44,22,282

13

Nilgiris

2,307

345

4,34,52,912 5,111

4,209

1,85,38,590

14

Perambalur

331

112

1,72,29,750 4,860

4,019

2,76,39,384

117

4,64,450

PENDING LITIGATION

75,364

2,52,147

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

S.No.

PRE-LITIGATION

Name of the
District

REFERRED

PENDING LITIGATION

SETTLED

AMOUNT

REFERRED

SETTLED

AMOUNT

5,970

3,37,68,350 8,316

6,999

3,67,94,268

15

Pudukottai

6,164

16

Ramanad

916

916

4,06,17,039 10,138

10,052

1,13,62,350

17

Salem

11,270

780

4,80,77,193 49,477

41,915

26,30,21,242

18

Sivaganga

531

531

2,69,02,440 19,880

19,880

1,73,07,144

19

Thanjavur

5,509

2,134

13,10,28,252 80,287

79,104

26,25,83,640

20

Theni

1,033

1,033

6,33,30,000 30,261

29,972

3,68,97,397

21

Tiruvallur

2,36,626

2,25,489

6,58,14,637 45,739

44,366

41,60,60,573

22

Tiruvarur

5,053

760

4,07,22,311 11,726

9,709

3,22,51,048

23

Trichy

9,631

1,334

10,00,59,957 48,357

42,843

7,85,72,073

24

Tirunelveli

38,505

33,070

6,72,50,348 24,825

23,056

8,05,82,687

25

Tiruvannamalai

7,498

3,715

5,25,88,150 14,233

12,977

8,08,50,383

26

Thoothukkudi

2,035

326

3,51,53,334 23,172

22,191

3,72,40,872

27

Vellore*

47,55,35,653 47,114

43,267

32,79,60,812

28

Villupuram

11,001

1,048

8,62,78,050 59,043

41,014

41,07,75,879

29

Virudhunagar

3,766

581

5,38,60,290 39,688

39,427

4,74,83,354

30

Ariyalur

964

917

4,42,90,627 6,178

6,178

31

Dharmapuri

734

734

8,71,11,188 14,348

14,348

12,59,29,805

32

Tiruppur

1,505

436

4,62,97,958 25,107

24,085

61,27,72,417

TOTAL

16,21,832

33
34
35

HCLSC,
Chennai
HCLSC,
Madurai
State Authority
Total

Madras High Court

3,73,834

3,63,695

15,30,135

273,05,33,593 10,37,278

9,39,826

36,52,751

1717,94,91,906

0 4,074

250

14,05,89,054

0 813

112

6,31,98,381

851

56,84,93,885

19,215
16,41,047

2,038
15,32,173

13,25,67,099 1,878
286,31,00,692 10,44,043

9,41,039

1795,17,73,226

118

R e p ort 2011-2014

UNION TERRITORY OF PUDUCHERRY


LEGAL SERVICES AUTHORITY (STATE AUTHORITY)
LOK ADALAT:
From 1998 to May 2003 as many as 1,838 cases were settled in Lok Adalats for a
staggering sum of Rs.7.22 crores. Continuous Lok Adalat came into being from May 2003.
As such continuous Lok Adalat was setup on 22-5-2003, to have sittings on every Monday
and Friday. This opened the gates for the parties to file directly before the Adalat cases of all
kinds, under section 19(5) (ii) of the Legal Services Authorities Act, 1987. That this institution
has gone down well with the people is clear from the frequency with which cases are filed
before it. Statistics are furnished below for the period 2003 - 2014 (June)
No. of sittings

: 900

No. of cases settled

: 10,920

Pendency

: 15

Amount settled (in MACTOP Cases) : Rs.20,86,46,739/-

119

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

SPECIAL LOK ADALATS:


Parallel to the Continuous Lok Adalats, Special Lok Adalats are organized for the
specific needs of the Banks (nationalized and private), Insurance Companies., Cell phone
Companies, and the Government of Pondicherry. Number of Adalats were conducted from
June 2003 to June 2014 and the details are furnished below :
No. of Adalats

: 386

No. of cases settled

: 25,483

Total amount settled

: Rs. 24,89,38,784/-

LEGAL AID & LITERACY CAMPS:


This Authority also conducts Legal Aid and Legal Literacy Camps all over the Territory.
Complaints if any are heard from the people and solutions are suggested. Wherever
necessary, the complaints are taken to the office of the Authority and appropriately dealt
with. People are also educated on their legal rights, how and where to assert them, and
whom to be contacted for legal assistance etc.
From 01.01.2003 to 31.05.2014, 1,414 camps were conducted covering 4,039 vilages
(All regions), many villages were covered for the second and third time also to the benefit of
2,36,835 persons.
CONCILIATION CELL:
Seven Conciliation Cells function in the Union Territory of Pondicherry. Four in Pondicherry,
and one each in Karaikal, Mahe and Yanam. Details of assistance given through Conciliation
Cell for the period 2003 to 31.05.2014 are as follows:
Total no. of sittings

2,425

No. of beneficiaries

29,403

JAIL CLINIC
A Jail Clinic functions at the Central Prison every day from 2.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. Details
of assistance given through Jail Clinics for the period 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and
from 2008 to 2014 are as follows:
No. of visits

: 1,183

No. of grievances heard

: 9,313

No. of persons for whom


Advocate were appointed : 443

Madras High Court

120

R e p ort 2011-2014

SERVICES RENDERED BY LEGAL AID COUNSELS


All the Magistrate Courts in the Union Territory are provided with Legal Aid Counsels, as
detailed hereunder;
Name of the Court

No. of Legal Aid Counsel

1. Chief Judl. Magistrate, Pondicherry.

2. Judl. Magistrate - I, Pondicherry.

3. Judl. Magistrate - II, Pondicherry.

4. Judl. Magistrate, Karaikal.

5. Judl. Magistrate, Mahe.

6. Judl. Magistrate, Yanam.

From the year 2003 till 2014 the total number of persons benifited are 977
REGISTRATION OF MARRIAGES
During the Legal Aid camps conducted by this Authority in various villages in this Union
territory, one of the main subject where legal assistance was sought by the Public was nonregistration of marriages. Upto June 2014, 60 applications were received from Puducherry,
Karaikal, Mahe and Yanam regions for registration of marriage, of which 52 marriages have
already been registered and certificates were issued to the parties concerned.
OTHER ACTIVITIES:
1.

2.

3.

4.

121

On 23.01.2013, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority organized


Legal Literacy Camp at Mangalam village, Villianur Commune, Puducherry. Around
400 women Self Help Group, Youth Association Members and Village Panchayat
member also participated and got benefitted.
On 25.01.2013, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority conducted
one day refresher course for Village Legal Aid Clinic Advocates and Para Legal
Volunteers. The main aim of the programme was to serve the rural people and their
legal assistance. Around 50 persons participated in this function.
On 19.2.2013 and 24.02.2013, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services
Authority, Mangalam Society and NABARD jointly conducted Legal Literacy camp
at Madagadipet Palayam, Thiruvandarkoil, Vinayagampet and P.S. Palayam. The
women Self Help Group attended the camps. Around 300 persons got benefited.
On 08.03.2013, Womens Day celebrations were jointly conducted by the Union
Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Kariamanickam Women Self
Help Group. Lectures were delivered about the various laws regarding the Womens
rights and Violence against women. Around 500 persons got benefited.
Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

5.

On 03.04.2013, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority organized


Legal Literacy Camp at Nettapakkam village. Lectures were delivered on Women
rights. Around 150 Women Self Help Group members participated.

6.

On 17.04.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority conducted


Legal Aid Camp at Villianur. In that camp about 200 persons got benefited.

7.

On 03.06.13, 05.06.13 and 13.06.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services


Authority, Myword N.G.O. and Village Self Help Group (women) jointly conducted
Legal Literacy camp at Lingareddy palayam, Katterikuppam and Pudukuppam.
Lecturers were delivered about the various laws. The Women Self Help Group
attended the camps. Around 270 persons got benefited.

8.

On 12.06.2013, U.T. of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Labour Department


jointly organized the World day against child Labour. Around 200 Women Self Help
Groups and Nehru Yuvagendra Association members participated.

9.

The Puducherry Legal Services Authority has conducted Legal Aid Camps in various.
Villages in the Puducherry region. During this period, 125 Marriages were registered
and the Certificates were handed over to the beneficiaries.

