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A

PROJECT REPORT
ON

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YAMAHA BIKES


AND OTHER COMPANIES BIKES

TO BE SUBMITTED TO UTTAR PRADESH TECHNICAL,


UNIVERSITY, LUCKNOW. IN THE PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF
THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE
OF

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


Batch 2013-15
Submitted to :
U.P.T.U., Lucknow

Internal Supervision of :
Mr. ABHIJEET SIR
(Faculty, MBA Deptt.)

KAPIL KUMAR
M.B.A. (IV Sem)
Roll No. - 1381770834

AR INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY


Mawana Road, Meerut Uttar Pradesh

STUDENT DECLARATION

I KAPIL KUMAR student of M.B.A. 4th Sem. here by declares that the project report
titled COMPARATIVE STUDY OF YAMAHA BIKES AND OTHER COMPANIES
BIKES is completed and submitted under the guidance of Mr. ABHIJEET SIR,
Asst Professor, ARIMT, Meerut is my original work.
The imperial finding in this report is based on the data collected by me.

KAPIL KUMAR
M.B.A. (IV Sem)
Roll No. - 1381770834

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
First of all I would endow my regards and thanks to God and my parents with whose grace and good
wishes I am able to complete this project work. This project would have not been completed without
the help and guidance of decided bond of people and thus as a token of appreciation to their efforts in
making this project a success, I would like to express my gratitude and thanks to their contributions.
I express my sincere gratitude to Mr. ABHIJEET SIR, Asst Professor, ARIMT, Meerut to time
in completing this project.

KAPIL KUMAR
M.B.A. (IV Sem)
Roll No. - 1381770834

CONTENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

INDIAN TWO WHEELER AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY


COMPANY PROFILE
ABOUT INDIA YAMAHA MOTOR PVT. LTD.
PRODUCT PROFILE
a. FZ
b. R15
COMPTITORS BIKES
OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY
RESEARCH METODOLOGY
DATA ANALYSIS

9.

SUGGESTIONS

10.

LIMITATIONS

11.
12.
13.

CONCLUSIONS
QUESTIONNAIRE
BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDIAN TWO WHEELER AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY


INTRODUCTION
The Indian automotive industry consists of five segments: commercial vehicles; multi-utility vehicles
& passenger cars; two-wheelers; three-wheelers; and tractors. With 5,822,963 units sold in the
domestic market and 453,591 units exported during the first nine months of FY2005 (9MFY2005),
the industry (excluding tractors) marked a growth of 17% over the corresponding previous. The twowheeler sales have witnessed a spectacular growth trend since the mid nineties.
4

Two-wheelers: Market Size & Growth


In terms of volume, 4,613,436 units of two-wheelers were sold in the country in 9MFY2005 with
256,765 units exported. The total two-wheeler sales of the Indian industry accounted for around
77.5% of the total vehicles sold in the period mentioned.
Figure 1
Segmental Growth of the Indian Two Wheeler Industry
(FY1995-2004)

After facing its worst recession during the early 1990s, the industry bounced back with a 25%
increase in volume sales in FY1995. However, the momentum could not be sustained and sales
growth dipped to 20% in FY1996 and further down to 12% in FY1997. The economic slowdown in
FY1998 took a heavy toll of two-wheeler sales, with the year-on-year sales (volume) growth rate
declining to 3% that year. However, sales picked up thereafter mainly on the strength of an increase
in the disposable income of middle-income salaried people (following the implementation of the Fifth
Pay Commission's recommendations), higher access to relatively inexpensive financing, and
increasing availability of fuel efficient two-wheeler models. Nevertheless, this phenomenon proved
short-lived and the two-wheeler sales declined marginally in FY2001. This was followed by a revival
in sales growth for the industry in FY2002. Although, the overall two-wheeler sales increased in
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FY2002, the scooter and moped segments faced de-growth. FY2003 also witnessed a healthy growth
in overall two-wheeler sales led by higher growth in motorcycles even as the sales of scooters and
mopeds continued to decline. Healthy growth in two-wheeler sales during FY2004 was led by growth
in motorcycles even as the scooters segment posted healthy growth while the mopeds continued to
decline. Figure 1 presents the variations across various product sub-segments of the two-wheeler
industry between FY1995 and FY2004.

Demand Drivers
The demand for two-wheelers has been influenced by a number of factors over the past five years.
The key demand drivers for the growth of the two-wheeler industry are as follows:
Inadequate public transportation system, especially in the semi-urban and rural areas;
Increased availability of cheap consumer financing in the past 3-4 years;
Increasing availability of fuel-efficient and low-maintenance models;
Increasing urbanisation, which creates a need for personal transportation;
Changes in the demographic profile;
Difference between two-wheeler and passenger car prices, which makes two-wheelers the
entrylevel vehicle;
Steady increase in per capita income over the past five years; and
Increasing number of models with different features to satisfy diverse consumer needs.

While the demand drivers listed here operate at the broad level, segmental demand is influenced by
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segment-specific factors.

MARKET CHARACTERISTICS
Demand
Segmental Classification and Characteristics
The three main product segments in the two-wheeler category are scooters, motorcycles and mopeds.
However, in response to evolving demographics and various other factors, other subsegments
emerged, viz. scooterettes, gearless scooters, and 4-stroke scooters. While the first two emerged as a
response to demographic changes, the introduction of 4-stroke scooters has followed the imposition
of stringent pollution control norms in the early 2000. Besides, these prominent sub-segments,
product groups within these sub-segments have gained importance in the recent years. Examples
include 125cc motorcycles, 100-125 cc gearless scooters, etc. The characteristics of each of the three
broad segments are discussed in Table 1.
Table 1
Two-Wheelers: Comparative Characteristics
Scooter

Motorcycle

Moped

Price*(Rs. as in January
> 22,000

> 30,000

> 12,000

2005)
2-stroke, 4Stroke

Mainly 4-stroke 2-stroke


stroke

Engine Capacity (cc)

90-150

100, 125, > 125 50, 60

Ignition

Kick/Electronic

Kick/Electronic Kick/Electronic
7

Engine Power (bhp)

6.5-9

7-8 and above

2-3

Weight (kg)

90-100

> 100

60-70

50-75

50-80+

70-80

High

Highest

Low

Fuel Efficiency (kms


per litre)
Load Carrying
*Ex-showroom Mumbai
Compiled by INGRES

Segmental Market Share


The Indian two-wheeler industry has undergone a significant change over the past 10 years with the
preference changing from scooters and mopeds to motorcycles. The scooters segment was the largest
till FY1998, accounting for around 42% of the two-wheeler sales (motorcycles and mopeds
accounted for 37% and 21 % of the market respectively, that year). However, the motorcycles
segment that had witnessed high growth (since FY1994) became larger than the scooter segment in
terms of market share for the first time in FY1999. Between FY1996 and 9MFY2005, the
motorcycles segment more than doubled its share of the two-wheeler industry to 79% even as the
market shares of scooters and mopeds stood lower at 16% and 5%, respectively.
Figure 2
Trends in Segmental Share in Industry Sales (FY1996-9MFY2005)

While scooter sales declined sharply by 28% in FY2001, motorcycle sales reported a healthy growth
of 20%, indicating a clear shift in consumer preference. This shift, which continues, has been
prompted by two major factors: change in the country's demographic profile, and technological
advancements.

Over the past 10-15 years the demographic profile of the typical two-wheeler customer has changed.
The customer is likely to be salaried and in the first job. With a younger audience, the attributes that
are sought of a two-wheeler have also changed. Following the opening up of the economy and the
increasing exposure levels of this new target audience, power and styling are now as important as
comfort and utility.

