2010 
The Basics of Forklift Safety

 

“The average forklift weighs as much as a medium‐ sized dump truck and, because it’s small and most  often a lot quieter than a dump truck, it can  become a very real source of danger…” 
Rob Vajko         2/11/2010   

www.nationalsafetyinc.com   

The Basics of Forklift Safety
Do you remember the movie “Christine”, the 1958 Plymouth fury with attitude based on a book by  Stephen King?  You may not have a killer car in your warehouse out for revenge but chances are you’ve got one or more  forklifts in it with the same destructive power. The fact is that the average forklift weighs as much as a  medium‐sized dump truck and, because it’s small and most often a lot quieter than a dump truck, it can  become a very real source of danger to your employees. Additionally, because forklifts are used to  transport heavy and bulky loads, its potential for injury goes up even more.  Forklifts are also used to load content onto trucks and semis which means that they are often working  on docks and crossing spans between the dock and the truck bed, furthering the changes of an accident.  Because forklifts are built to be more maneuverable than other vehicles (they usually have to get into  very tight spaces, turn on a dime, etc…) they are more prone to stability issues and can be more easily  flipped and tipped.   This writer has personally been involved in a forklift injury when a truck driver who had not checked to  make sure that the back of the truck was closed and the steel plate removed, assumed all the loading  was done and drove away suddenly leaving the back end of the forklift on the dock and the front end  hanging in mid‐air. I was fortunately younger and more agile than I am now (some 28 years ago now)  and managed to jump clear before the forks planted in the asphalt and the forklift flipped over on its  side (it fortunately tipped the opposite way from the way that I jumped). I came away unscathed. All  over the county each year there are many others who aren’t so fortunate.  Most of us understand that forklift operators need to receive proper training and be certified. Few of us  think about the fact that the forklift operators aren’t the only ones at risk.   Types of accidents caused by forklifts  1. Pedestrians hit by moving forklift (This includes pedestrians hit by any part of the forklift,  whether while the operator is driving or while the operator is maneuvering)  2. Unstable loads that fall on pedestrians  3. Danger of impalement to pedestrians  4. Injuries to operators because of tipping over or rolling over  5. Injuries to workers improperly standing on or working on the fork arms or loads.  6. Operators falling off the forklift  7. Person(s) being overcome by the exhaust fumes from a forklift  8. Injury from shelving or other objects that are hit by forklifts 

 
© National Safety, Inc. 

Page 2 

www.nationalsafetyinc.com   
Understanding the basics of forklift stability 
1. Forklifts are designed to carry loads. When a forklift moves without a load it is much more  unstable than one with a load carried low to the ground.  2. Because loads are not fastened down, applying the brakes often causes the load to shift, causing  additional instability.  3. Loads are intended to be carried low. When a load is raised the stability of the forklift drops  substantially. This becomes even more dangerous if the forklift is moving.  4. Uneven ground, especially when going downhill with the load in the front, is extremely unstable.  5. Because of the narrow wheel base of a forklift design (designed that way intentionally in order  to allow the lift to go into narrow spaces and still be maneuverable), the forklift is extremely  unstable when the operator takes a sharp turn.  6. Uneven loads on a forklift can add tremendously to the instability.  7. It takes very little to flip a forklift if the upper part (top of the cab or raised forklifts) comes into  contact with an overhead structure.  Measures to be taken in order to compensate for forklift instability  • • • Set and enforce low speed limits for forklifts. Do not allow reckless driving.  Delineate pedestrian zones in the warehouse using floor marking tape and enforce it.   Make sure that forklifts have seatbelts and make sure that the operator wears it. When an  operator jumps off a tipping or falling forklift the odds are very good that he will get seriously  hurt or killed.  Remove incentives and such that encourage operators to speed in order to get the work done.  Instead, give incentives for operators who demonstrate safety in the way that they do the work.  Always check the distribution of the load to make sure it is properly distributed. 

• •

Forklift speed 
It is important, when discussing speed and stopping distances as it applies to forklifts, to remember  what we observed earlier, namely that a normal forklift is about the same weight as a medium‐sized  dump truck.  Because forklift are so much smaller than a dump truck, we tend not to think of it in the same way but  when it comes to stopping distances, not understanding this similarity can be dangerous. Let’s take a  quick look at speeds and stopping distances for a typical forklift.  If a forklift is going 4 mph, it’s going to need about 17 feet or more to stop. The driver will usually travel  about 7 feet before he or she has time to apply the brakes (and that’s assuming that the driver is paying 

 
© National Safety, Inc. 

