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Directional Drilling I

Training Curriculum

T R AI NI N
ES S T. 2000
E

ER

YE

EMP

ES

CRCM_140_revA_0304

IN G E MP

Drilling & Evaluation Services

Training Department
16178 West Hardy Road, Houston, Texas 77060
Telephone: 281.260.5700 Facsimile: 281.260.5780

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Calculation: Slide vs Rotate


Distance to Slide = (Joint Length) * ((BR Proposed BR Rotating) / (BR Sliding BR Rotating))
Distance to Slide = (BR Required / BR Actual) * (Joint Length)
Build Rate Required = [(Sin Inc TGT) (Sin Inc Present)] * 1719
TVD TGT TVD Present
Rate of Build = ((Cos TF Setting) * (Expected D/L Motor) * (Sliding Length)) / 30
Rate of Turn = (Sin TF Setting) * ((Expected D/L Motor * Sliding Length) * (Sin Inc)) / 30
BR Actual = (Inc Present Inc Previous) / Course Length
Bit Inclination = (BR Actual * Bend to Bit Distance) + Inc Present
Radius = 1719 / BR Proposed
TVD = R * Sin (delta Inc)
Disp = R- (Cos (delta Inc) * R)
MD = (Delta Inc * 30) / BR
Survey to Survey Calculations
Course Deviation = Course Length * (Sin IncAVG)
Latitude = Course Deviation * (Cos AzmAVG)
Departure = Course Deviation * (Sin AzmAVG)
TVD = Course Length * (Cos IncAVG)
Vertical Section = Course Deviation * (Cos (AzmTGT AzmAVG))
IncAVG = (IncPresent + IncPrevious) / 2
AzmAVG = (AzmPresent + AzmPrevious) / 2
Closure Direction = Atan (Departure2 + Latitude2)
Closure = (Latitude2 + Departure2)1/2
Anti Collision = (delta Latitude2 + delta Departure2 + delta TVD2 )1/2
Computalog USA, Inc. This document contains Company proprietary information which is the confidential property of Computalog
Drilling Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the
one it was issued without written permission.

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Maps

Western Canadian Maps

Prairie Survey System

Adapted from Government of Alberta Website www3.gov.ab.ca/srd/land/airphoto/ats.html.


Any parcel of land in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta or the Peace River Block of British Columbia can be located
by its legal land description. Legal land descriptions are based on the Township System (TS). The system uses a
simple grid network to divide the prairies into equal sized parcels of land. Under the system land is described as being
west of the 1st to the 6th Meridian. The 1st Meridian runs north south right through Winnipeg. The 4th Meridian (110
degrees west longitude) is the Alberta Saskatchewan border. The 5th Meridian (114 degrees west longitude) is in the
center of the province and the 6th Meridian (118 degrees longitude) is east of the Alberta B.C. border.

Between meridians are six-mile wide columns called ranges, which run north to south. The ranges are numbered
consecutively starting with number one directly west of the meridian and increasing to 26 as you move further west.
Townships are six-mile rows that intersect the ranges. They are increase in numbers from south to north. Township 1 is
at the Canada USA Border and township 126 is at the Northwest Territories border.
Township is also used to describe the six-mile square formed by the intersection of a range and a township.
Townships are then further divided into 36 one-mile square sections.
Each section is divided into quarters: northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest or into 16 legal subdivisions or
LSD's.
Here is an example of how to use the system. You are asked to haul a load to a well that is located at
13 1 87 18W4. Where is it? Its easy if you know that the first number is the LSD, the second is the
section, the third is township, the fourth is range and the last one is the meridian. This means our location is Legal
Subdivision 13, Section 1, Township 87, Range 8 West of the 4th meridian.
Drilling Services Training

Houston, TX Telephone: 281.260.5771


Edmonton, AB Telephone: 780.462.6300

British Columbia Survey System (NTS System)

Adapted from NTS-Grid Map North East British Columbia, ISBN 1-895526-32-9.
The National Topographic System (NTS) used in British Columbia functions as follows.
Map number, unit, sheet, zone, centizone, and unit define a specific location. This is how you find the location:
93 F 12
Map Unit Sheet

E 53 b
Zone Centizone Unit

93 is the map number. British Columbia is divided into map numbers running south to north.
F is the unit. There are 16 units in each map. They run from A to P.
12 is the sheet. Each unit is divided into sheet of 16 equal parts.
E is the zone. Each zone is divided into 12 parts ranging from A to I.
53 is the centizone number. Each zone is divided into a 100 block centizone.
b is the unit designation within the centizone. Each block in the centizone is divided into 4 units a, b, c, and d.

Tips For Getting There

Once you have the legal land description, you can then plan your route to that area using a regular road map, oil
company maps, customer provided directions, or route information from your dispatcher. Do not deviate from the
route given to you by your dispatcher. This is critical because the route has been planned with road bans and bridge
capacities in mind. If you get off the route, you could end up damaging a road or a bridge and your company may be
responsible for paying for the repairs.
It is also very important to get specific landmarks that you can use to help find your off-highway destination. As you
may know, it can be difficult to locate well sites even if you have the legal description. One final point; remember to
ask for directions if you are not sure where you are.

Drilling Services Training

Houston, TX Telephone: 281.260.5771


Edmonton, AB Telephone: 780.462.6300

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Basic Math Assignment


1. Define the following:
Sin =

Cos =

Sin =
Cos =

Tan =
Tan =
A2 + B2 =
2.
A = 3 and B = 4

Find:
C=

=
=

3.
A = 1 and B = 1

Find:
C=

=
=

4.
C = 120 and B = 75

Find:
A=

=
=

5. C = 100 and = 65

Find:
A=

=
6. A = 50 and = 50

Find:
B=

C=

In the above triangle, which side is the hypotenuse? ________


In all triangles, the angles must add up to _______ degrees.
7.
r sin =

r cos =

r
y

Sqrt (x2 + y2) =

r and are ___________ coordinates.


x and y are ____ ______ coordinates.
If you are given x and y, how do you find r and ?
8.

Convert the following rectangular coordinates to polar coordinates:

Latitude = 100m
Latitude = -65m
Latitude = -84m
Latitude = 65m
R = 100m
R = 65m
R = 3000m
R = 1000m

Departure = 100m
Departure = 84m
Departure = -2m
Departure = -20m

Direction = 20 degrees
Direction = 140 degrees
Direction = 225 degrees
Direction = 280 degrees

r=
r=
r=
r=
Latitude:
Latitude:
Latitude:
Latitude:

direction =
direction =
direction =
direction =
Departure:
Departure:
Departure:
Departure:

Basic Rig Calculations


9. Buoyancy Factor (1200 kg.m3 mud) =

10. You require 15,000 daN WOB. How many drill collars are required if you are
using DC that weigh 150 kg/m and the mud density is 1200 kg/m3 ?

How many DC are required for the same WOB if the inclination is 10 degrees?

If the inclination is 25 degrees?

11. What is the annular volume for 222mm hole with 114.3mm DP at a depth of
900m?

12. If pump output is 1.5 m3/min, what is the bottoms up time?

Basic Math Assignment


1. Define the following:
Sin = A / C

Cos = B / C

Sin = B / C
Cos = A / C

Tan = A / B
Tan = B / A
A2 + B2 = C2
2.
A = 3 and B = 4

Find:
C=5

= asin 4/5 = acos 3/5 = 53.13


= asin 3/5 = acos 4/5 = 36.87

3.
A = 1 and B = 1

Find:
C = 1.41

= atan 1/1 = 45
= atan 1/1 = 45

4.
C = 120 and B = 75

Find:
A = sqrt(1202+752) = 93.67

= asin 75/120 = 38.68


= acos 75/120 = 51.32

5. C = 100 and = 65

Find:
A = 100 * cos 65 = 42.26

=100 * sin 65 = 90.63

= 90 65 = 25
6. A = 50 and = 50

Find:
B = 50 / tan 50 = 41.95

C = 50 / sin 50 = 65.27

= 90 - 50 = 40
In the above triangle, which side is the hypotenuse? ___C____
In all triangles, the angles must add up to __180__ degrees.
7.
r sin = x

r cos = y

r
y
x

Sqrt (x2 + y2) = r


r and are ___polar___ coordinates.
x and y are __rectangular_ coordinates.

If you are given x and y, how do you find r and ?


= Atan (x + y)
r = sqrt (x2 + y2)
8.

Convert the following rectangular coordinates to polar coordinates:

Latitude = 100m
Latitude = -65m
Latitude = -84m
Latitude = 65m
R = 100m
R = 65m
R = 3000m
R = 1000m

Departure = 100m
Departure = 84m
Departure = -2m
Departure = -20m

Direction = 20 degrees
Direction = 140 degrees
Direction = 225 degrees
Direction = 280 degrees

r = 141.42
r = 106.21
r = 84.02
r = 68.0
Latitude:
Latitude:
Latitude:
Latitude:

direction = 45
direction = 127.73
direction = 181.4
direction = 342.9

93.97
-49.79
-2121.32
173.65

Departure:
Departure:
Departure:
Departure:

34.20
41.78
-2121.32
-984.81

Basic Rig Calculations


10. Buoyancy Factor (1200 kg.m3 mud) =
BF = 1- 1200 / 7849 = 0.847
11. You require 15,000 daN WOB. How many drill collars are required if you are
using DC that weigh 150 kg/m and the mud density is 1200 kg/m3 ?
Determine air weight required:
15,000 / 0.847 = 17,709 daN
Determine length of collars required:
17,709 / (150 * 0.981) = 120 m
Determine number of collars required:

Assuming 9.1m/DC
120 / 9.1 = 13.23 DC = 14 DC
How many DC are required for the same WOB if the inclination is 10 degrees?
Vertical well = 14 DC
Directional well = 14 / Cos(10) = 14.22 DC = 15 DC
If the inclination is 25 degrees?
Vertical well = 14 DC
Directional well = 14 / Cos(25) = 15.45 DC = 16 DC
13. What is the annular volume for 222mm hole with 114.3mm DP at a depth of
900m?
=
=

Doh2 D p2 depth

0.222 2 0.1143 2 900


4
= 25.60m 3
14. If pump output is 1.5 m3/min, what is the bottoms up time?
= 25.60m3 / 1.5m3/min = 17.07 min

Label the Diagram

KOP

Build
Section
Locked in
Section

TVD
Tangent
Vertical
Section
Use the following Labels:
TVD
Tangent
Vertical Section
Locked in Section
Build Section
KOP

Label the following Horizontal Projection:

Closure

Latitude

Proposal
Direction
E
Departure

Vertical
Section
Calculated
on Proposal
Direction
Use the following Labels:
Latitude
Departure
Closure
Vertical Section calculated on proposal direction
Proposal Direction

