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THOUSANDS OF RARE FILMS, TV MOVIES & SERIES DIRECT FROM THE STUDIO’S VAULT
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH.
/ JUNE
2015Entertainment Co. and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved
©2015
Turner

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

CONTENTS
A Little Note From The Editor
Bring It On: Peyton Reed Is Excited For The Small Stakes Of ANT-MAN
Time-Travel Paradoxes in Cinema
Mondo Gallery Presents: WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH
TRAINWRECK:Amy Schumer Is Not Ready
To Commit To You, No Matter How Much You Love Her
The Language Of Film: An Interview With
THE TRIBE Director Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy
BMD Q&A: THE TRIBE’s Yana Novikova
On Her Impressive And Brave Film Debut
Your Guide To Drinking This Summer: Bucks, Mules And Their Ilk
The Frightening Heroics Of CONAN THE BARBARIAN
A Celebration Of The Cinematic Iliac Crest
PAPER TOWNS vs. The Manic Pixie Dream Girl
Video Vortex: The Exquisite Plagiarism Of TERMINATOR 2: SHOCKING DARK
Drinking With THE HUSTLER: The Alamo Drafthouse
Guest Bartender On A Drink Worthy Of Paul Newman
The Last Word With TANGERINE Director Sean Baker
Editor-in-Chief
Devin Faraci

Managing Editor
Meredith Borders

Associate Publisher
Henri Mazza

Art Director

Joseph A. Ziemba

Graphic Designers

Zach Short, Stephen Sosa, Kelsey Spencer

Copy Editor

George Bragdon

Contributing Writers

Joseph A. Ziemba, Ray Wagner, Justin Brookhart, Meredith Borders, Sumyi Antonson, Britt Hayes,
Devin Faraci, Bill Norris, Evan Saathoff, Andrew Todd, Scott Wampler, Mandy Curtis, Jennifer Keyser

Advertising and Sponsorships

Corey Wilson | corey.wilson@drafthouse.com

Public Relations Inquiries
Brandy Fons | brandy@fonspr.com

All content © 2015 Alamo Drafthouse | drafthouse.com | birthmoviesdeath.com
Promotional images and artwork are reproduced in this magazine in the spirit of publicity and as historical illustrations to the text.
Grateful acknowledgement is made to the respective filmmakers, actors, and studios.

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mondotees.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A Little Note
From The Editor
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor-in-Chief
@devincf
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

It’s the little things. That’s the premise of A SOUND
OF THUNDER, Ray Bradbury’s time travel short
story where a chrononaut changes history forever
simply by stepping on a butterfly in the distant past.
This month we look at some of the little things -- like
Marvel’s ANT-MAN, a superhero who can shrink to
tiny sizes. He’s our coverboy, and we’re proud to have
a report from the set.
Also little in this issue: a little bit of a man’s body.
This month MAGIC MIKE XXL hits (not a little
thing in sight in that film), so we asked our writers
to focus on one little piece of the male anatomy…
that pelvic V muscle. Although, since my own pelvic
muscle is nowhere near as defined as some of these
guys’, maybe it isn’t such a little thing after all.
THE TRIBE is a big movie told in a little way -- there’s
no music or dialogue, and the whole story is told
through sign language. The tiniest of gestures and
most subtle facial expressions allow director Miroslav
Slaboshpitsky to tell a brutal, moving and amazing
story. We’re excited to feature that film in this issue.

Maybe TERMINATOR: GENISYS isn’t so much a
little thing, but that’s why I mentioned SOUND OF
THUNDER -- the famous killer robot series takes
a turn as our heroes travel back in time to stop the
other guys who were trying to travel back in time to…
well, it gets complicated, so we decided to spend a
little time asking our resident scientist to explain to
us just how a little time works. Paradoxes ahoy.
There is a smaller side to TERMINATOR,
and that’s in the form of TERMINATOR 2:
SHOCKING DARK, an Italian rip-off/fake sequel
to THE TERMINATOR that has become a big
holy grail for lovers of the weird, wild and unruly
side of the movies.
And there’s more! This issue is no little thing after
all -- we have big star in the making Amy Schumer’s
TRAINWRECK featured, and there’s some littleknown movie called CONAN THE BARBARIAN we
like to talk about. Plus: a little bit of booze and a bit
of books and a bit of dinosaurs. We hope you like this
one -- even a little bit. 6

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Bring It On: Peyton Reed
Is Excited For The Small
Stakes Of ANT-MAN
DEVIN FARACI
Birth.Movies.Death Editor-in-Chief
@devincf
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

They made an Ant-Man movie. Seriously. And
they got the guy who directed the (underrated and
excellent) cheerleader comedy BRING IT ON to do
it. Again, seriously.
And it was probably a very good choice. When original
director Edgar Wright left the project, Marvel Studios
had to find a filmmaker, fast. They could have gone
with any number of Hollywood shooters who just get
the footage in the can, but they went with Peyton Reed,
whose career spans Superchunk music videos and TV’s
MR. SHOW and the crazy underappreciated period
romcom DOWN WITH LOVE.
“Wait,” you’re saying. “That’s a good thing? Where’s
the action in his resume? Has he ever even worked
with an explosion?”
Reed knows that you’re skeptical -- of him and his
movie. And it turns out that’s just the way he likes it.
Q: If people look at your IMDB they’re going to
see a lot of comedies, and not just comedies but
comedies like BRING IT ON -- nothing close to
the action or superhero genre.
A: A lot of my movies have been comedic, but it’s
long been a goal of mine to do a science fiction or
superhero movie -- that’s what I grew up on. That’s
what I love. Those are the movies that made me
want to get into movies -- PLANET OF THE
APES, STAR WARS. 
here are guys who are strictly comedy directors,
T
but there are also guys who love comedy but want
to do more kinetic stuff. Comedy can be sort of
all talking heads and it can be non-cinematic, but
from the beginning melding those two has been
important to me. BRING IT ON is a low budget
movie, but it’s a very kinetic movie. It’s almost
a musical without technically being a musical.
DOWN WITH LOVE, my second movie, was
very pre-planned and the visuals were very much at
the forefront. When we were doing stuff like THE
BREAKUP, which is more a straightforward comedy,
there isn’t as much an opportunity in a movie
like that to have fun with the visuals, and it was
something I really missed and wanted to get back to.
Q: A lot of filmmakers who direct these superhero
movies will say they’re a nerd, they’re fans of the
material, and I have started rolling my eyes at this,
because I think it’s just a standard thing they say in
interviews. But I know you, and I know that you
actually grew up a nerd.
A: In the cinematic world there’s always this Marvel
versus DC thing happening on the internet, and
I have a dog in that fight: I grew up a Marvel
kid. There were a handful of DC titles I read, and
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

I certainly read BATMAN and I read stuff like
KAMANDI: LAST BOY ON EARTH, but I
was die-hard Marvel. There’s a reason for that:
as a kid my critical faculties led me to Marvel, I
enjoyed them more. I like the world, I liked the
interconnectiveness of the world. I love the Stan
Lee editorial attitude. When it came time for the
FANTASTIC FOUR radio show in '74/'75 and
Stan Lee narrated that? I loved that sensibility, and
that was long before the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
S o when ANT-MAN came up, I felt like I had a
relationship with these characters. I had very specific
ideas about Ant-Man, and I brought those ideas to
the movie. 
ut it was PLANET OF THE APES that sucked
B
me in. Everybody talks about world building and
all that, and PLANET OF THE APES was the
best world building for me. The only one I saw
in theaters was BATTLE, but I was watching the
show on TV, watching the movies on TV. I came of
age at a time when PLANET OF THE APES was
being heavily merchandized. I was fixated on the
TV series that ran for like 16 episodes. I remember
being an annoying kid who, on Fridays, when we
would go visit my grandmother -- she was a twoand-a-half-hour drive from Raleigh, North Carolina,
where I grew up -- I would calculate that we had to
leave home by 5:30 so we could drive and make it
to my grandparents’ house and say hi to them and
then race to the TV at 8 o’clock and see PLANET
OF THE APES. If my kid grows up to be like that
it’ll be the most horrible, annoying thing in the
world… but I was that kid!