Page 3 

www.nationalsafetyinc.com   
close attention to his surroundings, which is not usually the case). It will take another 10 feet for the  forklift to come to a full‐stop.  If the forklift is going 8 mph, the distance jumps to 42 feet. At a speed of 9 mph the distance jumps up to  51 or more feet.  When we start to look at the numbers the severity of speeding on a forklift begins to become apparent.  That rack of pallets is not going to escape unscathed at best and will topple over and/or dump its’  content at worse when impacted by a forklift. What about the load on the forks? At maximum stopping  speed, the load will fly off, no if and or buts about it.  In addition, a forklift is much, much more unstable than a dump truck which greatly increases the  danger. Tipping over, flipping, etc… are a very real and serious threat.  Employers need to determine what a safe speed is depending on the working conditions, amount of  space, turn radius, etc… and post the speed limit accordingly. Forklift drivers need to know what the  speed limit is and know that it will be enforced. They need to know that there will be repercussions if  they are caught speeding.   If companies are serious about avoiding forklift injuries, this must be a clear policy in the workplace.  One out of three forklift injuries occur when an operator gets on or off of the forklift. Taking time to  make sure that the forklift is properly equipped and retrofitting it when it is not the case is time and  money well spent.  What forklifts should be equipped with:  • • • • • • A grab rail (used to hold on)  Anti‐slip foot holds and steps for mounting and dismounting without risk of the foot slipping off  the edge  Seatbelts  Forklift operators should be required to wear steel toe boots or shoes because of the danger of  toe injuries related to the forklift itself as well as the load that they are hauling  A horn  A backup alarm 

Other options to consider  • • • Mirrors and/or closed circuit video cameras to minimize strain to the neck when turning around  Properly adjusted ergonomic seating to reduce and minimize lower back strain (Sacroease is one  of the companies that makes an adjustable back support seat designed to support the lower  back and reduced injury)  Back supports (see, for example the Ergodyne Back Supports) 

 
© National Safety, Inc. 

Page 4 

www.nationalsafetyinc.com   
  Basic tips for forklift safety 
• • • • • • • • • Only operators who have been properly trained and who have forklift licenses should be  allowed to operate the forklift  Always set the brake when leaving the forklift unattended  Always keep the forks low. Keep them low and just off the ground when driving and tilted  forward on the ground when forklift is parked and unattended  Only the driver is allowed on the forklift (unless the forklift is equipped for more than one  person). Passengers are not to be permitted for any reason.  Never use the forks to raise personnel unless a forklift basket designed specifically for that  purpose is used. If you use a forklift basket, make sure it is properly attached to the forklift  As already mentioned, always wear seatbelts, posted speed limits and all other signs.  Always inspect the forklift to make sure everything is working as it should before using the  forklift at the start of the day.   Use the horn, especially when going around corners and in areas with restricted visibility  Operators need to be properly trained to NEVER try to jump from the cab of the forklift when it  starts to tilt or tip. They need to stay in the seat, hang on tight and lean in the opposite direction  from the tipping 

Establishing a basic traffic management safety plan 
Pedestrians and forklifts don’t mix. Management needs to understand this basic principle and plan  accordingly. It’s the reason that we have streets with sidewalks, stop lights and crosswalks.   The way that a warehouse is set up should be as clear as the rules governing street traffic are. Forklift  drivers should no more drive in pedestrian lanes than a truck driver would drive on the sidewalk.  Rights of way, stop signs, yield signs, etc… also need to be instituted in order to avoid accidents, not only  between pedestrians and forklifts but also between forklifts.  Here are some basic principles:  • • • • • Clearly outline and delineate pedestrian paths for pedestrians only. Forklifts are not allowed in  pedestrian zones.  Put up barriers to separate the pedestrians from the forklifts.  Clearly mark crosswalks where pedestrian paths will have to cross forklift areas  Clearly define who has the right of way in each area where pedestrians and forklifts are forced  to interact.  Post signs to make clear what the speed limit is, who has the right of way, where blind spots are,  etc… 

 
© National Safety, Inc. 

Page 5 

www.nationalsafetyinc.com   
• • • Hang mirrors in areas where visibility is limited. There are all kinds of mirrors to cover all kinds  of situations (see our the Se‐Kure Mirror section of our website for more details on the different  types of mirrors available)  Make sure that safety lights, back‐up alarms and warning devices (horns, lights, etc…) are in  working order  If pedestrians are not simply passing through (office personnel coming and going for example)  but actually have to work in the same environment as the forklifts for most of the work day,  make sure that pedestrians are wearing reflective safety vests.  Make sure that forklifts have high‐visibility markings on them as well (conspicuity tape, for  example). 

•  

Conclusion 
The bottom line is that forklifts have the potential to do a lot of damage, both to equipment and to  people. Because they have that potential however, doesn’t mean that they are necessarily dangerous. If  precautions and safety measures are taken, pedestrians and forklifts can both well together without  harm.  This can only happen with proper study and analysis that results in actions taken to make sure that both  are well protected. Do it today, don’t wait until someone has been hurt or worse before the safety  measures are put in place. 

 
© National Safety, Inc. 

Page 6 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful