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Wandering

_
Ph.* D..With
_ -
Midwest
. ,
Twang
. ... - ?

S. Korean Jack-Of-H-Trades
WITH 24TH IN3P.. BE5GT to the University of Michigan era U-S. and Alaska, he re-
—A 49-year old Korean who to win 'a Ph.D. in chemistry. turned to Korea in 1948 as_a
spent 23 years in the U.S. and HE DISCONTINUED his med- professor at the Women's Medi-
speaks English with a mid- ical studies, he said, because cal college of Seoul university.
western twang is working as of lack of funds. Armed with Sam. When the war broke/ out,
the Ph.D., in 1933 Sam went and thousands of others
a jack-of-all trades with the back to Omaha, where he open- went south.
Eagles Regiment Civil Assis- ed a hamburger stand, which Now a member of the Civil
tance office. he built into a restaurant in Assistance section, Sam has a
Sam—real name P'yong—the one and a half years, fee sub- multiplicity of duties.
son of Christian parents, came sequently sold it for $5000. • MAJ. CONWAY Jones,
to the U.S. in 1926 as a pre- "Even a Ph.D., has to eat," Washington, D.C., Civil Assis-
medical student at the Univer- he philosophises. tance officer, uses the Korean,
sity of Nebraska. After earn: AFTER WANDERING, flush cause as his ''main interpreter be-
of his excellent command
ing an A.B. degree he went on and broke by turns, over west- of English.
'Knowing more about Amer-

Marine Really Civilian can food than any Korean


cooks employed by the CAC,
he can frequently be found
By GEORGE MCAIiTHUR at mealtime, supervising prep-
, SOMEWHERE IN KOREA (AP)—Harold L. Hitchcock, aration of the food.
Rockford, 11L, is a civilian but he had a hard time convincing WHEN" THE CAC has an
the Marine Corps. overload of refugees, he isn't
He is on his way home now after three months of fighting above puting his medical
as a member of a bazooka team. AH the time he ,\vas a civilian knowledge to work helping the
recalled to the Marines through a clerical error. ! doctor examine, administer
HE SERVED a two year hitch in the Marine reserve and DDT and inoculate the home-
should have been discharged in December, 1949. He never got less wanderers.
that vital elii of paper. Although his fortunes are
TIME OUT—Jack Benny and his troupe pause at entrance
to the Al Jolson bowl in Korea to visit with members of the He was recalled to duty and sent overseas as a protesting currently at ebb, Sam is opti-
U.S. X Corps. (U.S. Army Photo) private first class. mistic about the future, but
HE WROTE letters. His wife wrote letters. Finally, the says he is waiting for the war
word came down from Washington—it was all a mistake, to end before he tries to make
Hitchcock could go home.
Nostalgic Memories "I knew I was a civilian," Hitchcock said, "but nobody paid
a comeback.
"Right now things are too
any attention. I figured it would get straightened out sooner unstable," he says, "to build
of later but I was beginning to sweat it out." for the future."
Of AT&Yongdungpo
By FRANK BARTHOLOMEW direct standard gauge' connec-
United Press Vice President tions across Manchuria and

