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INNOVATIONS

IN NEWSPAPERS
WORLD REPORT
2015
An annual survey by the Innovation International Media Consulting Group
for the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA)

th
17
EDITION

EDITORS

MATTHEW BENNETT / JUAN ANTONIO GINER / JUAN SEOR / MARTA TORRES

INNOVATIONS
IN NEWSPAPERS
WORLD REPORT
2015

www.innovation.media
headquarters@innovation.media

INNOVATIONS
IN NEWSPAPERS
WORLD REPORT
2015

www.innovation.media
headquarters@innovation.media

NGEL ARRESE
INNOVATION consultant, Professor of
Financial Journalism and Marketing, School
of Communications, University of Navarra ,
Pamplona, Spain

CONTRIBUTORS

CONTENT

JUAN ANTONIO GINER


President and founding partner of INNOVATION.
Former senior research fellow at Harvard
University. Wales, UK.

RODRIGO SNCHEZ
Art director at El Mundo and Unidad Editorial
Revistas, Madrid, Spain

EMMA GOODMAN
INNOVATION consultant, media researcher,
former WAN-IFRA senior editor. London, UK

JUAN SEOR
INNOVATION partner. Formerly with PBS, CNBC,
and the International Herald Tribune. TV journalist,
London, UK

MATTHEW BENNETT
INNOVATION editor, publisher of The Spain Report.
thespainreport.com, Madrid, Spain

ANTONIO MARTN HERVS


INNOVATION consultant, former editorial design
director at Recoletos, former deputy art director at
Expansin, Unidad Editorial, Madrid, Spain

MARTA TORRES
INNOVATION partner and administrative director.
Former reporter at Diario de Noticias in Pamplona,
Spain

MARTA BOTERO
INNOVATION editor, former editor of El Mundo in
Colombia. Medelln, Colombia

ANA MOLINA
INNOVATION consultant, former head of user
experience at Canal+, Madrid, Spain.

LVARO TRIANA
INNOVATION consultant. Former Arthur D. Little
and McKinsey and Tony Blair Associates.
Bogot, Colombia

MARC BAST
INNOVATION consultant, co-founder and CEO of
Lexdir, Barcelona, Spain

CHUS DEL RO
INNOVATION consultant, director of Digital
Branded Content, former head of content &
innovation at Prisacom, former deputy editor at
Diario AS, Madrid, Spain
THODORIS GEORGAKOPOULOS
INNOVATION consultant, Former Chief Internet
Officer at IMAKO Media SA, Athens, Greece

PEDRO MONTEIRO
INNOVATION consultant, product manager for
digital paid content at Impresa Publishing, Lisboa,
Portugal
ISMAEL NAFRA
INNOVATION consultant, head of digital innovation
at Grupo God, Barcelona, Spain
PABLO RAMREZ
INNOVATION consultant, founder of Sin Palabras
and former head of infographics at Recoletos,
Madrid, Spain

INNOVATION would also like to thank the following


people for their kindness and generosity during
the preparation of this years report: Anne Bidoli,
Ian Cockburn, Carlos Rodriguez Casado, Augusto
Costhanzo, Adonis Durado, Claude Erbsen, Joana
Frade, Thomas Jacob, James Kennedy, Larry
Kilmam, Mariv Murchante, Raju Narisetti, and
Vincent Peyrgne.

6 FOREWORD

THE VISUAL IMPACT OF NEWS

Robert Thomson
Chief Executive, News Corp

42 DATA STORIES

Examples of great data journalism from around


the world. By Ismael Nafra

8 ESSAY

Francisco Pinto Balsemo


Chairman, Impresa Group

48 VISUAL METAPHORS

How Metrpoli distills complex ideas into visual


simplicity. By Rodrigo Snchez

54 WELCOME NEW FOCUS

THE FUTURE OF NEWS

Guest editors bring new vigour and fresh ideas


to a newspaper. For a day. By Marta Botero

10 LOOKING AHEAD

A look into the future with The New York Times


and the BBC. By ngel Arrese

TRYING TO TURN A PROFIT


16 INFLUENCE VS. INCOME

The Times has reported a profit, but is it still


influential? By Emma Goodman

78 BREAKFAST BITES

24 SERIOUS INFLUENCE

LOpinion in France is a tightly-edited, serious


new newspaper. By Juan Antonio Giner

COVER ILLUSTRATION
DEBORAH WITHEY
cheesepicklesstudio@gmail.com
DESIGN
ANTONIO MARTN HERVS
martin@innovation.media
FONTS (SOLIDO & ACTA)
DINO SANTOS
www.dstype.com
ILLUSTRATIONS
CARLOS RODRGUEZ CASADO
carlosrodriguezcasado.tumblr.com
AUGUSTO COSTHANZO
www.costhanzo.com

28 WEEKEND WEALTH

There is a print format that works,


and it happens on weekends.
By Antonio Martn Hervs

JUAN A. GINER
President and Founding Partner

How easy is it for a big media company


to redefine values and sell more news?
By lvaro Triana

JUAN SEOR
Vice President & Partner

FRANCISCO GMEZ ANTN


Honorary President

INNOVATION MEDIA CONSULTING GROUP All rights


reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise, without the prior written
permission of the publishers and copyright holders

headquarters@innovation.media
www.innovation.media

Printed in Spain
ISBN: 978-84-96076-24-2
Legal deposit: NA-1435/1999

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

82 PAY ATTENTION

Tsunamis of information are flooding the world.


Respect users time. By Ana Molina
Time to catch up fast if you dont have a mobile
strategy. By Marc Bast

94 A DAILY MIRACLE

A tribute to those who create newspapers

96 MEDIA VOICES

Key quotes from the last 12 months


in newspapers and media

100 WAN-IFRA: WORLD


ASSOCIATION OF NEWSPAPERS AND
NEWS PUBLISHERS

MARTA TORRES
Administrative Director & Partner
CARLOS SORIA
Chairman

Early morning newsletters are a fine time to


reach readers. By Chus del Ro

88 MOBILE MINIMUM

Who is going to pay for investigative journalism?


By Thodoris Georgakopoulos

38 SALES STRUCTURE

The use of infographics is exploding across


business and platforms. By Pablo Ramrez

NEW NEWS FORMATS

The story of how Portugals Expresso has


renewed its focus. By Pedro Monteiro

34 DEEP VALUE

Le 1 is trying to pack lots of context into


a bird with foldable paper wings.
By Juan Antonio Giner

66 VISUAL INFORMATION

20 WEEKLY FOCUS

EDITORS
MATTHEW BENNETT
bennett@innovation.media
JUAN ANTONIO GINER
giner@innovation.media
JUAN SEOR
senor@innovation.media
MARTA TORRES
torres@innovation.media

58 NEW PAPERS

104 INNOVATION MEDIA


CONSULTING GROUP

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

NGEL ARRESE
INNOVATION consultant, Professor of
Financial Journalism and Marketing, School
of Communications, University of Navarra ,
Pamplona, Spain

CONTRIBUTORS

CONTENT

JUAN ANTONIO GINER


President and founding partner of INNOVATION.
Former senior research fellow at Harvard
University. Wales, UK.

RODRIGO SNCHEZ
Art director at El Mundo and Unidad Editorial
Revistas, Madrid, Spain

EMMA GOODMAN
INNOVATION consultant, media researcher,
former WAN-IFRA senior editor. London, UK

JUAN SEOR
INNOVATION partner. Formerly with PBS, CNBC,
and the International Herald Tribune. TV journalist,
London, UK

MATTHEW BENNETT
INNOVATION editor, publisher of The Spain Report.
thespainreport.com, Madrid, Spain

ANTONIO MARTN HERVS


INNOVATION consultant, former editorial design
director at Recoletos, former deputy art director at
Expansin, Unidad Editorial, Madrid, Spain

MARTA TORRES
INNOVATION partner and administrative director.
Former reporter at Diario de Noticias in Pamplona,
Spain

MARTA BOTERO
INNOVATION editor, former editor of El Mundo in
Colombia. Medelln, Colombia

ANA MOLINA
INNOVATION consultant, former head of user
experience at Canal+, Madrid, Spain.

LVARO TRIANA
INNOVATION consultant. Former Arthur D. Little
and McKinsey and Tony Blair Associates.
Bogot, Colombia

MARC BAST
INNOVATION consultant, co-founder and CEO of
Lexdir, Barcelona, Spain

CHUS DEL RO
INNOVATION consultant, director of Digital
Branded Content, former head of content &
innovation at Prisacom, former deputy editor at
Diario AS, Madrid, Spain
THODORIS GEORGAKOPOULOS
INNOVATION consultant, Former Chief Internet
Officer at IMAKO Media SA, Athens, Greece

PEDRO MONTEIRO
INNOVATION consultant, product manager for
digital paid content at Impresa Publishing, Lisboa,
Portugal
ISMAEL NAFRA
INNOVATION consultant, head of digital innovation
at Grupo God, Barcelona, Spain
PABLO RAMREZ
INNOVATION consultant, founder of Sin Palabras
and former head of infographics at Recoletos,
Madrid, Spain

INNOVATION would also like to thank the following


people for their kindness and generosity during
the preparation of this years report: Anne Bidoli,
Ian Cockburn, Carlos Rodriguez Casado, Augusto
Costhanzo, Adonis Durado, Claude Erbsen, Joana
Frade, Thomas Jacob, James Kennedy, Larry
Kilmam, Mariv Murchante, Raju Narisetti, and
Vincent Peyrgne.

6 FOREWORD

THE VISUAL IMPACT OF NEWS

Robert Thomson
Chief Executive, News Corp

42 DATA STORIES

Examples of great data journalism from around


the world. By Ismael Nafra

8 ESSAY

Francisco Pinto Balsemo


Chairman, Impresa Group

48 VISUAL METAPHORS

How Metrpoli distills complex ideas into visual


simplicity. By Rodrigo Snchez

54 WELCOME NEW FOCUS

THE FUTURE OF NEWS

Guest editors bring new vigour and fresh ideas


to a newspaper. For a day. By Marta Botero

10 LOOKING AHEAD

A look into the future with The New York Times


and the BBC. By ngel Arrese

TRYING TO TURN A PROFIT


16 INFLUENCE VS. INCOME

The Times has reported a profit, but is it still


influential? By Emma Goodman

78 BREAKFAST BITES

24 SERIOUS INFLUENCE

LOpinion in France is a tightly-edited, serious


new newspaper. By Juan Antonio Giner

COVER ILLUSTRATION
DEBORAH WITHEY
cheesepicklesstudio@gmail.com
DESIGN
ANTONIO MARTN HERVS
martin@innovation.media
FONTS (SOLIDO & ACTA)
DINO SANTOS
www.dstype.com
ILLUSTRATIONS
CARLOS RODRGUEZ CASADO
carlosrodriguezcasado.tumblr.com
AUGUSTO COSTHANZO
www.costhanzo.com

28 WEEKEND WEALTH

There is a print format that works,


and it happens on weekends.
By Antonio Martn Hervs

JUAN A. GINER
President and Founding Partner

How easy is it for a big media company


to redefine values and sell more news?
By lvaro Triana

JUAN SEOR
Vice President & Partner

FRANCISCO GMEZ ANTN


Honorary President

INNOVATION MEDIA CONSULTING GROUP All rights


reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise, without the prior written
permission of the publishers and copyright holders

headquarters@innovation.media
www.innovation.media

Printed in Spain
ISBN: 978-84-96076-24-2
Legal deposit: NA-1435/1999

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

82 PAY ATTENTION

Tsunamis of information are flooding the world.


Respect users time. By Ana Molina
Time to catch up fast if you dont have a mobile
strategy. By Marc Bast

94 A DAILY MIRACLE

A tribute to those who create newspapers

96 MEDIA VOICES

Key quotes from the last 12 months


in newspapers and media

100 WAN-IFRA: WORLD


ASSOCIATION OF NEWSPAPERS AND
NEWS PUBLISHERS

MARTA TORRES
Administrative Director & Partner
CARLOS SORIA
Chairman

Early morning newsletters are a fine time to


reach readers. By Chus del Ro

88 MOBILE MINIMUM

Who is going to pay for investigative journalism?


By Thodoris Georgakopoulos

38 SALES STRUCTURE

The use of infographics is exploding across


business and platforms. By Pablo Ramrez

NEW NEWS FORMATS

The story of how Portugals Expresso has


renewed its focus. By Pedro Monteiro

34 DEEP VALUE

Le 1 is trying to pack lots of context into


a bird with foldable paper wings.
By Juan Antonio Giner

66 VISUAL INFORMATION

20 WEEKLY FOCUS

EDITORS
MATTHEW BENNETT
bennett@innovation.media
JUAN ANTONIO GINER
giner@innovation.media
JUAN SEOR
senor@innovation.media
MARTA TORRES
torres@innovation.media

58 NEW PAPERS

104 INNOVATION MEDIA


CONSULTING GROUP

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

FOREWORD
ROBERT THOMSON
Chief Executive, News Corp / New York, USA
itation. There is a numerical limit to numerical
headlines, but these seemingly contemporary
devices (Buzzfeed et al) have been around for
many years at newspapers (Seven Particularly
Bleak Houses for Charles Dickens). Never be too
proud to adapt what works or to learn from the
success of others.
It is mildly amusing to visit certain digital companies and discover that the most obvious monument to modernity is the Post-It note,
multi-colored paper tiles proliferating on walls
and telling all that a project is evolving or a software update is due or that a bug in the coding needs a quick fix. That these archaic bits of
sticky paper are emblems of ingenuity (full disclosure - we use them at News Corp HQ) is a curiously encouraging sign of renewal and rebirth.

Smart Phones,
Smart Journalists

If the phones
are smart, we
in newspapers must
be smarter still.
A journalist must be
the smartest person
in the room.

So why have so many papers struggled to innovate? Why have some disappeared entirely?
Its not a question of ability, but one of sensibility. Some of the failings are those of myopic
managements and some are the sins of smug
journalists, satisfied in the sanctity of their
identity to the point of being contemptuous of
their society. We all have egos, but we are in
trouble when our egos have us.
Flexibility, with strategy not principles, and
institutional introspection are important ingredients. A willingness to question tradition while
still being conscious that you are the custodian
of tradition. Having been the Editor who shrunk
The Times of London, a paper whose provenance dates from 1785, I know how to agonize
over change. But that period of transformation,
which would have been impossible without
the passionate and thoughtful support of Rupert Murdoch, gave the paper a platform for the
future. The Times, in print and digital, is now
consistently profitable, which was not the case
while I was Editor, and it is poised to thrive for
another century or two.
Iconic or ironic? That so many characteristics of great newspapers are behind the success
in driving audiences at fledgling digital businesses should be a source of inspiration and irr-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

he word innovation is burdened by a certain cloying trendiness and a Victorian-era


class distinction: there are those who innovate (they inhabit the contemporary Upstairs)
and then there are the innovation impotents
(they are in the digital Downstairs). That those
who work in newspapers should have their potential to innovate questioned verges on the insulting - a great daily newspaper is a ceaseless
challenge in innovation and creativity, and a battle against the mundane and the mediocre.

The temptation to be fashionable, and not


functional, is not unique to the digital age, but
it is certainly strong and seductive. Too many
senior people in our industry have allowed content kleptomania to be standard practice and
permitted their cherished intellectual property to be co-opted by companies which promise
prestige but whose business goals are inimical
to those of all content creators. We have recently filed a submission challenging Google in Europe, where authorities are rightly examining
the business practices of a company that ceaselessly scrapes and repurposes other companies
content, and one which skillfully skews its dominance in horizontal search (a 90-plus percent
market share) to dominate verticals and crush
competitors.
We will all do business with the likes of
Google (Gmail, Android etc.) and other silicon
sisters, but we shouldnt approach the company as a supplicant, a tributary state paying homage to the Chinese Emperor, content kowtowing. And we must all understand the profundity
of the mass media mass migration to mobile. A
cursory examination of traffic metrics for any
media company will reveal how our audiences are shifting at scale to smartphones that will
only get smarter. If the phones are smart, we in
newspapers must be smarter still. A journalist
should be the smartest person in the room - the
challenge for us is that the room just got much,
much larger.
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

FOREWORD
ROBERT THOMSON
Chief Executive, News Corp / New York, USA
itation. There is a numerical limit to numerical
headlines, but these seemingly contemporary
devices (Buzzfeed et al) have been around for
many years at newspapers (Seven Particularly
Bleak Houses for Charles Dickens). Never be too
proud to adapt what works or to learn from the
success of others.
It is mildly amusing to visit certain digital companies and discover that the most obvious monument to modernity is the Post-It note,
multi-colored paper tiles proliferating on walls
and telling all that a project is evolving or a software update is due or that a bug in the coding needs a quick fix. That these archaic bits of
sticky paper are emblems of ingenuity (full disclosure - we use them at News Corp HQ) is a curiously encouraging sign of renewal and rebirth.