Label the Diagram

KOP

Build
Section
Locked in
Section

TVD
Tangent
Vertical
Section
Use the following Labels:
TVD
Tangent
Vertical Section
Locked in Section
Build Section
KOP

Label the following Horizontal Projection:

Closure

Latitude

Proposal
Direction
E
Departure

Vertical
Section
Calculated
on Proposal
Direction
Use the following Labels:
Latitude
Departure
Closure
Vertical Section calculated on proposal direction
Proposal Direction

Average Angle Survey Calculation Sheet


1

Measured
Depth

Inclination

Azimuth

MD

Inc

Az

4
Course
Length

5
Average
Inclination

CL

Ave Inc

Proposal Direction:
6
7
Average
Change in
Azimuth
TVD
Ave Az

4*Cos (5)

88
8
TVD
TVD + 7

9
Change in
Displacement

10
Change in
Latitude

4*Sin (5)

9*Cos (6)

1039.43

11
Latitude
Lat + 10

12
Change in
Departure
9*Sin (6)

6.17

13
Departure
Dep + 12

14
Closure
Direction
Atan(13/11)

15
Closure
sqrt(112+132)

10.56

16
Vertical
Section
15*Cos(PD-14)

1039.60

1.81

69.92

10.77

1045.00

3.03

80.47

5.40

2.42

75.20

5.40

1044.83

0.23

0.06

6.23

0.22

10.78

59.98

12.45

10.99

1049.40

4.02

89.06

4.40

3.53

84.77

4.39

1049.22

0.27

0.02

6.25

0.27

11.05

60.50

12.70

11.26

1058.80

7.85

89.65

9.40

5.94

89.36

9.35

1058.57

0.97

0.01

6.26

0.97

12.02

62.48

13.56

12.23

1039.60

1.81

69.92

1045.00

3.03

80.47

1049.40

4.02

89.06

1058.80

7.85

89.65

1246.60

87.00

88.00

1039.43

6.17

10.56

10.77

1180.00

5.00

130.00

130.00

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

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Average Angle Survey Calculation Sheet


1

Measured
Depth

Inclination

Azimuth

MD

Inc

Az

4
Course
Length

5
Average
Inclination

CL

Ave Inc

Proposal Direction:
6
7
Average
Change in
Azimuth
TVD
Ave Az

4*Cos (5)

8
TVD
TVD + 7

9
Change in
Displacement

10
Change in
Latitude

4*Sin (5)

9*Cos (6)

1039.43

11
Latitude
Lat + 10

12
Change in
Departure
9*Sin (6)

6.17

13
Departure
Dep + 12

14
Closure
Direction

15
Closure

16
Vertical
Section

Atan(13/11) sqrt(112+132) 15*Cos(PD-14)

1039.60

1.81

69.92

10.56

10.77

1045.00

3.03

80.47

5.40

2.42

75.20

5.40

1044.83

0.23

0.06

6.23

0.22

10.78

59.98

12.45

6.23

1049.40

4.02

89.06

4.40

3.53

84.77

4.39

1049.22

0.27

0.02

6.25

0.27

11.05

60.50

12.70

6.25

1058.80

7.85

89.65

9.40

5.94

89.36

9.35

1058.57

0.97

0.01

6.26

0.97

12.02

62.48

13.56

6.26

1039.60

1.81

69.92

1045.00

3.03

80.47

1049.40

4.02

89.06

1058.80

7.85

89.65

1246.60

87.00

88.00

1039.43

6.17

10.56

10.77

1180.00

5.00

130.00

130.00

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

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WELZ Well Planning Exercise


Assumptions:
Target TVD: = 3000 m
Target Latitude = 500m N
Target Departure = 700m W
FTD = 3500 m TVD
1) If KOP = 1200m and BR = 2.5/30m, find:
Target Inclination:
Target Azimuth:
MD at EOB (End of Build):
Displacement at EOB:
MD at FTD:
Displacement at FTD:

2) If Target Inclination = 25 & BR = 2.0/30m, find:


KOP:
MD at Target:
MD at EOB:
Displacement at EOB:
MD at FTD:
Displacement at FTD:

WELZ Well Planning Exercise


Assumptions:
Target TVD: = 3000 m
Target Latitude = 500m N
Target Departure = 700m W
FTD = 3500 m TVD
3) If KOP = 1200m and BR = 2.5/30m, find:
Target Inclination:

46.7

Target Azimuth:

305.5

MD at EOB (End of Build):

3068.29m

Displacement at EOB:

720.26m

MD at FTD:

3989.75m

Displacement at FTD:

1390.95

4) If Target Inclination = 25 & BR = 2.0/30m, find:


KOP:

520.12m

MD at Target:

3170.49m

MD at EOB:

1770.12m

Displacement at EOB:

268.41m

MD at FTD:

3722.18m

Displacement at FTD:

1093.39m

Hydraulics Reed Slide Rule


1

Your rig has a Continental Emsco F-800 pump with 152mm liners. Determine the
following:
Pump output at 120 spm assuming 100% volumetric efficiency.
Pump speed for a pump output of 1.5 m3/min with 95% volumetric efficiency.
Nozzle pressure drop for 3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min in
o
o
o

Water:
1200 kg/m3 mud:
900 kg/m3 mud:

Nozzle velocity for:


o
o
o
o

3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min:


3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.0 m3/min:
3 x 10.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min:
3 x 10.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.0 m3/min

Hydraulics Reed Computer Program


Input data
152 mm hole
well depth = 1200m
150m of 121mm x 57mm DC
88.9 mm 19.8kg/m DP w/3-1/2 IF connections
Case 2 surface equipment
Planned motor pressure drop = 3500kPa (sealed bearing motor)
MWD pressure drop = 700kPa
Maximum stand pipe pressure = 15,000kPa
Drilling Fluid density = 1100kg/m3
Maximum desired flow rate = 750l/min
Minimum desired flow rate = 500l/min
Determine:
Nozzles sizes for a tricone bit:
Planned flow rate:
Pump Pressure:
Bit Pressure Drop:
Annular velocity beside DP:
Annular velocity beside DC:

If 3 8.7mm nozzles were used, determine:

Planned flow rate:


Pump Pressure:
Bit Pressure Drop:

Commander Mud Motors


Name the five main components of a mud motor:
1
2
3
4
5
For a 121mm Commander MN4535 motor, determine the following:

Lobe configuration:

# of stages:

torque output at 2500kPa differential pressure:

RPM at 2500kPa differential pressure while pumping:


o 660 lpm
o

950 lpm

Distance from bit box to bend:

Maximum dynamic load:

Hydraulics Reed Slide Rule


2

Your rig has a Continental Emsco F-800 pump with 152mm liners. Determine the
following:

Pump output at 120 spm assuming 100% volumetric efficiency:


1.5 m3/min
3
Pump speed for a pump output of 1.5 m /min with 95% volumetric efficiency: 127 spm
Nozzle pressure drop for 3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min in

Water:

1,490 kPa

1200 kg/m3 mud: 1790 kPa

900 kg/m3 mud: 1340 kPa

Nozzle velocity for:


o

3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min:

52 m/sec

3 x 14.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.0 m3/min:

35 m/sec

3 x 10.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.5 m3/min:

100 m/sec

3 x 10.3mm nozzles with a pump output of 1.0 m3/min:

67 m/sec

Hydraulics Reed Computer Program


Input data
152 mm hole
well depth = 1200m
150m of 121mm x 57mm DC
88.9 mm 19.8kg/m DP w/3-1/2 IF connections
Case 2 surface equipment
Planned motor pressure drop = 3500kPa (sealed bearing motor)
MWD pressure drop = 700kPa
Maximum stand pipe pressure = 15,000kPa
Drilling Fluid density = 1100kg/m3
Maximum desired flow rate = 750 l/min
Minimum desired flow rate = 500 l/min
Determine:
Nozzles sizes for a tricone bit:

3 x 7.1 mm

Planned flow rate:

0.75 m3/min

Pump Pressure:

14,289 kPa

Bit Pressure Drop:

6,589 kPa

Annular velocity beside DP:

62.8 m/min

Annular velocity beside DC:

113 m/min

If 3 8.7mm nozzles were used, determine:

Planned flow rate:

0.75 m3/min

Pump Pressure:

10,693 kPa

Bit Pressure Drop:

2,993 kPa

Commander Mud Motors


Name the five main components of a mud motor:
1
Dump Sub Assembly
2

Power Section

Drive Assembly

Adjustable Assembly

Sealed Bearing Section

For a 121mm Commander II motor, determine the following:

Lobe configuration:

# of stages:

torque output at 2500kPa differential pressure:

RPM at 2500kPa differential pressure while pumping:


o 660 lpm
160
o

950 lpm

4:5

3.5

240

Distance from bit box to bend:

Maximum dynamic load: 17,000 daN

1.76m

1300 Nm

How to Single Shot 101:


1. Double check your proposal and well information, confirm with company man,
and then compare location with well license.
2. Stop drilling one single or more above KOP and strap out.
3. Double-check all tools and connections. Test single shot sensor, timer, and angle
units.
4. Pick up tools and make sure that you are oriented correctly. Insure that all
connections in the BHA are torqued correctly. RIH Survey on way in if needed.
5. Double-check tie-on data and target data in computer.
6. Rotary drill to KOP (depending on how single lengths work out you may consider
kicking off a few meters high). Always try and start on a high kelly or at least
most of one.
7a. The First Single:
Work all rotary torque out of drill string and run a survey (make sure motorman
"flags" survey line). Keep an eye on whoever is running the survey line and make
sure that the survey tool does not get "spudded". Assuming the drillpipe is
between 4" and 5" OD and KOP is between 100 and 500 meters you will get 2045 degrees reactive torque (depending on the amount of weight that you carry).
Orient on a magnetic heading (assuming the hole is so far straight) which will be
the direction that you want to go (remember to correct for magnetic declination).
Turn the pipe to the right an additional 20-40 degrees to correct for reactive
torque (right should always be the same as rotary right and left should always be
rotary left or reverse). Lock table and work pipe. Chain out single and run a check
survey to insure you are going to drill in the right direction. If check shot was OK
scribe pipe with chalk (make sure to scribe a line under the tool joint or on the
"bottle neck" as this will prevent it being wiped off once the joint goes into the
hole). Now make another scribe that matches the one on the pipe on the side of
the kelly bushing (after making kelly back up but before pulling the slips). When
scribing pipe always try and be consistent in the way that you do it. For example:
some people always keep the scribe in the same spot and this is done by picking a
spot like the front of the pipe (facing out the v-door). Assume that the scribe is
facing out the v-door and you want to turn the pipe 30 degrees to the right. Make
a second scribe 30 degrees left of the first one (on the bushings) and then turn the
kelly 30 degrees right so the second scribe is now facing out the v-door, rub out
the first scribe and work the pipe. Pick the bushings out of the table and rub the
scribe on the pipe off and replace it with one that matches the new scribe on the
bushings. This way of orienting always insures that the scribe stays in the same
place. Once you are successfully oriented and all trapped torque is worked down
to the bit you are ready to drill. Drill the first single with light weight to insure
Computalog USA, Inc. This document contains Company proprietary information which is the confidential property of Computalog Drilling
Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

that an initial correct direction is established. Watch to see if there is any "slop"
between the bushings and the kelly, because you will have to correct for this (the
same goes for any play between bushings and table and in the rotary lock dogs).
At kelly down work the pipe once with the rotary off (if you work the pipe with
the pumps on be very careful that the bushings do not come out of the table
because if the bit touches anything with the bushings out or the table unlocked the
pipe will spin backwards at 300 RPM). When you are ready to make the
connection and the pipe is in the slips check to see if the scribe on the pipe has
been washed off. If it has been washed off replace it by using the scribe that will
still be on the bushings. Chain out the kelly and make the connection (leave the
pump off) .Now you have to carry the scribe from the old single all the way up the
single you just added to the string. The best way to do this is to pick a spot on the
underside of the bushings and keep your eye on it while they run the new single in
(try not to get squashed by the bushings). When the bushings get down to you
make a mark on the bottom of the bushings and pick the new single up again.
When you get to the old single you should be able to see if the original scribe
matches the mark on the bottom of the bushings. I fit does not then do it over
again until it does. After successfully carrying the scribe up the new single mark
under the tool joint of the new single and rub out the old scribe on the bushings.
Replace the old scribe on the bushings with one that matches the new one on the
drill pipe. Turn the bushings so the scribe is pointing back where it should be (it
should be OK unless the new single turned while running it in or the pipe turned
in slips). Chain out and run a survey. Assuming that your survey point is lets say
14 meters back of bit you will not see any angle on this survey (because you have
only drilled about 9.5 meters of hole) What you will see however is where your
toolface is pointing and this should be very close to the original setting that you
made (magnetic direction). If you get any toolface other than the one that you are
expecting you have a problem and you need to figure out what it is (and right
away). Assuming everything is as expected make the kelly back up. Double-check
to see if the pipe scribe still matches the scribe on the bushings. During the course
of drilling single shot wells sooner or later somebody will ask you to survey off
bottom (or before the connection) as versus surveying on bottom (or after the
connection), it is a bad idea to survey off bottom because you will be so far back
with your survey point that it will be difficult to get a good handle on what the
well is doing. The only good reason to survey off bottom is if you are having hole
trouble and a high risk of getting stuck exists.
7b. The Second Single:
Generally speaking you may be rotating this single down however this memo is
not going to tell anybody what to slide and what to rotate, what slides to make and
motor settings are a judgment call that are best made by the directional driller. In
any case lets assume you are going to rotate this single down. Kick in the rotary
and put more weight to it, as this is a good time to make hole and check how
much higher the differential pressure is.
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

7c. The Third Single:


At kelly down turn the scribe back to where it was before and work the pipe
(rotary off and pump on) to get to the torque out. Chain out and make the
connection. Then carry the scribe up the new single, turn it to face where you are
orienting to (probably the front) work the pipe (with the pump off) and chain out
the kelly. Run another survey. If you returned the pipe to the correct spot you
should already be very close to the correct direction (on the magnetic toolface and
in azimuth). When you look at the survey you should be seeing some build
because you have drilled about 19 meters and your survey point is about 14
meters back (you should of course know exactly how far your survey point is
because you have measured it). It is critical at this point to get the direction as
accurate as possible. It is much easier to correct direction at low angle than it is at
higher angle so now is the time to get it right. After reading the survey and
deciding what your build rate probably is and what correction you need to make
to your azimuth (at this point you have made your previous set at a magnetic
heading so if your azimuth is within 15 degrees of what it should be you are
probably alright). Decide how much you are going to slide on this single
(remember that there is no reason not to slide part of every single and rotate part
of every single). Some directional drillers always slide whole singles and then
rotate off singles until they get the build rate that they need (surveying every 2-4
singles). This is a very risky practice because you can get badly out of shape and
1 or put large doglegs in the well. It is a much better practice to make shorter
slides and survey every single. During the build section you should never go more
than 2 singles without surveying, and on the hold section you should not go more
than 3 singles. If you are good enough to single shot well after well with no
problems and never put higher than proposed doglegs in the well then you can
survey whenever you want (assuming its OK with the oil company), however if
you are not at this skill level then I would recommend surveying more often and
keeping very close track of what your well is doing.
After making the decision of what to set to make and drilling this single down you
will have drilled 3 singles. At this point you may have enough angle in the hole to
go to "high side" toolface. The sets that you have made previously have all been
magnetic heading orientations and once the well has established a direction and
angle (over 3 degrees inclination) you can use your toolface in a highside
orientation. This would mean that you read your inclination and azimuth as per
normal but your toolface now reads right or left of highside (top of the wellbore).
Make sure that you do not get screwed up when you make this mental switch.
Continue to try and carry your scribe line on every single. If you are doing this
correctly once you turn the pipe back so that the scribe is facing where you want it
(and worked the torque out) when you drop your survey it should confirm that the
motor is already oriented highside (or very close to it), this makes orienting and
keeping track of reactive torque much easier. Continue on drilling.
8. Watch your reactive torque closely as it will increase with depth and you must
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

constantly adjust for it.


9. Try to carry your scribe accurately and on every single as this will keep the motor
oriented right where it should be before you even surveyor make adjustments.
10. Change out your angle units often. If you are running a 12 change it out to a 20 as
soon as you think that you have 9 or 10 degrees on bottom. Change out a 20 for a
90 as soon as you think you have over 15 on bottom. Then make sure you swap
your 20 or 90 compasses back and forth with each other. If an angle unit sticks
and you do not catch it you will drill in the wrong direction (and these things do
stick).
11. If you get a survey that indicates that something may not be quite right downhole
change out the angle unit and resurvey. If this survey confirms the original one
take a few minutes and think it through, double check your slide sheet. Do not
continue drilling hoping that a problem will go away or fix itself, if the well is
going in the VTong direction or doing something else strange you must figure it
out before you make hole.
12. When in doubt trip it out.
13. Draw little pictures. When a person gets extremely tired simple mistakes happen.
It is possible to get turning right and turning left mixed up, a lot of people have
done it and almost none will admit to it. If in doubt about where the well is going
or what you are doing draw a picture.
14. Doglegs. What can I say except keep them down. If a well is proposed for a 2degree build rate you should not have doglegs over a 4. If a well is proposed for a
3-degree build rate you should have nothing much over a 5. Doglegs cause rod
wear in oil wells and cost oil companies big bucks.
15. The turning left dilemma. When orienting the pipe sometimes it is easier to turn it
left than right (for example it is easier to turn 45 left than 315 right). This is of
course is a little on the risky side because you can back off pipe in the hole. It is a
judgment call but I would suggest that you should not turn the pipe more than 45
degrees left without working it thoroughly I also would suggest that you should
probably not turn the pipe more than 90 degrees left ever. If you are not confidant
in your ability to turn the pipe left without backing it off then do not turn it left at
all.
16. Double-check or re-read all your surveys, preferably right after your set is started.
Sometimes if you are tired your eyes may play tricks on you so try to catch your
mistakes before you get in a bind.
17. Start drilling with a fairly lightweight and make sure you have the well on track
before you go for the "Run of the Week.
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

18. Do not hesitate to resurvey. If you have any doubt about an orientation, run a
check shot.
19. Insure that all rotary torque (after rotating pipe) is worked out of the string before
you orient (work the pipe as much as you need to) and then make sure when you
do orient that the torque from your orientation is worked down to bottom (or else
you will not be oriented correctly). This is the number one cause of problems on
single shot jobs and it gets worse the deeper you go.
20. Put a scribe line (that indicates the keyway alignment on the stinger) on the
running gear just below the snubber, then when you pull the survey tool all the
way out to check the "walter" or drywall plug you will see if the running gear has
backed off. When you grab the stinger after changing the "walter" give it a hard
twist as this may indicate if any spacer bars or the stinger has backed off.
21. Turning the pipe left (with no reverse). It is possible on some rigs to disengage the
motor clutch, engage the hoist clutch and engage the rotary clutch. If you have
enough hole under you it should be possible to "squeak" down the kelly and as a
result turn the rotary backwards. If both you and the driller on tower don't know
exactly what you are doing do not bother trying this.
22. If you are out of shape with the well or having trouble controlling the well start
surveying every single. Once you have the well back on track you can increase
the number of singles between surveys.
23. Stalls. If you are rotating a single and the motor stalls, pick it up to free the bit and
wait for the differential pressure to return to normal and then go back drilling. If
you are sliding a single and the motor stalls it gets a little trickier. The motor can
torque quite a bit to the left when it stalls (over 100 degrees) and the question
becomes if you work the pipe after a stall will all that torque come back out and is
your original toolface setting still OK. On deeper wells and holes with a lot of
drag or high doglegs it is possible that your toolface is not quite where it should
be even after working the pipe. It is up to the directional driller to decide if a resurvey and re-orient is needed or not.
24. If you are going to trip (for any reason) it is a good idea to survey before you pull
out. If you have not caught a survey for several singles and you are going to trip
you defiantly should run a survey.
25. Never trust a computer. The number one rule when using a computer to drill a
directional well is not to trust the computer. Do not believe that the information
you get from your to-target screen is necessarily correct (actually the information
probably is correct however the information may not be complete or it may not be
what you think it is). To prevent problems from occurring the best rule is
extrapolate, extrapolate and then extrapolate again. If there are two directional
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issued without written permission.

drillers on location it never hurts to run both computers so that you can both
check each others data.
25a Why we extrapolate:
Lets say you are drilling a standard directional well and you are using wellz or
HP48 gx. The planned terminal angle is 15 degrees and the PDD (proposed drift
direction) is azimuth 45 degrees. Lets also say that you have 150 meters to drill to
target TVD and that your inclination is 13 degrees and your azimuth is 40. You
pull up your target screen (or to-target) and it gives you data on inclination to left
side, right side, backside, front side and center it also gives you the same
information in regards to azimuth. You of course are low in inclination and on the
left side of the target in azimuth. Now is a good time to cover another basic
principal. If you are headed for the dead center of a lets say 10 meter radius target
then the closer that you get to the target the more it will "grow or open up around
you. As you get closer and closer to the target TVD the bigger and bigger the
target will become until when you are very close to the target it will become
impossible to miss, and this is good. However if you are outside the target radius
the exact opposite happens. The closer you get to the target TVD (assuming you
are still outside the target radius) the faster the target will appear to move away
from you, and as you get closer still to the target TVD the target will soon become
impossible to hit no matter what you do. This is very bad. And now back to our
directional well. You are still low and to the left of target. You pull up the totarget (a short note here: I did not bother to figure this example out on the
computer, the numbers are wrong, so do not bother checking out these numbers
instead use your own) and it says that you need azimuth 43 to the left side and 14
degrees inclination to the front. You still have 13 degrees inclination and azimuth
40. Not so bad you think I only need to turn right 3 degrees and build 1 degree
and life is good. Dead wrong. The to-target extrapolation is a straight-line
projection (it even says that) and it assumes that your well is going to
instantaneously build 1 degree and turn 3 degrees right. It does not take into
account that you will have to drill hole to turn and build (and therefore it is giving
you misleading information). It gets worse, when the to-target says you need a 43
azimuth to catch the left hand side of the target it is assuming that your inclination
is heading for dead center (lets say your target inclination to center in this case is
16 degrees). Therefore you would need an inclination of 16 degrees in order to
catch the left side of the target with an azimuth of 43. You of course have an
inclination of 13. What is happening here is that: 1) the to-target is not taking into
account that you have to drill up hole to turn and build and 2) that by giving you
left, right, front and back of target it is creating a "box" or square target and the
reality is most targets are circles and the corners of the" box" do not exist. To
make things still worse you are outside the target radius with 150 meters TVD to
drill and if you do not get inside that target radius as you drill ahead that target is
going to start " moving away" from you at an ever-increasing rate. The answer is
to extrapolate and find out where you are really going to be.
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

25b. How to extrapolate:


There are several ways to extrapolate ahead depending on the software. you are
using: you can use a project ahead function, you can use a project to bit function,
you can "cook" it in as fake survey station or you could import the survey file into
a planning program. I will use the "cooked" survey technique as an example.
When you extrapolate ahead you are initially only concerned with three numbers
(horizontal wells are a little different). They are inclination, azimuth and TVD.
You get your TVD by "cooking" in a measured depth that gives the TVD that you
are looking for (usually target TVD). Lets use the last example over again, you
had 13 degrees of inclination and the to-target said you only needed 14 degrees to
the front side, you had an azimuth of 40 and the to-target said you only needed 43
to the left side. So you only need to build 1 degree and turn 3 degrees right.
Create a survey station lets say 20 meters deeper than your last survey and include
1-degree build and 3 degrees right turn. If the dogleg is acceptable and you are
confidant that you can build 1 degree and turn 3 degrees right in 20 meters (and
you should be) fake in a second survey station. This one will be a straight hold of
14 degrees inclination and azimuth 43 all the way to target TVD. Put in a
measured depth that will get you close to the TVD that you are looking for, in this
case try adding about 140 meters to your existing depth. The resulting survey
station will give you a TVD that is either slightly higher or lower than what you
are looking for. Delete the last station and adjust the measured depth to give a
more accurate TVD. This is kind of a pain but you should be able to get the
correct TVD fairly quickly. Once you have the correct TVD in for your survey
station the numbers you are interested in are your rectangular coordinates,
compare them to the target coordinates. You have a 10 meter radius target so you
should be able to see if your extrapolated coordinates are within 10 meters of the
given target coordinates. If not than you will miss the target by following this
plan. Delete the two " cooked" survey stations. Call up your to-target screen again
and find out what it says you need to target center. Create another survey station
with an achievable build and turn rate to the bearing and inclination that you need
to target center. Then re-extrapolate again to your given target TVD. Compare
your rectangular coordinates with the given target coordinates. In theory they
should be identical but they probably will not be because of the "straight line
projection" error we covered earlier. Delete the two "cooked" surveys again. Try
and figure out a plan with an achievable build rate and turn rate that hits the dead
center of your target. It should compare realistically with your to-target projection
(not the same but realistically close). In the past directional drillers (not with
Phoenix) have got out of shape and been drilling along trying to catch up to the
line when a simple extrapolation showed that it was impossible to hit the target
from where they were. This is unbelievably stupid and of course everybody else
(other directional companies) had a great laugh about it. There is no excuse for
not extrapolating ahead and knowing exactly what you need to hit the target from
where you are, anybody that cannot do this probably should not be directional
drilling. On horizontal wells it is even more critical to extrapolate ahead. I realize
that this memo is about single-shots however there are some areas of common
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issued without written permission.

ground. On a horizontal well you are not concerned with bearings and inclinations
to the left and right of the target. What you are concerned about is drilling a curve
down a fixed azimuth. If you get slightly ahead of the curve and correct it you
will still probably be slightly long in section. If you get behind the curve and
correct it you probably will still be short in section. Section and TVD at the
landing area (generally 90 degrees) are usually critical (on most horizontal wells
errors of more than I meter in TVD are considered a big deal and on some wells
errors of 1 meter or more in section are unacceptable). For this reason it is critical
to constantly extrapolate ahead while drilling, in fact you should have several
different scenarios constantly extrapolated ahead.
26. The tugger is your friend. On some drilling rigs there appear to only be about 6
notches for the rotary lock dogs to catch (and sometimes these keep popping out),
and sometimes you may want turn the table slightly to the left (and the rig has no
reverse). Take a chain and rap it several times around the bottom of the front aleg, attach a snatch block to the chain (like the one used to rack back the kelly),
run the tugger line through the snatch block sheave, make at least two complete
wraps around the bushings with the tugger line and then attach the hook end to the
bushings with a clevice. Unlock the table and adjust your orientation with the
tugger. This contraption is a pain on connections but it is the most accurate way to
orient.
27. How an angle unit works. First we will use a 12-degree or a 20-degree compass as
an example. The angle unit (or compass) consists of a tube filled with oil and it
has a compass card that is free to spin mounted inside it. Hanging above the card
is a tiny plumb bob that is hanging on a tiny wire. The compass card has the
standard directions and graduations that most compasses have printed around the
circumference. It also has a series of concentric circles (like a target) starting in
the center and moving out to the edge. These are used in conjunction with the
plumb bob to show inclination (or deflection). Direction is read by aligning the
plumb bob reading with the compass headings printed along the circumference of
the card. The only other reading to be made is toolface; this is a fixed mark (or
line) inside the angle unit tube that indicates where the motor is pointed (or
highside). If you think about it you will realize that a plumb bob always points
straight down and the concentric circles that indicate inclination are showing the
inclination of the bottom of the well bore. This means two things: 1) That even
though on a single shot job you are probably building angle fairly steadily the
little plumb bob is reading the angle of deflection at the bottom of the well bore
(or the angle of the low side of the hole) and: 2) The compass card is really
reversed (north is south and east is west). This sounds confusing but it has to work
this way. Lets say we have an oil well with 20 degrees inclination going due
north. You stand at the well head facing north with a normal compass in your
hand, in your other hand you hold a plumb bob with the tip right on dead center of
the compass card. Tip the front of the compass (the part reading north) up by 20
degrees to simulate the well bore. The plumb bob will be over due south. If this
were a single-shot compass you would be reading 180 degrees out in direction. So
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they reversed the directions on the single-shot compass. Stand at the wellhead
with a single-shot compass in your hand and tilt up the bottom of the compass by
20 degrees in a north direction to simulate the well bore. The plumb bob reads 20
degrees inclination in a north direction (the opposite of a normal compass). If this
ever confuses you take a known direction (lets say north) and tip the bottom end
of a single shot compass up (towards north) to simulate building angle north. If
you look down into the compass the plumb bob should be over a north direction,
if you are holding the compass the same way that it will be oriented by the
snubber and stinger than the high side marker line will also be at north. A 90degree compass works pretty much the same way, however instead of a compass
card it has a thing like a little black marble with the compass directions printed on
it. It is on gimbals so that it can spin and turn at the same time. Inclination is read
off a little strip or bar that hovers over the marble.
28. Toolface. There is a possibility of sometimes getting toolfaces mixed up on a
single shot job. The problem is with the survey readers each kit comes with. Some
readers have left on one side and right on the other, a different type of reader may
be reversed. Some readers want hole direction at the top and others at the bottom,
and of course it makes a difference if you flip the disk over. With all the flipping
and turning going on once in a while confusion sets in. The solution is to keep
track of what is going on down hole in your mind. Keep track of how direction
works: starting from due north and moving east you are turning right (rotary
right). If you start due north and move to the west you are turning left. Now lets
take a hypothetical single shot picture and read it. Lets say the inclination is 20
degrees and the direction is N45E (corrected). Lets also say that the direction you
want to go is N40E, and you are confused about the toolface. The first thing to
recognize is that you physically want to turn this well 5 degrees to the left (rotary
left). The only way to do this is to put the toolface (or where the motor is pointed)
on the left hand side of highside (if you want straight left turn you could orient at
75-85 degrees left and if you want turn and build you could orient anywhere
between 20 and 65 left, keep in mind you must also adjust for reactive torque).
Now lets look at the toolface, find the little toolface line on the survey and ignore
the graduated right left marks on the reader. Compare where the toolface direction
is to the survey direction. For example lets say the toolface direction looks like it
is at S40E or so. This is approximately 95 degrees right of hole direction (or
highside). Now read the toolface using the little graduated marks on the reader, if
it says something like 100 degrees left then you know you have a problem with
the reader (or more) likely the way you are using it). This is a good way to insure
that you are using the reader correctly.
29. Magnetic declination. Magdec is the difference in the direction between magnetic
north and true north. True north never moves but magnetic north moves around a
little bit from year to year. Make sure that you always correct for the difference
with a correct magnetic declination and be careful to check that any data that you
receive has not already been corrected or corrected with a different declination
than you are using.
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