The marketing pitch of scooters has typically emphasised reliability, price, comfort and utility across
various applications. Motorcycles, on the other hand, have been traditionally positioned as vehicles of
power and style, which are rugged and more durable. These features have now been complemented
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by the availability of new designs and technological innovations. Moreover, higher mileage offered
by the executive and entry-level models has also attracted interest of two-wheeler customer. Given
this market positioning of scooters and motorcycles, it is not surprising that the new set of customers
has preferred motorcycles to scooters. With better ground clearance, larger wheels and better
suspension offered by motorcycles, they are well positioned to capture the rising demand in rural
areas where these characteristics matter most.

Scooters are perceived to be family vehicles, which offer more functional value such as broader seat,
bigger storage space and easier ride. However, with the second-hand car market developing, a
preference for used cars to new two-wheelers among vehicle buyers cannot be ruled out.
Nevertheless, the past few years have witnessed a shift in preference towards gearless scooters (that
are popular among women) within the scooters segment. Motorcycles, offer higher fuel efficiency,
greater acceleration and more environment-friendliness. Given the declining difference in prices of
scooters and motorcycles in the past few years, the preference has shifted towards motorcycles.
Besides a change in demographic profile, technology and reduction in the price difference between
motorcycles and scooters, another factor that has weighed in favour of motorcycles is the high re-sale
value they offer. Thus, the customer is willing to pay an up-front premium while purchasing a
motorcycle in exchange for lower maintenance and a relatively higher resale value.

SUPPLY
MANUFACTURERS
As the following graph indicates, the Indian two-wheeler industry is highly concentrated, with three
players-Hero Honda Motors Ltd (HHML), Bajaj Auto Ltd (Bajaj Auto) and TVS Motor Company Ltd
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(TVS) - accounting for over 80% of the industry sales as in 9MFY2005. The other key players in the
two-wheeler industry are Kinetic Motor Company Ltd (KMCL), Kinetic Engineering Ltd (KEL),
LML Ltd (LML), Yamaha Motors India Ltd (Yamaha), Majestic Auto Ltd (Majestic Auto), Royal
Enfield Ltd (REL) and Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India (P) Ltd (HMSI).

Figure 3
Shares of Two-Wheeler Manufacturers in Industry Sales (FY20009MFY2005)

Although the three players have dominated the market for a relative long period of time, their
individual market shares have undergone a major change. Bajaj Auto was the undisputed market
leader till FY2000, accounting for 32% of the two-wheeler industry volumes in the country that year.
Bajaj Auto dominance arose from its complete hold over the scooter market. However, as the demand
started shifting towards motorcycles, the company witnessed a gradual erosion of its market share.
HHML, which had concentrated on the motorcycle segment, was the main beneficiary, and almost
doubled its market share from 20% in FY2000 to 40% in 9MFY2005 to emerge as the market leader.
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TVS, on the other hand, witnessed an overall decline in market share from 22% in FY2000 to 18% in
9MFY2005. The share of TVS in industry sales fluctuated on a year on year basis till FY2003 as it
changed its product mix but has declined since then.

Technology
Hitherto, technology transfer to the Indian two-wheeler industry took place mainly through: licensing
and technical collaboration (as in the case of Bajaj Auto and LML); and joint ventures (HHML).
A third form - that is, the 100% owned subsidiary route - found favour in the early 2000s. A case in
point is HMSI, a 100% subsidiary of Honda, Japan. Table 2 details the alliances of some major twowheeler manufacturers in India.
Besides the below mentioned technology alliances, Suzuki Motor Corporation has also followed the
strategy of joint ventures (SMC reportedly acquired equity stake in Integra Overseas Limited for
manufacturing and marketing Suzuki motorcycles in India).
Table 2
Technological tie-ups of Select Players
Nature of Alliance
Bajaj Auto Technological tie-up

Company

Product

Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd, Motorcycles


Japan

Technological tie-up

Tokya R&D Co Ltd, Japan

Two-wheelers

Technological tie-up

Kubota Corp, Japan

Diesel
Engines

HHML

Joint Venture

Honda Motor Co, Japan


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Motorcycles

KEL

Technological tie-up

Hyosung Motors & Machinery Motorcycles


Inc

KEL

Tie up for

Italjet, Italy

Scooters

manufacturing
and distribution
LML

Technological tie-up

Daelim Motor Co Ltd

Motorcycles

Hero

Technological tie-up

Aprilia of Italy

Scooters

Motors
Compiled by INGRES
With the two-wheeler market, especially the motorcycle market, becoming extremely competitive
and the life cycle of products getting shorter, the ability to offer new models to meet fast changing
customer preferences has become imperative. In this context, the ability to deliver newer products
calls for sound technological backing and this has become one of the critical differentiating factor
among companies in the domestic market. Thus, the players have increased their focus on research
and development with some having indigenously developed new models as well as improved
technologies to cater to the domestic market. Further, with exports being one of the thrust areas for
some Indian two-wheeler companies, the Indian original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have
realised the need to upgrade their technical capabilities. These relate to three main areas: fuel
economy, environmental compliance, and performance. In India, because of the cost-sensitive nature
of the market, fuel efficiency had been an interest area for manufacturers.
It is not only that the OEMs are increasing their focus on in-house R&D, they also provide support to
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the vendors to upgrade the technology and also assist them striking technological alliances.

TRENDS IN THE TWO-WHEELER INDUSTRY


Companies raising capacity to meet the growing demand
All the major two-wheeler manufacturers, viz. Bajaj Auto, HHML, TYS, HMSI and others, have
increased their manufacturing capacities in the recent past. The total capacity of these players stood at
7.8 million units per annum (FY2003) as against total market sales of 3.8 million units in FY2002.
Most of the players have either expanded capacity, or converted their existing capacities for scooters
and mopeds into those for manufacturing motorcycles. The move has been prompted by the rapid
growth reported by the motorcycles segment since FY1995.

HHML increased the capacity of its plants from 1.8 million units in FY2003 to 2.25 million in
FY2004 and has been able to achieve 92% capacity utilisation. In light of the increase in demand for
motorcycles, the company plans to set up a new plant. Since its entry in the Indian market during
FY2002, HMSI has aggressively expanded its capacity.

Niche markets also witnessing intense competition


A significant trend witnessed over the past five years is the inclination of consumers towards products
with superior features and styling. Better awareness about international models has raised
expectations of consumers on some key attributes, especially quality, styling, and performance. High
competitive intensity has prompted players to launch vehicles with improved attributes at a price less
than the competitive models.
In an effort to satisfy the distinct needs of consumers, producers are identifying emerging consumer
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preferences and developing new models. For instance, in the motorcycles segment, motorcycles with
engine capacity over 150cc, is a segment that has witnessed significant new product launches and
hence, become more competitive. The indigenously launched Pulsar 150 had met with success on its
launch and thereafter, a host of models have been launched in this segment by various players. While
Bajaj Auto launched the Pulsars (150 and 180 cc) with digital twin spark technology (DTSi) that
offers a powerful engine and fuel efficiency of 125 cc models, model launches by other players
include LML's Graptor/Beamer, HMSI's Unicorn besides the HHML's CBZ (improved version
launched in 2003-04) and TVS' Fiero F2. Moreover, in the recent past, the motorcycle segment has
witnessed launch of vehicles with higher engine capacity (higher than 150cc) and power (higher than
15bhp). These include models such as Bajaj Auto Eliminator and Royal Enfield's Thunderbird
followed by HHML's Karisma. Besides these, KEL has launched premium segment motorcycles GF
170 and GF Laser besides launching products from the portfolio of its technology partner (Hyosung's
Aquila and Comet 250). The products in this segment cater for style conscious consumers. Quite a
few players are developing models combining features such as higher engine capacity" optimum mix
of power and performance, and superior styling. However, the extent of shift to these products would
depend on the positioning of such products in terms of price.