Smart Phones,
Smart Journalists

If the phones
are smart, we
in newspapers must
be smarter still.
A journalist must be
the smartest person
in the room.

So why have so many papers struggled to innovate? Why have some disappeared entirely?
Its not a question of ability, but one of sensibility. Some of the failings are those of myopic
managements and some are the sins of smug
journalists, satisfied in the sanctity of their
identity to the point of being contemptuous of
their society. We all have egos, but we are in
trouble when our egos have us.
Flexibility, with strategy not principles, and
institutional introspection are important ingredients. A willingness to question tradition while
still being conscious that you are the custodian
of tradition. Having been the Editor who shrunk
The Times of London, a paper whose provenance dates from 1785, I know how to agonize
over change. But that period of transformation,
which would have been impossible without
the passionate and thoughtful support of Rupert Murdoch, gave the paper a platform for the
future. The Times, in print and digital, is now
consistently profitable, which was not the case
while I was Editor, and it is poised to thrive for
another century or two.
Iconic or ironic? That so many characteristics of great newspapers are behind the success
in driving audiences at fledgling digital businesses should be a source of inspiration and irr-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

he word innovation is burdened by a certain cloying trendiness and a Victorian-era


class distinction: there are those who innovate (they inhabit the contemporary Upstairs)
and then there are the innovation impotents
(they are in the digital Downstairs). That those
who work in newspapers should have their potential to innovate questioned verges on the insulting - a great daily newspaper is a ceaseless
challenge in innovation and creativity, and a battle against the mundane and the mediocre.

The temptation to be fashionable, and not


functional, is not unique to the digital age, but
it is certainly strong and seductive. Too many
senior people in our industry have allowed content kleptomania to be standard practice and
permitted their cherished intellectual property to be co-opted by companies which promise
prestige but whose business goals are inimical
to those of all content creators. We have recently filed a submission challenging Google in Europe, where authorities are rightly examining
the business practices of a company that ceaselessly scrapes and repurposes other companies
content, and one which skillfully skews its dominance in horizontal search (a 90-plus percent
market share) to dominate verticals and crush
competitors.
We will all do business with the likes of
Google (Gmail, Android etc.) and other silicon
sisters, but we shouldnt approach the company as a supplicant, a tributary state paying homage to the Chinese Emperor, content kowtowing. And we must all understand the profundity
of the mass media mass migration to mobile. A
cursory examination of traffic metrics for any
media company will reveal how our audiences are shifting at scale to smartphones that will
only get smarter. If the phones are smart, we in
newspapers must be smarter still. A journalist
should be the smartest person in the room - the
challenge for us is that the room just got much,
much larger.
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

11

ESSAY
FRANCISCO PINTO BALSEMO
Chairman, Impresa Group / Lisbon, Portugal

True Publishers & Democracy

he biggest problem both big and small


publishers face today is increasing competition. The increase in illegal competition comes from piracy, which is the distribution without payment of content produced by
publishers. The increase in legitimate competition stems from the creation of new companies,
from content aggregators and social networks to
websites and all kinds of apps that change consumer reading habits; time once spent on media
is now spent on the new platforms. The consequences are a fall in circulation and advertising
revenues in our print products, and not enough
advertising revenue from our digital businesses
to sustain production of quality news and entertainment. When we compete with free, often
the very content we invested in and produced,
which is then is re-published by others as part of
their own offer to the public, makes selling subscriptions more difficult.

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

Publishers need to:

The second goalwhich includes OTT content for TV or the use of Big and Small data in
the personalisation of content and advertising
is being pursued but with still uncertain results.
Today, as never before, greater union and cooperation between true publishers is needed.
By true publishers, I mean those who still believe not only that media must be profitable, in
order to guarantee their editorial independence,
but also that the media are indispensable in ensuring a working democracy. As Googles Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt has said for years,
the Internet is becoming a cesspool, making it
even more important to have professional media filtering, selecting and setting a hierarchy of
news, as well as offering different opinions on
relevant issues, in accordance with professional
criteria and following codes of conduct subject
to sanction in case of breach.

Work together to get tough new enforceable


legislation approved at EU level to give publishers clear copyrights and a clear means of exercising those rights so that big content aggregators and social networks dont just free-ride on
our investments. When they scrape ormore
factuallysteal our content, and make a business
out of selling advertising or paid subscriptions
around it, this is theft and needs to stop;

The path followed by the New York Times


shows it is possible to move towards profitable digital strategies without giving up abruptly on print. In a much smaller market, we have
achieved the same thing with Expresso in Portugal (modelled on The Observer or The Sunday
Times): we launched a paid online daily, with
good sales and a select group of advertisers willing to pay higher prices than is normal online.
although, we do not know how far across the
bridge we are or if we will reach the other side.

Create new information and entertainment


products, or adapt existing ones, in order to attract new consumers willing to pay for content
and advertisers convinced by our quality and
audience; and the return on the investments
made on those products with our brands.

Democracy and freedom are too important for


true publishers not to take responsibility. In this
case, this means working together with authorities and the market, and joining forces to adapt
and adopt new technologies on a global scale,
without fear of also helping competitors.

The first goal is far from being achieved in the


European Union and is even further away on a
global scale.

True publishers of the (democratic) world, unite!

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

11

ESSAY
FRANCISCO PINTO BALSEMO
Chairman, Impresa Group / Lisbon, Portugal

True Publishers & Democracy

he biggest problem both big and small


publishers face today is increasing competition. The increase in illegal competition comes from piracy, which is the distribution without payment of content produced by
publishers. The increase in legitimate competition stems from the creation of new companies,
from content aggregators and social networks to
websites and all kinds of apps that change consumer reading habits; time once spent on media
is now spent on the new platforms. The consequences are a fall in circulation and advertising
revenues in our print products, and not enough
advertising revenue from our digital businesses
to sustain production of quality news and entertainment. When we compete with free, often
the very content we invested in and produced,
which is then is re-published by others as part of
their own offer to the public, makes selling subscriptions more difficult.

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

Publishers need to:

The second goalwhich includes OTT content for TV or the use of Big and Small data in
the personalisation of content and advertising
is being pursued but with still uncertain results.
Today, as never before, greater union and cooperation between true publishers is needed.
By true publishers, I mean those who still believe not only that media must be profitable, in
order to guarantee their editorial independence,
but also that the media are indispensable in ensuring a working democracy. As Googles Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt has said for years,
the Internet is becoming a cesspool, making it
even more important to have professional media filtering, selecting and setting a hierarchy of
news, as well as offering different opinions on
relevant issues, in accordance with professional
criteria and following codes of conduct subject
to sanction in case of breach.

Work together to get tough new enforceable


legislation approved at EU level to give publishers clear copyrights and a clear means of exercising those rights so that big content aggregators and social networks dont just free-ride on
our investments. When they scrape ormore
factuallysteal our content, and make a business
out of selling advertising or paid subscriptions
around it, this is theft and needs to stop;

The path followed by the New York Times


shows it is possible to move towards profitable digital strategies without giving up abruptly on print. In a much smaller market, we have
achieved the same thing with Expresso in Portugal (modelled on The Observer or The Sunday
Times): we launched a paid online daily, with
good sales and a select group of advertisers willing to pay higher prices than is normal online.
although, we do not know how far across the
bridge we are or if we will reach the other side.

Create new information and entertainment


products, or adapt existing ones, in order to attract new consumers willing to pay for content
and advertisers convinced by our quality and
audience; and the return on the investments
made on those products with our brands.

Democracy and freedom are too important for


true publishers not to take responsibility. In this
case, this means working together with authorities and the market, and joining forces to adapt
and adopt new technologies on a global scale,
without fear of also helping competitors.

The first goal is far from being achieved in the


European Union and is even further away on a
global scale.

True publishers of the (democratic) world, unite!

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

13

FUTURE OF

NEWS
NGEL ARRESE

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Pamplona

arrese@innovation.media

GLOBAL NEWS
GIANTS: THE NEW
YORK TIMES AND
THE BBC IMAGINE
THE FUTURE

A global media distribution network has produced global media


brands. Two of the most respected and admired, the New York Times
and the BBC, have published reports on their future over the past
year. INNOVATION looked at the differences and similarities.

I
Simplainsomnia / Flickr

n The New York Times Innovation Report,


the Gray Lady wonders how to develop its audience in an ever more digital environment.
In the BBCs The Future of News, Auntie reflects on the challenges posed by that environment for a public news service whose mission
is keeping everyone informed. The first report
is slanted more towards marketing, the second
more towards reporting and editorial but both
target the same issue: how to stop quality journalism from becoming irrelevant in the new
digital journalism landscape.
They start with the same idea: for The New
York Times, a for-profit business in a competitive environment, producing great journalism is the hardest challenge in the 21st-Century, along with the art and science of getting
its journalism to readers; for the BBC, a public service broadcaster that has also become
a global brand, changes in the media environment are less important than continuing to

find out whats really going on and report it []


where there is less reporting and more noise.
The challenges of both global brands are shared
by all quality journalism brands.
ENGAGING AUDIENCES: THE NEW YORK TIMES
The New York Times report puts less emphasis on how to do better journalism and more on
how its way of doing journalism might bring in
more loyal readers: to take the lead in getting
more readers to spend more time reading more
of our journalism. The biggest novelty in this
analysis, conditioned as it is by the growth of
digitally native competitors like the Huffington
Post, Vox or BuzzFeed, is that it centres a large
part of the responsibility for the success of audience development on the newsroom itself.
There is a need to: tune the newsroom engine
to get all the cylinders firing more efficiently.
The newsroom must lead the process of discovery (better packaging and distribution of

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

13

FUTURE OF

NEWS
NGEL ARRESE

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Pamplona

arrese@innovation.media

GLOBAL NEWS
GIANTS: THE NEW
YORK TIMES AND
THE BBC IMAGINE
THE FUTURE

A global media distribution network has produced global media


brands. Two of the most respected and admired, the New York Times
and the BBC, have published reports on their future over the past
year. INNOVATION looked at the differences and similarities.

I
Simplainsomnia / Flickr

n The New York Times Innovation Report,


the Gray Lady wonders how to develop its audience in an ever more digital environment.
In the BBCs The Future of News, Auntie reflects on the challenges posed by that environment for a public news service whose mission
is keeping everyone informed. The first report
is slanted more towards marketing, the second
more towards reporting and editorial but both
target the same issue: how to stop quality journalism from becoming irrelevant in the new
digital journalism landscape.
They start with the same idea: for The New
York Times, a for-profit business in a competitive environment, producing great journalism is the hardest challenge in the 21st-Century, along with the art and science of getting
its journalism to readers; for the BBC, a public service broadcaster that has also become
a global brand, changes in the media environment are less important than continuing to

find out whats really going on and report it []


where there is less reporting and more noise.
The challenges of both global brands are shared
by all quality journalism brands.
ENGAGING AUDIENCES: THE NEW YORK TIMES
The New York Times report puts less emphasis on how to do better journalism and more on
how its way of doing journalism might bring in
more loyal readers: to take the lead in getting
more readers to spend more time reading more
of our journalism. The biggest novelty in this
analysis, conditioned as it is by the growth of
digitally native competitors like the Huffington
Post, Vox or BuzzFeed, is that it centres a large
part of the responsibility for the success of audience development on the newsroom itself.
There is a need to: tune the newsroom engine
to get all the cylinders firing more efficiently.
The newsroom must lead the process of discovery (better packaging and distribution of

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

14

15

FUTURE OF

FUTURE OF

NEWS
The BBCs Future
Of News Report

journalism), promotion (to be better advocates of their own work) and connection (pursuing user-generated content, events and other
forms of engagement in a way that reflects our
standards and values). The report suggests a
spirit of experimentation and interdisciplinary
collaboration infuse all of those areas, in order
to become a true digital-first newsroom [] deemphasising print and assessing more digital
needs, with more interplay between the newsroom units focused on reader experiences, notably design, technology, consumer insights,
R&D and product.

In an environment
characterised by
information hyperinflation,
traditional media outlets
must adapt to change without
losing sight of their basic
mission to produce quality
journalism

NEWS
The New York TImess
Innovation Report

The report says the achievement of these aims,


quite revolutionary in a journalistic culture so
linked historically to the division of church and
state, requires the creation of a Newsroom Strategy Team to work alongside newsroom leaders
to extract the reporting consequences derived
from a better analysis of competing strategies,
technological change and reader behaviour insights. The reports authors suggest the need to
bring in new, non-traditional talent to undertake new newsroom roles: makers, entrepreneurs, reader advocates and zeitgeist watchers.

tain engaged audiences with relevant stories


that make the most of all new technologies have
to offer (collaborative journalism, news you
can use, robo-journalism, content everywhere,
drones, etc.) but focused on using technology
for the public good.
At the same time, new news beats flourish
(health, tech and privacy, conflicts, etc.) alongside interest communities that will be crucial in
the future (women, cultural communities, business, etc.).

HOW TO KEEP EVERYONE INFORMED: THE BBC


The BBC Future of News report thinks about
longer-term challenges due to changes that are
happening in three key areas for journalism: information technologies, finding, producing and
broadcasting stories, and the transformation of
reader profiles and news behaviour.
New technologies provide journalists with
enormous opportunities (connectivity, computer power, the Internet of things, big data. cloud
computing, algorithms and machine learning,
etc.) but also create big challenges in terms of
people knowing whats really going on.
The BBC report suggests the best way to tackle this paradox, in order to keep everyone informed and report the unreported is to understand and adapt to those changes, taking into
account the huge diversity across its audience:
old and young, global and local, connected and
disconnected, with very general or very specific
interests. The organisation must do so without
forgetting its public service journalism is committed to its journalistic values, preferring quality over quantity, independence, openness and
universality.
The report suggests a new journalism is needed, one that serves those needs by emphasising local news, data journalism, personalised
news and location-based stories. The aim, as
in the case of the New York Times, is to main-

AN OLD MISSION IN A NEW LANDSCAPE


l Despite the different focuses, reading both the
New York Times and BBC reports shows media
organisations face common challenges in preparing quality journalism for the future. Neither
of them doubts their conventional journalism
mission, which has historically allowed them
to stand on the podium of the most respected
and admired media organisations in the world,
but both outlets see challenges in maintaining
that leadership in disruptive times. The phrase
this old mission in a new landscape will only
remain relevant if the following challenges can
be faced

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

l Activated Audiences: Audience engagement


(BBC) vs. Audience development (NYT).
Existing brands must grow their audiences and
improve their loyalty, and dedicate resources
towards those aims. The key to success is the
newsroom and the content it produces
l News vs. Noise: The problem of how to distinguish good information from bad (BBC)
vs. Focusing on the core is harder than starting
something new (NYT). In an environment characterised by information hyperinflation, traditional media outlets must adapt to change without losing sight of their basic mission to produce
quality journalism

l Experimentation & Discovery: Experimentation and innovation with content (BBC) vs.
Reassessing everything from our roster of talent to our organizational structure to what we
do and how we do it (NYT). The true engine of
change and adaptation to a new news environment.
l Technology Savvy: Without being explicit,
both reports assume the most will be made of
the opportunities offered by new technologies
all of them. Technology use adds lasting incremental value to the journalistic mission of both
brands, while creating and broadcasting stories.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Each media outlet can only face the future environment we are all racing towards from where it currently finds itself. The experience, research and scenarios outlined by global media brands, however,
can provide every project with useful signposts that
highlight relevant aspects of the future space for all.
Media companies must then adapt their operations
to prepare for future threats and opportunties.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

14

15

FUTURE OF

FUTURE OF

NEWS
The BBCs Future
Of News Report

journalism), promotion (to be better advocates of their own work) and connection (pursuing user-generated content, events and other
forms of engagement in a way that reflects our
standards and values). The report suggests a
spirit of experimentation and interdisciplinary
collaboration infuse all of those areas, in order
to become a true digital-first newsroom [] deemphasising print and assessing more digital
needs, with more interplay between the newsroom units focused on reader experiences, notably design, technology, consumer insights,
R&D and product.