30. Azimuth and quadrant. Azimuth is a way of measuring direction by describing a


360-degree circle to the right. N89E is azimuth 89, due S is 180, S89W is 269 and
due N can be 0 or 360. Quadrant divides the 360-degree circle up into four equal
sections of 90 degrees. The four quadrants are NE, SE, SW and NW. See above.
31. Correcting for magdec. The correction for declination is always applied to the
right Gust like azimuth always turns right). If you are applying a declination to a
quadrant direction it works like this, in the NE quadrant add the declination, in the
SE quadrant subtract the declination, in the SW quadrant add the declination and
in the NW quadrant subtract the declination. All you have to remember is that
adding declination will always turn the direction slightly to the right (in the
northern hemisphere).
32. Magnetic heading and highside. This applies to both MWD systems and single
shot survey equipment. When a hole is perfectly straight (vertical) it cannot have
a direction. Most straight holes do however have a slight amount of angle in them.
Generally when a straight hole is drilled it slowly corkscrews to the right and hole
angle will vary between 0 and 1.5 degrees. We tend to assume that a hole like this
for practical purposes has no direction. Now obviously a hole with no direction
cannot have a high side (or top of hole) so we cannot orient with a high side
heading. On a single shot job we would then have to orient by magnetic heading
(in other words we start drilling in the direction we want to go), this is done by
putting the toolface indicator mark on the direction you want to go (after
correcting for declination and reactive torque). Once you have an established hole
direction (say over 3 degrees in the proposed direction) you can mentally switch
over and use the toolface indicator as "highside". On an MWD job it works a little
differently. The MWD tool is preprogrammed to switch over from magnetic
heading to "highside" toolface at a fixed inclination (usually between 2.5 and 3
degrees). Make sure you discuss this with the MWD operator and know exactly
when the MWD tool "crosses over"; if you do not and the tool changes over in the
middle of a slide you could end up drilling in the wrong direction. It should be
mentioned here that if you ever have to hold angle at about 3 degrees with MWD
in the hole it can turn into a nightmare with the tool constantly flipping back and
forth from magnetic heading to "highside" heading.
Study obscure far eastern religious books and become one with the well.
33. Reaming and circulating. If the oil company wants to circulate on bottom you will
probably wash out the hole and lose your build rate if you sit there long enough.
Try to talk the oil company representative into letting you pick it up a few meters
instead. If they want to circulate with no pipe rotation then make sure that the
motor is pointed towards highside. If they want to circulate and rotate the pipe (a
good practice) insure that the driller works the pipe every few minutes and moves
the drill string to slightly different spots (but try not to work the pipe or circulate
in the bottom few meters of the hole), as this will prevent ledges from being
formed. When reaming in the hole great care must be taken not to sidetrack the
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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

10

well bore. As long as you ream into the hole faster than the formation will drill
you have very little chance of sidetracking. F or example if the area you are
reaming drilled at 5 min/meter and you are reaming in at 1 min/meter there is very
little chance of a sidetrack. If however the area you are reaming is slowing down
and getting closer to the original ROP (and is taking increasingly more weight)
you may be developing a problem. You may have to check your slide sheet and
surveys to decide if you should be reaming oriented or not.
34. Be nice to the rig hands (in fact be nice to everybody on location). On single shot
jobs if you do not plan to stand on the rig floor for the duration of the entire well
you had better make sure that those drillers are your buddies.
35. There is no "right way" to drill a well and this outline is simply intended to
provide some ideas about directional drilling. It is assumed that most people who
read this will already know just about everything written here. If that is the case
then just chuck this in the garbage. The intention of writing this was for the
people who might be able to find a little useful info here or maybe clear up
something they were not certain about. In any case it is not suggested that you
change the way you drill wells if you already have a successful method of singleshot.

Computalog USA, Inc. This document contains Company proprietary information which is the confidential property of Computalog Drilling
Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

11

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Services and shall not be copied, reproduced, disclosed to others, or used in whole or in part for any other purpose or reason except for the one it was
issued without written permission.

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Quick Start Guide

FIRST
V4.00

Prepared For: Computalog Drilling Services Ltd.

By: Pangaea Systems Inc.

Quick Start Guide

Contents - i

Contents
Overview

About First............................................................................................................ 5

Getting Started

Quick View ........................................................................................................... 6

Using FIRST

Creating A New Job.............................................................................................. 7

Entering Data

General Tab ......................................................................................................... 8


Contents..................................................................................................................................... 8
Wellsite Info / Personnel.......................................................................................................... 8
Wellsite Info / Personnel contd.................................................................................. 9
Surface Info/ Wellbore Sections............................................................................................. 9
Hole Planning / Planned Targets .........................................................................................10
General Notes .........................................................................................................................10

Rig Data Section................................................................................................. 10


Contents...................................................................................................................................10
Rig Tools Inventory................................................................................................................11
Rig Bits .....................................................................................................................................11
Rig Pumps ...............................................................................................................................12

Inventory Section ................................................................................................ 12


Contents...................................................................................................................................12
Directional Tools .....................................................................................................................13
MWD Tools..............................................................................................................................13
Motors ......................................................................................................................................14
Other Inventory.......................................................................................................................14
Inventory Notes.......................................................................................................................14

BHA Section....................................................................................................... 15
Contents...................................................................................................................................15
BHA Information Part 1 ......................................................................................................15
BHA Information Part 1 contd..............................................................................16
BHA Information Part 2 ......................................................................................................16

Daily Section ...................................................................................................... 17


Contents...................................................................................................................................17
Daily Information Part 1......................................................................................................17
Daily Information Part 1 contd.. ...............................................................................18
Daily Information Part 2......................................................................................................18
Daily Information Part 3......................................................................................................19

Costs Section ..................................................................................................... 20


Contents...................................................................................................................................20
Segment Costs Detail............................................................................................................20

Logs Section ...................................................................................................... 22


Contents...................................................................................................................................22
Additional Job Charges .........................................................................................................22
Usage Control.........................................................................................................................23
Incidents Log...........................................................................................................................24
Tool Transfer Log...................................................................................................................24
Tool Transfer Log Contd..........................................................................................25
Quick Start Guide

Contents - ii

Surveys Log ............................................................................................................................25

Menus ................................................................................................................ 26
File............................................................................................................................................26
File Import ............................................................................................................................26
File Import contd.................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.
File Export ............................................................................................................................28
Edit............................................................................................................................................28
Section.....................................................................................................................................28
Page .........................................................................................................................................28
Reports.....................................................................................................................................28
Tools .........................................................................................................................................28
View..........................................................................................................................................29
Help ..........................................................................................................................................29

Navigational Bar ................................................................................................. 30


Reports .............................................................................................................. 31
Inventory List...........................................................................................................................31
Detailed BHA...........................................................................................................................31
Doghouse BHA.......................................................................................................................31
Slide Sheet..............................................................................................................................31
Motor Evaluation.....................................................................................................................31
Daily Activity............................................................................................................................31
Daily Costs ..............................................................................................................................31
Job Costs Sheet.....................................................................................................................31
Cost Summary........................................................................................................................32
Usage Control.........................................................................................................................32
Tool Transfer Ticket...............................................................................................................32
Consolidated Tool Transfer..................................................................................................32
Incident Report........................................................................................................................32
Terms & Conditions................................................................................................................32
BHA Worksheet......................................................................................................................32
Slides Worksheet....................................................................................................................32

Lookup Lists....................................................................................................... 33

Glossary of Terms

Quick Start Guide

37

Contents - iii

Overview
About First
The Field Reporting System (FIRST ) is an application to track and maintain data collected at drilling
rig sites. FIRST allows you to store, maintain and retrieve information about drilling jobs without the
need for repetitive, time consuming paperwork when you are in the field.
In addition to saving time by entering data only once, FIRST allows you to retrieve and re-use
previously entered data, transfer drill site info and reports, and offers safer storage of crucial
information. All this can be done quickly and easily.
FIRST was designed with you in mind. Resembling a typical notebook or daytimer, using the
application will seem familiar even if its your first time.

Quick Start Guide

Overview - 5

Getting Started
Quick View
FIRSTs tabbed sections make it easy to record rig site information. Within each section there is a
contents or selection page, followed by the pages of recorded information. Simply point your
mouse to an item and left click to quickly access a different section or page. (See Glossary for
additional Tab Information)
Main Menu Bar
Tool Bar

General Tab

Rig Data Tab

Inventory Tab

BHA Tab
Navigational Bar

Daily Tab

Job Costs Tab

Reports Palette

Quick Start Guide

Logs Tab

Getting Started - 6

Using FIRST
Creating A New Job
Creating a new jobfile is a simple process. Just follow these instructions:
?
?
?

Double Click on the FIRST icon that appears on your desktop. (FIRST will open to the
last jobfile used as a default.)
Using your mouse, go to the Main Menu Bar, Click on File ->New. A New Job File
window will open. Defaults for the Job Number, Start Date and End Date are already
entered.
Enter the File No. (2 optional alpha characters base code followed by 4 or 5 digits)
and the start date of the job. Enter a date for the end of the job. This can be changed
throughout the course of the job, so that the last day of the job is the final date in the
paperwork. Click OK.

FIRST will prepare the files and database ready for you to enter the job data.

Ensure units are consistent with the country you are in. If you need to change, go to
Tools -> Job Options on the main menu bar.

Quick Start Guide

Using FIRST - 7

Entering Data
General Tab
Contents
The first page in the General Tab lists the contents of the general section. When your mouse is
moved over a selection, the selection highlights. When your selection is highlighted, simply left click
to jump to your selection. You can also quickly turn to the next page by clicking the mouse on the
Page Turn symbol at the bottom corners.

Page Turn Symbol

Wellsite Info / Personnel


The Job File No., Job Start/End dates that you entered on the Create New Job File screen will
appear on the General Wellsite Info page. As you move your mouse around the page, editable
fields will be outlined with a red box. Down Arrows and the Magnifying Glass indicate a drop down
list allowing you to select an entry for the field.

If an appropriate selection does not exist, edit the box to reflect the appropriate data.
Fill in the Wellsite information sections for File Numbers, Well Info and Rig with the information
provided to you by the company.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 8

Wellsite Info / Personnel contd.


Page G 3 is used to set up a contacts list. Using the drop down lists, select the Company Name
(default is Computalog Drilling Services Ltd.), and then select the correct Phone and Fax numbers.
Type in the Sales Rep name from the information provided to you.
To add a new person to the Personnel List, click on the + sign. In the Personnel Info, New
Contact will appear. The Personnel Info can be edited with the persons correct information.
Ensure that all required information on the Company Man, Directional Supervisor and MWD
Supervisor is entered. It is suggested that you include any other personnel that you have contact
with as well. A drop down list with job descriptions is provided for easy entry (Please do not change
the spelling of the descriptions). Once a person is entered, he can be deleted using the symbol. It
is possible to browse through the personnel detail records by clicking on each Person in the
Personnel List with the mouse or by clicking a Person and then using the computer keyboard up
and down arrows.
Note the order the personnel appear in the Personnel list determines the order in which they are
printed in the reports. This ordering can be changed by selecting a person and using the up and
down arrows appearing at the bottom of the Personnel List.

Surface Info/ Wellbore Sections


Fill in all geographical and geomagnetic information on page G-4. When data must

be entered in a specific manner, hints are provided in italics or light blue letters.
Selection information in the drop-down boxes can be edited if no appropriate selections are offered.
AFE, PO, WO number spaces are provided. Not all jobs will have a number for each of these
spaces, but all jobs will have at least one of them. This can be obtained from the onsite Oil
Company Representative.
To start filling in the required Wellbore section information, click on the + sign to add new section
information. Again, where data must be entered in a specific manner, hints are provided in light
blue or gray printing.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 9

Hole Planning / Planned Targets

Fill in the Planned Well Details and Survey Details on page G-6 by following the hints provided in
light gray text. Some fields also have drop down lists to choose from.
To enter Target Info (Planned), click on the + sign to add new targets. After entering Target Info will
appear in the Target List (Planned) at the top of page G 7. Remember to enter the information in
the format shown by the light gray hint text.