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Q: We have this vision of what a Marvel movie is,
and that vision gets bigger and bigger -AGE OF ULTRON has a floating city that is
about to destroy the Earth. Do you see ANTMAN as another giant spectacle, or is this a
palette-cleanser?
A: I think in the context of the Marvel Cinematic
Universe it feels more like a palette-cleanser, and
that’s by design. The idea for this movie was
always something smaller, more street-level. It
takes place in a grounded world, which gives us
a new perspective. The structure of the movie
was always a heist movie. These movies get
bigger and bigger and bigger, there’s talk about
superhero fatigue, but ANT-MAN, at its core, is
a science fiction movie. It’s a shrinking movie…
with the structure of a heist movie. It also has
this dual redemption story between fathers and
daughters, but it also has a comedic heart. And
I like that better than something with massive,
gigantic world-ending stakes.
Q: I’m glad you have a vision for Ant-Man as a
character, because a lot of people are asking the
question: Why Ant-Man?

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

A: I just wrote the forward for the ART OF ANT-MAN
book, and that’s what I led with -- he has to be the
most challenging character in the history of Marvel.
He’s never even supported his own comic magazine!
The writers, Stan Lee in particular, never seemed to
know what to do with that character, and as a result
he was Ant-Man, he was Giant Man, he was Goliath,
he was Yellowjacket… he was just schizophrenic. 
ut I like that. To me people will come into this
B
movie thinking maybe it’s silly -- “What can he do,
he can shrink and he can control ants?” -- but I also
think they’re coming in with less solid ideas of who
he is or isn’t. It gives me more leeway to create that
character, in terms of the movie version. 
nd I like that he’s an underdog. My first
A
movie, BRING IT ON, was a ten million dollar
cheerleader movie. It was absolutely an underdog,
and before it came out we had no idea how it would
do… and I like having that experience again, being
an underdog and pulling something out that is
unexpected. ANT-MAN brings me back there and,
perversely or not, I like that feeling. 6
ANT-MAN arrives in theaters July 17.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

Time-Travel
Paradoxes in Cinema
RAY WAGNER
Birth.Movies.Death. Science Editor
@ray_wagner
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Viral pandemics; zombie apocalypses; nuclear
armageddon; alien invasions; machine uprisings. That
such tropes surface again and again in science fiction
and fantasy cinema shouldn’t really surprise us -- they
are lenses through which we can wrestle with some
of our more existential fears, examining our place
in an overwhelmingly large universe and trying to
shake loose some solace in the attempt. And is there
anything crueler, more central to the human narrative
than the relentless march of time? Is there anything
more tantalizing than the possibility that we, creatures
who analyze, learn and adapt, could reach back across
time to our younger selves, nudging our more naive
counterparts around obstacles, whispering of upcoming
tragedies, and slyly pointing the right way at the forks
in life’s roads?

too late, and fascism spreads unchecked for the next
300-plus years. The utopian Federation of McCoy’s
time is never formed, and it’s only when the Enterprise’s
Captain Kirk follows McCoy back and allows Keeler’s
death, despite having fallen in love with her in the
meantime, that the proper future is restored.

Again and again, we find our science fiction films going
back to the well of time travel. But, despite this brief
glimmer of hope, there’s always an undercurrent of
resignation. Even if we were allowed to move freely
in time the way we do in space, the overwhelming
complexity of causality seems to guarantee that we’d
birth all manner of unintended consequences or
that, despite our best efforts, we'd find that the broad
strokes of our future were immutable no matter how
we changed the smaller details. Either way, the future
to which we'd like to return is no longer in the cards,
due to our meddling, giving us that classic corollary of
time-travel yarns: the temporal paradox.
Time-travel paradoxes in film tend to fall in two main
camps. The first is the grandfather paradox, whereby
a time traveler, in the course of fiddling with the past,
accidentally alters events central to her present -- say,
preventing her grandfather from ever meeting her
grandmother and erasing herself from their future in
the process. Only by existing in the first place was she
able to travel into the past, but while there she screws
things up so badly that there’s no longer a future
with her in it. The BACK TO THE FUTURE series
tackles this trope literally, with accidental time traveler
Marty McFly so badly mucking up the beginning
of his parents’ romance that he literally starts fading
out of existence. Not learning to leave well enough
alone, Marty then tries to fiddle with his future self's
life, only to trigger another grandfather paradox whose
consequences are far worse than a simple McFly-less
timeline. The Hugo award-winning episode of the
original STAR TREK series, “The City on the Edge
of Forever,” provides another great, poignant, example.
Dr. McCoy of the starship Enterprise is accidentally
thrown back in time to the New York slums of the
Great Depression, where he saves the life of social
worker Edith Keeler, fated to die young in a traffic
accident. Keeler's example of tolerance so influences
the subsequent national conversation that the United
States never enters the second World War until it’s
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

The other main time-travel conundrum we tend to
find in cinema is the predestination paradox. Here,
a time traveler is motivated by some earlier event to
take a trip into the past, only to find that he ends up
causing the event that prompted the trip in the first
place. No matter how he'd like to change events in
the past to tweak his future, he's fated to make the
same, circular journey. The film INTERSTELLAR
provides a recent example of this paradox. Amid a
severe climate crisis, ghostly messages begin appearing
to Astronaut-turned-farmer Joseph Cooper and his
young daughter, pointing the two of them to a secret
NASA installation where Cooper is recruited to travel
through a wormhole to a supermassive black hole
in a distant galaxy. In the course of his mission to
find a better home for the remainder of humanity,
Cooper falls into the black hole, only to encounter
an advanced intelligence that protects him from the
black hole's singularity. Encased inside a tesseract built
by the hyper-dimensional beings, Cooper is moved
through both space and time back to Earth, where he
realizes that he is now the ghostly presence who was
communicating with his younger self. Cooper finds
that he can pass the solution to humanity's crisis,
learned during his painful journey, along to his future

TABLE OF CONTENTS

adult daughter, but he also realizes that he must close
the loop of the paradox and send younger Cooper
the messages that propel him toward the answers his
daughter is seeking.
Perhaps the best known example of the predestination
paradox in film is found in THE TERMINATOR -- a
film by director James Cameron which shares enough
similarities with a short story by "The City on the Edge
of Forever" scribe Harlan Ellison that it prompted an
out-of-court settlement with the notoriously litigious
author. THE TERMINATOR opens in an apocalyptic
future where machine intelligence Skynet, tasked
with protecting humanity, has decided that the most
efficient solution involves eradicating the biggest threat
to the species -- humanity itself. The nuclear strike
launched by Skynet was largely successful, and it is
now in the process of mopping up the few surviving
humans using killer robots called Terminators.
Resistance leader John Connor and his fighters are
proving particularly troublesome, and Skynet, which
has been tinkering with time travel in its spare
time, decides to send a Terminator in the past to kill

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

Connor's mother Sarah before he's ever born. Connor
catches wind of this and sends soldier Kyle Reese
into the past to stop the Terminator. Reese succeeds,
falling in love with Sarah in the process and fathering
the young John Connor, catching Skynet in a classic
predestination paradox: in trying to rub out Connor
before his birth, Skynet actually incites the conception
of its greatest enemy.
This month at the Alamo Drafthouse, we'll see the next
chapter of the TERMINATOR saga, which promises
an alternate take on Skynet's time-travel hijinks. Will
the machines manage to squash the human resistance
before it starts this time, or will the future, through its
sneaky paradoxes, still manage to find a way for the
survivors to hold together? Will the humans be able
to stop the apocalypse now, or are they just as fated to
take the journey to a future war with Skynet? Given
the abundance of evidence in the cinematic canon, it
seems unwise to bet against the future... 6
TERMINATOR: GENISYS arrives in theaters July 1.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Mondo Gallery Presents:
WHEN DINOSAURS
RULED THE EARTH
JUSTIN BROOKHART
Mondo Gallery Director
@JustinBrookhart
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