In an environment
characterised by
information hyperinflation,
traditional media outlets
must adapt to change without
losing sight of their basic
mission to produce quality
journalism

NEWS
The New York TImess
Innovation Report

The report says the achievement of these aims,


quite revolutionary in a journalistic culture so
linked historically to the division of church and
state, requires the creation of a Newsroom Strategy Team to work alongside newsroom leaders
to extract the reporting consequences derived
from a better analysis of competing strategies,
technological change and reader behaviour insights. The reports authors suggest the need to
bring in new, non-traditional talent to undertake new newsroom roles: makers, entrepreneurs, reader advocates and zeitgeist watchers.

tain engaged audiences with relevant stories


that make the most of all new technologies have
to offer (collaborative journalism, news you
can use, robo-journalism, content everywhere,
drones, etc.) but focused on using technology
for the public good.
At the same time, new news beats flourish
(health, tech and privacy, conflicts, etc.) alongside interest communities that will be crucial in
the future (women, cultural communities, business, etc.).

HOW TO KEEP EVERYONE INFORMED: THE BBC


The BBC Future of News report thinks about
longer-term challenges due to changes that are
happening in three key areas for journalism: information technologies, finding, producing and
broadcasting stories, and the transformation of
reader profiles and news behaviour.
New technologies provide journalists with
enormous opportunities (connectivity, computer power, the Internet of things, big data. cloud
computing, algorithms and machine learning,
etc.) but also create big challenges in terms of
people knowing whats really going on.
The BBC report suggests the best way to tackle this paradox, in order to keep everyone informed and report the unreported is to understand and adapt to those changes, taking into
account the huge diversity across its audience:
old and young, global and local, connected and
disconnected, with very general or very specific
interests. The organisation must do so without
forgetting its public service journalism is committed to its journalistic values, preferring quality over quantity, independence, openness and
universality.
The report suggests a new journalism is needed, one that serves those needs by emphasising local news, data journalism, personalised
news and location-based stories. The aim, as
in the case of the New York Times, is to main-

AN OLD MISSION IN A NEW LANDSCAPE


l Despite the different focuses, reading both the
New York Times and BBC reports shows media
organisations face common challenges in preparing quality journalism for the future. Neither
of them doubts their conventional journalism
mission, which has historically allowed them
to stand on the podium of the most respected
and admired media organisations in the world,
but both outlets see challenges in maintaining
that leadership in disruptive times. The phrase
this old mission in a new landscape will only
remain relevant if the following challenges can
be faced

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

l Activated Audiences: Audience engagement


(BBC) vs. Audience development (NYT).
Existing brands must grow their audiences and
improve their loyalty, and dedicate resources
towards those aims. The key to success is the
newsroom and the content it produces
l News vs. Noise: The problem of how to distinguish good information from bad (BBC)
vs. Focusing on the core is harder than starting
something new (NYT). In an environment characterised by information hyperinflation, traditional media outlets must adapt to change without losing sight of their basic mission to produce
quality journalism

l Experimentation & Discovery: Experimentation and innovation with content (BBC) vs.
Reassessing everything from our roster of talent to our organizational structure to what we
do and how we do it (NYT). The true engine of
change and adaptation to a new news environment.
l Technology Savvy: Without being explicit,
both reports assume the most will be made of
the opportunities offered by new technologies
all of them. Technology use adds lasting incremental value to the journalistic mission of both
brands, while creating and broadcasting stories.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Each media outlet can only face the future environment we are all racing towards from where it currently finds itself. The experience, research and scenarios outlined by global media brands, however,
can provide every project with useful signposts that
highlight relevant aspects of the future space for all.
Media companies must then adapt their operations
to prepare for future threats and opportunties.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

16
12

17

DIGITAL

FUTURE OF

FIRST

NEWS
BBC
For anyone interested in reporting the world they live in, the means
of finding stories, the methods of telling stories, the mechanisms
of sharing stories, have all become infinitely bigger and better
In the internet age, the BBC is more necessary and valuable than ever.
The internet is not keeping everyone informed, nor will it; it is, in fact,
magnifying problems of information inequality, misinformation, polarization
and disengagement. Our job is keeping everyone informed
The opportunities of the New Journalism are plain to see in data journalism,
personalized news and engaging our viewers, listeners and users
so we have genuinely activated audiences
With even better connectivity people may expect news to find them,
not the other way around
Thinking about the period between now and 2027 it is clear that much
of what is central to journalism will remain the same reporting what is
happening, unearthing original stories, holding those in power to account,
analyzing and explaining complex subjects to a general audience

Two 2013 memos from Editor Lionel Barber (above)


caused a stir in FTs newsroom and were closely followed
by newsroom executives around the world

The BBC has always been an idea, not a gadget. It has been dedicated to
using technology for the public good. Over the years, it has made the most
of the wireless, the television, the computer screen. But it is defined itself by
its purpose, not the platform

NEW YORK TIMES


Audience development is the work of expanding our loyal and engaged audience
More than ever, the hard work of growing our audience
falls squarely on the newsroom
Packaging, promoting and sharing our journalism requires editorial oversight
Newsroom as a whole must take the reins in pursuing user-generated
content, events and other forms of engagement in a way that reflects
our standards and values
The newsroom should clarify how much personalization
we want on our home page and on our apps
The newsroom should collaborate with business-side units focused on reader
experience (Design, Technology, Consumer Insight Group, R&D and Product)
In the coming years, The New York Times needs to accelerate its transition from
a newspaper that also produces a rich and impressive digital report to a digital
publication that also produces a rich and impressive newspaper

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

16
12

17

DIGITAL

FUTURE OF

FIRST

NEWS
BBC
For anyone interested in reporting the world they live in, the means
of finding stories, the methods of telling stories, the mechanisms
of sharing stories, have all become infinitely bigger and better
In the internet age, the BBC is more necessary and valuable than ever.
The internet is not keeping everyone informed, nor will it; it is, in fact,
magnifying problems of information inequality, misinformation, polarization
and disengagement. Our job is keeping everyone informed
The opportunities of the New Journalism are plain to see in data journalism,
personalized news and engaging our viewers, listeners and users
so we have genuinely activated audiences
With even better connectivity people may expect news to find them,
not the other way around
Thinking about the period between now and 2027 it is clear that much
of what is central to journalism will remain the same reporting what is
happening, unearthing original stories, holding those in power to account,
analyzing and explaining complex subjects to a general audience

Two 2013 memos from Editor Lionel Barber (above)


caused a stir in FTs newsroom and were closely followed
by newsroom executives around the world

The BBC has always been an idea, not a gadget. It has been dedicated to
using technology for the public good. Over the years, it has made the most
of the wireless, the television, the computer screen. But it is defined itself by
its purpose, not the platform

NEW YORK TIMES


Audience development is the work of expanding our loyal and engaged audience
More than ever, the hard work of growing our audience
falls squarely on the newsroom
Packaging, promoting and sharing our journalism requires editorial oversight
Newsroom as a whole must take the reins in pursuing user-generated
content, events and other forms of engagement in a way that reflects
our standards and values
The newsroom should clarify how much personalization
we want on our home page and on our apps
The newsroom should collaborate with business-side units focused on reader
experience (Design, Technology, Consumer Insight Group, R&D and Product)
In the coming years, The New York Times needs to accelerate its transition from
a newspaper that also produces a rich and impressive digital report to a digital
publication that also produces a rich and impressive newspaper

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

H. Michael Karshis / Flickr

19

INFLUENCE VS

INCOME
EMMA GOODMAN

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, London

goodman@innovation.media

THE TIMES IS
PROFITABLE BUT IS IT
LOCKING ITSELF OUT
OF BIG DEBATES?

In December 2014, News UK reported Times Newspapers Limited


had posted an operating profit of 1.7million, its first in 13 years,
but are TNL newspapers and other subscription-only news sites
losing influence and shutting themselves out of national debates?
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

H. Michael Karshis / Flickr

19

INFLUENCE VS

INCOME
EMMA GOODMAN

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, London

goodman@innovation.media

THE TIMES IS
PROFITABLE BUT IS IT
LOCKING ITSELF OUT
OF BIG DEBATES?

In December 2014, News UK reported Times Newspapers Limited


had posted an operating profit of 1.7million, its first in 13 years,
but are TNL newspapers and other subscription-only news sites
losing influence and shutting themselves out of national debates?
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

20

21

INFLUENCE VS

INFLUENCE VS

INCOME

hen The Times and Sunday Times


introduced hard, non-porous online paywalls in 2010 they were greeted with skepticism and incredulity from media
gurus, while several other newspaper owners
wondered if this might work for them, glad that
somebody else was trying it first. Recently there
has been more of a tendency among commentators to cover the success of the paywall and in
December 2014 the papers owner News UK, a
subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corp, announced that Times Newspapers Ltd had posted
its first operating profit since 2001.
But can The Times paywall really be considered a success? What has made it work? And is
it really a model to follow?
THE EXPERIMENT
Although the last few years have seen many
news organisations adopt some kind of paid
online content model, the hard paywall is an
unusual and risky option. Most news outlets,
including other properties owned by Rupert
Murdoch elsewhere in the English-speaking
world, such as The Wall Street Journal or The
Australian, have opted for either a freemium
model, or a metered one, which has been championed by The New York Times.
These models allow for a certain level of free
access to content, higher readership numbers
and satisfied advertisers. Murdoch chose to do
something different with The Times: the hard
paywall emphasises the value inherent in journalism, making it the product rather than selling the customer to advertisers.
Unsurprisingly, the introduction of the paywall led to a massive drop in page views and
readers: a figure of 90% was reported at the
time. Times executives took this in their stride,
publicly at least. Many of the lost page views and
unique visitors would only have come from occasional visitors anyway, whilst loyal readers
could be expected to return.
Subscriber numbers have been climbing since
then and, as of the end of October 2014, the paper had 170,000 readers paying for the digital-only product, on top of 220,000 readers
subscribed to the combined print-digital package. Digital subscriber numbers have been rising faster than print sales and the numbers are
adding up.
News UK announced in a press release on
December 2, 2014 that Times Newspapers Ltd
(TNL), which owns both newspapers, had posted an operating profit of 1.7million for the financial year ended 30 June 2014. Something

that almost everyone said couldnt happen confounded prophecy, wrote former Guardian editor and commentator Peter Preston shortly after
the results were announced.
The figures confirm that the paid-for strategy, pursued by News UK, is working well and
is helping to secure a sustainable future for the
news, sport, analysis and comment of the papers, read the press release. As Preston pointed
out, though, there are other factors that might
help account for the profit, including moving
into a cheaper office, making staff cuts, taking
on external printing contracts and more.
Regardless of the exact reasons, News UK can
boast this profit is a success, proving it is possible to survive with no free content.
There is also the membership club with a
range of perks that might or might not be related
to its journalistic mission. Benefits available at
the time of writing include competitions to win
holidays and handbags, various events in London and elsewhere in the UK, including talks
chaired by Times journalists and correspondents book presentations, private museum visits, vouchers for free audio books and flower
bulbs.
News UK said that in 2014, 28,000 tickets
were sold to Times+ members for 150 events,
and journalists hosted more than 50 events at
the Cheltenham Literature Festival which the
papers sponsored, with 140,000 tickets sold.
Many publications are experimenting with
such membership schemes. The Guardian an-

The hard paywall


emphasises the value
inherent in journalism,
making it the product
rather than selling
the customer to
advertisers

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INCOME
nounced a multi-tiered membership scheme in
September last year, with levels priced from free
to 60 a month. Around the same time, The Wall
Street Journal launched WSJ+ which offers benefits and perks to subscribers. There is little evidence that they drive subscriptions, though.
Professor Charlie Beckett, founder of POLIS,
a think-tank for research and debate into international journalism and society within the
Media & Communications department at LSE,
said: There is nothing new in offers and competitions that date right back to Harmsworths
Daily Mail in the early 20th century. Generally,
competitionslike price discountsonly have a
short-term impact on consumption and what
newspapers need is sustained engagement and
subscription.
PROFITABLE PACKAGES
The tablet edition is one of the big selling points
of the digital pack. Unlike a website, it offers
readers finishability, and The Guardian recently reported The Times was moving towards
a new edition-based digital publishing model that would see its website updated at specific times to create three or four editions each day.
If people are paying even in the crowded UK
news landscape, with a strong public broadcaster and a handful of quality dailies, The Times is
doing something right, but readership is a fraction of that at papers such as The Daily Mail or
The Guardian, whose open strategy aims to have
its journalism read as far and wide as possible.
Audit Bureau of Circulation figures for March
2015 showed MailOnline reporting 226 million
unique browsers and The Guardian 127 million,
as part of a continuing upwards trend over the
past 12 months. Monetising so many visitors is
another question but the ability to influence
them is there.
The TNL press release announcing the 2014
profit refers to the Timess agenda-setting reporting and writing and to its journalism having had a huge impact at home and abroad.
But does it lose impact behind a metered paywall? Does its model not shut the Times off from
national and international debate?
In terms of influence, says Professor Beckett:
Times journalists work hard on social and other
media to keep the papers profile in the public
eye. The papers joint Facebook page has more
than 353,000 likes; on Twitter, The Times
has 419,000 followers and the Sunday Times
292,000, although of course only subscribers can
access any of the content shared on their pages. It
is easy to argue that anybody with any decision-

making power in the UK would be reading the


papers anyway: influence and impact depend on
who is reading as much as how many.
News UKs big-selling tabloid, The Sun, followed its stable mate behind a paywall in August
2013 and reported 225,000 subscribers by November 2014. However, in the run up to the UK
general election in May 2015, it launched a new
free-to-access site focused on politics called Sun
Nation. A release in March 2015 said it would:
use social media to share original political content that will ensure The Sun is at the heart of
the debate over the next ten weeks. Although
not explicitly stated, the implication is that free
access and sharing by social media are crucial to
being at the heart of the debate about who holds
political power in the UK. The hard paywall is
not a model that has been widely adopted by
big papers, even by those within the Murdoch
empire, with the exception of The Sun, but relatively successful initiatives do exist at smaller,
newer publications.
Mediapart, a French online-only investigative news site reported in March 2015 that seven
years after its creation, 112,000 subscribers are
generating an annual turnover of 8.8 milliona
27% increase in 2014 compared to 2013and a
profit of 1.48 milliona 64% increase.
Former Wall Street Journal reporter Jessica
Lessin told Digiday in January 2015 that her oneyear old subscription site The Information has
a subscriber base in the low thousands, each
paying 399/year.
A recent US survey by the Media Insight Project found that 40% of Millennials (aged 18-34)
pay for at least one news-specific digital service,
which is promising. Given the volatile and unreliable nature of digital advertising, the fact that
paid sales for 2014 represented 51% of TNL revenue, compared with 44% coming from advertising, will also be an attractive situation.
Professor Beckett warns on future growth,
though: longer-term there are deeper questions over the sustainability of the closed model
in marketing terms if it does not attract enough
new readers through social media.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
The question of infuence is no small matter, especially when the relationship between business,
media and politicis is considered. Each publication should carfeullly reflect on the target audience
it wishes to influence and adopt a platform strategy and business model that best fit that audiences
needs and news consumption preferences.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