General Notes
Use this section for any relevant job site details, changes etc. daily. This will print on the Job
Overview report.
There should be a brief summary entered every day in this report.

Rig Data Section


Contents
The first page in the Rig Data Tab lists the contents of the section. When your mouse is moved over
a selection, the selection highlights. When your selection is highlighted, simply left click to jump to
your selection. You can also quickly turn to the next page by using the Page Turn symbol at the
bottom corner.

Page Turn Symbol

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 10

Rig Tools Inventory

Use this section to add all rig tools (tools supplied by drilling contractor or Oil Company) that will be
used on the job. Simply click on the + sign to add a tool. This will activate the fields on the page R
3. Light gray text will indicate how to enter required fields. Make sure you enter all tools as they
are included in BHAs. Once you have entered the rig tools, the information will be available in
lookup lists in other sections of FIRST . Once an inventory item is used in a BHA, you cannot delete
it from the inventory until you have removed it from the BHA. You may however modify the data
fields for the item the item will still be connected to the BHA.
In the Component field you can select a component from the items in the drop down list or type
one in if an item doesnt appear in the list. It is recommended to use the selection supplied
whenever possible. This will standardize the data, allowing effective database searches when your
job file is merged with the central database.
Note the length field is just an average length when rig tools are added to the BHA later, the total
length of a group of drill pipe for example must be manually entered.

Rig Bits

Pages R 4 and R 5 allow you to add bits to the rig bit list. Click on the + sign to add bits.
Include the serial number to make it easier to identify the bit later. Bit information will be referenced
by the BHA and Daily reports.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 11

Rig Pumps

Click on the + sign to add rig pumps to the rig pump list. It is important to fill in the stroke length so
the flow rate can be calculated in the Daily Section. The order that the pumps appear in the list will
be the same order that is used on the Daily page where the flow rates are calculated.
Pump efficiency will alter the flow rate calculated by the program.

Inventory Section
Contents

Page Turn Symbol

The first page in the Inventory Section Tab lists the contents of the section. When your mouse is
moved over a selection, the selection highlights. Simply left click on the highlighted selection to
jump to your selection. You can also quickly turn to the next page by using the Page Turn symbol
at the bottom corner.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 12

Directional Tools

Directional inventory is added to the Directional Tools list. Fill in all details that apply, including
length, as it is used in BHA length calculations. This includes all tubulars that may need to be
tracked in a BHA
Leave Product Code blank unless you have the code used by your office for each item.
Original Field Date is the date the item was shipped to a job from the base.
Job Receive Date is the date the item was shipped to location or the day the job started. If on a
multi-well project, the original Field Date should stay the same for all wells until the tool is shipped
elsewhere or the project ends. The Job Receive Date should reflect the start date of the current
well, or the date the item was shipped to the current well.
Job Depart Date is the date the tool was transferred from location to base or another job this field
is read-only on this form since it is set to the Transfer Ticket Date in the LOGS Tool Transfer.
**NOTE Include MWD tubulars if they are part of the BHA items and are to be tracked
automatically in the usage chart.

MWD Tools

Click on the + sign to add MWD inventory to the MWD Tools list. Only include tools that are not
tracked in the BHA components list (i.e. non-tubular MWD tools). MWD Tools in this list are
manually tracked in the usage grid. (Batteries). Not all fields may apply here.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 13

Motors

Click on the + sign to add Motors inventory to the Motors list. Motor information is referenced by
the BHA and Daily reports.

Other Inventory

Click on the + sign to add items to the list that do not fit into other categories. Use the drop-down
lists as much as possible.

Inventory Notes

Use this page to record notes regarding inventory issues. For example, you may note that certain
tools were sent to another job site, lost or damaged items. The notes will print out on the inventory
report.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 14

BHA Section
Contents
Add or Delete BHA

Change BHA Name


Move Up
or Down
in List

Go to BHA Symbol
Page Turn Symbol

BHA Section Contents lists the BHAs. Add a BHA by using the + sign. You may also right click
your mouse and select Add BHA from the menu or by pressing the Insert button on your keyboard
while your cursor is in the list. Delete a BHA by selecting a BHA and then using the sign, or
pressing the Delete key on your keyboard. If the BHA is referenced in the Daily Activities section,
you will not be able to delete it until all references to it have been removed from the Daily Activities
section.
Navigating to listed BHAs is simple. You can use the arrows to move up and down in the list.
When you have made your selection either double left click your mouse key, press the Go to BHA
symbol or use the Page Turn symbol to move page by page.

BHA Information Part 1

Refresh symbol
ZOOM symbol

Clone symbol
Edit
Component

Use the left side of the page to add Components from the inventories into the BHA. Click the +
sign to open the Edit Component screen. To open a larger selection screen, simply click the
ZOOM symbol. Pressing the Clone symbol will allow you to copy the Components list from another
BHA in the job into the current BHA.
Note when cloning, the current BHA component list will be completely overwritten with the cloned
BHA component list. Once the component list has been cloned it is possible to make additions or
changes in the current BHA component list.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 15

BHA Information Part 1 contd.


Edit Component
Screen

Zoom Screen

Select a Source from the list box selections, then select a component from the Component list box
and click OK.
Enter your bit usage and motor usage information on the right-hand page. Motor comments will
appear on the motor evaluation report along with other automatically gathered information. You
may enter up to 4 bit nozzle sizes. Flow areas for the nozzles and total combined flow area will be
automatically calculated. If there are more than 4 nozzles or there are no actual nozzles on the bit,
a manually entered TFA can be used. If this is the case, make sure that the other nozzle diameters
are set to 0. Also ensure that the manual TFA data field is 0 if the data fields for individual nozzles
are used.

BHA Information Part 2

Enter BHA parameters on the left-hand page. Start/end dates and depths are automatically
obtained from the Daily Activities entries, where depths and BHA numbers are assigned to each
activity. Angle in and angle out values are pulled from the slide sheet record.
On the right page, add slide sheet information to the list box. You can add slide records by using
the + sign, or you can open a zoom window with the Zoom button. You only need to enter your
single length, bit depth, and slide meters; the rest will be calculated. If you enter a single length of
0.0, then you can enter a non-contiguous bit depth (i.e. it does not continue directly from where the
previous record finished rotating). Otherwise, when the numbers recalculate, the bit depths are
adjusted to be equal to the last rotate to depth plus the single length

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 16

Daily Section
Contents

Set Job Start/Set Job End buttons

The calendar on this page shows the dates for the job in green. Double-click on a date to jump to
the relevant page, or use the Go to Date button. The date range for the job can be changed by
selecting the desired date and then using the Set Job Start/Set Job End buttons or using the
menu items in the right-click menu. When this is done, it will change the start/end days in the
general section as well, but will not change the cost segment dates.

Daily Information Part 1

Add daily activities on the left-hand page. You may use the + sign for the Edit Activity Item or the
Zoom (Daily Activities List) screen shown below, for this task.
Edit Activity
Item Screen
Zoom Screen

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 17

Daily Information Part 1 contd..


For the first day of the job, there is a data field for the starting depth (Depth In On First Day) at the
top of the page. The Work Status drop-down determines an Operating or Standby day. This field
must be filled in for proper meterage calculations. Double-clicking on a list item, or using the Edit
button or the Edit menu item on the right-click menu can edit activity items. Adding and deleting
follows the standard methods. For more detail in adding activities, use the Zoom button or the
Zoom right-click menu item. This opens a large window with pre-defined activity codes on the left
and an enlarged view of the activities list box on the right. Working in this screen is very similar to
working in the BHA zoom screen.
Activities are categorized into Circulating, Drilling, MWD, Tripping, Rig and Other. Use the activities
that are provided. You cannot add new activities to the lists. The existing activities are coded as to
the type of hours associated with the activity (i.e. motor drilling hours, rotary drilling hours etc.).
Each activity can only be associated with one type of hours, so split up combined periods from the
tour sheets into separate activities.
Make sure you include the correct BHA number and depth in each activity. Meterage for the day
and for each BHA is calculated from the depths entered. When starting a sidetrack, enter the depth
for the sidetrack and click the box set new start depth in the bottom left corner of the Edit Activity
Item box. This will ensure the proper meterage calculations for the sidetrack. The total meterage
for the day will show the sum of the meters made before the sidetrack and since the sidetrack. Do
not leave a depth blank; it will be interpreted as a zero depth and throw off calculations. Also, do
not leave the BHA number blank during a series of entries. It can only be blank between BHAs and
ensure the BHA numbers are contiguous (no gaps and do not alternate i.e. 1,2,1,1). This will cause
unpredictable results in the calculated hours and meterage.
Fill in other daily parameters on the right-hand side.

Daily Information Part 2

On the left page, enter the daily mud information.


Liquid Type/Rate, Gas Type/Rate are for UBD applications only and can be left blank when this
does not apply.
On the right page, flow rates and pressures are recorded. You can enter the SPM and liner size for
up to three pumps. The order of the pumps is the order that is shown in the list box on the Rig
Pumps page. The flow rates will be calculated automatically.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 18

Daily Information Part 3


New Page
Personnel On Site

Zoom symbol

Clone symbol

Add daily Personnel On Site on the left-hand page. You may use the + sign for the Edit
Personnel On Site , the Zoom (Personnel On Site List) screen shown below, or the Clone for this
task. Clone allows you to copy the Personnel On Site List from another day in the job to the
currently selected day. Cloning the personnel list from another day with the same list is a short cut
method of entering the personnel list. Once the list has been cloned it may be edited for any
additions or changes.
Note when cloning, the current Personnel On Site list will be completely overwritten with the
cloned daily personnel list. It is recommended therefore, clone the desired daily personnel list
before making any changes.

Zoom Screen

Edit Personnel On Site


Screen

When adding personnel to the current day using either the Zoom or the Edit Personnel On Site
you will be required to specify the personnel Work Type (Field, Standby, Training or Travel). This
designation is independent of the daily Work Status in Daily Information Part 1.
Enter any comments on the right page, they will appear in the Daily Activities report.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 19

Costs Section
Contents

Change Segment
Name

The Contents page list of Job Cost Segments. Using the + sign allows you to add a new segment,
the sign is used to delete, clicking on the Go symbol will take you to the highlighted segment. It is
possible to change the name of an existing segment with Change Segment Name activity.