10. 28 Lok Adalats were organized during the period from July to September, 2013, in
which 143 cases were settled, including 104 MACT cases and compensation to the
tune of Rs. 87,90,600/- was awarded to the Claimants.
11. 26 Legal Literacy Camps covering 78 villages were organized during the Period
from July to September 2013, in which 2,965 persons got benefited.
12. During July 2013, 539 persons were provided free legal aid, which includes 143
Scheduled caste, 148 Backward class, 164 Women, 29 Children and 83 General.
13. The Legal Services Authority organized refreshment course for Village Legal Aid
Clinic Advocates and PLVs on 23.07.2013. About 48 lawyers/PLVs were benefited.
14. Legal Literacy Camps were organized on 28.08.2013, 29.08.2013, 30.8.2013,
05.09.2013 and 30.09.2013 in association with Mangalam Society and Helpage
India, Puducherry Rotary Club and Puducherry HIV and AIDS Control Society.
15. On 05.10.2013, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Buvan
Care (Senior Citizens Associations) jointly organized meeting Vaniga Vysial
Thirumana Mandapam at Villianur. Wherein 150 persons participated.
16. On 17.10.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Puducherry
HIV and AIDS control society, Puducherry jointly conducted Legal Literacy
Programme about the Immoral Traffic Act to the Police Officials. Lecturers were
delivered about the various laws relating to immoral traffic Act and about 50 officials
participated.

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17. On 22.10.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Adecom
Pinnagam (N.G.O) jointly organized Legal Literacy Programme at Ariyapalayam
village Villianur Commune, Puducherry. In that programme, Lectures were given on
various laws relating to Legal Services Authority Act and Juvenile Justice Act and
about 150 persons got benefited.
18. On 13.11.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Pudhcherry
HIV and AIDS Control Society, Puducherry jointly conducted Legal Literacy
Programme at Police Training Office, Puducherry . Lecturers were delivered about
Senior Citizens Act & Cyber Crimes to the Police Officials and about 75 persons got
benefitted.
19. On 13.11.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority has celebrated
Children Day at New Land English High School at Kombakkam, Puducherry. In that
function Para Legal Volunteers participated. About 300 students got benefited.
20. On 02.12.13 & 10.12.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and
Adecom Pinnagam (N.G.O), Puducherry jointly conducted Women Legal Awareness
Procession and Legal Literacy Programme. In the said Programme about 500
persons got benefit.
21. On 10.12.13 & 28.12.13, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority
and Human Rights Association jointly conducted Legal Literacy Programme at
Tamil Sangam Hall at Vengattanagar and Rina Mahal at Oulgaret. Panel Advocates
participated in the programme and 600 persons got benefited.
22. On 23.11.2013 when the National Mega Lok Adalat was conducted, Puducherry
also contributed disposal of 18,042 cases, for a quantum of money value of
Rs.10,82,79,598.
23. On 06-01-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority organized
Legal Literacy Camp at Villanur, Puducherry. Lectures were delivered regarding
Womens rights. Around 100 Women Self Help Group members participated.
24. On 24-01-2014, as per the directions of the NALSA, this authority opened additional
Village Care and Support Centre at Volontariat, Puducherry. About 200 people
participated in the programme.
25. On 17-02-2014 and 19-02-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services
Authority and Mangalam Society, Puducherry jointly conducted Legal Literacy
camp/Legal Literacy programmes at Karikalampakkam and Korcadu Village at
Nettapakkam Commune. Lectures were delivered about Womens rights, Domestic
Violence Act and various laws. Around 200 persons participated.
26. On 21-02-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority conducted
Legal Literacy Programmes at Middle School, Ariyankuppam, Puducherry. Para

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Legal Volunteer and Students numbering about 250 participated.


27. On 22-02-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Adecom
Binnagem, NGO jointly organized South Regional Seminar on Domestic Violence at
Veterinary Hospital Conference Hall, Puducherry. The Duty Counsels and Advocates
participated as Resource Persons. About 80 deligates attended the seminar.
28. On 08-03-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Women
Bar Association, Puducherry jointly Celebrated World Womens Day in the premises
of the Women Bar Association, Puducherry. About 60 women advocate participated
in that programme.
29. On 04-04-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Taluk
Legal Services Committee, Mahe conducted Legal Literacy Programme at Conference
Hall, Civil Station, Mahe. About 250 participants attended the programme.
30. On 12.04.2014, the State Authority conducted Mega Lok Adalat and disposed of
6,468 cases for an award of Rs.9,87,96,664/- The District Legal Services Authority,
Puducherry and Taluk Legal Services Committees of Karaikal, Mahe and Yenam
also contributed their part.
31. On 14-04-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority and Taluk
Legal Services Committee, Yanam conducted Legal Literacy Programme at
Conference Hall, Mini Civil Station, Yanam. About 300 participants attended the
programme.
32. On 17-04-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority conducted
Legal Literacy Programmes at Volontariat, Thuthipattu village, Villanur Commune,
Puducherry. Lectures delivered. About various women law and 60 women students
attended the programme.
33. On 19-05-2014 and 20-05-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services
Authority and Mangalam Society, Puducherry jointly conducted Legal Literacy
camp/Legal Literacy programmes at Vallalar Madam, Thattchavady. Lecturers were
delivered about Legal Services Authority Act, Domestic Violence Act and Consumer
Protection Act. Around 150 persons participated.
34. On 21-06-2014, Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority inaugurated
Legal Aid Clinic for Women in the office of the UTPLSA, Puducherry. Honble Mr.
Justice N. Paul Vasantha Kumar, Judge, High Court, Madras & Executive Chairman,
UTPLSA, Puducherry directed to organize this Programme. In that Programme
Honble Mr. Justice Satish K. Agnihotri, Acting Chief Justice of Madras and Patronin-Chief, UTPLSA inaugurated the Legal Aid Clinic for Women. Honble Mr. Justice
K.K.Sasidharan, Judge, High Court, Madras & Committee Judge of UTPLSA and
Honble Mr. Justice C.S.Karnan, Judge, High Court, Madras & Committee Judge

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of UTPLSA, Lok Adalat, etc., also graced the occasion. The Member Secretary
Dr. K. Arul, and the Duty Counsel Mr. A. Rashid also participated in the Programme.
35. On 30-06-2014, as directed the Honble Patron-in-Chief and Executive Chairman,
UTPLSA Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority conducted the one
day Sensitization programme on HIV/ AIDS in coordination with the Puducherry AIDS
control Society for imparting training to Panel Advocates and Para Legal Volunteers
with regard to the removal of social stigma from the minds of general pubic against
the HIV/AIDS affected persons and most at risk population. The Member Secretary
Dr. K. Arul, with the Officers of the UTPLSA, Dr. D.Gurumurthy, Project Director,
Dr. N.Gideon Dharmakkan Sathyaraj, Deputy Director (STD), Thiru. M.Krishnamurthy,
Deputy Director (IEC) and Thiru. S.Settouramane, Asst. Director (CSM) Pondicherry
AIDS Control Society participated in this Programme. About 81 participants attended
the programme.
THE FUTURE PLAN:

The Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority is concentrating in


educating people about their rights and duties, apart from legal and non-legal
requirements. On that venture, it has been proposed to have more number of
Village Legal Care and Support Centres in all the 30 Legislative Constituencies by
seeking temporary accommodation and assistance from the Local Administrative
Department (LAD), who also expressed their co-operation to extent the help to have
Village Legal Care and Support Centres. If it is done in all the jurisdictions, the
Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority would be a model State in
the country with more number of Village Legal Care and Support Centres, each
established within the radius of 3 kms.

That apart there are a dozen professional colleges including two Law Colleges
and half a dozen of Arts and Science Colleges in this Union Territory, which will be
taken as a target for imparting instructions on the legal awareness by educating the
student communy.

The Para Legal Volunteers are extending their marvelous support by attending all
the activities, for which they are meant for. The Para Legal Volunteers are given
periodical, adequate training for equipping their ability and skill in orderto discharge
their duties effectively to enable the people, who are all in need of legal services for
redressing their grievances.

It is also noteworthy to mention that the State Authority is having a Mobile Van, which
is meant for conducting Awareness Camps and for conducting Mobile Lok Adalats in
various parts of the State namely Puducherry, Karaikal, Mahe and Yanam regions.

The Members of the Puducherry Bar Association are having active participation oy

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extending their helping hand in the activities of Legal Services Authority for referring
pending matters before the Courts in this Union Territory having rich population of
about twenty lakhs spread to the nearby States of Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Andhra
Pradesh.

As narrated above, the Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority


is marching towards success in all its activities for enabling the stake holders to
have the benefits. Our plan is to make all the villages in the Union Territory to have
access to justice through Village Legal Care and Support Centres to resolve their
grievances.

The Honble the Chief Justice, High Court of Madras and Patron-in-Chief of UTPLSA
and the Honble Executive Chairman, UTPLSA wish that all the villages in the
Union Territory of Puducherry be extended with the Village Legal Care and Support
Centres. It is also desired to have Village Clinics for Women with the help of Panel
Lawyers and Para Legal Volunteers throughout the State in the days to come.

The Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority have opened Conciliation
Centres both at the Government General Hospital and Dr. Ambedkar Government
Law College. The Union Territory of Puducherry Legal Services Authority opened
18 Village Care and Support Centres in the already identified places. Exclusive
Legal Aid Clinic for women is functioning in the State Authority, in which the women
petitioners can have their grievances settled or referred to court with the help of the
Additional. Duty Counsel, who will have her sitting on Tuesdays and Fridays of the
week.