ABOARD THE PRESS TRAIN Siberia to all Europe.
(UP)—I can remember when Now it disappears in what
this railroad was known as the the railroaders call'"end xrt the
Say Armor Experts
SOMEWHERE IN KOREA—
"Pusan to Paris" and boasted Officials from the Armored
track" in a bombed out bridge
across the Imjin a few miles School recently visited the 64th
Utah Guard FA Unit north'of here, and the northern
division-'on the other side of the
crick is held by a group of mili-
Heavy Tank BaLtalion and
learned, a lesson in practical
radio communications.
"They looked over our tanks,"
Honored By Solons tary gentlemen under a Red flag
and no conjunction whatsoever apt. Terrell ;D. Huddleston, bat-
talion communications officer,
By CPL. KEITH M. WRIGHT to cooperate with our end. said, "ai-d were impressed with
WITH U.S. IX CORPS (Pac. ONE OF THE things they some innovations we've made
S&S).—The IX Corps 213th are sore about is that Maj. with radios."
Armored Field Artillery Bat- Robert H. McAfferty and his Huddleston said that a rep-
talion, a national guard organi- friends in the 712th Railway resentative from the command
zation from Utah, has been com- Operating Battalion ran most and staff section of the Armored
mended by the Utah state legis- of their locomotives off the School was particularly inter-
lature for action against the Chi- bombed bridge and into a river ested in -fhe way the tankers
nese, May 27. bed, arid dynamited the rest of have installed a high frequency
ATTACKED at close range them, at the time of the retreat COMBAT REPORT—Major Lukin -(left), OC "D" Coy, his radio in the armored vehicles.
during the early morning hours, from North Korea last winter. face covered with sweat after his return from leading a com- "WE FOUND that with this
the 213th fought off the Chinese The best the Communists can pany patrol into enemy territory, reports to his commanding radio in the command tank, as
from their gun positions.- As do by way of retaliation is to officer, Lt. Col. F. O. Hassett OBE, who recently ,took over well as the regular radio, we
command of the 3d Battalion, RAR. (BCOF Photo) can control air support much,
day broke, men from A Battery hang on to all the coal in Ko-
and the battalion headquarters rea and make our side import easier," Huddlestou said.
He explained that this elimi-
organized a combat patrol and all their railroad fuel from
pushed three quarters of a mile Japan.
down a canyon in which enemy OUR PIECE OP track known
positions were located, using one
Pilot Nets 4th Jet nates having to bring a radio
jeep with air tactical officers
along on missions.
TOKYO (Pac. S&S)~rPossible one burst. He went into a
of their self-propelled guns as a irreverently to the correspon- new jet air ace of the Korean dive and I followed, closing in- "WE'VE. ALSO had luck with,
tank. dents as the,Atchieon, Topeka war is Capt. Milton E. Nelson, to 25 feet, and then I held the the infantryman's radio, the
Once when the Chinese at* and Yongdungpo, runs about 200 Tarrant City, CalifJ trigger until the MIG burst in- Angry Nine," Huddleston said.
miles south and is operated by
tempted to escape over a ridgeJJ""
2th, a railway operating Nelson added the fourth MIG- to flamesV'He went into a spin "Our regular radios are FM 'line
the artillerymen halted thenFme 15 to his list Wednesday in the and the pilot bailed out." of sight' sets, and we have
with time fuze gunfire, progres- battalion sponsored by the Read- trouble whenever mountains or
ing railroad. The 150 miles of 20-minute air duel between 34 Now leading air-to-air combat
sively shortening the range to
line .south of that Is run by the Sabrejets and 30 of the Red pilots in Korea, Nelson is sec other obstacles come between.
bring the enemy closer. At the
724th, which is sponsored by the aircraft in "MIG alley." The ond only to Capt. James the tanks and the forward com-
. close of the action, the 213th had Communist jets had jumped a Jabara, Wichita, Kan., who shot mand post."
inflicted at least 400 casualties Pennsylvania railroad. flight of 20 F-80 Shooting Stars down six MIGs before return But by using the small Angry
on the Chinese and captured 831 "We have rebuilt about 300 who had just completed a ing to the States in June, Nine, an AM radio, he explained,
prisoners without the loss'of a locomotives both here and in bombing and napalming run THE SECOND MIG destroyed the tankers are assured of com-
man. Japan, said McAfferty, Pueblo over an ammunition factory in was claimed by, 1st Li*. 'Ralph munications all the time. "This
Upon receipt of the news the Colo., who in civilian life is Sinuiju. D. Gibson, Carm'el, 111. Gibson is extremely important over
Utah legislature passed a joint mechanical formeman for the IN REPORTING his fourth is second to Nelson as top je1 here," Huddleston said, "be-
resolution in special session Denver and Rio Frande. "We had kill, Nelson said, "The MIGs pilot In Korea with three ~of cause we go on so many long
"acknowledging the great ac- about 10,000 cars destroyed but started firing at 25,000 feet. I the swept back wing fighters lask forces and wind in and out
complishments" of the unit. we are building and rebuilding." pulled in behind one and fired to his credit. 9f the mountain ranges,"

Army Food Good, But Experts Are Working To Make It Better


By RELMAN MORIN house. That's the Army's pres- son, Champaign, 111., did the with machinegun speed and, when it's hot. He has to think
FORT KNOX, Ky. (AP)—! ent objective. work. never lose a finger. of that and plan for it, and
Common U.S. soldier comment Here's an example: These men are students at the THEY EVEN jearn how, maybe scrounge. But if he's any
oft Army rations is that "a man The other day at Fort Knox, Army Food Service school. They when and why to lift the lid good, he gets it."
can fight on this chow, but he a company of infantry was far go through an eight weeks from a stewing pan. Later, they The Army doesn't guess about
couldnt live on it." out In the field, on a training course. About 50 a week are get into fancy cake baking and calories and food values. Diet
Too often, that is true. In the: maneuver. For dinner, the men graduated. icing. Why would an infantry experts have- laid down the
$eld, a-soldier is frequently too ate braised beef, mashed pota- DURING THAT time, they unit in the field need anything principles, and the trainees
|iwsy to linger lovingly over his toes, buttered lima beans, sliced learn more about .food than the like that? learn it, even though they may
"can of C ration. He gulps it tomatoes and chilled cantaloupe, average housewife ever sus- "Morale," said Capt. Daniel O. always be following master
down. He opens a can of fruit With it, they were served bread, pects. They are taught not only Stoudemire, director of the menus, written elsewhere.
salad, which Is thirst quenching butter, lemonade and hot cof- the rudiments of cooking a school. "Nine times out of ten .MEANWHILE, they learn all
as well as sweet. And that's fee. steak, but the facts of diet, when morale is bad in a unit the tricks of cooking in the field,
it. THE MEAL was prepared in nutrition, balancing and some you can trace it directly to the under tents, or with the most
SOMETIMES it has to be that the field under conditions that morale factors. kind cf chow they're getting." primitive equipment, if that
way. But if brains and hard would simulate combat condi- In their first week, they don't He said the ideal Army cook should be necessary.
work can change that situation, tions. That is, all the instal- do so much as light a match. is almost as concerned with the In what the Army hopes will
the day may be near at hand lations had to be set up in a Their first lessons are in per- morale values of food as the be the common situation, rolling
when a Yank in a foxhole will hurry, the food brought in, then sonal hygiene, insect control, way it tastes. field kitchens will approach the
be getting better food than he prepared, and finally trans- mess sanitation and the care and "FOR EXAMPLE, a good man lines, and food will go forward
could puy at his favorite hash ported. . storage of rations. They are, will, break his, neck to see that When that day comes, a man
Seven soldier cooks, with^ an also taught how to hold a knife ftis 'men get !hot; soup, in .coSd will. $>£. ,able 'to ^jyej on < Army,
10 Pacific stars fir SfrHpei instructor,' Sgt. Lester R. John- so thai they can slice* Vegetables weather, and something cold chow as' well' as- fight on it.
Wandering
_
Ph.* D..With
_ -
Midwest
. ,
Twang
. ... - ?

S. Korean Jack-Of-H-Trades
WITH 24TH IN3P.. BE5GT to the University of Michigan era U-S. and Alaska, he re-
—A 49-year old Korean who to win 'a Ph.D. in chemistry. turned to Korea in 1948 as_a
spent 23 years in the U.S. and HE DISCONTINUED his med- professor at the Women's Medi-
speaks English with a mid- ical studies, he said, because cal college of Seoul university.
western twang is working as of lack of funds. Armed with Sam. When the war broke/ out,
the Ph.D., in 1933 Sam went and thousands of others
a jack-of-all trades with the back to Omaha, where he open- went south.
Eagles Regiment Civil Assis- ed a hamburger stand, which Now a member of the Civil
tance office. he built into a restaurant in Assistance section, Sam has a
Sam—real name P'yong—the one and a half years, fee sub- multiplicity of duties.
son of Christian parents, came sequently sold it for $5000. • MAJ. CONWAY Jones,
to the U.S. in 1926 as a pre- "Even a Ph.D., has to eat," Washington, D.C., Civil Assis-
medical student at the Univer- he philosophises. tance officer, uses the Korean,
sity of Nebraska. After earn: AFTER WANDERING, flush cause as his ''main interpreter be-
of his excellent command
ing an A.B. degree he went on and broke by turns, over west- of English.
'Knowing more about Amer-

Marine Really Civilian can food than any Korean


cooks employed by the CAC,
he can frequently be found
By GEORGE MCAIiTHUR at mealtime, supervising prep-
, SOMEWHERE IN KOREA (AP)—Harold L. Hitchcock, aration of the food.
Rockford, 11L, is a civilian but he had a hard time convincing WHEN" THE CAC has an
the Marine Corps. overload of refugees, he isn't
He is on his way home now after three months of fighting above puting his medical
as a member of a bazooka team. AH the time he ,\vas a civilian knowledge to work helping the
recalled to the Marines through a clerical error. ! doctor examine, administer
HE SERVED a two year hitch in the Marine reserve and DDT and inoculate the home-
should have been discharged in December, 1949. He never got less wanderers.
that vital elii of paper. Although his fortunes are
TIME OUT—Jack Benny and his troupe pause at entrance
to the Al Jolson bowl in Korea to visit with members of the He was recalled to duty and sent overseas as a protesting currently at ebb, Sam is opti-
U.S. X Corps. (U.S. Army Photo) private first class. mistic about the future, but
HE WROTE letters. His wife wrote letters. Finally, the says he is waiting for the war
word came down from Washington—it was all a mistake, to end before he tries to make
Hitchcock could go home.
Nostalgic Memories "I knew I was a civilian," Hitchcock said, "but nobody paid
a comeback.
"Right now things are too
any attention. I figured it would get straightened out sooner unstable," he says, "to build
of later but I was beginning to sweat it out." for the future."
Of AT&Yongdungpo
By FRANK BARTHOLOMEW direct standard gauge' connec-
United Press Vice President tions across Manchuria and

ABOARD THE PRESS TRAIN Siberia to all Europe.
(UP)—I can remember when Now it disappears in what
this railroad was known as the the railroaders call'"end xrt the
Say Armor Experts
SOMEWHERE IN KOREA—
"Pusan to Paris" and boasted Officials from the Armored
track" in a bombed out bridge
across the Imjin a few miles School recently visited the 64th
Utah Guard FA Unit north'of here, and the northern
division-'on the other side of the
crick is held by a group of mili-
Heavy Tank BaLtalion and
learned, a lesson in practical
radio communications.
"They looked over our tanks,"
Honored By Solons tary gentlemen under a Red flag
and no conjunction whatsoever apt. Terrell ;D. Huddleston, bat-
talion communications officer,
By CPL. KEITH M. WRIGHT to cooperate with our end. said, "ai-d were impressed with
WITH U.S. IX CORPS (Pac. ONE OF THE things they some innovations we've made
S&S).—The IX Corps 213th are sore about is that Maj. with radios."
Armored Field Artillery Bat- Robert H. McAfferty and his Huddleston said that a rep-
talion, a national guard organi- friends in the 712th Railway resentative from the command
zation from Utah, has been com- Operating Battalion ran most and staff section of the Armored
mended by the Utah state legis- of their locomotives off the School was particularly inter-
lature for action against the Chi- bombed bridge and into a river ested in -fhe way the tankers
nese, May 27. bed, arid dynamited the rest of have installed a high frequency
ATTACKED at close range them, at the time of the retreat COMBAT REPORT—Major Lukin -(left), OC "D" Coy, his radio in the armored vehicles.
during the early morning hours, from North Korea last winter. face covered with sweat after his return from leading a com- "WE FOUND that with this
the 213th fought off the Chinese The best the Communists can pany patrol into enemy territory, reports to his commanding radio in the command tank, as
from their gun positions.- As do by way of retaliation is to officer, Lt. Col. F. O. Hassett OBE, who recently ,took over well as the regular radio, we
command of the 3d Battalion, RAR. (BCOF Photo) can control air support much,
day broke, men from A Battery hang on to all the coal in Ko-
and the battalion headquarters rea and make our side import easier," Huddlestou said.
He explained that this elimi-
organized a combat patrol and all their railroad fuel from
pushed three quarters of a mile Japan.
down a canyon in which enemy OUR PIECE OP track known
positions were located, using one
Pilot Nets 4th Jet nates having to bring a radio
jeep with air tactical officers
along on missions.
TOKYO (Pac. S&S)~rPossible one burst. He went into a
of their self-propelled guns as a irreverently to the correspon- new jet air ace of the Korean dive and I followed, closing in- "WE'VE. ALSO had luck with,
tank. dents as the,Atchieon, Topeka war is Capt. Milton E. Nelson, to 25 feet, and then I held the the infantryman's radio, the
Once when the Chinese at* and Yongdungpo, runs about 200 Tarrant City, CalifJ trigger until the MIG burst in- Angry Nine," Huddleston said.
miles south and is operated by
tempted to escape over a ridgeJJ""
2th, a railway operating Nelson added the fourth MIG- to flamesV'He went into a spin "Our regular radios are FM 'line
the artillerymen halted thenFme 15 to his list Wednesday in the and the pilot bailed out." of sight' sets, and we have
with time fuze gunfire, progres- battalion sponsored by the Read- trouble whenever mountains or
ing railroad. The 150 miles of 20-minute air duel between 34 Now leading air-to-air combat
sively shortening the range to
line .south of that Is run by the Sabrejets and 30 of the Red pilots in Korea, Nelson is sec other obstacles come between.
bring the enemy closer. At the
724th, which is sponsored by the aircraft in "MIG alley." The ond only to Capt. James the tanks and the forward com-
. close of the action, the 213th had Communist jets had jumped a Jabara, Wichita, Kan., who shot mand post."
inflicted at least 400 casualties Pennsylvania railroad. flight of 20 F-80 Shooting Stars down six MIGs before return But by using the small Angry
on the Chinese and captured 831 "We have rebuilt about 300 who had just completed a ing to the States in June, Nine, an AM radio, he explained,
prisoners without the loss'of a locomotives both here and in bombing and napalming run THE SECOND MIG destroyed the tankers are assured of com-
man. Japan, said McAfferty, Pueblo over an ammunition factory in was claimed by, 1st Li*. 'Ralph munications all the time. "This
Upon receipt of the news the Colo., who in civilian life is Sinuiju. D. Gibson, Carm'el, 111. Gibson is extremely important over
Utah legislature passed a joint mechanical formeman for the IN REPORTING his fourth is second to Nelson as top je1 here," Huddleston said, "be-
resolution in special session Denver and Rio Frande. "We had kill, Nelson said, "The MIGs pilot In Korea with three ~of cause we go on so many long
"acknowledging the great ac- about 10,000 cars destroyed but started firing at 25,000 feet. I the swept back wing fighters lask forces and wind in and out
complishments" of the unit. we are building and rebuilding." pulled in behind one and fired to his credit. 9f the mountain ranges,"