In the scooters segment, the market for plastic-bodied variomatic scooters continues to witness
growth in the scenario of overall decline in scooter volumes. Higher volumes and growth are
especially true for certain scooter models, such as Honda Activa, that brought in new technology
(besides variomatic transmission) to further differentiate themselves. Thus, the need to differentiate
and create a niche has led to companies strengthening their research and development (R&D)
capabilities and reducing the development time for new models.
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Increasing focus on exports


For the first nine months of FY2005, two-wheeler exports increased by 37% over the corresponding
previous, led mainly by motorcycles even as exports of other two-wheelers were healthy. While
motorcycle exports increased by 40%, scooter and moped exports increased by 29% and 27%
respectively.
Motorcycle exports by Bajaj Auto, HHML and TVS have reported a tobust growth in FY2005 and are
expected to increase further in the medium term.

Table 3
Two-Wheeler Exports from India (in numbers)
FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 CAGR

9MFY2005

(FY200004)
Scooters

20,188

25,625

28332

30116

53148

27.4

44832

Motorcycles 35,295

41,339

56,880 126122 187287

51.4

188807

Mopeds

27,754

44,174

18,971

24234

-3.3

22739

Total

83,237 111,138 104183 179568 264669

33.5

256378

23330

Source: SIAM
Although the Indian two-wheeler manufacturers have forayed on their own in their target export
markets, there have been instances of tie-ups with the technology partners. Bajaj Auto's tie-up with
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Kawasaki to jointly market Bajaj products in Philippines is a case in point. Under the tie-up, M/s
Kawasaki Motors Philippines Corporation has been appointed as exclusive distributors to market
select Bajaj two-wheelers that include Byk, Caliber 115 and Wind 125. These vehicles are being sent
to Philippines in the completely built unit (CBU) form. Other strategy of expanding international
presence considered by few players is that of setting up assembly lines in select South East Asian
countries either on their own or in partnership with local players. Besides, plans of select overseas
technology partners to source from their Indian partners and plans of global majors to develop their
Indian manufacturing unit as a sourcing hub may also lead to increase in two-wheeler exports from
India.

Companywise two-wheeler exports since FY2000 are presented in the following Table 4.
Table 4
Company-wise two-wheeler exports (FY2000-9MFY2005)
FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004

CAGR

9MFY2005

(FY200004)
Bajaj
14924

16112

28527

53366

90210

56.8

87225

HHML

10061

10324

13023

21165

39254

40.5

43441

HMSI

1293

10916

31414

n.a

27734

7265

6621

7765

9636

28093

40.2

36666

Auto

TVS

17

Yamaha

15197

20446

20321

45546

32906

21.3

27539

Others

35790

57635

32752

39053

42792

4.6

33773

Total

83237

111138 103681 179682 264669

33.5

256378

Source: SIAM

Vehicle Emission Norms


Emission norms for all categories of petrol and diesel vehicles at the manufacturing stage were
introduced for the first time in India in 1990 and were made stricter in 1996. When the 1996 norms
were introduced, it resulted in certain models being withdrawn from the market. With Stage I India
2000 emission norms coming into place, the cost of developing suitable technology has remained
high.

The emission norms that are currently in force for two-wheelers and three-wheelers are more
stringent than the Euro II norms. The roadmap suggested for emission norms for two/three-wheelers
by the Expert Committee on Auto Fuel Policy is as follows:

For two-/three-wheelers the emission norms are recommended to be the same in the
entire country:

For new vehicles:

Bharat Stage II norms throughout the country from April 1, 2005

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Bharat Stage III norms to be applicable preferably from April 1, 2008 but not later than April
1, 2010.

For reducing pollution from in-use vehicles


New pollution under control (PUC) checking system for all categories of vehicles to be
put in place by April 1, 2005

Inspection & maintenance (I&M) system for all categories of vehicles to be put place by
April 1, 2010

Performance checking system of catalytic converters and conversion kits installed in


vehicles to be put in place by April 1, 2007.

Table 5 presents the emission norms for two-wheelers that were in place in the past, the India 2000
emission norms, and the norms that have been implemented for April 2005 (Stage II) and proposed
for 2008 (Stage III).

Table 5
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Exhaust Emission Norms


Old
Vehicle

Pollutants

1996 2000 2005* 2008/10**


Norms

Tow-

CO

12-30

4.5

2.0

1.5

HC+Nox

8-12

3.6

2.0

1.5

CO

12-30

6.8

4.0

2.25

1.25

HC+Nox

8-12

5.4

1.5

1.25

1.1

wheelers
(gm/Km)
Threewheelers
(petrol)
Three-

CO

wheelers

HC+Nox

0.85

PM

0.10

0.05

(Diesel)

CO: Carbon Monoxide; HC: Hydrocarbon; Nox: Nitrogen Oxide,


PM: Particulate Matter, * Maximum Sulphur parts per million (ppm)
permissible of 150 and ** Maximum Sulphur ppm permissible of 50
Compiled by INGRES

To be able to meet the exhaust norms, the Auto Fuel Policy has suggested following technologies:
Table 6
Technologies for meeting the emission norms for Spark Ignited Vehicles
2/3 - wheelers
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Level of Emission
2-Stroke Technology

4-Stroke Technology

Intake, exhaust, combustion

4-Stroke engine

optimisation Catalytic

technology

Norms
Euro I/India 2000

converter
Euro II/Bharat Stage II Secondary air injection

Hot tube Secondary

Caatalytic

air injection

Converter
Euro III/Bharat Stage

Fuel injection Catalytic

Fuel injection

III

converter

Carburetor + catalytic
converter

Euro IV/Bharat Stage

To be developed

Learn burn Fuel injection

IV

+ catalytic converter

Source: National Auto Fuel Policy

The adoption of new technologies for compliance with stricter emission norms may affect the prices
of vehicles. Some two-wheeler manufacturers are testing electronic fuel injection systems for
motorcycles. To begin with, electronic systems are likely to be introduced in premium segment
motorcycles.

Fiscal Policy
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The Union Budget for 2001-02 had lowered the excise duty on two-wheelers (with engine capacity in
excess of 75 cc) from 24% to 16%. The manufacturers responded to this by passing on a relatively
large part of the excise cut to customers. The Union Budget thereafter have left the excise duty on
two-wheelers unchanged. But the Union Budget 2004-05 provides for a weighted deduction of 150%
for investments in R&D. This may facilitate increasing R&D allocations and allow for improvement
in the technical as well as product development skills of the Indian companies.

Indian Auto Policy 2002


The Government of India approved a comprehensive automotive policy in March 2002, the main
proposals of which are as under:
Foreign direct investment : Automatic approval is proposed to be granted to foreign equity
investment up to 100% for manufacture of automobiles and components.

Import tariff : Import tariffs are proposed to be fixed at a level such that they facilitate the
development of manufacturing capabilities as opposed to mere assembly.

Incentives for R&D : The weighted average tax deduction under the Income Tax Act, 1961 for
automotive companies is proposed to be increased from current level of 125% (The weighted average
deduction for R&D was increased to 150% in the Union Budget 2004-05). Further, the policy
proposes to include vehicle manufacturers for a rebate on the applicable excise duty for every 1% of
the gross turnover of the company expended during the year on R&D.