20

21

INFLUENCE VS

INFLUENCE VS

INCOME

hen The Times and Sunday Times


introduced hard, non-porous online paywalls in 2010 they were greeted with skepticism and incredulity from media
gurus, while several other newspaper owners
wondered if this might work for them, glad that
somebody else was trying it first. Recently there
has been more of a tendency among commentators to cover the success of the paywall and in
December 2014 the papers owner News UK, a
subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corp, announced that Times Newspapers Ltd had posted
its first operating profit since 2001.
But can The Times paywall really be considered a success? What has made it work? And is
it really a model to follow?
THE EXPERIMENT
Although the last few years have seen many
news organisations adopt some kind of paid
online content model, the hard paywall is an
unusual and risky option. Most news outlets,
including other properties owned by Rupert
Murdoch elsewhere in the English-speaking
world, such as The Wall Street Journal or The
Australian, have opted for either a freemium
model, or a metered one, which has been championed by The New York Times.
These models allow for a certain level of free
access to content, higher readership numbers
and satisfied advertisers. Murdoch chose to do
something different with The Times: the hard
paywall emphasises the value inherent in journalism, making it the product rather than selling the customer to advertisers.
Unsurprisingly, the introduction of the paywall led to a massive drop in page views and
readers: a figure of 90% was reported at the
time. Times executives took this in their stride,
publicly at least. Many of the lost page views and
unique visitors would only have come from occasional visitors anyway, whilst loyal readers
could be expected to return.
Subscriber numbers have been climbing since
then and, as of the end of October 2014, the paper had 170,000 readers paying for the digital-only product, on top of 220,000 readers
subscribed to the combined print-digital package. Digital subscriber numbers have been rising faster than print sales and the numbers are
adding up.
News UK announced in a press release on
December 2, 2014 that Times Newspapers Ltd
(TNL), which owns both newspapers, had posted an operating profit of 1.7million for the financial year ended 30 June 2014. Something

that almost everyone said couldnt happen confounded prophecy, wrote former Guardian editor and commentator Peter Preston shortly after
the results were announced.
The figures confirm that the paid-for strategy, pursued by News UK, is working well and
is helping to secure a sustainable future for the
news, sport, analysis and comment of the papers, read the press release. As Preston pointed
out, though, there are other factors that might
help account for the profit, including moving
into a cheaper office, making staff cuts, taking
on external printing contracts and more.
Regardless of the exact reasons, News UK can
boast this profit is a success, proving it is possible to survive with no free content.
There is also the membership club with a
range of perks that might or might not be related
to its journalistic mission. Benefits available at
the time of writing include competitions to win
holidays and handbags, various events in London and elsewhere in the UK, including talks
chaired by Times journalists and correspondents book presentations, private museum visits, vouchers for free audio books and flower
bulbs.
News UK said that in 2014, 28,000 tickets
were sold to Times+ members for 150 events,
and journalists hosted more than 50 events at
the Cheltenham Literature Festival which the
papers sponsored, with 140,000 tickets sold.
Many publications are experimenting with
such membership schemes. The Guardian an-

The hard paywall


emphasises the value
inherent in journalism,
making it the product
rather than selling
the customer to
advertisers

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INCOME
nounced a multi-tiered membership scheme in
September last year, with levels priced from free
to 60 a month. Around the same time, The Wall
Street Journal launched WSJ+ which offers benefits and perks to subscribers. There is little evidence that they drive subscriptions, though.
Professor Charlie Beckett, founder of POLIS,
a think-tank for research and debate into international journalism and society within the
Media & Communications department at LSE,
said: There is nothing new in offers and competitions that date right back to Harmsworths
Daily Mail in the early 20th century. Generally,
competitionslike price discountsonly have a
short-term impact on consumption and what
newspapers need is sustained engagement and
subscription.
PROFITABLE PACKAGES
The tablet edition is one of the big selling points
of the digital pack. Unlike a website, it offers
readers finishability, and The Guardian recently reported The Times was moving towards
a new edition-based digital publishing model that would see its website updated at specific times to create three or four editions each day.
If people are paying even in the crowded UK
news landscape, with a strong public broadcaster and a handful of quality dailies, The Times is
doing something right, but readership is a fraction of that at papers such as The Daily Mail or
The Guardian, whose open strategy aims to have
its journalism read as far and wide as possible.
Audit Bureau of Circulation figures for March
2015 showed MailOnline reporting 226 million
unique browsers and The Guardian 127 million,
as part of a continuing upwards trend over the
past 12 months. Monetising so many visitors is
another question but the ability to influence
them is there.
The TNL press release announcing the 2014
profit refers to the Timess agenda-setting reporting and writing and to its journalism having had a huge impact at home and abroad.
But does it lose impact behind a metered paywall? Does its model not shut the Times off from
national and international debate?
In terms of influence, says Professor Beckett:
Times journalists work hard on social and other
media to keep the papers profile in the public
eye. The papers joint Facebook page has more
than 353,000 likes; on Twitter, The Times
has 419,000 followers and the Sunday Times
292,000, although of course only subscribers can
access any of the content shared on their pages. It
is easy to argue that anybody with any decision-

making power in the UK would be reading the


papers anyway: influence and impact depend on
who is reading as much as how many.
News UKs big-selling tabloid, The Sun, followed its stable mate behind a paywall in August
2013 and reported 225,000 subscribers by November 2014. However, in the run up to the UK
general election in May 2015, it launched a new
free-to-access site focused on politics called Sun
Nation. A release in March 2015 said it would:
use social media to share original political content that will ensure The Sun is at the heart of
the debate over the next ten weeks. Although
not explicitly stated, the implication is that free
access and sharing by social media are crucial to
being at the heart of the debate about who holds
political power in the UK. The hard paywall is
not a model that has been widely adopted by
big papers, even by those within the Murdoch
empire, with the exception of The Sun, but relatively successful initiatives do exist at smaller,
newer publications.
Mediapart, a French online-only investigative news site reported in March 2015 that seven
years after its creation, 112,000 subscribers are
generating an annual turnover of 8.8 milliona
27% increase in 2014 compared to 2013and a
profit of 1.48 milliona 64% increase.
Former Wall Street Journal reporter Jessica
Lessin told Digiday in January 2015 that her oneyear old subscription site The Information has
a subscriber base in the low thousands, each
paying 399/year.
A recent US survey by the Media Insight Project found that 40% of Millennials (aged 18-34)
pay for at least one news-specific digital service,
which is promising. Given the volatile and unreliable nature of digital advertising, the fact that
paid sales for 2014 represented 51% of TNL revenue, compared with 44% coming from advertising, will also be an attractive situation.
Professor Beckett warns on future growth,
though: longer-term there are deeper questions over the sustainability of the closed model
in marketing terms if it does not attract enough
new readers through social media.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
The question of infuence is no small matter, especially when the relationship between business,
media and politicis is considered. Each publication should carfeullly reflect on the target audience
it wishes to influence and adopt a platform strategy and business model that best fit that audiences
needs and news consumption preferences.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

22

WEEKLY

FOCUS
PEDRO MONTEIRO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Lisbon

monteiro@innovation.media

EXPRESSO
OFFERS READERS,
ADVERTISERS &
JOURNALISTS MORE
FOCUS AND CLARITY

Making sense of all of the information swirling around the globe, and
the new habits technolgies offer readers is no simple task. INNOVATION spoke to Portugals Expresso about its new weekly focus.

ornal Expresso was born in 1973 as a weekly


newspaper and soon became the best selling paper in Portugal. The Portuguese considered it one of the best media products on the
market. Both of these things are still true today.
In 1997, we launched a successful first website
and by the early 2000s, were experimenting
with a paywall of sorts, selling access to articles
via a telephone hot line. That didnt work so we
went back to a fully open website although Expresso never gave its paid content away for free.
In 2009, we moved on to Facebook and Twitter
and in 2011 we launched a tablet version of the

weekly newspaper, increasing digital subscriptions by 15%, a number that has been growing
ever since.
By 2013, though, it was clear Expresso needed a new approach to digital, both editorially and as regards its business model. The newsroom needed to fully embrace digital news, so
we came up with a fresh approach, a redefined
business model and new ideas for paid content.
Pedro Norton, Impresas CEO, said: Our
global strategy is that each of our brands must
break the link with its original distribution platform and focus instead on reaching its audience
blair_25 / Flickr

22

WEEKLY

FOCUS
PEDRO MONTEIRO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Lisbon

monteiro@innovation.media

EXPRESSO
OFFERS READERS,
ADVERTISERS &
JOURNALISTS MORE
FOCUS AND CLARITY

Making sense of all of the information swirling around the globe, and
the new habits technolgies offer readers is no simple task. INNOVATION spoke to Portugals Expresso about its new weekly focus.

ornal Expresso was born in 1973 as a weekly


newspaper and soon became the best selling paper in Portugal. The Portuguese considered it one of the best media products on the
market. Both of these things are still true today.
In 1997, we launched a successful first website
and by the early 2000s, were experimenting
with a paywall of sorts, selling access to articles
via a telephone hot line. That didnt work so we
went back to a fully open website although Expresso never gave its paid content away for free.
In 2009, we moved on to Facebook and Twitter
and in 2011 we launched a tablet version of the

weekly newspaper, increasing digital subscriptions by 15%, a number that has been growing
ever since.
By 2013, though, it was clear Expresso needed a new approach to digital, both editorially and as regards its business model. The newsroom needed to fully embrace digital news, so
we came up with a fresh approach, a redefined
business model and new ideas for paid content.
Pedro Norton, Impresas CEO, said: Our
global strategy is that each of our brands must
break the link with its original distribution platform and focus instead on reaching its audience
blair_25 / Flickr

24

25

WEEKLY

WEEKLY

FOCUS

wherever they are, whenever they want us.


This led to a simple strategy for Expresso: the
print and digital distribution of the newspapers
content are two sides of the same coin, and editorial products are adapted to readers needs.
They can access all of our content via whichever
channels they wish to use.
This business strategy led to reflections on
the papers editorial focus: we had to understand our audience better and create a family of products that would best serve our readers throughout the week and at different times
of the day. All the packages should contain the
newspapers values and quality control. Expresso Dirio was born on May 6, 2014.
Expresso Dirio is published at 6 p.m. every weekday and has razor-sharp focus. Readers are avid news consumers and, by the end of
the day, have been inundated with updates, so a
very edited format is needed to bring attention
to the facts that most likely to affect their lives.
With this in mind, we put all our content on
to an added-value diet, rather than separating
out the daily and weekly editions.
PAID CONTENT GALORE
We look at Expresso Dirio as a way to reach
out to our readers at a moment and on an occasion where we didnt have a paid editorial offering. When you subscribe to Expresso, you get
the global offering. For our customer, the unit is
not the weekly edition or the daily one its the
week, said Pedro Norton. Readers get a week

of paid content. Online this was relatively easy:


when you subscribe, you get access to all of our
content for the duration of your subscription.
In print, however, and remember we were not
going to differentiate between platforms, it was
a trickier challenge. A weekly code in the print
edition solved the problem: introduce the code
from your print copy and you get a weeks access to the website.
We can add as much paid content as we like
and distribute it in numerous ways whilst still
serving our readers with a single subscription
or weekly print code.
Advertising planning developed alongside
editorial strategy.
Pedro Norton explains: Our line of thought
was: the Expresso community is a special community with added value. It doesnt make any
sense to sell the possibility of contact with our
audience in a different way. We can never differentiate ourselves in terms of quantity. Lets do
this from quality. This distinctionwhich was
always recognised in our paper producthas a
value which must also be translated online. Its
a hard battle that must be supported by goals
but one which is crucial for a sustainable migration from paper to digital.
Companies now advertise both in print and
online: they are paying to reach our premium
audience, with higher ad rates than has been
standard online. Expressos strategy is based
on quality, not quantity, so our marketing team
commissioned an independent quarterly report

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

FOCUS

on our reader community. First results show


Expresso has a very qualified community of
readers who engage in our content in a manner attractive to advertisers. We are about to do
a second edition of the report and our (intentionally) small group of advertisers is very happy with the results so far.
ADAPTING WORK FLOWS
A new daily and more online content, on top of
the weekly edition, challenged the newsroom
initially, but it is now fully integrated with almost no distinction across platforms in terms
of content production. The biggest change came
not in formats but work flows and schedules,
with only marginal new hiring.
Pedro Nortons impression of the first year
of changes is clear: Up to now the results have
been very good. Expresso Dirio has a base of
18.000 daily readers, which places the publication in the top tier of Portuguese daily newspapers. Advertising results are above expectations.
Were still fine tuning the strategy but the idea is
to broaden the approach to Impresas other editorial brands.
He is equally emphatic regarding Expressos
team: This is a path that cannot be missed. Expresso is no longer just a weekly newspaper.
Im fully aware this is more demanding for the
Expresso newsroom and that it means added
work. Nevertheless, it also means more opportunities, bigger visibility, more future. If theres
something to be proud of it is the openness of

Expressos newsroom and its editors-in-chiefs.


By embracing the challenge, with the energy theyve shown, the Expresso newsroom has
proven to be the best newspaper newsroom in
the country.
Much more still needs to be done. Since the
launch of Expresso Dirio, news production
has become a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week business, with more emphasis on social networks.
We have embraced digital storytelling, along
the lines of the New York Timess Snowfall or
The Guardians NSA Files. We are sending out
a morning newsletter, which has been a huge
success. The changes have brought more possibilities than problems. Readers, advertisers and
journalist have all gained from a clearer strategy. Its a great time to be a journalist.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
A careful study of the way your audience consumes
news, how they are using their devices and at what
times of the day and week might reveal hidden
clues as to how a media organisation can transform
and prepare for the future without necessarily having to invest heavily in new hires or technology platforms. Better thinking will likely lead to more efficient change.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

24

25

WEEKLY

WEEKLY

FOCUS

wherever they are, whenever they want us.


This led to a simple strategy for Expresso: the
print and digital distribution of the newspapers
content are two sides of the same coin, and editorial products are adapted to readers needs.
They can access all of our content via whichever
channels they wish to use.
This business strategy led to reflections on
the papers editorial focus: we had to understand our audience better and create a family of products that would best serve our readers throughout the week and at different times
of the day. All the packages should contain the
newspapers values and quality control. Expresso Dirio was born on May 6, 2014.
Expresso Dirio is published at 6 p.m. every weekday and has razor-sharp focus. Readers are avid news consumers and, by the end of
the day, have been inundated with updates, so a
very edited format is needed to bring attention
to the facts that most likely to affect their lives.
With this in mind, we put all our content on
to an added-value diet, rather than separating
out the daily and weekly editions.
PAID CONTENT GALORE
We look at Expresso Dirio as a way to reach
out to our readers at a moment and on an occasion where we didnt have a paid editorial offering. When you subscribe to Expresso, you get
the global offering. For our customer, the unit is
not the weekly edition or the daily one its the
week, said Pedro Norton. Readers get a week

of paid content. Online this was relatively easy:


when you subscribe, you get access to all of our
content for the duration of your subscription.
In print, however, and remember we were not
going to differentiate between platforms, it was
a trickier challenge. A weekly code in the print
edition solved the problem: introduce the code
from your print copy and you get a weeks access to the website.
We can add as much paid content as we like
and distribute it in numerous ways whilst still
serving our readers with a single subscription
or weekly print code.
Advertising planning developed alongside
editorial strategy.
Pedro Norton explains: Our line of thought
was: the Expresso community is a special community with added value. It doesnt make any
sense to sell the possibility of contact with our
audience in a different way. We can never differentiate ourselves in terms of quantity. Lets do
this from quality. This distinctionwhich was
always recognised in our paper producthas a
value which must also be translated online. Its
a hard battle that must be supported by goals
but one which is crucial for a sustainable migration from paper to digital.
Companies now advertise both in print and
online: they are paying to reach our premium
audience, with higher ad rates than has been
standard online. Expressos strategy is based
on quality, not quantity, so our marketing team
commissioned an independent quarterly report

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

FOCUS

on our reader community. First results show


Expresso has a very qualified community of
readers who engage in our content in a manner attractive to advertisers. We are about to do
a second edition of the report and our (intentionally) small group of advertisers is very happy with the results so far.
ADAPTING WORK FLOWS
A new daily and more online content, on top of
the weekly edition, challenged the newsroom
initially, but it is now fully integrated with almost no distinction across platforms in terms
of content production. The biggest change came
not in formats but work flows and schedules,
with only marginal new hiring.
Pedro Nortons impression of the first year
of changes is clear: Up to now the results have
been very good. Expresso Dirio has a base of
18.000 daily readers, which places the publication in the top tier of Portuguese daily newspapers. Advertising results are above expectations.
Were still fine tuning the strategy but the idea is
to broaden the approach to Impresas other editorial brands.
He is equally emphatic regarding Expressos
team: This is a path that cannot be missed. Expresso is no longer just a weekly newspaper.
Im fully aware this is more demanding for the
Expresso newsroom and that it means added
work. Nevertheless, it also means more opportunities, bigger visibility, more future. If theres
something to be proud of it is the openness of

Expressos newsroom and its editors-in-chiefs.