It is also pertinent to pen down that the Taluk Legal Services Committee of Karaikal
now having the status of Judicial District will be established with the District Legal
Services Authority at Karaikal by taking necessary steps. By that the Union Territory
of Puducherry Legal Services Authority will be having two District Legal Services
Authorities and Two Taluk Legal Services Committees.

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Year-Wise Particulars
With Regard To Legal Awareness Camps And Beneficiaries
Year

No. of camps held

No. of beneficiaries

2011

169

26,715

2012

172

72,965

2013

126

16,120

2014

85

11,475

Total

552

1,27,275

Year-wise Particulars
With Regard To Lok Adalat Cases Settled And Amount Awarded

127

Year

No. of Adalats
(including all Adalats)

No. of cases settled

2011

284

10,131

5,80,56,989

2012

141

1,266

8,96,14,523

2013

157

683

2,24,85,272

2014

104

7,423

13,89,57,617

Total

686

19,503

30,91,14,401

Award amount ( ` )

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TAMIL NADU MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION CENTRE

Alternative Dispute Resolution Centre for Chennai District was inaugurated on 20.08.2013
by the Honble Mr.Justice P.Sathasivam, then Chief Justice of India in the presence of then
Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu, Honble Judges of the Supreme Court of India and Honble
Judges of the High Court of Madras participated in the function

The Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre, High Court, Madras, conducted the
Southern Regional Conference on Mediation at Chennai on 13.12.2014. The States of Andhra
Pradesh, Telengana, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Union Territory of Puducherry
have participated in the Conference. The Honble Mr.Justice F.M.Ibrahim Kalifulla, Judge,

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Supreme Court of India and the Honble Mr.Justice Madan B.Lokur, Judge, Supreme Court of
India, have graced the occasion. The Honble Mr.Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul, Chief Justice,
High Court of Madras / Patron-in-Chief, Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre,
the Honble Mr. Justice Kalyan Jyoti Sengupta, Chief Justice, High Court of Judicature at
Hyderabad for the State of Telengana and Andhra Pradesh, Honble Mr. Justice Satish
K.Agnihotri, Judge, High Court of Madras, Honble Mr.Justice M.Jaichandren, Chairman,
Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre, Honble Mr.Justice B.Rajendran and Honble
Ms. Justice K.B.K.Vasuki, Members, Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre and
other Honble Judges of the participating States have participated in the Conference.
Colloquium on Mediation
Colloquium on Mediation was held on 21.05.2014 in
the presence of Honble Mr. Justice Surinder Singh Nijjar,
Judge, Supreme Court of India, Honble Mr. Justice Satish
K.Agnihotri and Honble Mr. Justice V.Dhanapalan, Judges
of the High Court of Madras, The Honble Judges of the
High Court, the Judicial Officers of Chennai District and the
Mediators of the Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation
Centre participated in the Colloquium.
Distribution of Accreditation Certificates:
The Honble Mr.Justice Markandey Katju, then Judge, Supreme Court of India, has
distributed Accreditation Certificates to 41 Mediators of the Tamil Nadu Mediation and
Conciliation Centre, High Court, Madras on 26.08.2011.
Interactive Session with Japanese Mediators:
The Honble Ms. Justice K.B.K.Vasuki, Judge,
High Court, Madras/ Member, Monitoring Committee
for Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre, and
two eminent Mediators namely Ms.Keiko Konuma and
Ms.Misao Matsumura, Mediators from Sapprow, Japan,
had an interaction with the Mediators of the Tamil Nadu
Mediation and Conciliation Centre on 03.04.2014.
The Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre,
the first court annexed Mediation Centre in India, imparts
training in mediation to the Judicial Officers, Advocates and General Public. The orientation
programme on mediation creates awareness and the benefits of Mediation. The Basic

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Training Programme on Mediation imparts three days training to the advocates to enable
them to function as Mediators. The Advanced Training on Mediation is imparted to the
Mediators for two days to improve their skills in Mediation. The Tamil Nadu Mediation and
Conciliation Centre, has conducted the following training programmes between 2011 and
2014.
(a) Orientation Programme
Sl.No. Conducted During

Participants
2619 Advocates and 591 Judicial Officers from
30 Districts in the state of Tamil Nadu
Judicial Officers and Bar Members of the Union
Territory of Puducherry

1.

February 2011 to March 2011

2.

February 2012

3.

March 2012

Bar Members of the Karaikal Bar Association

4.

November 2013

Bar Members of the Karikal Bar Association

5.

February 2014

220 Students from Government Law College,


Chengalpattu

6.

March 2014

120 Advocates of Chennai District

(b) Basic Mediation Training Programme


Sl.No.

Conducted
During

Participants

1.

August 2012

40 Advocates from Madurai District Bar Association

2.

July 2013

33 Advocates from Vellore District Bar Associations

3.

July 2013

21 Advocates from Dindigul District Bar Associations


12 Advocates from Thoothukudi District Bar Associations

4.

October 2013

33 Advocates from Kanniyakumari District Bar Associations

5.

November 2013

32 Advocates from Tiruvallur District Bar Associations

6.

February 2014

14 Advocates from The Nilgiris District Bar Associations

7.

March 2014

27 Advocates from Tiruppur District Bar Associations

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(c) Advanced Training Programme


Sl.No.

1.

2.

3.

Conducted
During
Special Skills on Mediation Training Programme was
conducted for 116 Advocates / Mediators in four batches
by Mr.Greg Releyea, Trainer, Institute for the Study and
March 2012
Development of Legal Systems (San Francisco, CA) for the
Mediators of Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre
both in the Principal Seat at Chennai and at Madurai Bench.
Special Skills on mediationTraining Programme was
conducted for 60 Mediators of Tamil Nadu Mediation and
Conciliation Centre by Mr.Victor Schachter, President,
September 2013
Foundation For Sustainable Rule of Law Initiatives, California,
U.S.A.and Ms.Laila Ollapally, Co-ordinator of the Bangalore
Mediation Centre on 21.09.2013.
Advanced
Training Programme
on Mediation was
conducted for 119 Advocates of the Districts of Dindigul,
November 2014
Sivaganga, Virudhunagar, Theni, Madurai, Tirunelveli and
Ramanathapuram on 08.11.2014 & 09.11.2014

(d) Referral Judges Training Programme


Sl.No.

Conducted
During

Participants

1.

August 2012

Judicial Officers of Thiruchirappalli District

2.

November 2014

116 Judicial Officers of Dindigul, Sivaganga, Virudhunagar,


Theni, Madurai, Tirunelveli and Ramanathapuram Districts.

(e) Trainers Training Programme


Sl.No.

1.

131

Conducted
During

Participants

2012

25 Advocates from Tamil Nadu mediation and conciliation


centre / Mediators were trained by Mr.Rahim Shamji,
Barrister & Mediator, Director of Civil / Commercial Education
and Training and International Project, United Kingdom at
Chennai.

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Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

RELEASE OF NEWS LETTER:

The fourth Newsletter of Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre was released by
Honble Mr. Justice Madan B. Lokur, Judge, Supreme Court of India, on the occasion of the
Southern Regional Conference on Mediation.
INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENTS
Inauguration of New Mediation Halls:
On 14.03.2012 the Honble Mr.Justice M.Y.Eqbal, former Chief Justice, High Court,
Madras / Judge, Supreme Court of India, New Delhi, inaugurated the New Mediation Halls
to the extent of 3000 sq.ft. at the Tamil Nadu Mediation and Conciliation Centre, High Court,
Madras.
The Salient features of the New Mediation Halls are as follows:

An air-conditioned mediators lounge a little space for the mediators to interact,


unwind and freshen up:

An Impressive reception for receiving and griddling the parties to mediation:

A Committee Room for committee meetings:

A Library, being developed with consistent gathering of materials:

Training Facility: Now the Centre is designed in such a way that the regular mediation
trainings can be held at the centre itself:

Working conditions: The staff have also been provided with modern work stations,
computers and other necessities:

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The setting up of New Mediation Halls has changed the pattern of mediation sittings
from after Court hours to regular Court hours. The proportion of referrals and the
percentage of settlement have also increased after the inauguration of the new
mediation halls.

Inauguration Of District Mediation Centres At Chennai:


The Honble Mr.Justice M.Jaichandren, Judge, High Court, Madras / Chairman, Tamil
Nadu Mediation and Conciliation
Centre, inaugurated the City
Civil Court, Family Court and
Labour Court Mediation Centres
on 06.02.2014 at the Alternative
Dispute Resolution Buildings,
High Court Campus, Chennai,
in the presence of the Honble
Mr.Justice K.Kalyanasundaram,
Judge, High Court of Madras.
Mediation And Institutionalised Arbitration
Interactive Session on Mediation and institutionalised arbitration was convened on
14.08.2014 at Chennai by the Honble Chief Justice to ascertain the views of the Honble
Judges of Madras High Court for utilizing Mediation and Arbitration as effective tools of
Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanism both in the High Court and in the Subordinate
Courts.
Statistics:
The Statistical Information of the District Mediation Centre in the State of Tamil Nadu:

133

YEAR

TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES


REFERRED

TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES


SETTLED

2011

2743

342

2012

3159

517

2013

4035

799

2014

6019

970

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TAMIL NADU STATE JUDICIAL ACADEMY, CHENNAI

Training Programme for Advocates

In the gracious presence of Honble Mr. Justice P.Sathasivam, the then Chief Justice of
India, inaugural function of the launch of the programme, Redefining Legal Practice for
Advocate - Generation Next at district level, was held on 15.12.2013 at Tamil Nadu State
Judicial Academy.
Southern Regional Round Table Conference on Effective Implementation of juvenile
Justice (Care and Protection of Children Act, 2000)

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The High court of Madras and the Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy, in coordination
with the UNICEF, organized the Southern Regional Round Table Conference on Effective
Implementation of Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children Act, 2000). The
participants included the Principal Magistrates of the Juvenile Justice Boards, Directors of
the State Judicial Academies, the Member Secretaries of the Legal Services Authorities,
the Secretaries to the State Governments, top-level Police officers, Child Welfare Comity
Members, NGO Representatives, and the UNICEF Officials from all the Southern States,
viz. Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Puducherry, Tamil Nadu and Telangana.
International Conference on Emerging Trends in Intellectual Property Regime

The International Conference on Emerging Trends in Intellectual Property Regime was


held from 19 to 21st December, 2014. Honble Supreme Court Judges, Eminent Jurists with
the specialized knowledge on the subject from India as well as foreign countries, one High
Court Judge and two District Judges from the other High Courts, Honble Judges of High
Court of Madras and District Judges from the State of Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of
Puducherry participated in the conference.
TRAINING PROGRAMMES:Training programmes conducted during the years 2011-2014 by the Academy, to the
Judicial Officers/Advocates/Staff of the High Court of Madras and the Staff of the District
Courts.

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2011
Sl.
No.
1.

2.

3.
4.

Programme description
Interactive Session for Civil Judges (Senior
Division) on Application of Procedural Laws in Civil
Cases
Refresher Course for Civil Judges (Junior Division)
I Batch - (12.02.2011 & 13.02.2011)
II Batch - (19.02.2011 & 20.02.2011)
III Batch - (05.03.2011 & 06.03.2011)
IV Batch - (19.03.2011 & 20.03.2011)
V Batch - (04.06.2011 & 05.06.2011)
Training Programme for Public Prosecutors &
Judicial Officers
Training Programme for Newly appointed District
Judges (Entry Level)

Period

No. of
Participants

08.01.2011

30

502

15.02.2011

130

18.02.2011
&
21.04.2011

16

Refresher Course for Civil Judges (Senior Division)


5.

I Batch - 26.02.2011 & 27.02.2011


II Batch - 12.03.2011 & 13.03.2011
III Batch - 18.06.2011 & 19.06.2011

255

6.

Refresher Course for District Judges under the


aegis of 13th Finance Commission

26.03.2011
&
27.03.2011

122

7.

Interactive Session on Execution Proceedings

11.06.2011

120

8.

9.

23.07.2011
and
24.07.2011
Training Programme on "The Protection of Women 30.07.2011
from Domestic Violence Act, 2005" for Metropolitan/
and
Refresher Course for District Judges, Fast Track
Court Judges & Chief Judicial Magistrates

Judicial Magistrates
10.

Training Programme on MACTOP Cases in


Association with ICICI Lombard Insurance Co. Ltd.,

Madras High Court

31.07.2011
17.09.2011
and
18.09.2011

91

35

75

136

R e p ort 2011-2014

2012
Sl.
No.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Period

No. of
Participants

Refresher Course for District Judges


I Batch - 07.01.2012 & 08.01.2012
II Batch - 14.07.2012 & 15.07.2012
III Batch - 22.09.2012 & 23.09.2012
Refresher Course for Senior Civil Judges
I Batch - 21.01.2012 & 22.01.2012
II Batch - 03.03.2012 & 04.03.2012
III Batch - 23.06.2012 & 24.06.2012
IV Batch - 23.06.2012 & 24.06.2012
V Batch - 01.09.2012 & 02.09.2012
Workshop on Human Rights and Refugee
Protection in India for Civil Judges
Refresher Course for Civil Judges
I Batch - 11.02.2012 & 12.02.2012
II Batch - 10.03.2012 & 11.03.2012
III Batch - 17.03.2012 & 18.03.2012
IV Batch - 09.06.2012 & 10.06.2012
South Zone Regional Judicial Conference on Role
of Courts in Protection of Human Rights

6.

One Day Programme for District Judges

7.

Seminar on Intellectual Property Rights for Judges

8.

Training Programme for High Court Staff

9.

137

Programme description

Training Programme for Civil Judges in Child


Psychology/Child Welfare as stipulated under
Section 4(3) of Juvenile Justice (Care & Protection
of Children) Act, 2000
I
II
III
IV

Batch
Batch
Batch
Batch

-
-
-
-

07.07.2012 & 08.07.2012


28.07.2012 & 29.07.2012
04.08.2012 & 05.08.2012
29.09.2012 & 30.09.2012

206

201

21.01.12 to
22.01.12

35

306

24.02.12 to
26.02.12

85

28.04.12

52

30.06.12 to
01.07.12

35

30.06.12

40

265

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Sl.

Programme description

No.

Period

No. of
Participants

10.

Training Programme for Assistant Section Officers


from High Court Madras

28.07.12

40

11.

Training Programme for P.A. to Honble Judges

11.08.12

40

12.

Induction Training Programme for the Newly


Recruited Civil Judges - 2012 Batch

15.10.12 to
11.01.13

164

Period

No. of
Participants

2013
Sl.

Programme description

No.
1.
2.
3.

4.

5.
6.
7.

8.

Training Programme for the Newly Promoted


Senior Civil Judges
Induction Training Programme for the Newly
Recruited Civil Judges - 2012 (Batch - II)
Training Programme for the Ministerial Staff
Regional Training Programme for Senior Civil
Judges on "An Overview of Law Relating to Motor
Insurance"
At Madurai
- 09.02.2013
At Coimbatore - 09.03.2013
At Chennai - 16.03.2013
Induction cum Training Programme for the Court
Managers
Training Programme for Judicial Officers and
System Officers on Change Management and
Ubuntu Operating System
In-service Training Programme to the Ministerial
Staff of Subordinate Judiciary at each District
Training Programme on UBUNTU Software in
Districts to Judicial Officers and Staff
I Batch - 23.02.2013 & 09.03.2013
II Batch - 16.03.2013 & 17.03.2013
III Batch - 23.03.2013 & 24.03.2013

Madras High Court

19.01.13 &
20.01.13
30.01.13 to
15.04.13
09.02.13 &
30.06.13

42
165

229

16.02.13

59

16.02.13 &
17.02.13

110

23.02.13

138

R e p ort 2011-2014

Sl.
No.
9.

10.

11.

12.
13.
14.
15.

16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

139

Programme description
Special Training Programme on "Speedy Disposal
of Vigilance and Anti-Corruption Cases"
Training Programme to the Principal District
Judges, Chief Administrative Officers, Court
Managers at Madurai Bench of Madras High Court,
Madurai
Training Programme on UBUNTU Software &
Change Management by Master Trainers from
Kerala
I Batch - 16.03.2013 & 17.03.2013
II Batch - 30.03.2013 & 31.03.2013
III Batch - 23.03.2013 & 24.03.2013
Special Program for District Judges on "Women
and Children-Role of Courts"
Sharing Best Practices at TNSJA and Different
Courts at Chennai by Orissa Judicial Officers
Training Programme for the Newly Recruited &
Newly Promoted District Judges
One day Training Programme for newly recruited &
newly promoted District Judges on An Overview of
Law relating to Motor Insurance
Training Programme for High Court Staff
I Batch - 06.05.2013 and 07.05.2013
II Batch - 26.06.2013
Refresher Programme for Directly Recruited District
Judges (2011 Batch)
High Court Staff Training Programme
Training Programme for Master Trainers from Tamil
Nadu and other States on UBUNTU OS
Special Programme for all District Judges and
Chief Judicial Magistrates on Effective District
Administration and Court Management

Period

No. of
Participants

23.02.13

130

16.03.13

40

70

23.03.13
08.04.13 to
12.04.13
13.04.13 to
14.04.13
27.04.13

176
55
28
28

06.05.13 to
07.05.13
03.05.13 to
08.05.13
02.05.13 to
09.05.13
13.06.13 to
16.06.13
15.06.13 &
16.06.13

17

29
178

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.

Programme description

No.

21.

22.

Regional Training Programme on "Budget


Preparation" for the Staff of the Subordinate Courts
At Madurai
- 02.07.2013
At Coimbatore - 19.07.2013
At Chennai
- 26.07.2013
Refresher Course for Civil Judges
I Batch - 17.08.2013 & 18.08.2013
II Batch - 31.08.2013 & 01.09.2013

23.

Induction Training Programme for Civil Judges

24.

Refresher Course for District Judges

25.
26.

27.

28.
29.
30.
31.

32.