JURASSIC PARK is the first movie I ever saw in a
theater. I was five years old and my family brought
me to a giant, megaplex cinema. I got popcorn, soda
and candy and sat second row for one of the biggest
blockbuster movies ever. Watching the film I was
overcome with excitement, fear, wonder and a lot
of confusion. As a child I understood that movies
weren’t real. My parents had explained to me that
men and women created them to tell stories. What
I couldn’t understand after watching JURASSIC
PARK is how the men and women who made this
movie were able to get real dinosaurs to act in it. I
was convinced that they must have used some sort of
magic. How else could I have watched a triceratops
take breaths so deep they moved a grown man?
It was that scene, in which Dr. Sattler and Dr. Grant
scrutinizing the beauty of the sick animal, which
stuck with me long after leaving the theater. That
moment, more so than the famous first sighting of
the brachiosauruses, allowed me to connect with the
characters in a deeply emotional way. We shared in
the awe-inspiring sight of a real dinosaur. Not in fear,
but in total amazement. To them it was just as much
of a spectacle as what I was witnessing seated in the
darkened room.
It wasn’t until I was gifted a copy of the book, THE
MAKING OF JURASSIC PARK, that I began to
understand that the magic I believed in was called
“filmmaking.” Talented artists and craftsmen used
practical and digital effects to bring to life the
amazing creatures that appeared on screen in front

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

of me. They were the real wizards. I pored over the
pages of the book, reading every line, examining every
photo and illustration. This obsession sparked a love
of movies and art that still inspires me to this day.
Now, over twenty years after John Hammond first
appeared on screen to capture the imagination of
the entire planet, a new chapter in the JURASSIC
PARK franchise, JURASSIC WORLD, is opening in
theaters. To celebrate the release of the new movie,
Mondo is hosting an entire gallery exhibit dedicated
to the franchise, titled WHEN DINOSAURS
RULED THE EARTH. With over thirty pieces
of new artwork we aim to honor the iconic world
created by Stephen Spielberg and his team.
Each artist in the show is utilizing their unique talent
and skills to reinterpret imagery from the films.
Some are depictions of famous scenes and characters
while others are images befitting the walls of the
famous park gift shop. All of the artwork is rich with
love and produced by people with stories similar to
mine. Our hope is to create a new JURASSIC PARK
experience for old fans and new, just as JURASSIC
WORLD seeks to do the same.
Please join us on June 12th for the opening reception,
or view the artwork online after at mondotees.com. 6
Mondo Gallery Presents:
WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH
Opening Reception June 12th 7-10pm
On Display June 12th – June 27th
4115 Guadalupe St. Austin, TX

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TRAINWRECK:
Amy Schumer Is Not Ready
To Commit To You,
No Matter How Much
You Love Her
MEREDITH BORDERS
Badass Digest Managing Editor
@xymarla
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Here’s the thing about TRAINWRECK: it’s a romantic
comedy. It’s not a subversive take on the rom-com,
either. It’s a romantic comedy in the vein of the big,
mainstream, wildly successful romantic comedies of the
‘90s and early 2000s. It hits the beats you think it’s going
to hit, and it hits them well.
There’s a good chance most people aren’t going to call
it a romantic comedy, though. They’ll call it a Judd
Apatow movie; they’ll call it an Amy Schumer movie.
They’ll call it a sex comedy or just a comedy. That’s
because TRAINWRECK is very good and very funny
and very cool, and most people don’t want to admit that
rom-coms can be good, funny and cool.
This is the magic of Amy Schumer. She makes
everything seem cooler just by virtue of her association.
But the fact is, there was never anything inherently
wrong with romantic comedies as a genre. There have
been great romantic comedies, and there have been
terrible romantic comedies. TRAINWRECK is a great
romantic comedy.
Schumer plays Amy, a writer at an obnoxious men’s
magazine titled S’NUFF. At a young, impressionable age,
her father, the crotchety Colin Quinn, teaches her and
her sister, Kim (Brie Larson) that monogamy is a fruitless
endeavor. With Kim -- happily married, pregnant and
mother to a weirdly precocious step-son whom Amy
openly despises -- that lesson did not take. With Amy, it
caught on like gangbusters. She’s living a free-wheeling
single’s life filled with booze, bud and many, many men.
Lots of men. An incredibly impressive assortment of men.
And then she meets sports surgeon Aaron (Bill Hader).
So yeah, this goes where you think it’s going to go.
Despite her most abiding instincts, Amy falls for Aaron.
Their relationship is perfect, until it isn’t, and then Amy
must learn to overcome her deep-seated inclination
to flee at the first sign of adult obligation. And, of
course, everything works out at the end with a grand,
implausible gesture by Amy. I mean, seriously: you have
seen this movie.

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

And yet, TRAINWRECK still manages to surprise in
how profoundly funny it is, and in the wonderful realism
and recognizability of her character. Here is a woman
who’s a bit of a mess laid bare, and it’s a beautiful,
hilarious, interesting mess of which you’d like to see
much, much more. So, at the end, when Amy realizes
she must abandon childish pursuits and get her act
together to keep the man that she loves, a man who is
kind and funny and intelligent, it’s kind of a bummer,
frankly. We like irresponsible Amy. But if Amy doesn’t
like irresponsible Amy, well, that’s really her business.
These performances are perfect. Screenwriter Schumer
-- who admitted in the SXSW Q&A following the film’s
world premiere screening that all of this mess is truly her,
just Amy Schumer as she is in reality -- is as hilarious and
cool as you know she’s going to be, but what might surprise
you is how poignant and deeply sad she can be. There are a
few moments in TRAINWRECK in which Schumer will
bring you to tears. She’s honest and true, and never more
so than in her relationship with her sister, played warmly
here by Larson. Schumer’s sister Kim Caramele produced
TRAINWRECK with Schumer and the two are writing
partners, and the relationship onscreen is so plain and
genuine that we feel like we know something of Caramele,
and of the love and mutual support she and Schumer
share despite their very different personalities. Hader is
a much dreamier romantic lead than one might expect
of the comedian, and the most surprising standout of
TRAINWRECK is without a doubt LeBron James,
playing a very sweet, strange version of himself as Aaron’s
patient and friend. Oh yeah: and Tilda Swinton is in
this movie! She’s the posh, mildly evil editor of S’NUFF
whom Amy must go to great lengths to impress.
TRAINWRECK is a thoughtful, compelling, relatable
and wildly hilarious comedy that will win over audiences
male and female. Of course, at least half of that audience
won’t admit that it’s a romantic comedy that they’re
loving, but they will love it just the same. 6
TRAINWRECK arrives in theaters July 17.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Language Of Film:
An Interview With
THE TRIBE Director
Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy
SUMYI KHONG ANTONSON
Drafthouse Films VP of Marketing and Distribution, IIRC
@drafthousefilms
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