By embracing the challenge, with the energy theyve shown, the Expresso newsroom has
proven to be the best newspaper newsroom in
the country.
Much more still needs to be done. Since the
launch of Expresso Dirio, news production
has become a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week business, with more emphasis on social networks.
We have embraced digital storytelling, along
the lines of the New York Timess Snowfall or
The Guardians NSA Files. We are sending out
a morning newsletter, which has been a huge
success. The changes have brought more possibilities than problems. Readers, advertisers and
journalist have all gained from a clearer strategy. Its a great time to be a journalist.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
A careful study of the way your audience consumes
news, how they are using their devices and at what
times of the day and week might reveal hidden
clues as to how a media organisation can transform
and prepare for the future without necessarily having to invest heavily in new hires or technology platforms. Better thinking will likely lead to more efficient change.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

26

SERIOUS

INFLUENCE

JUAN ANTONIO GINER

President & Founder, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Wales

giner@innovation.media

LOPINION
AIMS HIGH WITH
PREMIUM EDITORIAL
CONTENT FOR
INFLUENTIAL
SUBSCRIBERS
Nicols Beytout and Christophe Chenut are trying to invest 20
million over four years to create the first new general interest print
daily to survive in Paris since the 1970s, targeting premium
top-tier subscribers with a cross-platform flow of serious politics
and economics news.

costs. As it approaches its second anniversary, I


visited its modern facilities at number 14 Rue de
Bassano, in one of the nicer areas of Paris, to talk
to the chairman and editor of the publication,
Nicols Beytout, and its CEO, Christophe Chenut.
ON BALANCE
The first thing I asked the pair is what they
would do differently today than when they
launched the daily: At the start, we thought
we were a print outlet with a digital arm; today
we see ourselves more as a digital outlet with a
print arm, they respond immediately.
We always saw ourselves, says Beytout: as
new media and not just a print newspaper, but

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

gaderinge.com / photomontage

ince the arrival of Libration in 1973, no


new generalist print daily in Paris has
been able to survive. Those that triedInformation, Le Quotidien de la Rpublique, La
Truffe and Le Jourclosed. LOpinion, an arthouse newspaper like Le 1, was created by
Nicols Beytout, the former editor of Le Figaro
and Les Echos, on May 14, 2013; it is a Monday to
Friday national newspaper, printed in Paris and
Marseille, that defines itself as liberal, European
and pro-business.
It was brought to life outside the French periodical press system, so there are no trade union
pressures, it depends on the near-monopoly of
newspaper distribution and, above all, its 8-12
pages and no more than 40 staff mean very low

26

SERIOUS

INFLUENCE

JUAN ANTONIO GINER

President & Founder, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Wales

giner@innovation.media

LOPINION
AIMS HIGH WITH
PREMIUM EDITORIAL
CONTENT FOR
INFLUENTIAL
SUBSCRIBERS
Nicols Beytout and Christophe Chenut are trying to invest 20
million over four years to create the first new general interest print
daily to survive in Paris since the 1970s, targeting premium
top-tier subscribers with a cross-platform flow of serious politics
and economics news.

costs. As it approaches its second anniversary, I


visited its modern facilities at number 14 Rue de
Bassano, in one of the nicer areas of Paris, to talk
to the chairman and editor of the publication,
Nicols Beytout, and its CEO, Christophe Chenut.
ON BALANCE
The first thing I asked the pair is what they
would do differently today than when they
launched the daily: At the start, we thought
we were a print outlet with a digital arm; today
we see ourselves more as a digital outlet with a
print arm, they respond immediately.
We always saw ourselves, says Beytout: as
new media and not just a print newspaper, but

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

gaderinge.com / photomontage

ince the arrival of Libration in 1973, no


new generalist print daily in Paris has
been able to survive. Those that triedInformation, Le Quotidien de la Rpublique, La
Truffe and Le Jourclosed. LOpinion, an arthouse newspaper like Le 1, was created by
Nicols Beytout, the former editor of Le Figaro
and Les Echos, on May 14, 2013; it is a Monday to
Friday national newspaper, printed in Paris and
Marseille, that defines itself as liberal, European
and pro-business.
It was brought to life outside the French periodical press system, so there are no trade union
pressures, it depends on the near-monopoly of
newspaper distribution and, above all, its 8-12
pages and no more than 40 staff mean very low

28

29

SERIOUS

SERIOUS

INFLUENCE

print imposed its needs from the start and the


organisation of the newsroom ended up relegating digital to second place. That was a mistake.
Today we see it all much more clearly, we must
concentrate almost exclusively on the new narratives and digital multimedia platforms and, at
the end of the day, tip the best, most relevant
content into the pages of the print edition.
Chenut adds: Thats why were changing our
CMS and developing our own that lets us do that
reverse publishing.
THE VALUE OF PRINT
For both of them, the success of LOpinion is
linked to the quality of the audience they can
find with the digital edition and the influence,
visibility and prestige that print offers. The editor explains that when we interview politicians and businessmen, the first thing they ask
us before answering is: is this for the print edition or the web?. For most of them, print is still
the medium of reference and where they want
to see themselves appear.
In fact, print and digital are two sides of the
same journalism and publishing coin: both editions are sold together to subscribers and advertisers, although 90% of ad revenues come from
the print edition. Just 10% come from the website. We print about 35,000 copies a day, says
Chenut: and we sell about half of them, but
then we get about 700,000 unique visitors each
month. The daily, with its distinctive red colour, is printed in the berliner format and sold
folded.
THE NEWSROOM
Of the 40 staff at LOpinion, 30 are journalists

Beytout: We must
concentrate on the
new narratives and digital
multimedia platforms and,
at the end of the day, tip
the best, most relevant
content into the pages
of the print edition

INFLUENCE
ment to traditional titles, which try to do everything for everyone and end up being papers for
no one. LOpinions effort to be selective makes
it valuable and that explains why its public visibility is so much higher than its market share.
A five-column editorial with the editors bylinemostly by Nicolas Beytout and sometimes
his chief editor, Rmi Godeauis to be found
on the front page and there are always some
thoughts from Michel Schifres below.

and 10 are administrative and sales staff.


We hired big-name, well-known journalists, says Beytout: because we knew that
quality reporting is expensive and needs contacts. Many of our journalists used to work at
big titles like Les Echos, Paris Match, LEst Republicain, Europe 1, Le Parisien, Challenges or
Courier International, and they came over here
because they believed LOpinion was going to
be what it has been; innovative, influential and
top quality.
Hiring top veterans meant more spending up
front but, at the same time, guaranteed well-respected names, something the creators would
not have achieved with a newsroom full of new
starts or digital natives. Today all of them work
for both the website and the print edition.
The online offer includes 30 minutes of video
and around 15 interviews each day, all accessible
across all of the digital formats.

INCOME
The paper sells for 1,70 a copy (Le Figaro costs
2 ). Subscriptions to the print and digital versions come in three basic flavours for individual
subscribers: a six-month trial period for 149, a
full subscription for 24,90 a month, and a digital-only subscription for 19,90 a month.
There is also a reduced student subscription
starting at 16 a month and two corporate subscription options allowing companies to subscribe up to 10 users in a 1490 deal that comes
with invitations to the Club Very Opinion People
and one of four annual LOpinion conferences.
Chenut says his main challenge is getting
more groups to subscribe with big discounts:
the print subscription includes lots of licences to access the digital version of LOpinion: he
might sell 50 subscriptions to the print version
and include 200 website licences.
The business plan contemplates an investment of around 20 million over four years, at
the end of which they hope to break even.

READERS
LOpinions print deadline is 8 p.m. (Librations
is 7:30 p.m.) and the PDF version is available for
subscribers half an hour later at 8.30 p.m.. They
also send out a stream of daily e-mail newsletters in the morning and in the evening.
The paper aims for high-end, luxury advertisers and big brands interested in reaching influential opinion makers and sometimes adds a
second, subject-based section (Les Cahiers de
LOpinion) to attract advertisers from specific
niches.
We are a very young media company, targeting the leadership class, says Chenut: While
our market share in the national press is 3%, we
triple that, up to 9%, in terms of the most quoted media outlets on radio and TV, which is a
very high multiplier.
SOBRIETY
LOpinion prefers text over graphs, and photos are limited to the portraits of its most wellknown writers. Whilst only publishing 8-12
pages, the appearance of weight is prejudicial
and quick-read formats its readers, with little
free time, would appreciate, are notoriously absent.
In any case, the graphic monotony gives the
paper sobriety and serenity; this is a daily without shrillness where political and economic discourse dominate culture and lifestyle, a daily
that can only justify its existence if it adds value
to what other media outlets, print or digital, already publish.
All of that makes the newspaper a comple-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS TAKE

POLITICAL POSITION OF LOPINION


PRO-BUSINESS / FREE MARKET

Les Echos

LEFT

Le Monde

Le Parisien
Aujourdhui

Liberation

LOpinion is an experiment in how to preserve print


newspapers into the future with quality content,
more analytical than opinionated, more explanation
than news. They save their readers time and offer up
key points and trends. Its Achilles Heel is how not
to cannibalise that content in the digital version, but
the payment model minimises that risk and what
could be a disadvantage becomes a benefit for readers who, paying, can get their news wherever, however and whenever the want.

RIGHT
Le Figaro

LHumanit
PRO-STATE / PROTECTIONIST

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

28

29

SERIOUS

SERIOUS

INFLUENCE

print imposed its needs from the start and the


organisation of the newsroom ended up relegating digital to second place. That was a mistake.
Today we see it all much more clearly, we must
concentrate almost exclusively on the new narratives and digital multimedia platforms and, at
the end of the day, tip the best, most relevant
content into the pages of the print edition.
Chenut adds: Thats why were changing our
CMS and developing our own that lets us do that
reverse publishing.
THE VALUE OF PRINT
For both of them, the success of LOpinion is
linked to the quality of the audience they can
find with the digital edition and the influence,
visibility and prestige that print offers. The editor explains that when we interview politicians and businessmen, the first thing they ask
us before answering is: is this for the print edition or the web?. For most of them, print is still
the medium of reference and where they want
to see themselves appear.
In fact, print and digital are two sides of the
same journalism and publishing coin: both editions are sold together to subscribers and advertisers, although 90% of ad revenues come from
the print edition. Just 10% come from the website. We print about 35,000 copies a day, says
Chenut: and we sell about half of them, but
then we get about 700,000 unique visitors each
month. The daily, with its distinctive red colour, is printed in the berliner format and sold
folded.
THE NEWSROOM
Of the 40 staff at LOpinion, 30 are journalists

Beytout: We must
concentrate on the
new narratives and digital
multimedia platforms and,
at the end of the day, tip
the best, most relevant
content into the pages
of the print edition

INFLUENCE
ment to traditional titles, which try to do everything for everyone and end up being papers for
no one. LOpinions effort to be selective makes
it valuable and that explains why its public visibility is so much higher than its market share.
A five-column editorial with the editors bylinemostly by Nicolas Beytout and sometimes
his chief editor, Rmi Godeauis to be found
on the front page and there are always some
thoughts from Michel Schifres below.

and 10 are administrative and sales staff.


We hired big-name, well-known journalists, says Beytout: because we knew that
quality reporting is expensive and needs contacts. Many of our journalists used to work at
big titles like Les Echos, Paris Match, LEst Republicain, Europe 1, Le Parisien, Challenges or
Courier International, and they came over here
because they believed LOpinion was going to
be what it has been; innovative, influential and
top quality.
Hiring top veterans meant more spending up
front but, at the same time, guaranteed well-respected names, something the creators would
not have achieved with a newsroom full of new
starts or digital natives. Today all of them work
for both the website and the print edition.
The online offer includes 30 minutes of video
and around 15 interviews each day, all accessible
across all of the digital formats.

INCOME
The paper sells for 1,70 a copy (Le Figaro costs
2 ). Subscriptions to the print and digital versions come in three basic flavours for individual
subscribers: a six-month trial period for 149, a
full subscription for 24,90 a month, and a digital-only subscription for 19,90 a month.
There is also a reduced student subscription
starting at 16 a month and two corporate subscription options allowing companies to subscribe up to 10 users in a 1490 deal that comes
with invitations to the Club Very Opinion People
and one of four annual LOpinion conferences.
Chenut says his main challenge is getting
more groups to subscribe with big discounts:
the print subscription includes lots of licences to access the digital version of LOpinion: he
might sell 50 subscriptions to the print version
and include 200 website licences.
The business plan contemplates an investment of around 20 million over four years, at
the end of which they hope to break even.

READERS
LOpinions print deadline is 8 p.m. (Librations
is 7:30 p.m.) and the PDF version is available for
subscribers half an hour later at 8.30 p.m.. They
also send out a stream of daily e-mail newsletters in the morning and in the evening.
The paper aims for high-end, luxury advertisers and big brands interested in reaching influential opinion makers and sometimes adds a
second, subject-based section (Les Cahiers de
LOpinion) to attract advertisers from specific
niches.
We are a very young media company, targeting the leadership class, says Chenut: While
our market share in the national press is 3%, we
triple that, up to 9%, in terms of the most quoted media outlets on radio and TV, which is a
very high multiplier.
SOBRIETY
LOpinion prefers text over graphs, and photos are limited to the portraits of its most wellknown writers. Whilst only publishing 8-12
pages, the appearance of weight is prejudicial
and quick-read formats its readers, with little
free time, would appreciate, are notoriously absent.
In any case, the graphic monotony gives the
paper sobriety and serenity; this is a daily without shrillness where political and economic discourse dominate culture and lifestyle, a daily
that can only justify its existence if it adds value
to what other media outlets, print or digital, already publish.
All of that makes the newspaper a comple-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS TAKE

POLITICAL POSITION OF LOPINION


PRO-BUSINESS / FREE MARKET

Les Echos

LEFT

Le Monde

Le Parisien
Aujourdhui

Liberation

LOpinion is an experiment in how to preserve print


newspapers into the future with quality content,
more analytical than opinionated, more explanation
than news. They save their readers time and offer up
key points and trends. Its Achilles Heel is how not
to cannibalise that content in the digital version, but
the payment model minimises that risk and what
could be a disadvantage becomes a benefit for readers who, paying, can get their news wherever, however and whenever the want.

RIGHT
Le Figaro

LHumanit
PRO-STATE / PROTECTIONIST

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

30

WEEKEND

WEALTH
ANTONIO MARTN HERVS

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

martin@innovation.media

ADVERTISERS
REJOICE AT REBIRTH
OF EVEN BIGGER
WEEKEND
SUPPLEMENTS

As media outlets around the world struggle to make journalism work


with advertising again, and as readers continue to ignore online ads,
big titles in the US and Europe have discovered a renewed enthusiasm
for high-end weekend supplements stuffed full of luxury ads.

he weekend supplement, that faithful


shield bearer of daily papers, is still one of
the medias fundamental pillars. Although
the model has suffered closures and cutbacks,
and a deep advertising and identity crisis, The
New York Times, Le Monde and Expresso have
bet hard on their magazines. Out with Sancho
Panza, in with Don Quixote.
Yes, you wanted a Sunday paper, but what
you wanted from it wasnt really news it was
your life. Joseph Pulitzer, the father of infotainment was very clear about that when he
launched The World on Sunday, a New York
World supplement in 1898. 117 years later and
in the same city, The New York Times Magazine
was recently relaunched. At 220 pages, it is the

biggest Sunday supplement in the papers history.