Period

Special Training Programme for Judges of Family


Courts
Training Programmes on Mediation for Senior Civil
Judges
Exchange Programme - Deputation of Judicial
Officers in the Cadre of Civil Judges
To Delhi
- 18.09.2013 to 21.09.2013
To Karnataka
- 25.09.2013 to 28.09.2013
To Kerala
- 23.10.2013 to 26.10.2013
To Andhra Pradesh - 06.11.2013 to 09.11.2013
Training programme for Civil Judges
Seminar on "Corporate Social Responsibility
and Alternative Dispute Resolution
Special Training Programme on Child Psychology /
Child Welfare
Special Programme (on Refugees) for The
Secretaries of the District Legal Services Authority
of Tamil Nadu & Puducherry & Civil Judges
Special Programme for The Presiding Officer
of Industrial Tribunal, Chennai & Presiding Officers
of Labour Courts in Tamil Nadu & Puducherry

Madras High Court

No. of
Participants

134

120
10.09.13 to
09.11.13
14.09.13 &
15.09.13
14.09.13 &
15.09.13
14.09.13 &
15.09.13

12
60
07
40

80

21.09.13 &
22.09.13

100

28.09.13

30

26.10.13 to
27.10.13

81

26.10.13 to
27.10.13

106

26.10.13 to
27.10.13

11

140

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Sl.
No.
33.
34.

Programme description
Special Programme on Conclusion of the Induction
Training Programme Newly Recruited Civil Judges
Southern Regional Conference on POCSO Act,
2012

Period

No. of
Participants

09.11.13

157

16.11.13 to
17.11.13

145

30.11.13

106

35.

Refresher Programme for Senior Civil Judges

36.

Training Programme on Mediation for Presiding


Officers of Family Courts of Tamil Nadu and
Puduchery

30.11.13 &
01.12.13

46

37.

One Day Special Programme for District Judges

07.12.13

105

38.

Inauguration of Redefining Legal Practice for


Advocates Next Generation (0 -10 Years Practice)
at District Level

15.12.13

66

2014
Sl.
No.
l.

Programme description

Period

No. of
Participants

Programme on Protection of Children from Sexual


Offences Act, 2012

04.01.2014

63

04.01.2014 &
05.01.2014
25.01.2014*
26.01.2014 and
08.02.2014 &
09.02.2014
31.01.2014 to
02.02.2014

2.

Continuing Legal Education and Professional


Development Programme for District Court
Lawyers Vellore, Salem, Tirunelveli, Cuddalore,
Thanjavur, Trichy, Coimbatore, Madurai, Chennai

Regional Judicial Conference on "Role of Courts


in Upholding Rule of Law"

Judicial Colloquium on Anti-Human Trafficking

15.02.2014

139

Workshop on "Child Rights and Child Labour


Issues"

22.02.2014

25

Special Training Programme for District Judges

01.03.2014

98

Special Training Programme for Civil Judges

05.04.2014

153

Special Training Programme for District Judges

14.06.2014

100

141

2620

121

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Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Sl.

Programme description

No.

Period

Refresher Course for Civil Judges


I Batch - 14.06.2014 & 15.06.2014
II Batch - 13.09.2014 & 14.09.2014
9.
III Batch - 08.11.2014 & 09.11.2014
IV Batch - 22.11.2014 & 23.11.2014
V Batch - 13.12.2014 & 14.12.2014
Refresher Course for Senior Civil Judges
10. I Batch - 21.06.2014 & 22.06.2014
II Batch - 09.08.2014 & 10.08.2014
11
12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Refresher Course for District Judges


Special Programme for Presiding Officers of
Family Court Judges / Labour Court Judges/
NDPS Court Judges and Senior Civil Judges
Ministerial Staff Training Programme for Junior
Assistants / Copyists / Typists / Readers /
Examiners at District Head Quarters
One-day Training Programme for Sensitization
and to Create Awareness on the Juvenile Justice
System for Judicial officers and Additional Public
Prosecutors
Training Programme for High Court Staff
I Batch - 09.08.2014
II Batch - 27.09.2014
III Batch - 01.10.2014
Training Programme for Presiding Officers of
Special Courts under PC Act / CBI Courts and
Mahila Courts
Redefining Legal Practice for Advocates Generation Next (0-10 years practice) - Phase
II - Tirunelveli, Thanjavur, Trichy, Chidambaram,
Chennai, Coimbatore and Madurai Zones
Workshop on Bonded Labour Law for Civil
Judges

Madras High Court

No. of
Participants

426

197
12.07.2014 &
13.07.2014

63

19.07.2014 &
20.07.2014

Z3

19.07.2014

3729

03.08.2014

33

464

23.08.2014 &
24.08.2014

Z9

23.08.2014 &
24.08.2014 and
13.09.2014 &
14.09.2014

3711

07.09.2014

166

142

R e p ort 2011-2014

Sl.
No.

Period

No. of
Participants

20.09.2014

1595

20.09.2014 &
21.09.2014

180

11.10.2014 to
12.10.2014

135

02.11.2014

33

Programme description

Ministerial Staff Training Programme at District


Headquarters
Training Programme on Criminal Investigation
20
and Trial Proceedings for Public Prosecutors
Southern Regional Round Table Conference
21 on "Effective Implementation of Juvenile Justice
(Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2000"
Meeting of Principal District Judges (Head of the
22 District) to Review the Conduct of the Advocate
Training Programme at District Headquarters
Exchange Programme - Deputation of Judicial
Officers in the Cadre of Civil Judges
23. To Maharashtra - 10.11.2014 to 13.11.2014
To Jharkhand
- 18.11.2014 to 21.11.2014
To Chandigarh - 09.12.2014 to 12.12.2014
Ministerial Staff Training Programme for Head
24 Clerks -Category II / Central Nazir / Sheristadars /
Chief Administrative Officer / Court Manager
International Conference on Emerging Trends in
25
Intellectual Property Regime
19

92

13.12.2014
19.12.2014 to
21.12.2014

150

Exchange Programmes to Other States from Tamil Nadu


In pursuance of the proposal of the National Judicial Academy, TNSJA had drawn up a
framework on sharing best practices being adopted in various states of the country, and the
newly recruited civil judges (2012 Batch) were deputed to New Delhi, Karnataka, Kerala,
Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Jharkahand and Chandigarh.
Training Programme for Public Prosecutors
With an object to enhance the professional competence of the Public Prosecutors, a
training programme was held on 20 and 21st September, 2014.
Decentralisation of Training Programmes
Corresponding to the increase in litigations being filed in District-level Courts, there is
an increase in the number of judicial officers and staff members. Further, in order to cut
expenditure on organizing the training programmes for the judicial officers, young advocates,

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and the staff members, it was decided by the Honble Governing Body of TNSJA to
decentralize the training programmes to the District Headquarters. The above decision was
taken, considering the scenario in future that the stakeholders of the justice delivery system
require to be inculcated training on the legal and social trends emerging from time to time,
as often as required. In pursuance of this decision, every District Headquarters was allotted
funds to the tune of Rs.4.37 lakhs, aggregating Rs.1.45 Crores, for providing information
technology infrastructure, so that with the aid of technology, the training programmes for
the target group of judicial officers, advocates and staff members, could be conducted at
every District Headquarters, wherever required, without any administrative hassles. The
particulars of computers and other gadgets and consumables, which were provided for
every District Headquarters, are four numbers of Desktop Computers, UPS, two numbers
of Laser Jet Printers with Toner and Photocopier, Projector with Screen and Presenter Plus.
Online facilities to Judicial Officers
The laptops of the judicial officers functioning in Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, were installed
with online journals, viz. Supreme Today and Law weekly.
E-Journal
The Academy publishes every month for circulation to the judicial officers, an
E-Journal
consisting of important judgments of the Supreme Court and the Madras High Court. This
E-Journal is also updated on the website of the Academy.
Mobile Phone Law Software (MOBILEX) application
As an extension of the training materials supplied to the judicial officers to enhance
their knowledge of law and procedure, the Governing Body of the judicial academy, had
approved provision of Mobile Phone Law Software (MOBILEX) application to all the judicial
officers, under the aegis of the 13th Finance Commission Grant. This would enable them to
access to 71 important Central Acts. This facility was inaugurated by the Honble Mr. Justice
M.Y.EQBAL, the then Chief Justice of the High Court of Madras, on 18.06.2011. By using
this software provided in their mobile phones, the judicial officers can refer to the 71 Central
Acts in seconds without any network connection. It has been designed in a unique format
in which user interface is very simple and easy to use. The software is a ready reckoner to
the judicial officers.
List of Publications of the Academy
The following books penned by the then Chief Justice of the High Court of Madras, the
Honble Mr. Justice M.Y. Eqbal, presently the Judge, Supreme Court of India, were published
by the Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy.
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R e p ort 2011-2014

1.

Exparte Decree and Duty of the Court

2.

Interlocutory Applications - Duty of the Courts

3.

Duty of Executing Courts in Speedy Disposal of Section 47 C.P.C. Objections and


Execution Proceedings

4.

Adjournments-Duty, Responsibility & Accountability of Courts/Lawyers

5.