Q: Can you talk more about your inspiration for making
a film in sign language without subtitles or voice-over?
A: I wanted to make a modern silent film. When I was
starting the work on THE TRIBE, I knew that it
would be a universal story in sign language, easy to
understand by any audience in all corners of the globe,
without voice-over or subtitles. It was my principal
challenge -- to make a film in film language. 
Making a film with the deaf using subtitles never even
occurred to me. For me it would have been like having
a man on stage who would be reading aloud the
libretto of the ballet while it is performed. 
he film has been sold in forty countries and each
T
country is playing the exact same film without any
alterations whatsoever; every studio who buys the film
signs a contract that has a clause forbidding subtitles,
voice-over and other attempts to modify the film so
they can see the film as I intended.
Q: The cast of THE TRIBE are all deaf, non-professional
actors. Can you talk more about the casting process?
A: I never considered the idea of shooting non-deaf
people. From the very beginning I knew that my
actors should be people for whom sign language
is their mother tongue. The idea of teaching nondeaf actors sign language was excluded at the very
beginning. The deaf communicate in sign language
with their whole bodies and each individual has his
or her particular and unique manner of speaking,
connected with their physical characteristics: mobility
of features, temperament, degree of animation and
physicality. Their style of communication influences
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

the performance of a role more than the manner of
a speaking actor so I was interested in personalities,
naturalness and vibes.
Q: How did you communicate with your cast while
directing? Did you learn any signing?
A: We had a sign language interpreter who was always
on set to help interpret for me and to make sure that
the actors would stick exactly to the script. I know
a couple of gestures -- of course, the actors taught
me how to swear straight away. So I can swear in the
Ukrainian sign language brilliantly. Sometimes it was
quite useful during the filming!
Q: Were there any films that you showed the cast in
preparation of making THE TRIBE?
A: Actually we showed a lot of films to the cast since they
weren’t professional actors. It was like a brief cinema
class of my most loved and preferred films to help
open their minds and give them reference points for
me to describe what I do and why. 
o prepare for the sex scenes, I had the leads, Grigoriy
T
and Yana, watch LAST TANGO IN PARIS, LA VIE
D’ADEL, 9 SONGS, SHORTBUS and several films
from Lars von Trier, Larry Clark and Pier Paolo Pasolini.
Q: What made you want to tell the story of a
confrontation between an individual and the group
which he is also a part of?
A: I think that upon considering the narrative
construction of THE TRIBE, you’ll find a
classical Western. The protagonist comes to a
town where there’s a gang, he falls in love with the

gang leader’s girl, and so on and so forth. And a
hero is the hero only when he stands out against the
whole world alone.
Q: W 
hy did you decide to set this film in a
boarding school?
A: I chose a boarding school setting because it is a closed
system, which -- like a prison -- can be perceived to be
a metaphor of the state even if that isn’t the intention.
THE TRIBE is, to a certain extent, a metaphor of
the arrangement of the Ukrainian state, at least the
pre-revolutionary Ukraine. And the arrangement of
the state of Ukraine was based on the principle of a
Mafiosi group. However, I think this problem can be
understood by audiences outside of Ukraine as well;
when anti-drug police units are the main drug dealers,
and the anti-prostitution units control brothels, these
are the signs of the rotten Mafiosi system. When
representatives of social institutions perform the
functions contrary to their duties.
Q: Was there one scene in particular that you found most
challenging to film?
A: Technically speaking, the most difficult scene to shoot
was of one of the deaf actors being harmed by a truck
since we didn’t use a stuntman. The deaf actor truly
couldn’t hear the truck approaching so we worked
with the best stunt director of Ukraine. No computer

effects were used for this scene, everything was filmed
in the honest, old-school way. Theoretically everything
was very safe but it was still nerve-wracking. We did
seven takes and when everything was finished safely,
we felt a wild relief. Most of the people involved in
shooting that particular scene celebrated by getting
drunk right after we successfully completed it!
Q:You were a crime reporter before becoming a
filmmaker. Can you talk more about that and if that
helped influenced your film?
A: The events in the film did not happen with particular
people in reality. However, all these stories came either
from my own experience or were told to me from
my time as a crime reporter. As to the “tribal” system,
there exists a certain parallel world in which deaf and
voiceless people live; from time to time they have
communication problems with the non-deaf. In some
particularly insular cases, there is a system of their
own “court of arbitration” and supervision outside
of our speaking world which some have dubbed the
“deaf mafia.” My exposure to that world came through
my time as a crime reporter and I thought it was a
dramatic perspective to explore. 6
Drafthouse Films presents THE TRIBE this month at
theaters all over the country. Check drafthousefilms.com/film/
the-tribe for listings.

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CHILLER PREMIERE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15

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BMD Q&A: THE TRIBE’s
Yana Novikova
On Her Impressive
And Brave Film Debut
BRITT HAYES
Badass Digest Contributor
@missbritthayes
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

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THE TRIBE is a truly exceptional, singular film -- the
story of a Ukrainian boarding school for the deaf, where
director Miroslav Slaboshpitsky employs real deaf actors
and utilizes no spoken dialogue or music, providing a fully
immersive and (pardon the pun) disquieting experience for
the viewer. One of the many highlights of THE TRIBE is
Yana Novikova’s bold and brave performance as Anya, a girl
who -- along with her friend, Svetka -- is pimped out by a
group of her rowdy male peers, resulting in an unnerving
dramatic arc for Anya. Novikova’s performance is even
more impressive when you discover that this was her first
time acting professionally. I had a chance to interview
Novikova to discuss her inspirations and the challenges of
playing Anya.
Q: THE TRIBE was the first time you acted in front of
a camera, and the film demands a lot from you both
emotionally and physically. Can you discuss what that
experience was like?
A: Y 
es. At first I had no experience as I was not a
professional working actress. In rehearsals, we discussed
each scene and more about my role with the director
and I worked very hard. It got less difficult to fall into
her role as we continued shooting. I knew I had to put a
lot of emotion and authentic feeling so the audience can
believe in her character. I thank the movie for giving me
experiences to work on my qualities as an actress.
Q: What was the audition process like?
A: T 
here were many auditions held with several deaf
schools and communities during the casting. At first,
I was not chosen for the role and I was very upset,
but then they contacted me for another audition and
I thank destiny that they changed their mind and
Myroslav gave me this role in his movie.
Q: Going in, I imagine you already had a strong
connection to the material and the world created in
the film, but what were some of the other meaningful
moments or connections you discovered while
making the film?
A: A 
fter I viewed the movie LIFE ADELE (which
Myroslav recommended) [note: she’s referring to
LA VIE d’ADELE aka BLUE IS THE WARMEST
COLOR), I felt a connection and it is the moment I
was sure that I could do a powerful performance and
I set my objectives for the film. Myroslav told me that
the movie received awards at the Cannes film festival. I
didn’t know about the Cannes film festival. I asked him,
“will THE TRIBE play at Cannes film festival?” And
he replied “I don’t know, it depends from the movie
and us.” I was living in an apartment in Kiev during
production and I decided to write on my bathroom
mirror in red lipstick, “THE TRIBE will receive the
Palme d’Or”. Later, THE TRIBE got in Cannes and
received four awards, it is improbable!

Q: W 
hat was the most challenging moment for you as
an actress? 
A: It was heaviest to play the emotional scenes and
also the abortion scene. I imagined going through
all the powerful emotions and pain and tried to
show those feelings.
Q: H 
ow did you approach playing the role of Anya? Were
you able to connect with her on a personal level?
A: Anya sees prostitution as a means to an end, it earns
her money so she can achieve her goal to go abroad and
dream of a new life in Italy so she can separate herself
from what she is doing. I tried to immerse myself
into Anya’s character and how she thought even when
not shooting so even my own personality was under
construction while I played this role.
Q: T 
he abortion scene is a really tough moment, but the
emotions in that scene speak to many women on a
universal level. Does that scene speak to a reality for
some women in the Ukraine?
A: After a premiere screening of our movie, one woman
who was deaf came up to me and told me she felt it was
very realistic to her experience. I felt that meant I was
not mistaken with how I portrayed this scene.
Q: A 
re there any similarities between the fictional boarding
school in this film and schools you’ve attended?
A: I studied in a boarding school and so I have seen how
children can fight, demand money, etc. Of course, not
all schools are like this or that extreme, but I was able to
experience a little of it.
Q: W 
hat do you feel is the most powerful takeaway in the
film, for you personally, or for the audience?
A: In our movie, although there are not proper words
like in a silent cinema, when the deaf communicate
-- in addition to gestures through sign language
-- there is even more to understand. I would say
it is because communication -- in any form -- is
important. I also think it is a wider window for us
all and THE TRIBE forces the viewer to forget he or
she is sitting in a cinema. 6
Drafthouse Films presents THE TRIBE this month at
theaters all over the country. Check drafthousefilms.com/film/
the-tribe for listings.