Environmental aspects : Adequate fiscal incentives are proposed to promote the use of low22

emission auto fuel technology (in line with the Auto Fuel Policy). The auto policy states the
Government's intent to align domestic policy with the international practice of imposing higher road
tax on old vehicles so as to discourage their use.

23

COMPANY PROFILE
YAMAHA MOTORS PVT. LTD.
Founded

July 1, 1955

Capital

48,342 million yen (as of March 31, 2009)

President

Takashi Kajikawa

Employees

49,761(as of December 31, 2008)

(Consolidated)

Parent: 9,396 (as of December 31, 2008)

Sales (Consolidated)

1,603,881millionyen
(from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008)
Parent:740,177millionyen
(from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008)

Sales Profile

Sales (%) by product category (consolidated)

Sales (%) by region (consolidated)

Major

Products

& Manufacture and sales of motorcycles, scooters,


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Services

electro-hybrid bicycles, boats, sail boats, personal


watercrafts, pools, utility boats, fishing boats, outboard
motors, diesel engines, 4-wheel ATVs, side-by-side
vehicles, racing karts, golf cars, multi-purpose engines,
generators, water pumps, snowmobiles, small-sized
snow

throwers,

machinery,

automobile

industrial-use

engines,

unmanned

intelligent
helicopters,

electrical power units for wheelchairs, helmets.


Biotechnological production, processing and sales of
agricultural and marine products and microorganisms.
Import and sales of various types of products,
development of tourist businesses and management of
leisure, recreational facilities and related services.
Headquarters

2500 Shingai, Iwata-shi, Shizuoka-ken, Japan

Affiliated Companies

Consolidated subsidiaries: 109


Non-consolidated subsidiaries: 7 (by the equity
method)
Affiliates: 26 (by the equity method)

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For society, for the world


Yamaha works to realize
our corporate mission of creating Kando

Yamaha Motor is a company that has worked ever since its founding to build products defined by the
concepts of high-quality and high-performance and light weight and compactness as we have
continued to develop new technologies in the areas of small engine technology and FRP processing
technology

as

well

as

control

and

component

technologies.

It can also be said that our corporate history has taken a path where people are the fundamental
element and our product creation and other corporate activities have always been aimed at touching
peoples hearts. Our goal has always been to provide products that empower each and every customer
and make their lives more fulfilling by offering greater speed, greater mobility and greater potential.
Said in another way, our aim is to bring people greater joy, happiness and create Kando* in their
lives.
As a company that makes the world its field and offers products for the land, the water, the
snowfields and the sky, Yamaha Motor strives to be a company that offers new excitement and a

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more fulfilling life for people all over the world and to use our ingenuity and passion to realize
peoples dreams and always be the ones they look to for the next Kando.

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ABOUT INDIA YAMAHA MOTOR PVT. LTD.


Yamaha made its initial foray into India in 1985. Subsequently, it entered into a 50:50 joint venture
with the Escorts Group in 1996. However, in August 2001, Yamaha acquired its remaining stake
becoming a 100% subsidiary of Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd, Japan (YMC). In 2008, YMC entered into
an agreement with Mitsui & Co., Ltd. to become a joint investor in the motorcycle manufacturing
company "India Yamaha Motor Private Limited (IYM)".
IYM operates from its state-of-the-art-manufacturing units at Surajpur in Uttar Pradesh and
Faridabad in Haryana and produces motorcycles both for domestic and export markets. With a strong
workforce of more than 2000 employees, IYM is highly customer-driven and has a countrywide
network of over 400 dealers. Presently, its product portfolio includes MT01 (1670 cc), YZF-R1 (998
cc), the all new YZF-R15 (150 cc), Gladiator Type SS & RS (125 cc), Gladiator Graffiti (125cc), G5
(106 cc), Alba (106 cc) and Crux (106 cc).

VISSION
We will establish YAMAHA as the "exclusive & trusted brand" of customers by "creating Kando"
(touching their hearts) - the first time and every time with world class products & services delivered
by people having "passion for customers".
MISSION
We are committed to:
Be the Exclusive & Trusted Brand renowned for marketing and manufacturing of YAMAHA
products, focusing on serving our customer where we can build long term relationships by raising
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their lifestyle through performance excellence, proactive design & innovative technology. Our
innovative solutions will always exceed the changing needs of our customers and provide value
added vehicles.
Build the Winning Team with capabilities for success, thriving in a climate for action and delivering
results. Our employees are the most valuable assets and we intend to develop them to achieve
international level of professionalism with progressive career development. As a good corporate
citizen, we will conduct our business ethically and socially in a responsible manner with concerns for
the environment.
Grow through continuously innovating our business processes for creating value and knowledge
across our customers thereby earning the loyalty of our partners & increasing our stakeholder value.
CORE COMPETENCIES
Customer #1
We put customers first in everything we do. We take decisions keeping the customer in mind.
Challenging Spirit
We strive for excellence in everything we do and in the quality of goods & services we provide. We
work hard to achieve what we commit & achieve results faster than our competitors and we never
give up.
Team-work
We work cohesively with our colleagues as a multi-cultural team built on trust, respect, understanding
& mutual co-operation. Everyone's contribution is equally important for our success.
Frank & Fair Organization
29

We are honest, sincere, open minded, fair & transparent in our dealings. We actively listen to others
and participate in healthy & frank discussions to achieve the organization's goals.

30

HISTORY OF YAMAHA INDIA

IM Division reorganized as in-house company "IM Company"

Corporate ties with Toyota Motor Co. strengthened

Yamaha Motor Asian Center Co., Ltd. (YMAC) founded in Thailand

Toru Hasegawa appointed as fifth YMC president

Yamaha builds temporary pool "Suimu 21" for the main competition pool of the 9th World
Swimming Championships in Fukuoka, Japan

Yamaha succeeds in the high-concentration mass culturing of Chaetoceros

Announcement of new three-year plan "NEXT 50"

New 4-region headquarters system initiated with newly established headquarters for Asia and
Japan added to the existing European and N. American headquarters

Limited regional release of the electric commuter motorcycle "Passol"

Manufacture of 50cc scooters for the Japanese market shifted to YMT in Taiwan

Marine Engine Division reorganized as in-house company "ME Company"

Yamaha Motor Distribution Singapore Pte. Ltd. (YDS) founded


31

Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd., Moscow Representative Office opened in Russia

Start of "YAMAHA CCS 21 Campaign"

Won MotoGP rider championship title

Takashi Kajikawa appointed as sixth YMC president

New medium-term management plan "NEXT 50 - Phase II" announced

Yamaha captures MotoGP triple crown by winning the rider, team and manufacturer titles

Sales company Yamaha Motor CIS (YMCIS) founded in Russia

Life Science Laboratory opened in Fukuroi, Shizuoka, as research and development center for
YMC's bio-technology business

Motorcycle manufacturing factory Yamaha Motor Manufacturing West Java (YMMWJ)


founded in Indonesia

Mass production of Astaxanthin as a supplement begun at factory in Fukuroi, Shizuoka

Global Parts Center established in Fukuroi city, Japan and full operations begun

Compliance Promotion Committee established

32

GENICHI KAWAKAMI
Genichi Kawakami was the first son of Kaichi Kawakami, the third-generation president of Nippon
Gakki (musical instruments and electronics; presently Yamaha Corporation). Genichi studied and
graduated from Takachiho Higher Commercial School in March of 1934. In July of 1937, he was the
second

Kawakami

to

join

the

Nippon

Gakki

Company.