Army Food Good, But Experts Are Working To Make It Better


By RELMAN MORIN house. That's the Army's pres- son, Champaign, 111., did the with machinegun speed and, when it's hot. He has to think
FORT KNOX, Ky. (AP)—! ent objective. work. never lose a finger. of that and plan for it, and
Common U.S. soldier comment Here's an example: These men are students at the THEY EVEN jearn how, maybe scrounge. But if he's any
oft Army rations is that "a man The other day at Fort Knox, Army Food Service school. They when and why to lift the lid good, he gets it."
can fight on this chow, but he a company of infantry was far go through an eight weeks from a stewing pan. Later, they The Army doesn't guess about
couldnt live on it." out In the field, on a training course. About 50 a week are get into fancy cake baking and calories and food values. Diet
Too often, that is true. In the: maneuver. For dinner, the men graduated. icing. Why would an infantry experts have- laid down the
$eld, a-soldier is frequently too ate braised beef, mashed pota- DURING THAT time, they unit in the field need anything principles, and the trainees
|iwsy to linger lovingly over his toes, buttered lima beans, sliced learn more about .food than the like that? learn it, even though they may
"can of C ration. He gulps it tomatoes and chilled cantaloupe, average housewife ever sus- "Morale," said Capt. Daniel O. always be following master
down. He opens a can of fruit With it, they were served bread, pects. They are taught not only Stoudemire, director of the menus, written elsewhere.
salad, which Is thirst quenching butter, lemonade and hot cof- the rudiments of cooking a school. "Nine times out of ten .MEANWHILE, they learn all
as well as sweet. And that's fee. steak, but the facts of diet, when morale is bad in a unit the tricks of cooking in the field,
it. THE MEAL was prepared in nutrition, balancing and some you can trace it directly to the under tents, or with the most
SOMETIMES it has to be that the field under conditions that morale factors. kind cf chow they're getting." primitive equipment, if that
way. But if brains and hard would simulate combat condi- In their first week, they don't He said the ideal Army cook should be necessary.
work can change that situation, tions. That is, all the instal- do so much as light a match. is almost as concerned with the In what the Army hopes will
the day may be near at hand lations had to be set up in a Their first lessons are in per- morale values of food as the be the common situation, rolling
when a Yank in a foxhole will hurry, the food brought in, then sonal hygiene, insect control, way it tastes. field kitchens will approach the
be getting better food than he prepared, and finally trans- mess sanitation and the care and "FOR EXAMPLE, a good man lines, and food will go forward
could puy at his favorite hash ported. . storage of rations. They are, will, break his, neck to see that When that day comes, a man
Seven soldier cooks, with^ an also taught how to hold a knife ftis 'men get !hot; soup, in .coSd will. $>£. ,able 'to ^jyej on < Army,
10 Pacific stars fir SfrHpei instructor,' Sgt. Lester R. John- so thai they can slice* Vegetables weather, and something cold chow as' well' as- fight on it.