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Your Guide To Drinking
This Summer:
Bucks, Mules And Their Ilk
BILL NORRIS
Alamo Drafthouse Beverage Director
@wnorris3
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

This is a drink that nearly everyone will enjoy. It knows
no gender or cultural boundaries; indeed, it started out as
something of an ambassador in a highball glass. It does,
however, have a kick to it (thanks to the ginger) and it's most
certainly not a drink to be scoffed at by your single maltsipping brethren. Your grandfather probably had a few of these
when he came home from World War II.
-- Brad Miles
Sometimes you don’t want all the fuss and circumstance of
seeking out obscure liqueurs. Sometimes you don’t want to
muck around with separating eggs or carefully measuring
drops of flower water.
Sometimes you just want a drink, and, when the weekends
are hot and lazy, you want that drink to be long, to be
refreshing and to be quick to put together. Sometimes you
just want a Buck, or a Mule, or a Dark and Stormy, all
drinks cut from the same cloth and built around a formula
that works with almost any spirit at all.
Nomenclature
There are those that hold that a Buck is made from a
mixture of spirit, sour citrus and ginger ale, while a Mule
will take that formula and sub in spicier ginger beer for
the more mellow ginger ale. There are those who insist
you can use either soft drink as your mixer and call it
a Buck, and there are those who just know that the
formula just works and you should just call for it when
you’re thirsty and the sun is over the yardarm. Oh, and
that ginger beer is always better than ginger ale, but
either will do in a pinch.
Origin of the Species
Claims abound that the Buck takes its name from The
Buck's Club a London social club founded in 1919,
which did indeed feature a drink called The Buck’s Fizz,
created by a bartender who worked there by the name of
McGarry. Unfortunately, the Buck’s Fizz contains neither
spirit, nor sour citrus, nor ginger beer. Instead it consists
of Brut Champagne and fresh orange juice, and if made to
the standards of McGarry, a touch of good grenadine.
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

In other words, a Buck’s Fizz is what we know as a
Mimosa, something decidedly not a Buck in the liquor,
ginger and citrus vein.
From 1890 or so, there was The Horse’s Neck, a drink
that started life as ginger ale with a very long strip of
lemon peel inside, and evolved into the Horse’s Neck
With a Stick (or a Kick), the above fitted out with a slug of
whiskey, or more commonly brandy. American in origin,
the Horse’s Neck (kick version) became a staple of British
Navy wardrooms by the 1960s, and was notorious enough
that Ian Fleming, in Octopussy, called The Horse’s Neck
“the drunkard’s drink.” Fleming is alleged to have been
quite partial to them himself.
There is nothing wrong with a nice spicy ginger ale topped
up with a snort of whiskey or brandy, but it is not quite
balanced enough for serious tippling and it lacks a certain
panache. Enter Ginger Beer and Citrus.
Ginger Beer v. Ginger Ale
The difference between modern ginger beer and ginger ale
is usually to do with sweetness and spice. Contemporary
ginger beer is generally less sweet than ginger ale and
packs more of a spicy ginger kick. Both began life in a
different form, as a brewed, fermented beverage, and
it’s still worthwhile to brew your own ginger beer if you
have a little time on your hands. The flavor will be better
than any that you can buy, and the alcohol levels will
be negligible, hovering in the same range as kombucha.
(NB -- Follow the directions carefully. Anytime bottle
fermentation takes place, there is a risk of explosion, in this
case, a very sticky risk.)
Historically, though ginger beer was produced in much
the same manner as sourdough bread, from a starter
euphemistically called a "Ginger Beer Plant.” Ginger Beer
Plant is not a leafy green, but rather a toxic looking white
mass, a mixture of microorganisms, fungi and yeast that
was fed with sugar and grew, with the starter periodically
halved and passed off to friends. It’s certainly worth trying
if you can get your hands on some, but sugar, yeast and

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time will yield roughly the same results, with a whole lot
more control of the finished product.
Early mass-produced ginger based soft drinks began to
appear in the United States by the mid- 1800s, and early
brands like Vernor’s Ginger Ale moved into what came to
be called a “Golden Style,” with a flavoring extract aged
in oak barrels for four years before use. Ginger Ale was so
popular (it was the most popular soft drink in the United
States until the 1930s) that many unscrupulous companies
failed to use ginger at all, instead relying on Capsaicin to
spice up their products. These early ginger ales were most
likely closer to what we now call ginger beer; accounts refer
to them as both sweet and powerfully spicy.
The modern, “Dry” style of ginger ale took off around
the time of prohibition, particularly in the hands of John
McLaughlin, who first brewed up Canada Dry in 1907.
This style has a more mellow ginger flavor, is arguably
easier drinking, and is most definitely dominate in today’s
soda aisles.
For our purposes here, particularly with strong spirits,
I’d go with ginger beer, relying on homemade, or the

A Whole Mess of Recipes
Your Basic Buck
1 ½ -2 oz. of Good Spirit
½ oz. or juice of half a lemon or lime
Ginger Beer
Fill a glass with ice. Add spirit and citrus juice, top with
ginger beer, stir gently and serve.
Barbados Buck
Adapted from Charles Baker, Jr.
¾ oz. aged, dark rum
¾ oz. light rum
½ oz. fresh lime juice
4-5 oz. ginger beer
Fill a tall glass with ice. Add your rum and lime and top
with ginger beer. Give it a gentle stir, garnish with a lime
wedge or wheel if you wish and serve.
Kentucky Buck
Erick Castro
2 oz. Bourbon
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
¾ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice
½ oz. Simple Syrup
1 Medium Strawberry
Ginger Beer
Place lemon juice and strawberry into a mixing glass and
muddle strawberry vigorously. Pour in bourbon, bitters
and simple syrup. Add ice and shake. Strain over ice into a
collins glass and top with ginger beer. Garnish with finely
sliced strawberry and lemon wheel.
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

excellent products from Maine Root, Fentiman’s, Barritt’s,
Fever Tree, and myriad other, smaller, mostly local
options. Reed’s is a pioneer in returning true ginger beer
to American shelves, and their Extra Ginger Brew is a nice
option with a lot of bite.
A Brief Note on Execution
Bucks are forgiving drinks, designed to be made quickly
and go down easy. They are essentially a highball, or
what some bartenders call “one and ones,” dressed up
with a squeeze of citrus. You can trust your eye on these
more than you can with most. Don’t fuss with them, just
enjoy them.
A Further Note on Ingredients
As long as your spirits are of decent quality, your citrus
juice is fresh, and you’ve got a nice, spicy ginger beer on
hand, you really can’t go wrong. Pair your citrus with the
spirit: rum, tequila, and gin tend to have an affinity for
limes; brown liqueurs like lemon; and vodka, well vodka
can work with anything, giving its legally mandated
neutrality -- though the Moscow Mule version of the
Buck, using vodka, lime and ginger beer, has had an
enduring run of popularity.