Appealable Orders (Myths & Realities)

6.

Plight of Victims & Duty of Courts (Motor Accident Claims)

The other books, which were published by TNSJA are as follows:


1.

Effective District Administration;

2.

Courts - Staff - Registers - Legal Procedures: A Guide for Judicial Ministerial Staff
(Chennai City);

3.

Courts-Staff-Registers - Legal Procedures: A Guide for District Judiciary;

4.

Important Legal Provisions at a Glance (English & Tamil)

5.

Speeches delivered by Honble Mr. Justice P.Sathasivam, Chief Justice of India at


Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy

6.

Induction Training Programme Study Material 2012 for Civil Judges

7.

Study Material for High Court Staff

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Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

Regional Centres of Tamil Nadu State Judicial Academy at Madurai and Coimbatore
Regional Judicial Academy, Coimbatore

The Academy has received Rs.15 Crores under 13th Finance Commission Grant, towards
the Head Building of Infrastructure and the Honble High Court had utilized the said amount
and also the additional grant of Rs.2 Crores from the State Government to construct two
Regional Centres, one at Madurai, and the other at Coimbatore. The construction of the
Regional Centre is nearing completion. The High Court of Madras has also addressed the
Government for sanction of staff and other infrastructure facilities and orders are awaited
from the government.
Regional Judicial Academy, Madurai

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Madurai Bench of
Madras High Court Madurai

R e p ort 2011-2014

Part D

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Innovative Reforms Marching Towards Excellence


Many initiatives have been taken in the recent past not only in the nature of administrative
reforms but also towards upkeeping the judicial discipline, reforming the case management
and heading towards digitization and preserving the case bundles intact.
The following would stand as testimonials for our commitment to strive to exceed the
expectations. In fact, the year of 2014 has seen major developmental activities. To narrate,
On Judicial Side:
1.

On 11.6.2014, as directed by the Honble the Acting Chief Justice, an Official


Memorandum was issued directing the Registry to upload all the daily orders and
judgments, except cases relating to matrimonial matters (Family Courts), Juvenile
Justice Act, Official Secrets Act, Intelligence Agencies, domestic violence, sexual
offences against women and children etc. on the High Courts website and the P.As
to the Honble Judges were directed that before uploading such daily orders and
judgments, they must ensure that judgments/orders in cases of the above said
categories are not marked for uploading.

2.

The centuries old practice of filing the cases in folded papers before the Courts,
since proved to be unsafe for the papers getting damaged and the contents therein
getting faded, given the natural wear and tear, has been replaced by a new filing
system called Flat filing system introduced both at the Principal Seat at Madras
and at the Madurai Bench in respect of all cases, w.e.f. 3.11.2014 and it is a great
success with the over-whelming response and co-operation from the Members of
the Bar.

3.

For the hearing and disposal of Division Bench matters, Six Honble Division Benches
have been constituted. Cases of senior citizens are given priority and all categories
of cases of senior citizens are listed for early disposal before the concerned
Benches. Cases wherein interim stay, interim injunction have been granted by the
Honble Court against the trial of cases pending before the lower courts are collected
categorywise and such cases are listed before the Honble Courts as per the roster,
paving way for the disposal of cases pending before the lower courts. Separate
single Benches are provided with final hearing of Criminal Appeals, Criminal
Revision and Criminal Original Petitions of all the years. Cases relating to offences
against women are listed on priority basis. In addition to the existing Master Court,
four Additional Master Courts were constituted to record evidence so as to facilitate
and save precious time of Honble Courts, hearing suits. In order to reduce the
pendency of old cases in all categories chronologically, a circular was issued on
05.09.2014 by the Registrar General, High Court, Madras, as per the directions of

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R e p ort 2011-2014

the Honble The Chief Justice, directing the Officers/Section Heds/Posting Clerks of
the respective Honble Courts both at the Principal Seat Madras and Madurai Bench
to list old cases in the respective category, chronologically, every Wednesday, apart
from listing fresh admission cases and extension of stay cases only.
4.

Towards strict compliance of the directions of the Honourable Supreme Court in the
order dated 05.09.2014 passed in W.P.(Criminal) No.310 of 2005 (Bhim Singh vs.
Union of India and others), all theJurisdictional Magistrates/Chief Judicial Magistrates/
Sessions have been directed, by a circular dated 26.09.2014, to hold one sitting in a
week in each jail/prison for two months commencing from 1st October, 2014 for the
purpose of effective implementation of Sec.436-A of the Code of Criminal Produce.
In their sittings in jail, the above said Judicial Officers are directed to identify the
under-trial prisoners who have completed half period of the maximum period or
maximum period of imprisonment provided for the said offence under the law and
after complying with the procedure prescribed under Section 436A Cr.P.C. pass an
appropriate order in jail itself for immediate release of such under trial prisoners who
fulfill the requirement of Section 436A of the Cr.P.C. and such officers were directed
to submit a report of each of such sitting to the Registrar General, High Court,
Madras, for onward transmission to the Honble Supreme Court of India.

5.

In the light of the directions of the Honble Supreme Court of India, contained in Anil
Rai vs. State of Bihar [(2001) 7 SCC 318], the Personal Assistants to the Honble
Judges / Court Officers were directed, by a circular dated 27.8.2014, that in the case
where the judgment is reserved and is pronounced later, a column to be maintained
in the judgment, where, on the first page, after the cause title, date of reserving the
judgment and date of pronouncing it, be separately mentioned.

6.

Considering the alarming pendency of huge number of cases causing hardship to the
litigant public, all the District Judges/Heads of Units and Chief Judicial Magistrates of
Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of Puducherry were directed, by a circular dated
25.8.2014, to dispose of the cases, which have been pending for more than 10 years,
15 years and 20 years, in their respective courts, within a period of three months
and they were also informed that double norms and triple norms are awarded for
the disposal of 7 year old, 15 year old and 20 year old cases as per the High Courts
earlier circulars dated 18.11.1999 and 28.10.2010. All the District Judges/Heads
of Units and Chief Judicial Magistrates were directed to keep on monitoring and to
intimate the High Court Registry every week regarding the statistical particulars of
the disposal of the aforesaid cases through e-mail and submit monthly statement in
the nature of special statement, regarding the implementation of this circular.

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On Administrative side:
1.

2.

To safeguard the interest of the Judicial Officers from the unscrupulous elements
trying to distort their attention by sending anonymous complaints against them, as
a great reprieve to the judicial officers and to encourage a system of accountability
and to instinct a sense of confidence not only in the minds of Judicial Officers,
but also the genuine complainants, the Honble the Chief Justice has directed the
Registry of the High Court to observe the following guidelines, while dealing with the
complaints received against the Judicial Officers of the Subordinate Judiciary:
i.

The Complaint making allegations against Judicial Officers of the Subordinate


Judiciary should not be entertained and no action should be taken thereon,
unless it is accompanied by a duly sworn affidavit and verifiable material to
substantiate the allegations made therein.

ii.

If the complaint is not accompanied by a duly sworn affidavit and verifiable


material to substantiate the allegations made therein, then a sworn affidavit
and verifiable material should be called for from the complainant and
thereafter, the same should be submitted before the Honble Portfolio Judge.

iii.

If the complaint does not meet the above requirements, the complaint should
be filed/lodged without taking any steps. The Honble the Chief Justice has
directed the High Court Registry to communicate the above guidelines issued
to the Registry, to all the Judicial Officers of the Subordinate Judiciary and
the same have been communicated, by the Official Memorandum dated
09.10.2014.

Towards achieving zero vacancies in the District Judiciary, steps have been initiated
to fill up all the vacancies, by promotion in respect of Civil Judges (Senior Division)
and 65% promotional quota in the cadre of District Judge (Entry level) and by direct
recruitment in respect of Civil Judges and District Judges (under 25% quota).

Madras High Court

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R e p ort 2011-2014

3. Location Sign Boards

MADRAS HIGH COURT


CHENNAI - 600 104

a Bose
Chandr

Road

-2

No
Gate
(A)
Gate
North Gate)
(MBA

Parking

No-3
(B)
Gate
North Gate)
(Aavin

Area

s
lim all
us H
M yer
Pra

Subash

D
PW ffice
O

Netaji
Gate

BSNL
Office

Small Causes Court

BLOCK D

Information
Center

Dispensary

Advocates Clerks Association

Indian Bank ATM

Toilet

Toilet

ach Road

BLOCK C

Old Law Chamber Building

Advocates Canteen Building

Madras High Court


Advocates Association

- Arbitration Center

Addl. Law Chambers Building


- Women Lawyers Association

Govt. Branch Press

Family Cour
t
Labour Cour
t
CAT

Parking
Area

Official Assi
gnee
AG & OT

Court

High Court
Annex Bui
ldin

Dispensary

LANE

Law Officers Building


- Advocate General
- Govt. Pleader
- Public Prosecutor

Aavin Parlour

- Canteen

Xerox

5 Floor Law Chambers


- Auditorium

LANE

BLOCK D

BLOCK E

City Civil Court Building


Addl. City Civil Court Building
- Family Courts

High Court Museum


&
Auditorium
High Court Record Building

- Labour Courts

Auditorium & Museum

Addl. City Civil

KD

Pay & Use


Toilet

SOUTH GATE LANE

Railway
Reservation
Counter

BLOC

Police
Control
Room

OCK E
BLO

E LANE

La

SOUTH ENTRANC

wn

Tamilnadu Fire
&
Rescue Service

House

Lawn

RT LANE

JUDGES

ESPLANADE LANE

Police Station

Drinking Water (RO)

- Creche

BLOCK

Gate No-5

Entry Pass
Reception Counter

Old Light

CIVIL COU

BLOCK D

Overseer
Quarters

Parking

High Court Staff Association

Mediation Center

- Juice Stall
Manu Needh
i
Cholar Statue

City Civil Court

Esplanade Gate

La
wn

LIBRARY
LANE

dl.
New Ad
s
amber
Law Ch

Records
Tamil
Translation
& Other
Departments

La
wn
NE
DG
ES

LA

High Court
Library Ann
ex

North Be

Parking
Area

JU

RS LAN
E

JUDGES

rium
Audito
or)
(5th Flo

CHAMBE

Information Center

BLOCK B

La
wn

Parking
Area

Toilet

JUD

High Court
Main Buildin
g

Ambed
kar
Statue

LANE

LANE

mbers

RT LANE

KC

OLD LAW

LAW OFF
ICERS

CHAMBERS

BLOC

ficers
Law Of ing
Build

KB

BLOC

en

NEW LAW

Media
tio
Cente n
r

MHAA

Old Law Cha

E
GES LAN

Post
Office

Dr. Ambedkar Govt. Law College

Cante

Esplanade Road

amber
Law Ch

LANE

Gate No-1

Lawyers
Women
on
Associati

MHAA

Judges Gat
e

Adv

uncil

Bar Co

Addl.

KA

ter

nteen

Ca
ocates

Court Halls - 30 to 39

Court Halls - No. 1 to 29


Press Reporters Room

Madr
as Ba
Asso
r
ciatio
n

on Cen

Arbitrati

RO Water

cil

Coun

MBA LAN

Aavin

CIVIL COU

BAR

Xerox

Indian
Bank

-4

No
Gate

BLOCK
B

Area

BLOC

Parking

BLOCK A
High Court Main Building
High Court Annex Building
Madras Bar Association

- Central Administrative Tribunal

Toilet

- AG & OT

ATM

- Official Assignee
Police Control Room

Puduchery Block
Temp. Parking

PWD Office

MTC Bus Depot


Tamil Nadu State Legal
Service Authority

ADR Center, DLSA


Gate No-7

e
South Gat

North Fort Road

You
are
here

Railway Reservation Counter


Pay & Use Toilet
Small Causes Court Building
- Law Association

Confusing detours in the campus of the High Court are a thing of past with the erection of
signage boards in the High Court campus. The campus of the Chartered High Court of Madras
is spread across 36 acres and houses not only the historic High Court, but also City Civil
Courts, Small Causes Courts, Family Courts with litigants thronging the campus on all working
days. In order to wipe out the confusion from the minds of not only the litigants but also the
officials and Advocates
visiting the campus,
signage boards have
been
erected
in
prominent places in the
High Court campus,
containing information
not only in English but
also in vernacular.

153

Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

4.

Replacing the old system of manual attendance


registers, Bio-matric machines have been installed in
the High Court, to ensure on-time presence of the staff
members.

5.

29.10.2014 has seen host of inauguration of the following


five new buildings in the High Court premises to cater to
the needs of not only the High Court, but also the learned
Law Officers and respected members of the Bar:

A Stilt + nine floored building in an area


measuring 75,000 sq.ft. for housing
both English Record as well as
Translation Department, constructed
at a cost of Rs.11,16,69,680/-.

A stilt + two floored building,


constructed at a cost of Rs.10 crores
exclusively to house Auditorium and
Museum.

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R e p ort 2011-2014

A stilt + three floored building has been


constructed at a cost of Rs.4,47,89,107/to house the Advocates Cooperative
Society Limited (canteen) and some
Law Chambers for the respected
members of the Bar.

6.

155

A stilt + Four floored building, constructed


at a cost of Rs.7,45,00,000/- for the use
of the learned Law Officers.

Ground + two floored building,


constructed at a cost of Rs.72,20,000/to house the Police Control room,
Police rest room (men and women)
and Police store room.

A Police Control Room and rest


room have been constructed
and inaugurated at the Madurai
Bench to cater to the needs of the
security personnel.
Madras High Court

Re p o rt 2011- 2 0 1 4

7.
Indian Bank ATMs have been inaugurated within
the campus both at the Principal Seat at Madras and at
Madurai Bench.

8.

The High Court of Madras is a Heritage monument and as per the directions of
the Honble Heritage Committee, many steps have been taken to conserve and
preserve it. When the roof of the second floor housing the Establishment section
was found leaking during rainy season, it was repaired and restored, using the
ancestral building technology of making use of jaggery and other natural sources
and not cement. Now the lamp shines as usual.
9. Madras is the cultural capital of South India and Madurai is a Temple city. Both
these cities witness lot of dignitaries and Honble Judges from all over the country
for pilgrimage or vacation. In order to avoid any embarrassment to the visiting
dignitaries and Honble Judges, eleven new Nissan Evalia XV (Diesel) cars have
been purchased exclusively for the protocol purpose, both at Madras and at Madurai,
thus replacing the eleven old Honda City cars.
10. To de-congest the record rooms, the old system of maintaining the case bundles in
racks, allowing them to the dangerous conditions of getting dust, rust, wear and
tear, as directed by the Honble Building Committee, racks are being replaced by
the ultra modern Compactors.
11. To digitize the records in the Madras High
Court, in order to curtail the quantum of original
records that are being maintained by the High
Court, tenders have been called for and it is in
the offing.
12. In harness of Nature, the flora and fauna of not only the Heritage structure of the
principal seat at Madras but also the Madurai Bench are well preserved and nurtured
with utmost care, caution and affection.
13. To keep pace with time, a proposal has been mooted with the Government for
allotment of Skoda cars to the Honble Judges, since the existing cars of the Honble
judges are sufficiently old.

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14. Work is worship and work place is the place of worship. To prevent any sort of
aberration to women employees at the work place, particularly in the manner and
shape of a sexual harassment, and in compliance of the direction of the Honble
Supreme Court of India in Binu Tamta and another Vs. High Court of Delhi and
others [in W.P.(C) No. 162/2013 dated 17.07.2013], the Madras High Court notified
THE GENDER SENSITISATION & SEXUAL HARASSMENT OF WOMEN AT THE
MADRAS HIGH COURT - PRINCIPAL SEAT AT CHENNAI AND MADURAI BENCH
AT MADURAI (PREVENTION, PROHIBITION AND REDRESSAL) REGULATIONS,
2013, which came into force with effect from 01.01.2014. As per the said Regulations,
the Gender Sensitisation and Internal Complaints Committee-I for the Principal Seat
at Madras and the Gender Sensitisation and Internal Complaints Committee-II for
the Madurai Bench of Madras High Court, Madurai have been constituted. Likewise,
similar internal complaints committees have been constituted in the Subordinate
Courts in the State of Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of Puducherry. Further,
as per the said Regulations, the High Court framed the Policy to Prevent Gender
Discrimination and Sexual Harassment in the Madras High Court and the Honble
The Chief Justice was pleased to release the said Policy on 29.10.2014 in the
presence of the Honble Chairperson and the members of the Gender Sensitisation
and Internal Complaints Committee.

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IMPLEMENTATION OF E-COURTS PROJECT


The e-Courts Integrated Mission Mode Project is one of the National e-Governance
Projects being implemented in High Courts and District/Subordinate Courts of the Country.
The project has been conceptualized on the basis of the National Policy and Action
Plan for Implementation of Information and Communication Technology in the Indian
Judiciary-2005 by the Honble e-Committee, Supreme Court of India.
An Empowered Committee has been constituted under the Chairpersonship of Secretary,
Department of Justice, to give strategic direction & guidance to the project.
The project is being implemented by National Informatics Centre (NIC). A project
monitoring Committee comprising of Department of Justice, representatives of the Honble
e-Committee and NIC meets on a monthly basis to monitor the progress of the project.
A Steering Committee at each High Court has been formed to oversee the implementation
of the project in their respective High Court.
Totally 799 Courts are covered under the e-Courts Project in the State of Tamil Nadu and
Union Territory of Puducherry.
The following are the activities covered under the Project:

All the Judicial Officers are provided with laptops and laser printers.

Hands on training have been provided on Ubuntu Operating System, to all Judicial
Officers.

Broadband connectivity has been provided to the residences of all the Judicial
Officers and Court Complexes.

VPN over Broadband connectivity have been provided in all the District and Taluk
level Court Complexes.

Apart from VPN over Broadband connectivity, Leased line connections have been
provided in 42 District Court Complexes.

All Judicial Officers have been provided with unique identification numbers and
e-mail IDs.