He quickly rose to positions of manager of the company's Tenryu Factory Company (musical
instruments) and then Senior General Manager, before assuming the position of fourth-generation
President in 1950 at the young age of 38.
In 1953, Genichi was looking for a way to make use of idle machining equipment that had previously
been used to make aircraft propellers. Looking back on the founding of Yamaha Motor Company,
Genichi had this to say "While the company was performing well and had some financial leeway, I
felt the need to look for our next area of business. So, I did some research." He explored producing
many products, including sewing machines, auto parts, scooters, three-wheeled utility vehicles, and
motorcycles. Market and competitive factors led him to focus on the motorcycle market. Genichi
actually visited the United States many times during this period.
When asked about this decision, he said, "I had my research division chief and other managers visit
leading motorcycle factories around the country. They came back and told me there was still plenty of
33

opportunity, even if we were entering the market late. I didn't want to be completely unprepared in
this unfamiliar business so we toured to German factories before setting out to build our first 125cc
bike. I joined in this tour around Europe during which my chief engineers learned how to build
motorbikes. We did as much research as possible to insure that we could build a bike as good as any
out there. Once we had that confidence, we started going."
"If you are going to make it, make it the very best there is." With these words as their motto, the
development team poured all their energies into building the first prototype, and ten months later in
August of 1954 the first model was complete. It was the Yamaha YA-1. The bike was powered by an
air-cooled, 2-stroke, single cylinder 125cc engine. Once finished, it was put through an
unprecedented 10,000 km endurance test to ensure that its quality was top-class. This was destined to
be the first crystallization of what has now become a long tradition of Yamaha creativity and an
inexhaustible spirit of challenge.

The first Yamaha motorcycle... the YA-1.


Then, in January of 1955 the Hamakita Factory of Nippon Gakki was built and production began on
the YA-1. With confidence in the new direction that Genichi was taking, Yamaha Motor Co. Ltd. was
founded on July 1, 1955. Staffed by 274 enthusiastic employees, the new motorcycle manufacturer
built about 200 units per month.

34

That same year, Yamaha entered its new YA-1 in the two biggest race events in Japan. They were the
3rd Mt. Fuji Ascent Race and the 1st Asama Highlands Race. In these debut races Yamaha won the
125cc class and the following year the YA-1 won again in both the Light and Ultra-light classes of the
Asama Highlands Race.
By 1956, a second model was ready for production. This was the YC1, a 175cc single cylinder twostroke. In 1957 Yamaha began production of its first 250cc, two-stroke twin, the YD1.
Based on Genichi's firm belief that a product isn't a product until it can hold it's own around the
world, in 1958 Yamaha became the first Japanese maker to venture into the international race arena.
The result was an impressive 6th place in the Catalina Grand Prix race in the USA. News of this
achievement won immediate recognition for the high level of Yamaha technology not only in Japan
but among American race fans, as well. This was only the start, however.

The first Yamaha to compete in Americ(1957).


Yamaha took quick action using the momentum gained in the USA and began marketing their
motorcycles through an independent distributor in California. In 1958, Cooper Motors began selling
the YD-1 250 and the MF-1 (50cc, two-stroke, single cylinder, step through street bike). Then in
1960, Yamaha International Corporation began selling motorcycles in the USA through dealers.

35

With the overseas experiences under his belt, in 1960, Genichi then turned his attention to the Marine
industry and the production of the first Yamaha boats and outboard motors. This was the beginning of
an aggressive expansion into new fields utilizing the new engines and FRP (fiberglass reinforced
plastic) technologies. The first watercraft model was the CAT-21, followed by the RUN-13 and the P7 123cc outboard motor.
In 1963, Yamaha demonstrated its focus on cutting-edge, technological innovations by developing the
Auto lube System. This landmark solution was a separate oil injection system for two-stroke models,
eliminating the inconvenience of pre-mixing fuel and oil.
Yamaha was building a strong reputation as a superior manufacturer which was reflected in its first
project carried out in the new Iwata, Japan Plant, built in 1966. (The YMC headquarters was moved
to Iwata in 1972.) Toyota and Yamaha teamed up to produce the highly regarded Toyota 2000 GT
sports car. This very limited edition vehicle, still admired for its performance and craftsmanship,
created a sensation among enthusiast in Japan and abroad.
Genichi said, "I believe that the most important thing when building a product is to always keep in
mind the standpoint of the people who will use it." An example of the commitment to "walking in the
customers' shoes" was the move in 1966 by Yamaha to continue its expansion. Overseas motorcycle
manufacturing was established in Thailand and Mexico. In 1968, the globalization continued with
Brazil and the Netherlands. With manufacturing bases, distributors and R&D operations in a market,
Yamaha could be involved in grassroots efforts to build products that truly met the needs of each
market by respecting and valuing the distinct national sensibilities and customs of each country.
Yamaha continues that tradition, today.
By the late 1960s, Yamaha had quality products that had proven themselves in the global marketplace
based on superior performance and innovation. Distribution and product diversity were on the right
36

track. But Genichi knew that beyond quality, success would demand more. He had this view on the
power of original ideas. "In the future, a company's future will hinge on ideas over and above quality.
Products that have no character, nothing unique about them, will not sell no matter how well made or
affordable and that would spell doom for any company."
He also knew that forward vision, walking hand in hand with original ideas, would create an
opportunity for the company and its customers that could mean years of happiness and memorable
experiences. Genichi said, "In the business world today, so many people are obsessed with figures.
They become fixated on the numbers of the minute and without them are too afraid to do any real
work. But in fact, every situation is in flux from moment to moment, developing with a natural flow.
Unless one reads that flow, it is impossible to start out in a new field of business."A real-world
illustration of this belief is the Yamaha DT-1. The world's first true off-road motorcycle debuted in
1968 to create an entirely new genre we know today as trail bikes. The DT-1 made a huge impact on
motorcycling in the USA because it was truly dirt worthy. Yamaha definitely "read the flow" when it
produced the 250cc, single cylinder, 2-stroke, Endure that put Yamaha On/Off-Road motorcycles on
the map in the USA. The DT-1 exemplified the power of original ideas, forward vision, and quick
action coupled with keeping in mind the customers' desires.
In years to come Yamaha continued to grow (and continues to this day). Diversity increased with the
addition of products including snowmobiles, race kart engines, generators, scooters, ATV's, personal
watercraft and more.
Genichi Kawakami set the stage for Yamaha Motor Company's success with his vision and
philosophies. Total honesty towards the customer and making products that hold their own enables
the company that serves people in thirty-three countries, to provide an improved lifestyle through
exceptional quality, high performance products.
37

Genichi Kawakami's history with Yamaha was long and rich. He saw the new corporate headquarters
in Cypress, California and the 25th Anniversary of Yamaha become a reality in 1980. He also
watched bike #20 million roll off the assembly line in 1982. Genichi passed away on May 25, 2002
yet his vision lives on through the people and products of Yamaha, throughout the world.

38

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Title

Name

Chairman and Director

Tsuneji Togami

President and Representative Director

Takashi Kajikawa

Representative Director

Tetsuo Uchiyama

Representative Director

Toru Watabiki

Director (Outside)

Shuji Ito

Director

Toyoo Ohtsubo

Director

Takaaki Kimura

Director

Masahito Suzuki

Director (Outside)

Masayoshi Furuhata

39

Director (Outside)

Eizo Kobayashi

Director (Outside)

Yuko Kawamoto

Standing Corporate Auditor

Haruhiko Wakuda

Standing Corporate Auditor

Tsutomu Mabuchi

Corporate Auditor (Outside)

Naomoto Ohta

Corporate Auditor (Outside)

Norihiko Shimizu

Corporate Auditor (Outside)

Tetsuo Kawawa

40

PRODUCT PROFILE
FZ
FZ-S highlights the style quotient and has more flesh to flaunt with purely European international
design like new colours & graphics, aerodynamic chiseled windshield, stylish & sporty carbon
pattern meter consol, and more aggressive looking headlight. The new FZ-S is for stylish and
attention seeking Macho man.
FZ-S scores high in looks not only in its segment but beyond and is designed to satiate the need for
style and fashion by riders. Etched with style and geared to todays fashion conscious customers, FZS is a fusion of machismo and fashion.
FZ-S overflows with dynamism and originality. The running performance brims with thrust that
overpowers all others with its unprecedented torque. Dubbed as Lord of the Streets, FZ-S is
designed and engineered with the potential for active and even aggressive enjoyment of around-town
street riding and styling that brings pride of ownership and makes any rider look like they own the
road.
With the Triple Macho concept projecting the Muscular silhouette, muscular body parts and muscular
chassis, FZ -S is an object deart on the street and reflects visual expression of performance.