Gin-Gin Mule
Audrey Saunders
1 ½ oz. Tanqueray Gin
¾ oz. lime juice
1 oz. simple syrup (or 1 teaspoon superfine
granulated sugar)
8 to 10 mint leaves, chopped
2 oz. ginger beer plus more for topping up.
Muddle the lime juice, simple syrup, and mint leaves
together in the bottom of a mixing glass. Add ginger beer
and gin. Shake well. Pour into a highball glass filled with
ice, and top with additional ginger beer and a sprig of mint.
Dark & Stormy
(Gosling’s Black Seal Rum has a trademark on the Dark
& Stormy, and they are litigious bastards, who have been
known to sue bars, writers and others who recommend
a Dark & Stormy be made with any other sort of rum.
Fortunately, Gosling’s Black Seal rum is excellent in the
drink. Unfortunately, the trademarked recipe does not
include any lime juice, which I think enlivens the drink
and elevates it. The absence of lime also, of course, makes
the Dark & Stormy not a buck at all. Anyway.)
2 oz. Goslings Black Seal Rum
Ginger Beer
Fill a Collins glass with ice. Fill with ginger beer, leaving
two-three fingers of head space at the top of the glass.
Top with the black seal rum. To make a better drink,
something we could call a “Black Seal Buck,” squeeze
in a bit of lime juice. 6

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The Frightening Heroics Of
CONAN THE BARBARIAN
EVAN SAATHOFF
Birth.Movies.Death. Senior Editor
@sam_strange
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

A look at one of cinema’s roughest heroes.
We’ve had movie characters that set golden standards
for heroism. We’ve also had likable protagonists who
are awful people. Our cinematic palate has grown
durable enough to handle cads, losers, conmen,
rogues and a whole host of other negative adjectives
when it comes to central characters. Regardless of
their weaknesses, we typically want them to succeed
if the movie works. When it comes to CONAN THE

BARBARIAN, however, things get a bit trickier -because while he’s definitely the film’s protagonist, he
is also somewhat terrifying.
Filtered through the mind of John Milius, a guy
defined by such strongly averred machismo that he
could provide a safe-for-work emoji for testicles,
Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Cimmerian, as
portrayed by Arnold Swarzenegger, is very much a
heroic figure. He transforms himself from a slave into

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an eventual king. He avenges his parents and people.
He rids the world of an evil and powerful wizard. He
also looks super cool, which is important.
But Milius’ Conan is not a nice or friendly figure.
He’s a brutal, blunt and remorseless expression
of alpha male ideals sent on a quest of personal
vengeance that just happens to take out someone
even more evil. Like Achilles before him, he wields a
combination of power and emotional disposition that
makes him both awesome and awful. As good guys
go, this is one you might want to avoid.
This is especially true during the film’s first half,
where an enslaved Conan explores his talent for
violence without the benefit of his own agency.
Doomed to spend his life as a pit fighter for the
entertainment of others, Conan takes only a moment
during his initial fight to understand what the stakes
are and what’s expected of him. After he puts that first
fighter down, we’re treated to a montage of Conan’s
gladiator career, in which he kills guy after guy with
the dumb glee of a dog pouncing on a wounded
squirrel. This animal metaphor isn’t as off-base as it
sounds since we also learn that Conan’s keepers feed
him women for breeding. He is literally a stud.
Right off the bat, Conan supplies an interesting
central figure because, while we might expect a
typical hero to fight against his or her own slavery,
Conan does not appear to mind. Rather than
represent weakness, this passive resignation tells us
how much Conan enjoys all this killing and free sex.
This is part of who he is, and he’s into the power it
grants him.
Once set free upon the world, Conan indulges in
the hedonistic revelry befitting a guy restrained by
captivity for most of his life. This includes expected
treats such as alcohol, exotic food and drugs, but it
also involves punching a camel in the face. Actually,
Conan is especially rough on animals. Along with the
camel assault, we see him kill wolves, a vulture and a
gigantic snake.

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

But it makes sense that Conan inflicts so much
violence on animals, as well as on men. Even his
natural world (or supernatural when it comes to the
snake) is a dark, unforgiving place that preys upon
the weak at every turn, a fictional setting that seems
very much a predecessor for GAME OF THRONES’
brutal kingdoms. Conan himself is a product of this
brutality, a point that does not escape his nemesis,
Thulsa Doom. The film offers a glorious montage
of Conan’s rough upbringing, in which he is forced
to endlessly turn the Wheel of Pain. As a child, he is
just one of many. By the time he’s fully grown, we see
a gigantic, lonely beast pushing the wheel, as though
he absorbed the strength of all those who fell through
the years. He also witnessed his mother’s decapitation
just after seeing his father getting eaten by dogs. If
you need an origin story for someone who grows up
to be a psychopath, this one should suffice.
Once Conan finally embarks upon his quest to find
and kill Thulsa Doom, he softens a bit. He gets a
pal, and he falls in love. He has a drive to actually
do something, which makes his character more
recognizably heroic. But he is still Conan, out there
worshipping the power of steel and killing like crazy.
Even when crucified, he’s badass enough to bite a
vulture to death. And when he does kill Doom, he
does not just behead him quickly -- he lops it off in
three ugly and painful-looking blows.
Conan is a barbarian. It says so right there in the
title. And it’s a testament to John Milius that he
actually lives up to that label. Conan isn’t a thinker
(his attempt at subterfuge gets him caught in about
two minutes), he’s not all that spiritual, he’s mostly
unfriendly and he’s really fond of killing things.
Barbarians aren’t supposed to be cuddly gentlemen
who ponder the existential price of life and death.
A barbarian is supposed to be a big dumb meathead
who will punch a camel in the face for no reason at
all. And that’s our Conan. You’d do well to give him
wide berth. 6
The Alamo Drafthouse is screening CONAN THE
BARBARIAN this month. Check drafthouse.com for listings.

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BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

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A Celebration Of The
Cinematic Iliac Crest
BIRTH.MOVIES.DEATH.STAFF
@bmoviesd
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

The crest of the ilium, Apollo’s belt, athlete’s girdle, the
Jesus muscle, the iliac furrow: call it what you will, it’s
the same thing: the shallow grooves on either side of
the superolateral margin of the greater pelvis. In more
relevant terms, it’s that little pelvic V that only the most
extraordinary of muscular men have to offer. In honor of
this month’s MAGIC MIKE XXL, we pay tribute to that
little V on the big screen. Here’s to the cinematic iliac crest.
Brad Pitt, FIGHT CLUB
Tyler Durden: the man, the myth, the legend. He must be
a figment of our imagination to boast a bod like that. And
yet Brad Pitt, the actor who portrays him, is flesh and bone,
a real living human who somehow crafted his body into a
totem of toned.
He can wear a pink fluffy robe decorated with teacups or
nothing more than a yellow kitchen glove and he’s still
the most stylish man in the room. Because his style goes
beyond fashion into something more molecular -- or, at
the very least, muscular.
He may tell us to “stop being perfect,” he may claim that
“self-improvement is masturbation,” but that physique tells
a different story. I’d like to go into his cave, because Tyler
Durden is my power animal. (Meredith Borders)
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

Christian Bale, AMERICAN PSYCHO
Patrick Bateman may be a psychopathic serial killer and
complete douchebag, but he’s right about one thing:
he makes it look good. His meticulous daily hygiene
and workout routine pay off, demonstrating the power
of believing in yourself to the point of psychosis. The
world’s biggest Phil Collins fan may not be likeable,
but he’s definitely lustable.
Bateman’s body looks great whether banging
two ladies at once or running around with a
chainsaw coated in their blood. It’s completely
understandable that he’d stare at himself in the
mirror while having sex -- his powerful biceps and
torso would be the envy of any cocaine-fueled Wall
Street testosterone junkie. The start of Christian
Bale’s Yo-Yo-ing Muscle Mass Period is a high point
indeed. (Andrew Todd)
Dan Stevens, THE GUEST
Any fan of DOWNTON ABBEY expects a certain
softness out of their beloved Cousin Matthew.
Genteel, romantic, amiable and, if we’re being honest,
a little doughy.