Andy Wright, the publisher, defined the new
magazines editorial and commercial formula
the day he introduced it to the world: Tonight is
a celebration of narrative journalism at its very
best - a magazine that teaches, inspires, entertains and helps millions of readers stay better
informed about the world they live in week after week. The Timess 23 million readers deserve that investment in quality, despite the cutbacks and lay-offs.
A justified climate of optimism was foreshadowed by an important setback. Last July,
the NYT announced a fall in profits of 21% for
the first few months of the year, largely due to

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

30

WEEKEND

WEALTH
ANTONIO MARTN HERVS

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

martin@innovation.media

ADVERTISERS
REJOICE AT REBIRTH
OF EVEN BIGGER
WEEKEND
SUPPLEMENTS

As media outlets around the world struggle to make journalism work


with advertising again, and as readers continue to ignore online ads,
big titles in the US and Europe have discovered a renewed enthusiasm
for high-end weekend supplements stuffed full of luxury ads.

he weekend supplement, that faithful


shield bearer of daily papers, is still one of
the medias fundamental pillars. Although
the model has suffered closures and cutbacks,
and a deep advertising and identity crisis, The
New York Times, Le Monde and Expresso have
bet hard on their magazines. Out with Sancho
Panza, in with Don Quixote.
Yes, you wanted a Sunday paper, but what
you wanted from it wasnt really news it was
your life. Joseph Pulitzer, the father of infotainment was very clear about that when he
launched The World on Sunday, a New York
World supplement in 1898. 117 years later and
in the same city, The New York Times Magazine
was recently relaunched. At 220 pages, it is the

biggest Sunday supplement in the papers history.


Andy Wright, the publisher, defined the new
magazines editorial and commercial formula
the day he introduced it to the world: Tonight is
a celebration of narrative journalism at its very
best - a magazine that teaches, inspires, entertains and helps millions of readers stay better
informed about the world they live in week after week. The Timess 23 million readers deserve that investment in quality, despite the cutbacks and lay-offs.
A justified climate of optimism was foreshadowed by an important setback. Last July,
the NYT announced a fall in profits of 21% for
the first few months of the year, largely due to

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

32

33

WEEKEND

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

WEALTH
a drop in print advertising revenue. Circulation figures, in contrast, increased. Clearly one
of the battles was with advertisers, so what better way to solve the problem? The first edition
of the new magazine carried 120 pages of ads,
more than 50% of the whole.
A month earlier, on January 10, Expresso
home to some of the best journalism in Europelaunched a new magazine product E, A
Revista do Expresso.
The Impresa group, chaired by Pinto Balsemao, considerably strengthened the journalism
and commercial value of its magazine.
It isnt a news magazine, said the company: Neither is it a new version of Revista or
Atual (which disappear with this launch). It
is something really new, with a new format
much biggerand a separate offer, capable of
complementing our Cuaderno Principal or the
Cuaderno de Economa (the weekly print edition). It will have a base of 100 pages and we
will establish our content on the basis of journalistic culture, behaviour and the big formats.
Obviously with a new design that will seek to
reach an audience we know is more and more
demanding.
The design aspect, always at the forefront at
Expresso, is fundamental. Marco Grieco, Expressos art director, said the brand will only
maintain its prestige if all of the Expresso titles are looked after carefully, regardless of their
platform or format.
E, A Revista do Expresso structures the publication in four very different graphical sections:
Fisga is well-designed micro-formats close to
the news; +E is big features and interviews with

Selling hope and


getting straight to
readers most commercial
desires will continue to
be a good advertising
formula

wonderful photography; Culturas looks at art,


literature and entertainment; and Vicios does
life style with an emphasis on gastronomy and
leisure. Information, knowledge and pleasure,
thinking about and for the reader but being nice
to advertisers with new sections and a bigger
format. All in a medium that only appears once
a week.
Another European media giant, Le Monde,
relaunched its magazine M, le Magazine du
Monde on October 10, 2014 as part of a global
change in the French evening paper led by Gilles
van Kote. For him, the new pillars of Le Monde
must be: learning, understanding and discovery. Interestingly, and rightly, the magazine
was re-imagined at a moment of growth, seeing a +2.71% increase in awareness in 2014 compared to the previous year ( 262,268 copies, OJD
France).
Le Mondes magnificent new magazine mixes elegance and luxury with long texts and
good journalism. Marie-Pierre Lannelonge said:
there are many reasons why M, le Magazine du
Monde will also change with the newspaper.
The magazines chief publisher believes a lot
of emphasis needs to be placed on the print version. Our inspiration is magazines, these lovely
things that switch between long, grey texts with
images, photos and illustrations, offering [readers] a certain majesty. Faced with digital gadgets
and chromatic orgies that try to imitate online
aesthetics, we prefer the deliciously antiquated
lines of Satoshi Hashimoto (a Japanese illustrator who created the icons readers use to navigate the publication), whose small drawings
mark the pages as softer touches in a universe
in which our smartphones or addiction to social networks will not stop us loving them passionately. M, le Magazine du Monde means to
experiment. A paper experiment. The subtlety
of Lannelonges words are a faithful reflection
of her publication.
These three new magazine relaunches teach
us that the weekend is still key for increasing
reader loyalty thanks to the long narratives that
can be read at a more leisurely pace, and for attracting advertisers who seek a space with good
content and better print quality. Regardless of
the editorial formula, the common denominator must be quality above all, in journalistic excellence and in deeper work with advertisers.
QUALITY, QUALITY, QUALITY
To speak of quality is to speak of intelligent content, of design as an effective transmitter and of
a satisfactory sensorial experience. As an exam-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

32

33

WEEKEND

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

WEALTH
a drop in print advertising revenue. Circulation figures, in contrast, increased. Clearly one
of the battles was with advertisers, so what better way to solve the problem? The first edition
of the new magazine carried 120 pages of ads,
more than 50% of the whole.
A month earlier, on January 10, Expresso
home to some of the best journalism in Europelaunched a new magazine product E, A
Revista do Expresso.
The Impresa group, chaired by Pinto Balsemao, considerably strengthened the journalism
and commercial value of its magazine.
It isnt a news magazine, said the company: Neither is it a new version of Revista or
Atual (which disappear with this launch). It
is something really new, with a new format
much biggerand a separate offer, capable of
complementing our Cuaderno Principal or the
Cuaderno de Economa (the weekly print edition). It will have a base of 100 pages and we
will establish our content on the basis of journalistic culture, behaviour and the big formats.
Obviously with a new design that will seek to
reach an audience we know is more and more
demanding.
The design aspect, always at the forefront at
Expresso, is fundamental. Marco Grieco, Expressos art director, said the brand will only
maintain its prestige if all of the Expresso titles are looked after carefully, regardless of their
platform or format.
E, A Revista do Expresso structures the publication in four very different graphical sections:
Fisga is well-designed micro-formats close to
the news; +E is big features and interviews with

Selling hope and


getting straight to
readers most commercial
desires will continue to
be a good advertising
formula

wonderful photography; Culturas looks at art,


literature and entertainment; and Vicios does
life style with an emphasis on gastronomy and
leisure. Information, knowledge and pleasure,
thinking about and for the reader but being nice
to advertisers with new sections and a bigger
format. All in a medium that only appears once
a week.
Another European media giant, Le Monde,
relaunched its magazine M, le Magazine du
Monde on October 10, 2014 as part of a global
change in the French evening paper led by Gilles
van Kote. For him, the new pillars of Le Monde
must be: learning, understanding and discovery. Interestingly, and rightly, the magazine
was re-imagined at a moment of growth, seeing a +2.71% increase in awareness in 2014 compared to the previous year ( 262,268 copies, OJD
France).
Le Mondes magnificent new magazine mixes elegance and luxury with long texts and
good journalism. Marie-Pierre Lannelonge said:
there are many reasons why M, le Magazine du
Monde will also change with the newspaper.
The magazines chief publisher believes a lot
of emphasis needs to be placed on the print version. Our inspiration is magazines, these lovely
things that switch between long, grey texts with
images, photos and illustrations, offering [readers] a certain majesty. Faced with digital gadgets
and chromatic orgies that try to imitate online
aesthetics, we prefer the deliciously antiquated
lines of Satoshi Hashimoto (a Japanese illustrator who created the icons readers use to navigate the publication), whose small drawings
mark the pages as softer touches in a universe
in which our smartphones or addiction to social networks will not stop us loving them passionately. M, le Magazine du Monde means to
experiment. A paper experiment. The subtlety
of Lannelonges words are a faithful reflection
of her publication.
These three new magazine relaunches teach
us that the weekend is still key for increasing
reader loyalty thanks to the long narratives that
can be read at a more leisurely pace, and for attracting advertisers who seek a space with good
content and better print quality. Regardless of
the editorial formula, the common denominator must be quality above all, in journalistic excellence and in deeper work with advertisers.
QUALITY, QUALITY, QUALITY
To speak of quality is to speak of intelligent content, of design as an effective transmitter and of
a satisfactory sensorial experience. As an exam-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

34

35

WEEKEND

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

WEALTH
ple, we might look at Die Zeit Magazine, which
makes is the Sunday offering in the German
leaders universe ( 631,846 circulation in 2014,
according to IVW). With its characteristic sobriety, it hits the spot with its content and displays
a higher level of visual creativity than normal.
As a good German media outlet, long texts share
space with some of the best photography in Europe. Exquisiteness and luxury are the common
denominators.
The brave front covers of the Thursday Magazine of Times of Oman, which show how much
can be done with this platform, are also worth
highlighting. The English-speaking dailys supplement in the Sultanate is frequently awarded Society of News Design prizes.
SPECIALIST PUBLICATIONS
The weekend offer stretches from Friday to Sunday. Many newspapers try to target particular
groups on particular days. Two Spanish publications have followed the Italian tradition here,
turning Saturdays into a new big day. El Mundo produces Yo Dona, a version of Corriere della Seras Io Donna, and El Pas now has S Moda,
a womens magazine to dazzle readers each Saturday with a sophisticated look at the world of
fashion.
Although there is a big difference in circulation compared to the Sunday magazine (355,000
vs. 1,384,000, EGM 2014 ), the womens supplement is growing by 1.2% whereas that of El Pas
Semanal is falling by 5.5%.
INDEPENDENT MAGAZINES
In some cases, the publication goes beyond a
weekend compliment and strikes out from the
parent newspaper, as happened at El Pas in
2013 when mens magazine ICON was born.
Javier Moreno, who was then the editor of the
newspaper, said: With ICON, we were covering a key sector. Beginning with a print run of
more than 300,000 copies and 196 pages of content, it competes directly with other mens publications on the newsstand like Esquire or GQ.
It is free with the newspaper on the first Thursday of each month and then sold separately for
three euros.
In Italy, the now mythical Il (Intelligence
in Lifestyle) is the monthly magazine of Milan
newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. Since its creation in
2008, it has striven for excellence across different styles of journalism with new narratives.
The formula is to treat soft news with the seriousness of hard news, and to provide information and elegance.

Il is the standard for magazines that, despite


the parent papers logo next to the title, enjoy a
happy life outside the family unit. Many speak
of a before and after in infographics and design
at Il, which has reached the visual Olympics. It
is on sale for a whole month although it normally disappears from the newsstand a few days
after going on sale on the third Friday of each
month.
LUXURY AS A SELLING POINT
Julia Carrick created the How To Spend It supplement for The Financial Times in 1985, and it
became a world leader with a simple equation:
the FT helps people to acquire a fortune and
How To Spend It helps them to spend it. Easy.
The magazine has maintained its leading position through changing concepts of luxury, beginning as a quarterly offering, then becoming
monthly and it is now weekly.
The format was exported to Pearsons other financial titles: Les Echos, FT Deutschland, Expansin, Diario Econmico and El Cronista Comercial.
Selling hope and getting straight to readers
most commercial desires will continue to be a
good advertising formula: luxury goods have
suffered the least from the advertising crisis. El
Mundo stopped publishing its Sunday supplement in 2014 to start publishing Fuera de Serie,
the Spanish version of How To Spend It, which
was already published on Saturdays by Expansin.
What is now accepted now by all is that weekend supplements meet the different needs of
readers and advertisers. Umberto Eco said: I
think of myself as a serious professor who, during the weekend, writes novels. Newspaper
magazines should offer more prestige, more
recognition, more quality and strive to think for
themselves. Weekend supplements should not
be considered a nice glossy sub-product of the
newspaper.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
The resurgence of weekend supplements in a way
that pleases both advertisers and readers is welcome news for all. Given changing reading habits and always-on global news, the weekly format
and weekend publication should also be considered
as an option for news and features, not just glossy
magazines.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

34

35

WEEKEND

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

WEALTH
ple, we might look at Die Zeit Magazine, which
makes is the Sunday offering in the German
leaders universe ( 631,846 circulation in 2014,
according to IVW). With its characteristic sobriety, it hits the spot with its content and displays
a higher level of visual creativity than normal.
As a good German media outlet, long texts share
space with some of the best photography in Europe. Exquisiteness and luxury are the common
denominators.
The brave front covers of the Thursday Magazine of Times of Oman, which show how much
can be done with this platform, are also worth
highlighting. The English-speaking dailys supplement in the Sultanate is frequently awarded Society of News Design prizes.
SPECIALIST PUBLICATIONS
The weekend offer stretches from Friday to Sunday. Many newspapers try to target particular
groups on particular days. Two Spanish publications have followed the Italian tradition here,
turning Saturdays into a new big day. El Mundo produces Yo Dona, a version of Corriere della Seras Io Donna, and El Pas now has S Moda,
a womens magazine to dazzle readers each Saturday with a sophisticated look at the world of
fashion.
Although there is a big difference in circulation compared to the Sunday magazine (355,000
vs. 1,384,000, EGM 2014 ), the womens supplement is growing by 1.2% whereas that of El Pas
Semanal is falling by 5.5%.
INDEPENDENT MAGAZINES
In some cases, the publication goes beyond a
weekend compliment and strikes out from the
parent newspaper, as happened at El Pas in
2013 when mens magazine ICON was born.
Javier Moreno, who was then the editor of the
newspaper, said: With ICON, we were covering a key sector. Beginning with a print run of
more than 300,000 copies and 196 pages of content, it competes directly with other mens publications on the newsstand like Esquire or GQ.
It is free with the newspaper on the first Thursday of each month and then sold separately for
three euros.
In Italy, the now mythical Il (Intelligence
in Lifestyle) is the monthly magazine of Milan
newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. Since its creation in
2008, it has striven for excellence across different styles of journalism with new narratives.
The formula is to treat soft news with the seriousness of hard news, and to provide information and elegance.

