“Harrison Bergeron” questions Instructions: Read over the list of questions below, and choose any combination of questions

that total 20 points and answer them in complete sentences on your own notebook paper (or word process). You may go over 20 points, but choosing less than 20 points will negatively affect your grade. 1. What are the implications of the opening sentence, “The year was 2081, and everyone was finally equal?” (3 points) 2. Why is Harrison Bergeron such a threat to society? (3 points) 3. How old is Harrison Bergeron, and why might this be significant to the plot? (2 points) 4. Describe how Harrison Bergeron has been handicapped to make him “equal.” (2 points) 5. Why are the people in the story so obedient? What could they have done to change things? Why didn’t they do so? (5 points) 6. How are George and Hazel Bergeron described? (2 points) 7. What does Hazel and George Bergeron’s dialogue and word choice show us about them? Include quotes from these two characters to help illustrate your points. (5 points) 8. What sort of life do they lead and what is the author parodying (making fun of) in this story? (5 points) 9. What are the functions of the agents of “the United States Handicapper General?” (2 points) 10. Discuss/explain how school sometimes acts like “the United States Handicapper General” (5 points) 11.How would Harrison Bergeron define equality? How would Diana Moon Glampers define it? (3 points) 12. Harrison tried to break the rules of society. Under what circumstances should an individual go against society? (3 points) 13. Are such changes, as found in “Harrison Bergeron” impossible in our American capitalist society, or are they likely results of just such a system? Explain. (5 points) 14.If you lived in the society described in this story, what are some things about yourself that you think would need to be handicapped in order to make you equal to everyone else, and how would you think the handicapper general might go about doing this for you? (3 points) “Harrison Bergeron” questions Instructions: Read over the list of questions below, and choose any combination of questions that total 20 points and answer them in complete sentences on your own notebook paper (or word process). You may go over 20 points, but choosing less than 20 points will negatively affect your grade. 1. What are the implications of the opening sentence, “The year was 2081, and everyone was finally equal?” (3 points) 2. Why is Harrison Bergeron such a threat to society? (3 points) 3. How old is Harrison Bergeron, and why might this be significant to the plot? (2 points) 4. Describe how Harrison Bergeron has been handicapped to make him “equal.” (2 points) 5. Why are the people in the story so obedient? What could they have done to change things? Why didn’t they do so? (5 points) 6. How are George and Hazel Bergeron described? (2 points) 7. What does Hazel and George Bergeron’s dialogue and word choice show us about them? Include quotes from these two characters to help illustrate your points. (5 points) 8. What sort of life do they lead and what is the author parodying (making fun of) in this story? (5 points) 9. What are the functions of the agents of “the United States Handicapper General?” (2 points) 10. Discuss/explain how school sometimes acts like “the United States Handicapper General” (5 points) 11.How would Harrison Bergeron define equality? How would Diana Moon Glampers define it? (3 points) 12. Harrison tried to break the rules of society. Under what circumstances should an individual go against society? (3 points) 13. Are such changes, as found in “Harrison Bergeron” impossible in our American capitalist society, or are they likely results of just such a system? Explain. (5 points) 14.If you lived in the society described in this story, what are some things about yourself that you think would need to be handicapped in order to make you equal to everyone else, and how would you think the handicapper general might go about doing this for you? (3 points)

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