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And then we meet “David” in Adam Wingard’s THE
GUEST. Dan Stevens whittled, sculpted, crafted and
whipped Cousin Matthew’s pasty British torso into
the robust, powerhouse shape of a supersoldier. The
moment David walks out of the shower with a towel
just barely wrapped around his waist -- who are we
kidding, that towel was at least four inches below his
waist -- Cousin Matthew was dead all over again. And
this time, women celebrated.
This is a man who easily carries two full kegs of beer, one
under each arm, while taking the time to smile roguishly at
every woman in the room. This is the man who can make
a hoodie and a backpack look like fetish wear. And this is
the man so dangerously charming, so intensely seductive,
so pelvically blessed, that I would be totally okay if he were
forced to kill my entire family. (Meredith Borders)
Harrison Ford, INDIANA JONES AND THE
TEMPLE OF DOOM
I don't spend a lot of time considering the male form -- it's
simply not how I'm wired -- but if called upon to identify
my idealized form of red-hot masculinity, I've got an
immediate answer for you: Harrison Ford in INDIANA
JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM.
From where I'm standing, this is about as perfect a package
as you can get. Indy's chiseled yet vulnerable (a dichotomy
perfectly captured in his chin: impossibly strong, but with
a little scar, just in case you think this God-amongst-men
can't bleed). He's brawny yet brilliant (when he's not
eradicating the notorious Thuggee cult one uppercut at
a time, he's studying up on the Jin Dynasty). He looks
just as good wearing a crisp tux in a nightclub as he does
rocking a sweaty bare chest while drinking blood out of a
mummified skull. He's fearless, he's funny, he's good with
a whip, and he is literally the only dude who should ever
be allowed to wear a fedora.
Your gyrating male strippers are nice, I guess. But if I'm
gonna get with a dude, it's gonna be with Indiana Jones:
badass masculinity personified. (Scott Wampler)

Jeff Goldblum, THE FLY
When is the last time you appreciated Jeff Goldblum's
hot bod? Maybe when you saw JURASSIC PARK, you
found yourself pleasantly delighted at the sight of him,
shirt unbuttoned as he casually reclined, looking like he

knows what's up but doesn't care. I could write an entire
essay on this dork-hunk's handsome body -- fit but not
ripped, modestly glistening with sweat, with just the
right amount of hair on his chest, promising your fingers
will never get lost in a coarse forest. And those hips -not too bony, not too cushiony, but a polite amount of
suggestion to inspire serious consideration.
Maybe you were surprised at Goldblum's nerd-hot-bod
in JURASSIC PARK because you've never seen David
Cronenberg's THE FLY, in which Goldblum's bod reached
peak levels of Damn, Son. WHERE JURASSIC PARK
doles out those smooth hips in moderation, Goldblum was
far from reserved in THE FLY, in which his hips were not
so much a courteous insinuation as they were an explicit
assertion. And that's not even considering his hair.
Whether gently hinting at a glorious truth we are -- and
remain -- unready to accept, or aggressively commanding
attention, Jeff Goldblum's hips are a monument to
his nerdy perfection, the cradle of his sexy life, and the
pinnacle of all human achievements (sorry, The Rock's oily
biceps). (Britt Hayes)

The Spartans, 300
When talking about dude-ity, it’s hard to go past 300.
Taking both a quality and quantity approach, Zack
Snyder’s swords-and-sandals movie delivers as much
literal fetishism as it does figurative. While most
movies are content to serve up a single piece of mancandy (if that), 300 dumps the whole box on you at
once, with literal hundreds (three of them) of toned,
muscular male bodies.
That it’s an ancient Greek war movie only improves
matters. As our Spartan warriors become sweatier,
greasier and bloodier, the additional fluids intensify
the lusty male flesh on display. Sadly, high-waisted
Spartan battle underwear conceals any furtive
glimpses we might get of the warriors’ iliac crests, but
the improbable six-packs sported by Gerard Butler
and co. make up for it. Tonight, we perve in hell.
(Andrew Todd) 6
MAGIC MIKE XXL arrives in theaters July 1.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAPER TOWNS vs. The
Manic Pixie Dream Girl
MANDY CURTIS
Forever Young Adult Contributor
@mandyannecurtis
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

You know the type. She’s quirky, mysterious and often
aloof, but also kind, funny, and can hold her own in
a battle of wits. She’s pretty, but not in a supermodel
kind of way. She easily achieves the extraordinary,
be it through her actions, words, or the batting of
her eyelashes. Those who know her either want to
date her or want to be her. She’s Manic Pixie Dream
Girl (MPDG) and she’s a figment of pop culture's
imagination brought to life.
Although she wasn’t given a name until 20071, the
MPDG has been flitting through pop culture for a
long time. According to writer Nathan Rabin, who
coined the term in a review of ELIZABETHTOWN:
“The Manic Pixie Dream Girl exists solely in the
fevered imaginations of sensitive writer-directors to
teach broodingly soulful young men to embrace life
and its infinite mysteries and adventures.”
After something is given a name, it often takes on a
life of its own. And since 2007, the MPDG trope has
grown and changed. (See: genderbent versions, Young
Adult novels, Zooey Deschanel’s career.) But there
comes a time in the life of every trope when people
begin to rebel against the idea; in fact, Rabin has even
apologized2 for his part in popularizing the term.
John Green goes a step further with his portrayal and
subsequent tear down of the MPDG in his YA novel
PAPER TOWNS (and its film adaptation, which
opens this month).
PAPER TOWNS tells the story of a teenager, Quentin
“Q” Jacobsen (played by Nat Wolff in the film), who’s
in love with (the idea of ) his next door neighbor,
Margo Roth Spiegelman (Cara Delevingne). Margo
-- according to Q -- is perfection. She’s not exactly
pretty, but never wants for the attentions of admirers.
She does well in school, even though she occasionally
disappears on adventures that, when she returns,
spread through their high school’s halls like wildfire
and are accompanied by admiring statements of
disbelief in her moxie. Q sees the fact that he lives
next door as to Margo as a miracle along the lines of
setting foot on Mars or surviving being shipwrecked
at sea. He’s certainly smitten, but it’s unclear at first
if his interest in her goes deeper than her surfacelevel characteristics, the characteristics that make her
appear to be, well, a trope.
At the start of their story, Margo ropes Q into an
all-night adventure filled with pranks and mischief;
basically, the best night of young Q’s life. The next
day, she disappears, off on what most people think
is yet another of her infamous adventures. When the
days she’s gone start adding up, however, Q begins
to worry. And when he finds what he believes to be a
clue Margo left just for him, he ropes his friends into
an adventure that rises to Margo’s level.

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

Throughout the journey to find Margo, Q and his
friends discover things about her that only heighten
her mystique. She becomes larger than life and all
the more perfect for it. But when they find her, and
most of these traits they’ve discovered turn out to be
incorrect, they realize they didn’t know her at all. Q
and his friends might think that they’re learning about
Margo while on their quest, but they end up learning
more about themselves and what it really means to
know someone. (It is a YA novel, after all.)
At first glance, Margo is a quintessential MPDG.
But Green has gone on the record more than once
asserting that PAPER TOWNS isn’t a MPGD story:
“PAPER TOWNS is devoted IN ITS ENTIRETY to
destroying the lie of the manic pixie dream girl; the
novel ends (this is not really a spoiler) with a young
woman essentially saying, ‘Do you really still live in
this fantasy land where boys can save girls by being
romantically interested in them?’ I do not know how
I could have been less ambiguous about this without
calling the novel THE PATRIARCHAL LIE OF
THE MANIC PIXIE DREAM GIRL MUST BE
STABBED IN THE HEART AND KILLED.”3
Does PAPER TOWNS manage the subversion Green
wants it to? Like with nearly everything in life, that’s a
matter of opinion. But it’s clear that he at least tried.
In the end, Margo’s not the ideal that Q thought she
was. She’s a whole -- and flawed -- person. She’s not
always upbeat, nor is she magical. But she remains Q’s
dream girl, even as he comes to the realization that
dreams are open to interpretation. 6 
V Club: “The Bataan Death March Of Whimsy,
A
Case File 1: ELIZABETHTOWN”
2 
Salon: “I’m Sorry For Coining The Phrase Manic
Pixie Dream Girl”
3
John Green’s Tumblr Post 57820644828
1

PAPER TOWNS arrives in theatres July 24.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Video Vortex:
The Exquisite Plagiarism
Of TERMINATOR 2:
SHOCKING DARK
JOSEPH A. ZIEMBA
Alamo Drafthouse Art Director and Programmer
@JosephAZiemba
Read more at birthmoviesdeath.com