Computer Server Rooms and Judicial Service Centers have been provided in all
Court Complexes.

Out of the 799 Courts covered under the e-Courts Project, the Case Information
System Software (CIS, Pune Version) was rolled out in 709 Courts and in 17 Courts
Old CIS Pune Version is being used in Court of Small Causes, Chennai and in 2
Courts CIS Delhi Version is being used and in remaining 71 Courts in City Civil

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Courts, Chennai CIS has not been installed due to non receipt of Hardware Materials
from the NIC, New Delhi.

15 Ubuntu Master Trainers (Judicial Officers), have been selected by the Honble
e-Committee, Supreme Court of India, in the State of Tamil Nadu, to impart training
to other Judicial Officers in the State.

17 staff members have been trained as Master Trainers on CIS software, who, in
turn, are imparting training to other staff members.

Filing, scrutiny, registration, allocation of cases, cause-list generation, hosting of


judgments, etc., are done using CIS software, and the Courts are now able to
provide basic case-related services to litigants and lawyers.

All the Districts have been provided with technical manpower (One System Officer
and two System Assistants).

All the Courts have been provided with Computers, printers, scanners, diesel
generator sets, UPS units, etc.

Data entry of old cases is nearing completion in all the courts.

Websites have been created for all the District Courts.

SMS Services have been started successfully in 19 Districts & Union Teritrory of
Puduchery in remaining 13 Districts the said services will be implemented shortly.

(i) Process Re-engineering:


Based on the concept of Process Re-engineering, suggested by the Honble e-Committee,
Supreme Court of India, a Committee constituted by the High Court dealt with the various
aspects of change management and filed a report, which was accepted by the Honble
e-Committee, Supreme Court of India, and the same was suggested to be implemented.
The Process Re-engineering Committee is in the process of implementing the said report
in the five courts viz., Judicial Magistrate Court No.III, Thanjavur, District Munsif Court,
Pattukottai, Judicial Magistrate Court No.V, Vellore, Principal District Munsif Court, Vellore
and VII Metropolitan Magistrate Court, George Town, Chennai
(ii) e-Filing
National Informatics Centre (NIC), New Delhi, has stated that the process of e-Filing is to
be worked out under the Process-reengineering and the software will be developed later.

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(iii) Digital Display Board


Digital Display Boards have been installed both in Madras High Court and Madurai Bench
of Madras High Court, during the year 2007, for the use of Advocates and Litigant Public.
Due to the normal life cycle of the Electronic items and poor maintenance by the vendor,
most of the display boards have become irreparable and obsolete.
The State Government was addressed for sanction of funds to install the new technology
display boards, and the State Government, vide G.O.Ms.No.294, Home (Courts III)
Department, dated 23.04.2014 and revised G.O. 489, Home (Courts III) Department, dated
16.07.2014, have accorded sanction of Rs.1,24,79,500/- for the High Court, Madras and
a sum of Rs.63,92,000/- for the Madurai Bench of Madras High Court, for replacing the
existing display boards, with the latest technology Display Boards, and the work order was
placed to M/s. Godrej and Boyce Manufacturing Co. ltd., Chennai.
The Display Boards have been inaugurated on 29.10.2014 by the Honble the Chief Justice
of High Court, Madras for the use of Advocates and Litigant Public. Many Advocates and
Litigant Public rely upon the display boards to appear in the right time for their cases in the
corresponding Court Halls. The Display Boards have been installed and started functioning
in the High Court, Madras. The work is in completion stage in the Madurai Bench of Madras
High Court.
The Display Boards have been installed inside the Court Halls, Outside the Court Halls
and Composite Display Boards have been installed in six different locations in the High
Court premises.

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The features of the Display


Boards are LED with 46, 55
and 65 displays, to view the
case status clearly. Display
Boards provide integrated case
details of all the Court Halls.
Outside Display Boards display
the case details currently being
heard in the respective Court
Hall. Display Control Unit is
handled by the Court Officers
in which the customized software application is installed by which the Court Officer will
load the cause list for the day and will then select the item number to be heard using the
keyboard/Mouse. Training has been provided to the Court Officers for operating the Display
Control Unit. Composite Display Boards shows the details of cases being heard in all the
Court Halls. The consolidated input as per the standardized format is given by Content
Management Software.
Composite Display

Inside the Court Hall

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Outside the Court Hall

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(iv) High Court Website

The following services are provided in High Court Website:


1. Citizen Charter
a. Location of Madras High Court and entry points.
b. Jurisdiction and functions.
c. Services available within the High Court Premises.
d. Judicial Section.
e. Advocate Offices.
2. Item No. of the case and the corresponding Court No. displayed in the digital display
board can be viewed online in the Website. This status can also be viewed in Mobile
by downloading an Android App for Display Board.
3. Profiles of the Honble the Chief Justice and the Honble Judges of High Court are
available online.
4. Details of Cases such as, Cause List (Daily, Weekly and Monthly), Judgements,
Daily orders, Present Status of cases are being hosted in the website.
5. Link to e-Court Services.

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(v) Implementation of SMS based System:


SMS service has been introduced in the Principal Seat (with effect from (23.01.2014)
and in the Madurai Bench (with effect from 02.04.2014), providing information to Advocates
about the status of cases filed by them.
At present, the following three services are being provided
1.

2.

SR Numbering Stage:

SR Number

Date of filing

Date of numbering

Name of the Counsel

After SR Numbering (if the case is returned for rectification of defects)

SR Number

Date of filing

Date of numbering

Date on which the case is returned

Date on which the case is to be represented after rectification of defects.

The service will be gradually extended to the following areas later:

Date when the case is listed for hearing and before which Court.

Details of respondents vakalat

Details of daily proceedings like Next Adjournment Date, result of the


case, etc.

Details of Copy Applications filed and

Date on which copies of orders are made ready, etc.

(vi) Digitization of Judgements and Orders:


The process of Digitization of the case records has been initiated in the Madras High
Court with a view to save space and to explore the possibility of creating paperless courts
in future.
Since, digitization process is already going on in two other High Courts, viz., the High
Court of Punjab and Haryana and the Delhi High Court, the Honble Computer Committee
directed that information be collected from these High Courts on digitization. Accordingly,
steps have been taken for digitization of case records in the Madras High Court.

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MODEL COURTS
Name of the Court

Name of the
District/Taluk

No. of
Courts

Location

Principal Judge, City Civil


Court

Chennai

High Court Campus

District Court & Sub Court

The Nilgiris (District


Headquarters)

In One Complex
(Heritage building)

Judicial Magistrate Court

The Nilgiris(District
Headquarters)

In One complex

Sub Court & Judicial


Magistrate Court

TambaramTaluk,
Kancheepuram
District

Combined Court Building

Family Court &


Labour court

Coimbatore (District
Headquarters)

Combined Court Building

Family Court

Puducherry (District
Headquarters)

Combined Court Building

Total

10

The High Court has identified the above 10 Courts in the State of Tamil Nadu for
implementing the Model Courts Project. Among the above said 10 courts, the Principal
Judge, City Civil Court, Chennai and the Family Court, Coimbatore were prioritized for
implementing the Model Courts Project.
A comprehensive cost estimate for developing the required infrastructure and other
facilities as already suggested by the High Court has been sent to the Department of Justice,
Government of India. Reply is awaited.

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Comprehensive
Security System

The Madras High Court Campus is spread over an area of 36 acres and housing not only
Madras High Court but also various other Courts inside the campus. The Madras High Court
Campus consists of 7 Gates, out of which, one gate is meant exclusively for the entrance
and exit of the Honble Judges. All the 7 Gates are guarded by the Tamil Nadu State Police
Force, with a sanctioned strength of 238 Police Personnel including Officers with modern
gadgets & scanner and they provide round the clock Security Cover to the Madras High Court
Campus. 16 High Resolution Cameras have been installed at various prominent locations in
the High Court for continuous monitoring of the persons who enter the Madras High Court
Campus which is constantly monitored in a Police Control Room.

Police Control Room


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Parking Regulations
The Honble Security Committee has evolved a plan for parking the Vehicles inside the
Madras High Court Campus. On 08.09.2014 the parking regulations was introduced by the
Honble The Chief Justice along with the Honble Judges of the Security Committee in the
presence of various Advocate Associations.

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Madras High Court Arbitration Centre


The Government of Tamil Nadu in
the G.O.No.104,Home (Cts.IV) Dept.,
dt.13.02.2015, have sanctioned a sum
of Rs.1,98,00,000/-, for Establishing an
Arbitration Centre in the High Court of
Madras.

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Photo

Madras High Court

Gallery

150th Year Celebrations

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150th Year Celebrations

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150th Year Celebrations

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Inauguration of 5 New Buildings

Madurai Bench Events

Welcome address to the Honble The Chief Justice


at Madurai Bench on 12-11-2014

Welcome address to the Honble The Chief Justice


at Madurai Bench on 12-11-2014

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Southern Regional Conference on Mediation

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International Conference On Emerging Trends In Intellectual Property Regime

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