Segment Costs Detail

The Costs in this Segment page (page C-2) allows you to move up and down, add, delete, edit,
refresh and clone segment. Clicking on the plus sign or the Zoom symbol will bring up the
Segment Costs List allowing you to select the itemized costs for the segment.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 20

On the Segment Costs List screen, the tabs at the bottom left of the screen allow you to pick cost

Segment Costs
List Screen

items from different areas of FIRST Price Book, Inventory Items and Additional Charges (see
Logs Section Additional Job Charges for entering items that will appear in this Additional
Charges list).
If you need to change the unit price of a selected item (i.e. if you need to charge for motor hours),
from the Segment Costs List screen double click on the item or from the Costs in this Segment
list double click the item or select the item and press the Edit Item symbol to edit the cost. Select
the Override Price and UOM for this item and enter the cost.
The Segment Costs page (page C-3) shows the segment costs by day. This is a small grid
showing the quantities for each cost item for each day, along with daily cost totals and job totals for
each cost item. Double-clicking in the grid on a cell or pressing the Edit Amount symbol while a
cell is selected will put the cell into edit mode so that you can change the quantity charged for the
selected item for that day. The quantities for inventory items are not automatically calculated, in
case there are special arrangements regarding the billing for the items so, make sure that you set
the quantities for each inventory item that is charged, for each day as required. Pressing the Zoom
symbol on this page will bring up a larger version of the Segment Costs grid.

Segment Costs
Zoom Screen

Edit Amount
symbol

Editing the quantities on this screen are the same as on the smaller Segment Costs grid page.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 21

Logs Section
Contents

Page Turn Symbol

The first page in the Logs Section Tab lists the contents of the section. When your mouse is moved
over a selection, the selection highlights. Simply left click on the highlighted selection to jump to
your selection. You can also quickly turn to the next page by using the Page Turn symbol at the
bottom corner.

Additional Job Charges

Items not appearing in the Inventory or the Price Book but are charged to the job will be entered
here. These items will show up on the Additional Charges tab of the Segment Costs List edit
screen. Press the + sign to add an item. Use the Product Code 999999 for items that do not have
an assigned code.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 22

Usage Control

Sort symbol

Toggle Value
symbol

The Usage Items list on the right-hand page shows all the personnel and inventory items on the
job, followed by the total days that each is used over the length of the job if they are not used the
Days will total 0 (zero). If the list is not ordered the way you like, it can be reordered using the up
and down arrows to move or the mouse to drag and drop individual items up and down in the list.
Pressing the Sort symbol will sort the entire list so the alphabetized personnel appear at the top
and the alphabetized inventory appears at the bottom. Sorting items in the Usage Items list affects
the ordering in the Usage Control grid.
The Usage Control grid on the left-hand page shows the specific days that each item in the Usage
Items list is used on the job. Cells with a 1 indicate the item was used on the job for that day. For
most of the items appearing in this grid, the usage is determined automatically by FIRST based on
the entries in Daily Personnel list and the BHA Components list(s). The usage for inventory
items such as Lift Subs, Pickup Subs, Survey Kits, Single/Multi-shot survey tools, Tool Baskets and
MWD tools, items that do not make up part of the external BHA components, cannot be
automatically determined. The descriptions for these items are presented in blue, indicating the
usage for that item can be toggled off and on manually. To toggle these items for a specific day
double-click the appropriate cell or select the cell and then press the Toggle Value symbol.
Pressing the Zoom symbol on this page will bring up a larger version of the Usage Control grid.

Usage Control
Zoom Screen

In the Usage Control zoom screen it is possible to toggle the adjustable cells by double-clicking on
the appropriate cell.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 23

Incidents Log

Incidents or problems that arise on the job are entered here. Press the + sign at the bottom of the
Incidents list to add an item. It is important to complete as much of the Incident Details
information and summaries as possible.

Tool Transfer Log


New Page
Tool Transfer Log

Change Ticket
Number symbol

Tools that are transferred from the current job to another job or back to the base are entered here.
Tool Transfer Tickets are created on the left-hand page. You may use the + sign at the bottom of
the Transfer Tickets list to create new tickets. The ticket number is generated automatically, but it
is possible to either specify a different number when the ticket is created or after ticket creation by
pressing the Change Ticket Number symbol. The Destination Details, Shipping Details and
Transfer Comments (if any) make up the cover information for the Transfer Ticket, therefore tools
on a Ticket may only go to one destination. Note the ticket transfer date that is specified here is
the date will appear in Job Depart Date field for all inventory items included on the ticket. Transfer
Tickets for tools returning to the base should be specified by selecting RETURN TO BASE from
the Well Name drop-down list. For Tickets going to other jobs the Well Name selection information
in the drop-down box can be edited to allow entry the appropriate information.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 24

Tool Transfer Log Contd.


On the left-hand page, you may use the + sign for the Edit Transfer Item, or the Zoom (Transfer
Items List) shown below, to add Transfer Items, tools, to the ticket. Use the sign to remove tools
from a ticket. Note - removing a tool item from a ticket also clears its inventory Job Depart Date .
FIRST does not allow a tool to be transferred on two tickets. In the Transfer Items List zoom
Transfer Items
List Zoom Screen

Edit Transfer
Items Screen

screen, items appearing in the Inventory Selections list on the left with a gray background are
items that already appear on a transfer ticket. The Edit Transfer Items screen does not display
items that have already been transferred.

Surveys Log
This section is not currently available.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 25

Menus
File
This sub menu allows you to perform FIRST job related actions. It includes New, Open, Save,
Save a Copy to Floppy Disk, Import, Export, and Exit. By default FIRST will save and open job
files in the c:\first4\jobfiles directory. Job files will have a JOB file extension.
The explanation of New is covered in Using FIRST Creating a New Job above. Aside from
Import and Export (explained below), the other menu items are self-explanatory.

File Import
The import FIRST Job File menu item allows you to import job data from another job file.
Importing information from another Job file can greatly reduce the amount of import required to start
a new job. Importing from another job file is intended for use with newly created job files only,
as previously existing data in several areas are replaced and in some it is discarded. Data is
replaced in:
General Section: Client, Field, Prov/State, Country, Rig Name, Rig Number, Service Co., Service
Type and all Personnel records
Rig Section: Tools, Bits, Pumps
Inventory: DIR Tools, MWD Tools, Motors, Other Tools
Segments: Segments, Segment Costs, but not daily charges
Logs: Additional Job Charges
All the data above is replaced even though you may not choose any inventory items to import. Data
is discarded in:
BHA: BHAs, BHA Components, BHA Slides
Daily: BHA field in Daily Activity lines
When you use the import FIRST Job File to open a job file the Select Inventory Items to Carry
Forward From Previous Job screen is displayed. Select the tools you want to import by checking

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 26

the box beside each item, either individually or with the Select All button. All the imported items will
have the inventory Job Receive Date set to the Receive Date entered on this screen.
By default the current date will be used as the Receive Date however it is adjustable to any date on
or between the Job Start Date and Job End Date. The Carry Forward Original Field Dates?
flag, allows you to carry forward the Original Field Date for all imported inventory items.
The import Lookups Data File menu item allows you to import other Lookups Data files that may
have been updated with other information, replacing your current lookups data. Lookups Data files
are by default saved with a LKP file extension. It is recommended that you export your current
lookups data prior to importing new lookups data.
Using the import Tool Transfer File menu item, it is possible to import the inventory tools sent
from the Dispatch System and therefore reduce the amount of typing to enter the inventory used on
the job. When the Transfer File, created with a TTR file extension, is opened, the Select Tools to
Import from Dispatch Ticket screen will be displayed. This lists all the tools available for import in

the transfer file. Select the tools you want to import by checking the box beside each item, either
individually or with the Select All button. It is possible to change the tool Type for each item prior
to importing, so check that each type is correct. All the imported items will have the inventory Job
Receive Date and Original Field Date set to the Receive Date entered on this screen. By default
the current date will be used as the Receive Date however it is adjustable to any date on or
between the Job Start Date and Job End Date. After the tools have been imported go through all
the imported items in the Inventory screens and complete any of the fields missing relevant data.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 27

File Export
As you begin to add and adjust items in the various lookup fields, these changes are saved in the
FIRST database. It is possible to export this Lookup Data so that this revised list can be used on
other computers running FIRST. By default, the exported file will have a LKP file extension.

Edit
This menu item provides the standard edit functions such as Cut, Copy, Paste, and Select All.

Section
In addition to the Section tabs and the Navigational Bar already provided in FIRST, this sub menu
provides the menu items as well as hot keys for navigating to the different parts of the FIRST
application.

Page
This sub menu provides page-level movement through FIRST. History Back and History Forward
to allow you to move back to where you were. First and Last provide the ability to move quickly to
the first and last pages of the current section. Next and Prior allow you to move to the next and
previous pages including from section to section.

Reports
This sub menu provides the menu items plus hot key short cuts for printing the various reports.

Tools
This sub menu provides a number of tools helpful and necessary for the proper functioning of
FIRST .
The Spell Check facility is available for all Notes, Comments and text items. Note it is available
through the F7 short cut key.

The Job Options item allows you to specify the currency type and measurement units to be used
for operating FIRST.
If the need arises, Change Job File Name allows you to change the file name of the existing job

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 28

it is possible to change the File Number as well as the Date Code. Changing the Date Code here
will not change the Job Start Date.
The Rebuild Data Files and Data Viewer options are intended for usage only if you are
experiencing major data problems with FIRST and even then it is recommended that these items
only be used on the advice of the Systems Administrator.
The Calculator displays the calculator available from the Windows operating systems.

View
This sub menu allows you to adjust which FIRST features are displayed. You can toggle off and on
the various menu bars; Tool Bar, Navigational Bar, and the Reports Palette. The 640 x 800
Mode, which was included for computers with lower resolutions, toggles off the Tool Bar,
Navigational Bar and the Reports Palette and makes the Tool Bar into a floating menu so as to
conserve display space.

Help
As well as providing some of the standard items that you would find under help, this sub menu also
includes an Expiry Date item.

The Expiry Date feature allows you to see what the FIRST current expiry date is and can also be
used to extend the license period. It is necessary to phone the Systems Administrator for the valid
code that can be entered in the input box provided.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 29

Navigational Bar
The Navigational Bar appearing along the left side of FIRST provides quick access to the various
sections and pages of the application. Clicking on the Section Bars will open up a menu with icons
for the various activities in each section. The icons on the BHA menu represent 2 pages and on
Daily 3 pages. In addition to using the Page Turn symbols to go to these respective pages in BHA
and Daily, it is possible to traverse through the pages represented by these icons by either clicking
on the icon again or by right-clicking the mouse on the icon and selecting the desired page from the

Navigational Bar

Right -click menu


on Daily

Page Turn
symbol

menu.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 30

Reports
There are a few ways to access reports for FIRST . You can use the Reports menu and select a
menu item to print a particular report. You can use the Quick Print button on the toolbar if it makes
sense for the current page (i.e. current inventory section, current BHA, current day). You can also
use the report palette at the bottom of the main window.
For most reports, you will be presented with a selection dialog box that will allow you to choose, for
example, which inventory sections, or which BHAs, or which days to print. Then, a report preview is
shown. You can cancel the printouts at this point, or click the print button on the toolbar to print the
report.

Inventory List
This report can show each inventory section (Directional Tools, MWD Tools, Motors, Other Tools)
individually or combined together.