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Life is full of mysteries that I will never understand.
Like automobile engines, sports and the musical
genre known as vegan straight edge. But the biggest
mystery of all is the existence of TERMINATOR 2:
SHOCKING DARK.
At one time, the act of plagiarism was a legitimate
way to earn a living. Especially if you made movies
in Turkey, Indonesia or Italy. For nearly three decades
beginning in the late 1960s, Asian and European
movie producers forged a new wave from the
delicate art of copyright infringement. From Lucio
Fulci's "interpretation" of George Romero's zombie
mythology in ZOMBIE to the appearance of undead
rapists during Rambo's fight for freedom in VAHSI
KAN, aka TURKISH FIRST BLOOD, these movies
were chaotic, fearless and a bazillion times more
outrageous the their source material. For instance,
no one in Alfred Hitchcock's THE BIRDS had a
conversation with their own penis while sitting in a
jacuzzi. But that happens in BEAKS: THE MOVIE.
Every cultural movement needs a focal point. In this
case, that honor belongs to Bruno Mattei. More
than any other filmmaker, Italian sleaze merchant
Mattei built a legacy by re-envisioning other people's
ideas. In HELL OF THE LIVING DEAD, Mattei
one-upped Fulci by actually stealing music cues from
George Romero's DAWN OF THE DEAD. With
CRUEL JAWS, Mattei proved that JAWS would
have been way better if it contained footage from
JAWS 3-D. In ROBOWAR, Mattei grabbed the most
successful elements of PREDATOR (the Predator)
and ROBOCOP (Robocop) by combining them
into one character who spoke like Shemp Howard
during a seizure. This still doesn't explain how
Bruno Mattei managed to release his own sequel
to THE TERMINATOR, called TERMINATOR
2: SHOCKING DARK, a full year before James
Cameron's TERMINATOR 2: JUDGEMENT DAY
was made. But it does explain that the world is insane.
After Venice is decimated by chemical warfare,
citizens are forced to find refuge in tunnels beneath
the streets. A man enters a control room in one of the
tunnels. He says:
"I'm Samuel Fuller from the Tubular Corporation.
And I'm looking for Megaforce."
Megaforce is a team of mercenaries who protect
the world from harm. The team spends their time
walking around the tunnels, screaming at each other
and shooting machine guns. Then the underground
fortresses are besieged by aliens. The aliens look like
a combination of Marvel Comics's Man-Thing and
papier mâché dinosaurs that were made by children,

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

which is to say, they look incredible. These monsters
are our reward for paying attention while everyone
hangs out and talks.
The first hour of this movie follows a group of
warriors and scientists as they battle aliens within a
maze-like structure. If that sounds like ALIENS, it
should. Because that's exactly what it is. Except in
TERMINATOR 2: SHOCKING DARK, the part
of Ripley is played by Sarah Conner from James
Cameron's TERMINATOR. Soon enough, The
Terminator shows up to battle Sarah for the fate of
the galaxy. The main difference between Cameron's
Terminator and Mattei's Terminator is that
Cameron's creation can't be destroyed by the foam
from a fire extinguisher.
TERMINATOR 2: SHOCKING DARK was made
by adults, but you'd never know that from watching
it. In fact, the movie feels a lot like what happens in
RUSHMORE when tenth-grader Max Fisher and his
pals reenact SERPICO as a school play. In that scene,
the novelty of seeing kids impersonate an R-rated Al
Pacino is hilarious on its own. But beyond that, it
captures how we process passion and creativity as
children. It's like happiness unfolding before our
eyes. That's why TERMINATOR 2: SHOCKING
DARK is so endearing. Mattei's choices suggest the
same feeling. But in this case, the awe of childhood
is replaced by the cynicism of adulthood. Mattei and
his friends -- including screenwriter Claudio Fragasso,
who would go on to make TROLL 2 -- made this
movie because they were dreaming of dollar signs. In
this case, those dreams came true.
While it was a huge hit overseas, TERMINATOR 2:
SHOCKING DARK was never released in North
America on any format for obvious reasons. That's
why discovering this movie via an uncut Japanese
VHS tape -- in English and with Japanese subtitles (!!)
-- is so much fun. It's like we're witnessing an urban
legend coming to life before our eyes, something that
exists despite its contention with all forms of logic.
But because it exists, life on our planet becomes even
more satisfying. And inexplicable.
It should come as a surprise to no one that this movie
is also known as ALIENATOR. 6
TERMINATOR 2: SHOCKING DARK plays as part
of the Video Vortex series this month at the Alamo
Drafthouse. Check drafthouse.com for listings.

Drinking With THE
HUSTLER: The Alamo
Drafthouse Guest
Bartender On A Drink
Worthy Of Paul Newman
JENNIFER KEYSER
Bar Manager of Contigo Austin

THE HUSTLER: a great movie about a pool player
who can't catch a break. Seems like the story of many.
Interchange the job title and it could apply to just
about any of us.
This movie is a great character study. I wanted to craft
cocktails that also seemed to focus on the character. In
this instance, bourbon is the star.
The Corner Pocket is a nice, boozy cocktail starring
Maker's Mark bourbon. It fits Paul Newman's
character profile exactly: sharp, spicy with some
sweetness shining through. The addition of
Cardamaro (an Italian wine-based digestif amaro)
tames the cocktail and fresh citrus brightens it up.
It's a juxtaposition, much like Newman's character in
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

the film, and it’s surprising, like comedic actor Jackie
Gleason's serious role as Minnesota Fats.
The Corner Pocket is not what you expect, and that's
what I like about it.
Corner Pocket
1.5 oz Maker's Mark
1 oz Cardamaro
.5 oz orange juice
2 oz soda
Shaken, served tall. 6
The Alamo Drafthouse is programming
THE HUSTLER as part of our Cinema Cocktails series.
Check drafthouse.com for listings.

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

The Last Word With
TANGERINE Director
Sean Baker

Q: What is your earliest movie memory?
A: According to my parents, the first film I ever saw
was a Disney film, however my earliest memory of
watching a film was in first grade. My mother took
me to the local library where they were screening
classic scenes from the Universal Monster films on
16mm. I remember there being scenes from THE
MUMMY, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK
LAGOON and DRACULA. 
ut the one that had a major impact on me was the
B
climactic burning mill scene from James Whale's
FRANKENSTEIN. I was in awe and, from that
moment, I knew I wanted to make movies.
Q: What was the first movie you saw that made you
understand that movies can be art?
A: That's a difficult one. I probably recognized films
as creative visions from a very early age without
ever applying the word "art" to them until my
college years. I do however remember being
conscious and intrigued by the directing style
of CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD
KIND. That film had more of an impact on me
than STAR WARS.
Q: What is your guilty pleasure movie?
A: BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA. It's actually only
one scene from it -- When Papi gazes off into the
night sky as Enrique Iglesias' Hero plays. Brings a tear
to my eye.
Q: What movie do you want to make before you die?

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

A: I just want to make another movie. In 2015,
with the state of the industry being what it is, a
filmmaker is lucky just to be able to keep working.
Q: What was your most magical cinema experience?
A: Anytime I've shed a tear in a cinema... Lars Von
Trier's THE IDIOTS. Hal Ashby's HAROLD AND
MAUDE. Lukas Moodysson's TOGETHER and a
handful of others.
Q: What is the one movie you believe everyone should see?
A: Lar Von Trier's THE IDIOTS.
Q: Only one of your movies can continue to exist after
you're gone -- which one is it?
A: I 'm still not satisfied enough with any of my films
to be the permanent representation of my work.
Hopefully my next.
Q: If you weren't born to direct, what else would you
be doing?
A: A 
barista. Seriously, making a decent latte is my only
other skill.
Q: Why do you make movies?
A: To attempt to create a film that gives me the feeling
of awe I felt when I was 6 years old, watching that
climactic scene from FRANKENSTEIN. 
U 
nfortunately, it's a doomed mission. I understand
the mechanics of filmmaking and will never be able
to suspend disbelief with my own films. 6

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

PAUL

RUDD

EVANGELINE

LILLY

COREY

STOLL

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / JUNE 2015

BOBBY

CANNAVALE

MICHAEL

PENN˜ A
PE

PENA

MICHAEL

AND

DOUGLAS
DR. HANK PYM

AS