41

42

YAMAHA R-15
Much awaited Yamaha's YZF - R15, a 150 cc sports bike is finally out on Indian roads. The bike
today announced by Yamaha Motor Pvt. Ltd. contains true Yamaha Racing DNA. The bike, Super
Sports Yamaha R15 is expected to set all new standards in design and performance in bike Industry
of India.

Machine, ie. the bike has technology percolated from R1. This new bike YZF - R15 has many firsts
to its credit on Indian road including first liquid cooled engine, 4 valve fuel injected engine etc. The
YZF R15 is powered by 149.8cc Fuel Injected liquid cooled engine producing 17bhp with maximum
torque of 15 Nm at 7500rpm; which makes it like the most powerful bike under 200cc range. Yamaha
YZF R-15 boasts 6 speed gearbox with optimized gear shift ratio so expect a smoother ride.
The bike will be priced at Rs 97,425 ex-showroom (All India).
The bike was recently showcased on Race Track on Chennai. Bike was impressive and attractive. We
will now talk about various aspects of the bike one by one.

43

Looks and Design


If you are not a bike enthusiast but still have some interest in bikes even then you will Yamaha YZF
R15. And if you happen to be a person who is little aware about bikes around the world then you sure
know that we have a DNA of Yamaha YZF- R1 on Indian roads. The bike is directly derived.. rather
say inspired from R1. Just to add here, Yamaha YZF R1 is globally acclaimed Yamaha bike and has a
fair respect around the world. So Yamaha, by introducing / developing a bike derived from R1 is like
giving Indians what they want. Indian bike market is still in initial stage. So giving R15 is like
giving taste of international standards and styling to Indians but on the cost which is in their reach.
When I say that design is inspired from R1 then there is really nothing much left to say as we know
about the success and design of R1 very well, however, in layman's language, bike has stunning
looks. Company says that they have a "R" characteristic in their design which is adopted in R15 too.

44

From company's website explaining about their R factor : "Harmony between rider and machine.
YAMAHA's Human Technology involves studying the form of the motorcycle actually in motion
with

the

rider

on

it.

The

series

is

the

embodiment

of

1) a wide frontal space that protects the rider,


2) an easy to ride seating area that gives riders the freedom of movement and allows them to steer
effectively,
3) the glamorous tail treatment that takes into account the management of airflow behind the rider,
and

45

4) a sensual racing form that brings all 3 of these elements together in a harmonious package. "
Starting from the headlamp, the R15 dual sharp head lamps clearly reflect the yamaha R1 in it.
However, it still manages to distinguish easily from R1.

Yamaha R1 Headlamp
Yamaha R15 Headlamp
So you may see that right from the beginning they had R1 DNA in their mind. However the R15 is
not scaled down version of R1 and it is clearly distinguished from R1. The R15 has more practical
design as per Indian perspective. They made sure that bike looks international as well usable in India
perspective too. The bike has some good details, however they adopted it to be more curvy than
having sharp design of R1. Side cowl ar impressively designed to cover small engine (150 cc) of R15
and nicely placed. However, engine would have looked even better if it was body colored or black.
The bike sports digital console and speedometer. Tyres are tubeless.

46

Riding position is all sporty. One would feel sporty the moment you take seat on bike. As hot now a
days, the bike sports split rear grab rail. Looks cool. However, real side indicators could have been
more sporty. They just look so basic and give little feel of out of theme. May be because of little
simple back of R15 as compared to its front. But overall, it makes decent impression.

47

Engine
The Yamaha YZF R15 is powered by 149.8cc Fuel Injected liquid cooled engine producing 17bhp
with maximum torque of 15 Nm at 7500rpm. So consider it as return of evil that we had once saw
many years back in Yamaha's bike and for which Yamaha was famous in India. I still see that people
rework on old Yamaha bike and use them even they are out of production because they remember and
like that power image of Yamaha.
R15's engine is liquid cool, its first in India in bikes. The technology is widely used in four wheelers
etc but its hardly their in bikes of this niche. Being a liquid cool engine, it ensure better engine
performance even on power ride and on long ride. So bike has a small radiator in it. Moreover, being
liquid cooled, it also helps in reducing engine noise so deliver even smoother ride.

Engine of Yamaha YZF R15


Also, Yamaha has implemented new DiASil Technology which makes engine more efficient in power
handling. DiASil Cylinders are all-aluminum cylinders made by YAMAHAs proprietary aluminum
die casting technology. An aluminum alloy with 20% silicon content is used to create a very hard,
reliable cylinder surface, making conventional iron sleeves obsolete. As a result, the entire cylinder
can be made of aluminum, a better conductor of heat, which means the cylinder delivers better heat
dissipation and less weight. (Aluminums heat conductivity is 3.1 times that of iron.)
48

And the piston used in R15 are made in a forging process, its a Yamaha's own proprietary
"Controlled Forging" which makes piston lighter and thinner yet more usable.
Engine uses Fuel injecting technology with 3 ltr air duct and providing improved combustion ability
hence efficiency.
Overall, engine is power packed and highly optimized. Surely gonna make you rock.

Chassis and Suspension


YZF-R15 is equipped with a linked type monocross suspension that delivers a comfortable ride and a
cushioning performance that is less prone to bottoming out. In particular, it reduces annoying
sinking when riding tandem. And the Chassis is derived from their experience of MotoGP and they
call

it

Delta

box

frame.

Company

describes

it

as

" This type of frame is currently used in YAMAHAs R series of sport models. The engine is mounted
on rigid supports; one on the head side and two on the case side; so that the engine itself becomes a
structural member contributing to body strength and rigidity. The engines low vibration makes rigid
supports

possible,

ensuring

low

vibrations

and

excellent

balance

of

rigidity."

Mileage
As a performance bike, do not expect a decent mileage, being a 150 cc bike , only expect 35kmpl to
45kmpl of mileage.
In the Last
It looks like real performer from Yamaha after a very long period and surely it will going to revive
their performance image in Indian market which they lost a while ago. By launching R15 in India,
Yamaha gave Indian a glimpse of the international standards on Indian price. However, priced little
49

heavily otherwise their no other cons of this bike which I could find. Riding comfort, engine
responsiveness as well whole layout is neat and attractive

50

COMPTITORS BIKES
150cc bikes in India

Pulsar 150 DTS-i

Unicorn

CBZ Xtreme

Hunk

Apache RTR

Pulsar

just

tries

to

upgrade

their

existing

version

to

higher

platform.