Il is the standard for magazines that, despite


the parent papers logo next to the title, enjoy a
happy life outside the family unit. Many speak
of a before and after in infographics and design
at Il, which has reached the visual Olympics. It
is on sale for a whole month although it normally disappears from the newsstand a few days
after going on sale on the third Friday of each
month.
LUXURY AS A SELLING POINT
Julia Carrick created the How To Spend It supplement for The Financial Times in 1985, and it
became a world leader with a simple equation:
the FT helps people to acquire a fortune and
How To Spend It helps them to spend it. Easy.
The magazine has maintained its leading position through changing concepts of luxury, beginning as a quarterly offering, then becoming
monthly and it is now weekly.
The format was exported to Pearsons other financial titles: Les Echos, FT Deutschland, Expansin, Diario Econmico and El Cronista Comercial.
Selling hope and getting straight to readers
most commercial desires will continue to be a
good advertising formula: luxury goods have
suffered the least from the advertising crisis. El
Mundo stopped publishing its Sunday supplement in 2014 to start publishing Fuera de Serie,
the Spanish version of How To Spend It, which
was already published on Saturdays by Expansin.
What is now accepted now by all is that weekend supplements meet the different needs of
readers and advertisers. Umberto Eco said: I
think of myself as a serious professor who, during the weekend, writes novels. Newspaper
magazines should offer more prestige, more
recognition, more quality and strive to think for
themselves. Weekend supplements should not
be considered a nice glossy sub-product of the
newspaper.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
The resurgence of weekend supplements in a way
that pleases both advertisers and readers is welcome news for all. Given changing reading habits and always-on global news, the weekly format
and weekend publication should also be considered
as an option for news and features, not just glossy
magazines.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014


2015

36

DEEP

VALUE

THODORIS GEORGAKOPOULOS

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Athens

georgakopoulos@innovation.media

WHO IS GOING
TO PAY FOR
INVESTIGATIVE
REPORTING AND
HOW DO YOU
MEASURE IT?

ournalism costs money. The kind of investigative research that goes deeper into core issues and uncovers hard truths can cost lots
of it. Those long, expertly researched exposs
that topple governments, reveal corruption and
ignite political and social change take weeks,
months, or even years of work. They demand a
level of commitment and investment that even
the largest media companies of our era can now
find difficult to justify, easily in the high sixfigure range. Might this kind of journalism face
extinction within our lifetime?
There is hope. Dozens of small new organisations have appeared over the last decade, focused on investigative journalism. Their targets
vary but they share one characteristic trait: they
are non-profits, and they generally rely on phi-

lanthropic donations.This is not a novel idea, of


course. Journalism has long been considered a
service and a public good, rather than a mere
product, and non-profit organisations that do
journalism are an idea almost as old as journalism itself. The most famous organisation of
its kind, in fact, was formed in 1846, when five
newspapers pooled resources to cover the Mexican-American war. The resulting entity still
operates as a non-profit today: you may know it
as the Associated Press.
The current trend has been facilitated by the
new digital platforms that lower the barrier of
entry for publishers and by a few successful
examples that have had a catalysing effect. The
best known example is ProPublica, a nonprofit
investigative journalism outlet in New York.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Gardeners Supply Company / Potmaker

Some non-profit journalism organisations have produced


world-class investigative reporting but financial backers are
becoming more demanding and it is not clear how the impact
of reporting can be easily measured.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

36

DEEP

VALUE

THODORIS GEORGAKOPOULOS

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Athens

georgakopoulos@innovation.media

WHO IS GOING
TO PAY FOR
INVESTIGATIVE
REPORTING AND
HOW DO YOU
MEASURE IT?

ournalism costs money. The kind of investigative research that goes deeper into core issues and uncovers hard truths can cost lots
of it. Those long, expertly researched exposs
that topple governments, reveal corruption and
ignite political and social change take weeks,
months, or even years of work. They demand a
level of commitment and investment that even
the largest media companies of our era can now
find difficult to justify, easily in the high sixfigure range. Might this kind of journalism face
extinction within our lifetime?
There is hope. Dozens of small new organisations have appeared over the last decade, focused on investigative journalism. Their targets
vary but they share one characteristic trait: they
are non-profits, and they generally rely on phi-

lanthropic donations.This is not a novel idea, of


course. Journalism has long been considered a
service and a public good, rather than a mere
product, and non-profit organisations that do
journalism are an idea almost as old as journalism itself. The most famous organisation of
its kind, in fact, was formed in 1846, when five
newspapers pooled resources to cover the Mexican-American war. The resulting entity still
operates as a non-profit today: you may know it
as the Associated Press.
The current trend has been facilitated by the
new digital platforms that lower the barrier of
entry for publishers and by a few successful
examples that have had a catalysing effect. The
best known example is ProPublica, a nonprofit
investigative journalism outlet in New York.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Gardeners Supply Company / Potmaker

Some non-profit journalism organisations have produced


world-class investigative reporting but financial backers are
becoming more demanding and it is not clear how the impact
of reporting can be easily measured.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

38

39

DEEP

DEEP

VALUE

Founded in 2007, ProPublica was the brainchild of American billionaire Herb Sandler
who, along with his wife Marion, hired former
Wall Street Journal managing editor Paul Steiger
to build a newsroom of seasoned reporters and
editors who would produce groundbreaking
journalism of the kind traditional media could
not easily invest in. ProPublica has since won
two Pulitzer prizesone for a report on a New
Orleans hospital that was cut off from civilisation during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
and another on the American financial crisis
of 2008and has earned a reputation as a well
known, respectable reporting outfit.
They have published innovative web apps,
have worked with the worlds largest media
companies on stories like fracking and Big
Pharma corruption, and were the first organisation The Guardian reached out to when they
wanted to smuggle Edward Snowdens files out
of the UK.
One Pew Research Centre study in 2012 charted 172 similar organisations around the United
States, of various types. There is The Lens, focusing on New Orleans and the Gulf Coast area,
and The Marshall Project, led by former New
York Times editor Bill Keller with a focus on
the US criminal justice system. Around 100 are
members of the Institute for Nonprofit News
(formerly known as the Investigative News
Network), a cooperative that provides consulting and services to its member organisations.
The model has also spread outside the United
States, with dozens of organisations working
with the same broad idea. CORRECT!V in Germany calls itself the first nonprofit newsroom
in the German speaking world, and is funded

Counting mosquito
nets in Sub-Saharan
Africa is relatively easy,
but how does one
measure the impact
of investigative
journalism?

VALUE

ProPublica
ProPublica was founded in 2007,
has won two Pulitzer Prizes and was
the first organisation The Guardian
contacted with the Snowden files.

primarily by the Brost Foundation. The Bureau


of Investigative Journalism was founded in
2010 in London and has published over 50 stories that have been republished and rebroadcast
by major media outlets.
In the summer of 2013, during a visit to ProPublicas headquarters in New York, editorin-chief Stephen Engelbert showed me a new
venture he had just been made aware of: a
Thai banker who was also a blogger had created a non profit journalism organisation called
ThaiPublica.
Yet the creation of all those new media entities has not led to a renaissance. Some do produce quality journalism and all employ journalists that might otherwise very well be out of a
job but they are small in size. A 2013 survey by
the Global Investigative Journalism Networks
David Kaplan showed most have budgets of
less than $50,000 and five or fewer staff. This
is understandable, considering most rely on a
limited pool of endowments. Journalism professor Jeff Jarvis said in a blog post that: there
is not enough money in the endowments of all
the foundations interested in supporting news
to pay for the work that needs to be done.
Acknowledging those limitations, some organisations are attempting to diversify their

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

models. ProPublica, CORRECT!V and The Bureau of Investigative Journalism all began with
one major donor who covered their expenses
for a reasonable period during their startup
phase. ProPublica now only covers part of its
eight-figure annual budget with contributions
from the Sandler Foundation. They cover the
rest by fundraising, just like any other nonprofit. The Texas Tribune, founded by venture
capitalist John Thornton in 2009, has diversified
its model further, adding revenue streams such
as events and corporate sponsorships, and now
relies on philanthropy for only about a third of
its revenue.
A 2013 report by the John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation on the state of 18 non-profit
news organisations around the United States
showed they had grown revenues over 30 percent in the three previous years and had decreased reliance on endowments by diversifying their revenue streams. However, the report
found that their sustainability is still not guaranteed. They invest most of their budgets in
editorial operationsa statistic they take pride
inbut most of them soon realise that fundraising and revenue diversification turn out to be as
important and time consuming as the organisations main operational focus.

A final challenge facing journalism nonprofits, common to all such organisations everywhere, is accountability. One of the most
significant contributions of the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation to philanthropy has been the
trend towards measurable results, which charity organisations have learnt to provide in order
to attract new donors who expect their donations to be well managed. Counting mosquito
nets in Sub-Saharan Africa is relatively easy, but
how does one measure the impact of investigative journalism? Sometimes a story is published
and a judicial procedure is initiated, resulting in
new legislation or fines, but most of the time it
is murkier. Awareness is slippery.
There are efforts to reach a consensus (ProPublica co-CEO Dick Tofel has written an interesting white paper on the matter), but attracting modern donors who expect measurable
results will remain a challenge into the future.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Given the amounts of money needed to finance deep
investigative reporting, it is difficult to see how this
kind of media outlet can continue to rely on philanthorpy as its major source of income into the future.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

38

39

DEEP

DEEP

VALUE

Founded in 2007, ProPublica was the brainchild of American billionaire Herb Sandler
who, along with his wife Marion, hired former
Wall Street Journal managing editor Paul Steiger
to build a newsroom of seasoned reporters and
editors who would produce groundbreaking
journalism of the kind traditional media could
not easily invest in. ProPublica has since won
two Pulitzer prizesone for a report on a New
Orleans hospital that was cut off from civilisation during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
and another on the American financial crisis
of 2008and has earned a reputation as a well
known, respectable reporting outfit.
They have published innovative web apps,
have worked with the worlds largest media
companies on stories like fracking and Big
Pharma corruption, and were the first organisation The Guardian reached out to when they
wanted to smuggle Edward Snowdens files out
of the UK.
One Pew Research Centre study in 2012 charted 172 similar organisations around the United
States, of various types. There is The Lens, focusing on New Orleans and the Gulf Coast area,
and The Marshall Project, led by former New
York Times editor Bill Keller with a focus on
the US criminal justice system. Around 100 are
members of the Institute for Nonprofit News
(formerly known as the Investigative News
Network), a cooperative that provides consulting and services to its member organisations.
The model has also spread outside the United
States, with dozens of organisations working
with the same broad idea. CORRECT!V in Germany calls itself the first nonprofit newsroom
in the German speaking world, and is funded

Counting mosquito
nets in Sub-Saharan
Africa is relatively easy,
but how does one
measure the impact
of investigative
journalism?

VALUE

ProPublica
ProPublica was founded in 2007,
has won two Pulitzer Prizes and was
the first organisation The Guardian
contacted with the Snowden files.

primarily by the Brost Foundation. The Bureau


of Investigative Journalism was founded in
2010 in London and has published over 50 stories that have been republished and rebroadcast
by major media outlets.
In the summer of 2013, during a visit to ProPublicas headquarters in New York, editorin-chief Stephen Engelbert showed me a new
venture he had just been made aware of: a
Thai banker who was also a blogger had created a non profit journalism organisation called
ThaiPublica.
Yet the creation of all those new media entities has not led to a renaissance. Some do produce quality journalism and all employ journalists that might otherwise very well be out of a
job but they are small in size. A 2013 survey by
the Global Investigative Journalism Networks
David Kaplan showed most have budgets of
less than $50,000 and five or fewer staff. This
is understandable, considering most rely on a
limited pool of endowments. Journalism professor Jeff Jarvis said in a blog post that: there
is not enough money in the endowments of all
the foundations interested in supporting news
to pay for the work that needs to be done.
Acknowledging those limitations, some organisations are attempting to diversify their

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

models. ProPublica, CORRECT!V and The Bureau of Investigative Journalism all began with
one major donor who covered their expenses
for a reasonable period during their startup
phase. ProPublica now only covers part of its
eight-figure annual budget with contributions
from the Sandler Foundation. They cover the
rest by fundraising, just like any other nonprofit. The Texas Tribune, founded by venture
capitalist John Thornton in 2009, has diversified
its model further, adding revenue streams such
as events and corporate sponsorships, and now
relies on philanthropy for only about a third of
its revenue.
A 2013 report by the John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation on the state of 18 non-profit
news organisations around the United States
showed they had grown revenues over 30 percent in the three previous years and had decreased reliance on endowments by diversifying their revenue streams. However, the report
found that their sustainability is still not guaranteed. They invest most of their budgets in
editorial operationsa statistic they take pride
inbut most of them soon realise that fundraising and revenue diversification turn out to be as
important and time consuming as the organisations main operational focus.

A final challenge facing journalism nonprofits, common to all such organisations everywhere, is accountability. One of the most
significant contributions of the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation to philanthropy has been the
trend towards measurable results, which charity organisations have learnt to provide in order
to attract new donors who expect their donations to be well managed. Counting mosquito
nets in Sub-Saharan Africa is relatively easy, but
how does one measure the impact of investigative journalism? Sometimes a story is published
and a judicial procedure is initiated, resulting in
new legislation or fines, but most of the time it
is murkier. Awareness is slippery.
There are efforts to reach a consensus (ProPublica co-CEO Dick Tofel has written an interesting white paper on the matter), but attracting modern donors who expect measurable
results will remain a challenge into the future.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Given the amounts of money needed to finance deep
investigative reporting, it is difficult to see how this
kind of media outlet can continue to rely on philanthorpy as its major source of income into the future.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

41

SALES
STRUCTURE

LVARO TRIANA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Bogota

triana@innovation.media

CAN EL TIEMPO
REDEFINE ITS
VALUES AND
MOVE CLOSER
TO READERS?

Innovation in large media companies with a broad mix of legacy


assets is no less of a struggle than innovating from the ground up
with small new projects. Colombias El Tiempo told INNOVATION
about the sales strategies it is using to transform its media group.

C
Photo by Chickering, Boston, Mass. / Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

olombias Casa Editorial El Tiempo (CEET)


owns TV, print, digital and printing press
assets that produce annual sales of $220
million. Print daily El Tiempo has 980,000 daily readers and ElTiempo.com attracts 10 million
unique visitors each month. Two of the three
new owners in the companys 104-year history
have appeared in the last eight years.
In 1985, the group began a programme of
business and editorial transformation: the single El Tiempo brand became 30, a diversification process it believes has helped it to stay
afloat and profitable.
The business model seeks to grow a broad
print subscriber base that now represents 70%
of its circulation income. Ad revenues make up
60% of total revenue. 75% of El Tiempo subscribers say they prefer to receive a daily paper,
not just a weekend version.

Changes in the media industry environment


have affected CEET but GDP growth in Colombia of more than three percentage points between 2013 and 2015 has helped. The group
began developing transactional and digital
products more than 15 years ago, focusing on
the generation of digital content for jobs and
real estate portals. Digital product income now
represents 12% of the total, with ElTiempo.com
bringing in 7%.
New strategies and print technology have allowed the group to offer products such as magazines or commercial inserts to third parties.
Profits from this side of the business are growing. Optional component sales have helped
maintain a stable subscriber base.
TRANSACTIONAL PRODUCTS
Faced with the fall in print media circulation
figures, CEET built alliances for its transactional

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

41

SALES
STRUCTURE

LVARO TRIANA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Bogota

triana@innovation.media

CAN EL TIEMPO
REDEFINE ITS
VALUES AND
MOVE CLOSER
TO READERS?

Innovation in large media companies with a broad mix of legacy


assets is no less of a struggle than innovating from the ground up
with small new projects. Colombias El Tiempo told INNOVATION
about the sales strategies it is using to transform its media group.

C
Photo by Chickering, Boston, Mass. / Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

olombias Casa Editorial El Tiempo (CEET)


owns TV, print, digital and printing press
assets that produce annual sales of $220
million. Print daily El Tiempo has 980,000 daily readers and ElTiempo.com attracts 10 million
unique visitors each month. Two of the three
new owners in the companys 104-year history
have appeared in the last eight years.
In 1985, the group began a programme of
business and editorial transformation: the single El Tiempo brand became 30, a diversification process it believes has helped it to stay
afloat and profitable.
The business model seeks to grow a broad
print subscriber base that now represents 70%
of its circulation income. Ad revenues make up
60% of total revenue. 75% of El Tiempo subscribers say they prefer to receive a daily paper,
not just a weekend version.