Detailed BHA
The detailed BHA report includes the components list, motor info, bit info, and daily info for selected
BHAs.

Doghouse BHA
The doghouse BHA report is a list of the BHA components, printed in a landscape orientation. No
other information is displayed. It is meant for use as a reference in the doghouse.

Slide Sheet
This report shows the slide sheet information for selected BHAs.

Motor Evaluation
This report shows the motor usage comments for selected BHAs along with relevant BHA, motor,
bit, and daily information combined automatically by the program.

Daily Activity
The Daily Activity report shows all daily information, including activities list, hours breakdown, BHAs
used information, mud, pressures, flow rates, and daily comments. There is a sign-off spot for the
customer.

Daily Costs
This report lists out the cost items for the job, with the quantities and costs for the selected days.
There is a sign-off spot for the customer.

Job Costs Sheet


This report shows all cost items and job days in a grid format with totals. There is a sign-off spot for
the customer.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 31

Cost Summary
This report lists out the cost items for the job, with the quantities and costs for the entire job or for
specific segments. There is a sign-off spot for the customer.

Usage Control
The usage control report shows all inventory items and job days in a grid format with totals.

Tool Transfer Ticket


This report shows the shipping information and the tools being transferred.

Consolidated Tool Transfer


This report shows a consolidated list of the selected Tool Transfer Tickets on which tools were
transferred from the job including general tool information and the destination for each item.

Incident Report
This report shows a report for each selected incident.

Terms & Conditions


This report shows the general Terms & Conditions under which services, personnel, equipment etc.
are provided.

BHA Worksheet
A blank spreadsheet for recording BHA components.

Slides Worksheet
A blank spreadsheet for recording slides information.

Quick Start Guide

Entering Data - 32

Lookup Lists
There are two type of lookup lists ones that you can edit (add, delete, modify), and ones where
the choices are fixed. The lookups that can be edited allow you to add your own items to save on
typing when you need to use that item again later. The non-editable lists are restricted from user
editing in order to preserve their exact contents. The items in these lists will be used as key values
in database searches when the job files are combined into the main database.
The activity lists are shown below for reference.

Activity Lookup List Circulating


-

Blow Down Hole With N2


Circ & Accumulate Surveys
Circ & Condition Hole
Circ & Condition Mud
Circ & W.O.O.
Circ Bottoms Up
Circ Sample
Circulating
Circulating - See Comments
Displace Hole
Displace Hole With N2
Flow Test
Pump Down Survey Barrel
Pump Out Singles
Unplug Nozzles
Unplug Tools
Work Stuck Pipe & Circ
Work Tight Hole & Circ

Activity Lookup List Drilling


-

Quick Start Guide

Back Ream
Build Trough
Control Drill
Drill Mouse Hole
Drill Out Flt, Shoe & Cmnt
Motor Drill To KOP
Orienting With Motor
Polish Cement Plug
Ream - See Comments
Ream Hole
Rotary Drill
Rotary Drill To KOP
Rotating With Motor
Time Drill

Entering Data - 33

Activity Lookup List - MWD


-

Change Batteries
Change MWD
Change Pulser
EM MWD Surveys
Gamma Rerun
Gyro Wellbore
Shallow Pulse Check
Shallow Test Tools
Wait On MWD Tools
Work On EM MWD
Work On MWD

Activity Lis t Other


-

Cement Casing
Coring
DST
Fishing
Logging
Make Up Fish Tools
Mill Window
Move Rig
MU Whipstock
Other - See Comments
Recover Core BBL
Released
Run Casing
Run Liner
Set Bridge Plug
Set Cement Plug
Standby
Travel Home
Travel To Job
Undefined - See Comments
W/L Surveys & Orienting
Wait On Cement
Wait On Cementers
Wait On Daylight
Wait On Directional
Wait On Directional Tools
Wait On Fisherman
Wait On Loggers
Wait On Mobilization
Wait On Orders
Wait On Other Tools
Wait On Weather

Activity List Rig


Quick Start Guide

BOP Drill
Change Pump Liners
Fire Up Boiler
Flow Check
Lay Down Derrick
Entering Data - 34

Move In Rotary Tools


Nipple Up BOPs
Pressure Test
Rig Out Rotary Tools
Rig Repair
Rig Service
Rig Up

Activity Lookup List Rig contd


-

Rig Up Cementers
Rig Up Derrick
Rig Up RBOPs
Rig Up Rotary Tools
Rig Up Top Drive
Rig Up UBD Equipment
Safety Meeting
Slip And Cut
Spot Shacks
Tear Out Rig
Tear Out Top Drive
Weld On Conductor
Wireline Survey
Work on Pumps
Work on Top Drive

Activity List - Trip


Quick Start Guide

Change Bit
Change Bit And Motor
Change Motor
Change Out Drill Collars
Change Out Drill Pipe
Handle Directional Tools
Lay Down Directional Tools
Lay Down Drill Collars
Lay Down Drill Pipe
Lay Down HW Drill Pipe
Pick Up Drill Collars
Pick Up Drill Pipe
Pick Up HW Drill Pipe
Pipe Swap
POOH - See Comments
POOH For Bit
POOH For Directional
POOH For EM MWD
POOH For Motor
POOH For MWD
POOH To Change BHA
POOH To Change Mtr Set
POOH To Check For Wash
POOH To Check Tools
POOH To Log
POOH To Recover Surv Barrel
POOH To Run Casing
POOH With Fishing Tools
Entering Data - 35

POOH With Gyro


- POOH With Reamer
- POOH With Whipstock
- POOH, Lay Down DC
- POOH, Lay Down DP
- POOH, Lay Down HWDP
- PU Directional Tools
- Pull Back For Sidetrack
- RIH
- RIH - See Comments
- RIH Open Ended
- RIH With Directional
- RIH With Fishing Tools
- RIH With Gyro
- RIH With New BHA
- RIH With New Bit

Activity Lookup List Trip contd


-

Quick Start Guide

RIH With Overshot


RIH With Rotary Tools
RIH With Whipstock
Snub Out
Strip In
Survey On Trip In
Trip In
Trip Out For DST
Trip Out Sideways
Trip Out With DST
Trip To Set Up Motor
Trip To Turn Down Motor
Wiper Trip
Work Stuck Pipe
Work Tight Hole

Entering Data - 36

Glossary of Terms
Reports Palette:

Allows quick, easy access to all available reports.

Navigational Bar: The Navigational Bar allows quick access to other sections and their
contents.
Tool Bar:

Allows you to create NEW job, OPEN existing job, SAVE job, SAVE job TO
FLOPPY, PRINT, GO BACK, GO NEXT, QUICK PRINT and EXIT application

Logs Tab:

Record Addition Job Charges, Usage Items/Usage Control, Incidents


Logs, Tool Transfer Logs, Survey Logs in this section.

Job Costs Tab:

Record Build and Segment costs (Item, Serial #'s, Unit Of Measure, Price
on the Left side of the page. Daily recap of costs appears on the Right
side of the page.

Daily Tab:

Allows you to record/edit job start and end dates, record daily activities,
hours, depths, parameters, WOB, and Daily Progress Summary.

BHA Tab:

Contains information on Build Hole Assemblies

Inventory Tab:

Contains Directional Tools, MWD Tools, Motors, Survey Tools/Other


Items Inventories and Inventory Notes.

Rig Data Tab:

Contains Information on Rig Tools Inventory, Rig Bits Inventory and Rig
Pumps

General Tab:

Contains Wellsite Info/Personnel, Surface Info/Wellbore Sections, Hole


Planning/Planned Targets and General No

Quick Start Guide

Glossary of Terms - 37

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Maps

Western Canadian Maps

Prairie Survey System

Adapted from Government of Alberta Website www3.gov.ab.ca/srd/land/airphoto/ats.html.


Any parcel of land in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta or the Peace River Block of British Columbia can be located
by its legal land description. Legal land descriptions are based on the Township System (TS). The system uses a
simple grid network to divide the prairies into equal sized parcels of land. Under the system land is described as being
west of the 1st to the 6th Meridian. The 1st Meridian runs north south right through Winnipeg. The 4th Meridian (110
degrees west longitude) is the Alberta Saskatchewan border. The 5th Meridian (114 degrees west longitude) is in the
center of the province and the 6th Meridian (118 degrees longitude) is east of the Alberta B.C. border.

Between meridians are six-mile wide columns called ranges, which run north to south. The ranges are numbered
consecutively starting with number one directly west of the meridian and increasing to 26 as you move further west.
Townships are six-mile rows that intersect the ranges. They are increase in numbers from south to north. Township 1 is
at the Canada USA Border and township 126 is at the Northwest Territories border.
Township is also used to describe the six-mile square formed by the intersection of a range and a township.
Townships are then further divided into 36 one-mile square sections.
Each section is divided into quarters: northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest or into 16 legal subdivisions or
LSD's.
Here is an example of how to use the system. You are asked to haul a load to a well that is located at
13 1 87 18W4. Where is it? Its easy if you know that the first number is the LSD, the second is the
section, the third is township, the fourth is range and the last one is the meridian. This means our location is Legal
Subdivision 13, Section 1, Township 87, Range 8 West of the 4th meridian.
Drilling Services Training

Houston, TX Telephone: 281.260.5771


Edmonton, AB Telephone: 780.462.6300

British Columbia Survey System (NTS System)

Adapted from NTS-Grid Map North East British Columbia, ISBN 1-895526-32-9.
The National Topographic System (NTS) used in British Columbia functions as follows.
Map number, unit, sheet, zone, centizone, and unit define a specific location. This is how you find the location:
93 F 12
Map Unit Sheet

E 53 b
Zone Centizone Unit

93 is the map number. British Columbia is divided into map numbers running south to north.
F is the unit. There are 16 units in each map. They run from A to P.
12 is the sheet. Each unit is divided into sheet of 16 equal parts.
E is the zone. Each zone is divided into 12 parts ranging from A to I.
53 is the centizone number. Each zone is divided into a 100 block centizone.
b is the unit designation within the centizone. Each block in the centizone is divided into 4 units a, b, c, and d.

Tips For Getting There

Once you have the legal land description, you can then plan your route to that area using a regular road map, oil
company maps, customer provided directions, or route information from your dispatcher. Do not deviate from the
route given to you by your dispatcher. This is critical because the route has been planned with road bans and bridge
capacities in mind. If you get off the route, you could end up damaging a road or a bridge and your company may be
responsible for paying for the repairs.
It is also very important to get specific landmarks that you can use to help find your off-highway destination. As you
may know, it can be difficult to locate well sites even if you have the legal description. One final point; remember to
ask for directions if you are not sure where you are.

Drilling Services Training

Houston, TX Telephone: 281.260.5771


Edmonton, AB Telephone: 780.462.6300

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