The top end speed i rode was 120 in UG2 . but in UG3 cant go above 115.and pulsar struggles after
touching 93km/hr . The noise produced is heavy. ( would fear about engine) .
Unicorn, the product from Honda is a good one too. This soundless beast (compared to pulsar)
reaches smoothly 115km/hr. No problem with it, but I couldnt go more than this speed as my road
was little bumpy.
CBZ Xtreme - one of the hefty bikes in this series is very powerful, MR LONG, has a great tendency
to reach top end speed with less time. It reached 125 km/hr . Speedo error is also present so average
of 120 km/hr . The acceleration from 60-100km/hr is best. This uses old unicorn engine, as soundless
feature like in unicorn.
Hunk is also a HH product. Yes, it also reaches 115km/hr as the specification is the same as CBZ ( I
have not rode it).
51

Apache RTR is a 160 cc bike produces 15.2 bhp which is the leader here . it reaches 132km/hr , but i
am sure the speedometer has error in it . To tell I think it has reached 125 km/hr.

STYLING :
Pulsar wins here with styling because Bajaj mainly aims up only with the sleek design factor.
Trendy headlight, mighty tank and sharp end tail.
But that doesnt mean that others are bad.
Apache is the smallest bike : BEST suitable for height less than 56?
Pulsar : not more than 510?
Unicorn : 510?
Hunk: 58?-511?
CBZ Xtreme: Best suitable for more than 6
Ride comfort mainly comes with CBZ Xtreme and unicorn only. If u r willing to do extra fitting like
2-piece or 3 -piece handle bar, pulsar is best. People who really like toe shifting try out for Apache or
CBZ.
MILEAGE:
This is where we Indians look greatly onto. Guyz comeon, this is a 150 cc segment , a power session
from here and India is further developing onto higher cc segments , so from now onwards do not try
to speak of mileage still, I can give the mileage provided by the bikes
These mileages were tested by me only:

52

Petrol was poured up for Rs 20/- on the reserve point and drove till next reserve point, the speed was
set for it and the average was found.
Pulsar: Best > 64 km/l UG3( drove not more than 45 km/hr and gear shifting was at 3500 rpm.
Worst>33km/l (drove in drastic condition)
Apache: best > 57km/l worst> 28km/l
Unicorn: best > 67 km/l worst> 39km/l
Hunk: best 58km/l worst 37km/l
CBZ: best 66km/l worst 32km/l
Well, if u mileage concerned then I would recommend u to take over either pulsar, Unicorn or CBZ
according to ur height and riding condition.
ACCELERATION :
Apache is best in acceleration followed by CBZ Hunk, Pulsar and Unicorn
RIDE COMFORT :
Unicorn and CBZ leads in this category. Pulsar has a huge tank mainly a big bulge in front of u , well
there are guyz who lost there defiantly male thing ( am serious about it) by applying sudden break.
MAINTANENCE :
Pulsar and Apache has good looks and latest Digital speed Console that is good, but in terms of cost
if these had any damages u will suffer in it. The cost is high. Bajaj, TVS have higher cost
maintenance than other bikes. Gearbox in Bajaj has got some problems, but those people has to tried
to rectify it. Hero Honda which is good company has not got big equipments on HUNK and CBZ , so
if any damage , means u can easily repair it with mow cost compared to others.
53

MONEY VALUE :
Well, all the bikes come around 63000- 68000 INR . After spending this much money u need to put
petrol as well as maintain the bike too.
So who is the winner?
CBZ XTREME > PULSAR > RTR > UNICORN > HUNK
This is my judgment and opinion as i have drove all the bikes except Hunk. I would recommend u ppl
to go for CBZ if u r tall, mileage, money value.
Note: This post was submitted by one of the visitor at speedmasti. Thanks Prakash for a nice review.

54

OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

To study the Customer satisfaction of yamaha bikes

To study the competitors bikes

Comparative study Yamaha bikes with other two wheeler bike companies

To study the consumer behaviors for Yamaha bikes.

To study the consumer satisfaction level of Yamaha bikes

55

RESEARCH METODOLOGY
SCOPE
Survey of customers and dealers dealing in bikes.
Record feed back from the market and recommended future plan for the operation.
Through the survey, it is trying to know, what is the basic difference between our company and other
fast moving Consumer goods Companys product in quality, price, packaging etc .through the survey,
it would be able to ascertain the weak point of salesman, distributors and other product related in this
way may would be able to create effective training package or can give some instructions to make
them more effective.

1: RESEARCH DESIGN USED:


Research is an art of scientific, investigation and systematic research for pertinent information on a
specific .I have used descriptive type of research. Descriptive research designing can be used to
study: consumer profiles, market potential studies, product usage, attitude surveys, sales analysis,
media research and price surveys etc.]
2:DATA COLLECTION METHOD:
I have used survey method for data collection. Survey is the most commonly used method.
3: DATA SOURCE:
Primary data: The objectives of primary data are formulated on the basis of research objectives.
Primary data has been collected personally from various consumers as well as retailers.
56

Secondary data: I collected data from magazines, newspaper and different websites.
4: RESEARCH INSTRUMENT:
A. Questionnaire for consumers: a questionnaire consist of questions presented to respondents for
their answers. Because of its flexibility, the questionnaire is the most common instrument used to
collect primary data.
B. Schedule for retailers: Schedule is a device in social research, which frequently used in
collecting field data especially where the survey method is employed. It contains questions and blank
tables, which are to be filled by the investigators themselves after getting information from the
respondents.
5: TYPE OF QUESTIONNAIRE:
Structured, Non-disguised- In this types of questioning the researcher setup a formal list of
questions Answers are frequently limited to a list of alternatives which is stated or implied.
6: TYPE OF QUESTIONS:

Multiple choice

Open- ended

Close-ended

Ranking item questions

57

7: ATTITUDE MESSUERMENT TECHNIQUES:


(A)Direct Personal Interview- A direct personal interview is face-to-face communication with the
respondents. The interviewer gets in touch with the respondents ask the questions, and records the
answers obtained.
(B)Rating Scales-The rating scale involves qualitative description of a limited number of aspects of a
thing or traits of a person.
(C) Ranking scales-Under ranking scales (or comparative scales) we make relative judgments
against other similar objects. The respondents under this method directly compare two or more
objects and make choice among them. I have used method of rank order, under this method of
comparative scaling, the respondents are asked to rank their choices. This method is easier and faster
than method of paired comparisons.
8: SAMPLING PLAN
A sampling plan is a definite plan determined before any data are actually collected for obtaining a
sample from given population.
(A)Sample Size-100 (The standard sample size had chosen by me.)
(B)Sampling Technique-I have used Probability sampling for my research report. Under this
sampling design every item of the universe has equal chance of inclusion in as ample.
(C)Place of the Study-Ghaziabad,Sahibabad and Noida.

58

SAMPLING METHOD
In many marketing research project making a census study of the entire universe will be impossible
on account of limitation of time and money. Hence sampling become inevitable.Sampling is used to
collect primary data when source of data for too many to be exhaustively handled. Sampling is an
integral part of data collection process.A sampling is only a portion of universe of population. The
success of sampling depends on the extent to which characteristics of the sample truly represent these
of the universe.
According to Yule, a famous statisticians, the objective of sampling is to get maximum information
about the parent population with minimum effort.Properly done, sampling produces representative
data on the entire population.
Term commonly used in sampling population or universe:
In marketing research population research population means the aggregate of all elements that are
relevant to the scope of the problem under the study.All of them process the characteristics under
investigation. When the research defines the characteristics under investigation, automatically it
delimits the population.Population need not necessarily means living persons, It may denotes
nonliving objects like companies, event or dealers.
Sample is a part of universe that is being studied and which generally reflects most of the traits that
universe had.
Method of Sampling:

Probability Sampling Method.

Systematic sampling

Area Sampling
59

Non Probability Sampling

Convenience sampling

Quota Sampling

Judgement sampling

Panel Sampling

In My Project Report I Used Random Sampling Method

60

MEANING OF PROJECT
Project gives us necessary guidance and though for the foundation of business. A project is an
essential requirement of business and for motivated person. Prior starting of any project it is
necessary to understand the meaning of every letter of word Project each letter of the project has its
special meaning that is discussed.
P Planning:- The first step P stands for planning, planning is the word that means prior the
construction of any thing and for their arrangement there should be good planning which gives better
results in manufacturing the thing that is being prepared as well as it is the bridge of between present
and future.
R: Resource: R stand for resource as resource give the current idea to promote the work.
O: Operative: It is a process of performing various function in systematic way.
J: Joint effort: a project cannot achieve its maximum success without the complete cooperation of
group member.
E: Engineering: Engineering is a branch of science under which a given task can be performed
efficiently with the help of knowledge and technique in a short duration by employing less money.
C: Communication: Communication simply means the exchange of ideas, which flows between two
or more person as well as from one place to an other place.
T: Techniques: Techniques is a simply an art performing a task the project should be finished with
different technique of works.

61

DATA ANALYSIS
DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS
Processing & Analysis the collected data: - once the field survey is over and questionnaire have
been received, the next task is to aggregate the data in a meaningful manner. A number of tables are
prepare to bring out the main characteristics of the data. The researcher should have a well thought
out framework for processing and analyzing data, and this should be done prior to the collection. it
includes the following activities
(i) Editing: the first task in data processing is the editing. Editing is the process of examining errors
and omissions in the collected data and making necessary corrections in the same.
(ii) Coding: coding is the procedure of classifying the answer to a question into meaningful
categories. Coding is necessary to carry out the subsequent operations of tabulating and analyzing
data. If coding is not done, it will not be possible to reduce a large number of heterogeneous
responses into meaningful categories with the result that the analysis of data would be weak and
ineffective, and without proper focus.
(iii)Tabulation: tabulation comprises sorting of the data into different categories and counting the
number of cases that belong to each category. The simplest way to tabulate is to count the number of
responses to one question. This is also called universal tabulation. The analysis based on just one
variable is obviously meager. Where two or more variables are involved in tabulation, it is called
bivariate or multivariate tabulation.
(iv) Analysis: after the all three above steps, the most important step is analysis of the data.
Under this step, they can use the various tools of the analysis such as Central Tendency, Dispersion,
Correlation co-efficient, Regression Analysis, Test of Hypothesis etc.
62

DATA ANALYSIS OF FZ 16 and FZ S


In which age group you are
a. 15-20
b. 20-25
c. 25-30
d. 30 & above

63

What is your qualification


a. High school
b. Intermediate
c. Graduate
d. PG

64

What is your occupation


a. Service man
b. Businessman
c. Student

65

In which Income group you are (in thousands)


a. 15-20
b. 20-25
c. 25 above

66

Which bike you have in a earlier time


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

67

From where you have got the information about FZ


a. TV
b. Internet
c. Print media
d. Friends
e. FM
f. And other

68

Which colour do you liked most


a. Red
b. Black
c. Orange

69

Which factor influenced you to purchased it


a. Style
b. Power
c. Handling
d. Comfort

70

Which mode of payment you choose


a. Cash
b. Finance

71

Are you satisfied with customer services?


a. Yes
b. No

72

Which bike are more comfortable


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

73

Which bike give you more mileage


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

74

Which bike are looking more stylish


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

75

Price of yamaha bikes


a. High
b. Average

76

Which bikes give you maximum speed


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

77

Customer satisfaction of after sale service


a. Hero Honda
b. Yamaha
c. Bajaj
d. Honda
e. TVS
f. Suzuki

78

SUGGESTIONS
1.

Company Should Focus On Advertisement in news paper for better walk in


showrooms.

2.

The level of service from the company side should be more effective as it was in the
past.

3.

Back office of Bushan Auto finance is totally ineffective. It should be more comfort
and allow to the other institution for provide finance and release some terms and
conditions.

4.

Make warrantee terms flexible for customer of R15 and FZ because these are the
premium segment customers.

5.

Increase frequency of adds in visual media that can be create a long term image in the
customer mind.

6.

Adds should be creative, motivated and passionate.

7.

Reduce the cost of product under 100CC segment.

8.

Company should have to inform directly to the sub dealers about schemes and
discounts.

9.

Company should have to organize programmes to influence the sub dealers and
dealers because both are the part of the company.

10.

The company also should have focus on infrastructure of sub-dealers showrooms.

11.

Company should have to provide schemes on different occasions like Diwali, Holi,
and Dusheshra and marriage season.

79

LIMITATIONS

1. Time duration was short.


2. Due to non-availability of mode of transport lots of inconvenience was faced by the
investigator.
3. A large sample could not be taken and systematic probability was not conducted due to the
lack of time.
4. During the course of survey some unavoidable error are faced such as no response, inaccuracy
in response.
5. The findings are totally based on respondents prediction and hence can be biased to some
extent.

80

CONCLUSIONS
1. The brand awareness of yamaha is good.
2. The looking of the bikes is better then other bikes.
3. Style, warranty, price, brand image are the major factor considered for the customer
while buying a particular brand.
4. The 18 to 25 years of age of youngsters are more like these bikes.
5. Dealers are not satisfied from the payment of his dues from the company side. It is
very time taken.
6. Relations between the dealers and sub dealers are not good especially in Ghaziabad.
7. Advertisement by the company side is very least.
8. Dealers want more schemes for promotion of Yamaha.
9. There is some gap in flow of information to the sub-dealers by dealer and company
side.

81

QUESTIONNAIRE
FZ and R15 CUSTOMER SURVEY
Customer name
Contact No..
1. In which age group you are:
a. 15-20

b. 20-25

c. 25-30

d. 30 & above

2. What is your qualification


a. High school

b. Intermediate

c. Graduate

d. PG

3. What is your occupation


a. Service man

b. Businessman

c. Student

4. Which bike you have in a earlier


a. Hero Honda

b. Yamaha

e. TVS

f. Suzuki

c. Bajaj

d. Honda

5. From where you have got the information about yamaha bike
a. TV

b. Internet

e. FM

f. And other

c. Print media

d. Friends

c. Orange

d. yellow

6. Which colour do you liked most


a. Red

b. Black

7. Which factor influenced you to purchased it


a. Style

b. Power

c. Handling

8. Which mode of payment you choose


a. Cash

b. Finance
82

d. Comfort

9. Are you satisfied with customer services:


a. Yes

b. No

10. Write two good things about Yamaha bikes


_________________________________________________________
11. Areas of improvement or suggestions
_________________________________________________________
12. Rating scale:
1
Good

2
Very

3
Fair

4
Poor

5
6
Very poor Moderate

7
Excellent

Parameter

good
Hero

Yamaha

Bajaj

Suzuki

TVS

Honda
Comfort
Mileage
Style
Customer
services
Price
Speed
After sale
service

83

Honda

BIBLIOGRAPHY

G C Beri, Marketing Research, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. LTD., New Delhi,
Third Edition (2002)

Rajan Sexana -Marketing Management


(Publish by Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. LTD, New Delhi)
Second Edition (2001)

R Sexana- Marketing Management


(Publish by Himalaya Publication, New Delhi)
Ninth Edition (2000)

Philip Kotler- Marketing Management


(Publish by Pren Tice-hall of India PVT. LTD., New Delhi)
Ninth Edition (2002)

Bhandrai- Research Methodology


Print 2004, second edition

WEB SITE:
www.yamaha.co.in
Search Engine
www.google.com
www.yahoo.com

84