Changes in the media industry environment


have affected CEET but GDP growth in Colombia of more than three percentage points between 2013 and 2015 has helped. The group
began developing transactional and digital
products more than 15 years ago, focusing on
the generation of digital content for jobs and
real estate portals. Digital product income now
represents 12% of the total, with ElTiempo.com
bringing in 7%.
New strategies and print technology have allowed the group to offer products such as magazines or commercial inserts to third parties.
Profits from this side of the business are growing. Optional component sales have helped
maintain a stable subscriber base.
TRANSACTIONAL PRODUCTS
Faced with the fall in print media circulation
figures, CEET built alliances for its transactional

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

42

43

SALES

SALES

STRUCTURE

products with subject-area experts, in order to


optimise structures, reduce costs and increase
value in the eyes of its readers and advertisers.
Consulting firms and associations became partners in the employment and real-estate products, which guaranteed market participation
and new sales.
Sales executives are more than twice as productive as before, dealing with 120 clients each
compared to the previous 50, following a process of reorganisation and the hiring of more
sales analysts. Selling classified ads has led to
greater specialisation.
NEW PRODUCTS
Executives backed start ups from the beginning,
separating them from the core business to ensure enough resources were provided to meet
market demands. One, the free print newspaper
ADN, distributed in the Colombian capital Bogot, has grown since its launch.
Advertisers also enjoy a larger magazine portfolio than before.
SALES FORCE
The choice of 30 brands attracts advertiser income and allows the sales force to design solutions and campaigns with increased efficiency, selling combined packages across print, TV
and digital platforms. Advertisers can maintain
brand identity, market segments, discourse and
content across platforms. This allows a critical
mass of advertisers and readers to be aligned
around stories or news categories.
Big clients represent around 60% of CEETs
total income and have dedicated account executives and teams providing them with tailored
solutions. Roles, processes and incentives are
clear and aligned with sales targets. Magazines
have a separate sales force with a clear segmentation strategy.
LOYALTY
CEET ensures print products are delivered to
readers temporary or holiday homes and analyses reader information to structure a benefits
club. The group has developed models allowing it to predict which subscribers are likely to
leave, which allows it to adapt its customer service processes. It claims the models have an 85%
success rate.
The company designs campaigns and programmes to attract better suppliers and more
benefits (like tickets to entertainment events)
for club members.

STRUCTURE

FUTURE CHALLENGES

CEET DATA

CEET is aware there is no magic formula for ensuring


future sustainability.

ElTiempo.com was launched in 1996. There is a desktop version and a responsive website that reduces it in
to different sized screens. The website was redesigned in 2014 to offer readers more news and a better user
experience on mobile phones. Mobile visitors represent around 31% of the total

El Tiempo is still 50% of total income, highlighting a


vulnerability
Logistics and customer service strategies must
move closer to readers

ELTIEMPO.COM AD INCOME

Classified ads need to be seen by more readers to


increase margins

C CA

The B2C strategy needs to guarantee advertisers


better return on investment

Innovation must happen constantly at the owner


and operational levels

2009

Corporate values need redefining: news and


entertainment are important

Santiago lvarez, El Tiempos General Business


Manager, says he is focusing on five things:
More digital: to replace print

18%

11.7

10

7%

2010

2011

2012

2013

eltiempo.com
(10x more visitors
than the print version
has readers)

2014

Mobile Traffic

CCA 9%

8
6
4

Making the most of print side during the slide

2010

2011

2012

More TV: programming, audience share, profits

2013

2014

INCOME EVOLUTION BY BUSINESS AREA

Radio: to close the media group circle

In thousands of millions of pesos


DIGITAL

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

93%

In millions of visitors
12

Beyond individual examples, sales, marketing and


customer service structureswhich are crucial for
any business in any industryare an area where
media companies can concentrate more effort, especially when combined with greater strategic focus on a targeted group of influential readers. Logic would suggest that the more precise the thought
and the greater the organised commercial structure
around that mission, the more abundant will be the
rewards.

14.6

ELTIEMPO.COM DIGITAL TRAFFIC

Charging for content: B2C more than B2B

INNOVATIONS TAKE

15.4

13.4

8.5

6.4

The company is too dependent on search engine


rankings

THE BOSSS FOCUS

TOTAL
INCOME

In millions of pesos

TV

TRANS.

OTHERS

PRINT
GROWTH

% EBITDA

DIGITAL

0.2%

0.6%

TV

-2.5%

-8.3%

TRANS.

5.5%

29.9%

OTHERS

6.9%

9.3%

PRINT

-1.9%

68.5%

2011
TOTAL
505,4

2014

19,5

19,7

35,3

32,6

60,5

71,1

63,3

77,4

326,7

308,1

TOTAL
508,9
Sources: SAP, Omniture Digital Metrics, CEET (StratCo)

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

42

43

SALES

SALES

STRUCTURE

products with subject-area experts, in order to


optimise structures, reduce costs and increase
value in the eyes of its readers and advertisers.
Consulting firms and associations became partners in the employment and real-estate products, which guaranteed market participation
and new sales.
Sales executives are more than twice as productive as before, dealing with 120 clients each
compared to the previous 50, following a process of reorganisation and the hiring of more
sales analysts. Selling classified ads has led to
greater specialisation.
NEW PRODUCTS
Executives backed start ups from the beginning,
separating them from the core business to ensure enough resources were provided to meet
market demands. One, the free print newspaper
ADN, distributed in the Colombian capital Bogot, has grown since its launch.
Advertisers also enjoy a larger magazine portfolio than before.
SALES FORCE
The choice of 30 brands attracts advertiser income and allows the sales force to design solutions and campaigns with increased efficiency, selling combined packages across print, TV
and digital platforms. Advertisers can maintain
brand identity, market segments, discourse and
content across platforms. This allows a critical
mass of advertisers and readers to be aligned
around stories or news categories.
Big clients represent around 60% of CEETs
total income and have dedicated account executives and teams providing them with tailored
solutions. Roles, processes and incentives are
clear and aligned with sales targets. Magazines
have a separate sales force with a clear segmentation strategy.
LOYALTY
CEET ensures print products are delivered to
readers temporary or holiday homes and analyses reader information to structure a benefits
club. The group has developed models allowing it to predict which subscribers are likely to
leave, which allows it to adapt its customer service processes. It claims the models have an 85%
success rate.
The company designs campaigns and programmes to attract better suppliers and more
benefits (like tickets to entertainment events)
for club members.

STRUCTURE

FUTURE CHALLENGES

CEET DATA

CEET is aware there is no magic formula for ensuring


future sustainability.

ElTiempo.com was launched in 1996. There is a desktop version and a responsive website that reduces it in
to different sized screens. The website was redesigned in 2014 to offer readers more news and a better user
experience on mobile phones. Mobile visitors represent around 31% of the total

El Tiempo is still 50% of total income, highlighting a


vulnerability
Logistics and customer service strategies must
move closer to readers

ELTIEMPO.COM AD INCOME

Classified ads need to be seen by more readers to


increase margins

C CA

The B2C strategy needs to guarantee advertisers


better return on investment

Innovation must happen constantly at the owner


and operational levels

2009

Corporate values need redefining: news and


entertainment are important

Santiago lvarez, El Tiempos General Business


Manager, says he is focusing on five things:
More digital: to replace print

18%

11.7

10

7%

2010

2011

2012

2013

eltiempo.com
(10x more visitors
than the print version
has readers)

2014

Mobile Traffic

CCA 9%

8
6
4

Making the most of print side during the slide

2010

2011

2012

More TV: programming, audience share, profits

2013

2014

INCOME EVOLUTION BY BUSINESS AREA

Radio: to close the media group circle

In thousands of millions of pesos


DIGITAL

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

93%

In millions of visitors
12

Beyond individual examples, sales, marketing and


customer service structureswhich are crucial for
any business in any industryare an area where
media companies can concentrate more effort, especially when combined with greater strategic focus on a targeted group of influential readers. Logic would suggest that the more precise the thought
and the greater the organised commercial structure
around that mission, the more abundant will be the
rewards.

14.6

ELTIEMPO.COM DIGITAL TRAFFIC

Charging for content: B2C more than B2B

INNOVATIONS TAKE

15.4

13.4

8.5

6.4

The company is too dependent on search engine


rankings

THE BOSSS FOCUS

TOTAL
INCOME

In millions of pesos

TV

TRANS.

OTHERS

PRINT
GROWTH

% EBITDA

DIGITAL

0.2%

0.6%

TV

-2.5%

-8.3%

TRANS.

5.5%

29.9%

OTHERS

6.9%

9.3%

PRINT

-1.9%

68.5%

2011
TOTAL
505,4

2014

19,5

19,7

35,3

32,6

60,5

71,1

63,3

77,4

326,7

308,1

TOTAL
508,9
Sources: SAP, Omniture Digital Metrics, CEET (StratCo)

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

44

DATA
STORIES

ISMAEL NAFRA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Barcelona

nafria@innovation.media

GREAT DATA
JOURNALISM
AROUND
THE GLOBE

New projects are focusing on the possibilities of data journalism


but so far it has been bigger traditional media players around
the globe who have scooped up the most success in this field.

he main aim of data journalism is, or


should be, the same as non-data journalism: to tell the most interesting and
relevant stories to readers in the most efficient way possible. Data journalism has been
done in newspapers for many years, but the
growing options offered by the digital world
in terms of collecting information, slicing it
up and presenting it in some attractive way
to readers mean we are living through a golden age for this type of journalism. To this
we must add the launch over the past twelve
months of several digital reporting projects
that are betting on data, which has encouraged even more newspapers to jump on the
bandwagon. Amongst the new projects, the
most relevant are FiveThirtyEight and Vox.
FiveThirtyEight
(www.fivethirtyeight.

com) is a very visual, interactive data journalism project, led by Nate Silver and protected by ESPN. Silver became famous thanks to
his New York Times blog of the same name,
where he predicted the results of several elections with great precision, including the last
presidential election. An agreement was not
reached for him to continue at the newspaper, so he launched the new site, which currently employs some 20 specialist journalists.
Vox (www.vox.com), a Vox Media site, was
set up by another journalist, Ezra Klein, who
also left a great newspaper, The Washington Post. Voxs main aim is to help readers
better understand the news. To do that, Vox
uses all sorts of data, graphs and applications
alongside new formats like cards. Launched
in April 2014, at the end of the year it had

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

44

DATA
STORIES

ISMAEL NAFRA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Barcelona

nafria@innovation.media

GREAT DATA
JOURNALISM
AROUND
THE GLOBE

New projects are focusing on the possibilities of data journalism


but so far it has been bigger traditional media players around
the globe who have scooped up the most success in this field.

he main aim of data journalism is, or


should be, the same as non-data journalism: to tell the most interesting and
relevant stories to readers in the most efficient way possible. Data journalism has been
done in newspapers for many years, but the
growing options offered by the digital world
in terms of collecting information, slicing it
up and presenting it in some attractive way
to readers mean we are living through a golden age for this type of journalism. To this
we must add the launch over the past twelve
months of several digital reporting projects
that are betting on data, which has encouraged even more newspapers to jump on the
bandwagon. Amongst the new projects, the
most relevant are FiveThirtyEight and Vox.
FiveThirtyEight
(www.fivethirtyeight.

com) is a very visual, interactive data journalism project, led by Nate Silver and protected by ESPN. Silver became famous thanks to
his New York Times blog of the same name,
where he predicted the results of several elections with great precision, including the last
presidential election. An agreement was not
reached for him to continue at the newspaper, so he launched the new site, which currently employs some 20 specialist journalists.
Vox (www.vox.com), a Vox Media site, was
set up by another journalist, Ezra Klein, who
also left a great newspaper, The Washington Post. Voxs main aim is to help readers
better understand the news. To do that, Vox
uses all sorts of data, graphs and applications
alongside new formats like cards. Launched
in April 2014, at the end of the year it had

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

46

47

DATA

DATA

STORIES

reached 20 million users, which would seem to


provide proof of the warm welcome the public
is giving this kind of journalism.
THE NEW YORK TIMES REACTS
The New York Times did not sit around on its
hands as it watched one of its star journalists
leave. It commissioned one of its most respected journalistsPulitzer Prize winner and former
Washington bureau chief David Leonhardtto
ready a new project. The Upshot (www.nytimes.
com/upshot) is a new space for news, analysis
and data visualisation, launched in April 2014,
with the main aim of helping readers to understand the news, as a Times article explained by
way of presentation.
The article described the need to write very
directly and simply to make it easy for readers to
understand the issues and get the most from the
large amounts of digital data the Internet makes
available: One of our highest priorities will be
unearthing data sets and analysing existing
ones in ways that illuminate and explain the
news.
The Upshot team has data visualisation specialists who had already taken part in some of
the papers most successful interactive projects,
like a survey on the way people talkwhich was
the Timess most visited piece of content in
2013, and among the most visited in 2014or the
tool to help someone decide if they are better off
buying or renting a house.
During the first year of activity, The Upshot
team has worked on lots of projects that seem
to have been welcomed by Times readers. Many
of them have made it into the daily, weekly, monthly or even yearly most read sections.
Where Are the Hardest Places to Live in the
U.S.?a graphical analysis of living standards
in every US countywas the tenth most visited
piece of content in 2014.
Other Upshot contentsuch as The Premier
League Standings If Only Goals By English Players Counted or Mapping Migration in the
United States [since 1900]has triumphed on
social media and readers loved the sports data
stories A Map of Baseball Nation, Which Team
Do You Cheer For? An N.B.A. Fan Map and
N.C.A.A. Fan Map: How the Country Roots for
College Football.
The Upshot team has made extensive use of
photography to present information efficiently, such as with the What 2,000 Calories Looks
Like project, produced with images of the different menu combinations offered by leading
restaurant chains in the United States.

The Who Will Win The Senate interactive


feature and The American Middle Class Is No
Longer the Worlds Richest story on the evolution of the purchasing power of the American
middle class also deserve a special mention.
On top of The Upshots work, the Times has
given us with the occasional master class in data
visualisation, like when it produced its Reshaping New York feature to explain urban change
in New York City over the twelve-year period
Michael Bloomberg was Mayor.
THE GUARDIAN
The data team at British newspaper The Guardian is one of the longest-serving and active in
the field of data journalism. Their Datablog continues to be one of the leading references for almost all of the journalists around the world who
are interested in working with data and making
it visual in some way.
Around 20 people work on The Guardians
data team. Thanks to the quality of their work
and high output, data journalism has become
one for the most distinctive elements of the online activity of the British newspaper.
One of the most spectacular pieces of 2014 was
a project on the situation with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transexual rights around the world:
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
For a newspaper like The Wall Street Journal,
where economic information is an absolutely
essential part of its offer, working with data is
obviously not new. Its journalists are used to analysing all types of data, but the paper still offers
specialist training in this field.
On WSJ.com, news stories that use data bases
and different data visualisations to better tell the
story are more and more frequent. More than a
special space dedicated to data journalism, the
newspaper is trying to spread the philosophy
across all of its work. Last year, in fact, they created a team of investigative journalists and data
experts to work together.
One of the newspapers ongoing blogs is
Numbers, where they analyse and explain in
detail the numbers behind all sorts of news stories. http://blogs.wsj.com/numbers/

STORIES

FIVE THIRTY EIGHT


Nate Silvers dedicated data journalism site.

VOX
Launched in April 2014, at the end of the year it had reached 20 million users

THE NEW YORK TIMES


Which Team Do You Cheer For? An N.B.A. Fan Map.

LA NACIN
Argentinian daily La Nacin has a core five-person team producing a special space dedicated
exclusively to data journalism: La Nacin Data
Team leader Momi Peralta Ramos says it is important to share knowledge: to infect the whole
newsroom and all the editors and journalists so

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

46

47

DATA

DATA

STORIES

reached 20 million users, which would seem to


provide proof of the warm welcome the public
is giving this kind of journalism.
THE NEW YORK TIMES REACTS
The New York Times did not sit around on its
hands as it watched one of its star journalists
leave. It commissioned one of its most respected journalistsPulitzer Prize winner and former
Washington bureau chief David Leonhardtto
ready a new project. The Upshot (www.nytimes.
com/upshot) is a new space for news, analysis
and data visualisation, launched in April 2014,
with the main aim of helping readers to understand the news, as a Times article explained by
way of presentation.
The article described the need to write very
directly and simply to make it easy for readers to
understand the issues and get the most from the
large amounts of digital data the Internet makes
available: One of our highest priorities will be
unearthing data sets and analysing existing
ones in ways that illuminate and explain the
news.
The Upshot team has data visualisation specialists who had already taken part in some of
the papers most successful interactive projects,
like a survey on the way people talkwhich was
the Timess most visited piece of content in
2013, and among the most visited in 2014or the
tool to help someone decide if they are better off
buying or renting a house.
During the first year of activity, The Upshot
team has worked on lots of projects that seem
to have been welcomed by Times readers. Many
of them have made it into the daily, weekly, monthly or even yearly most read sections.
Where Are the Hardest Places to Live in the
U.S.?a graphical analysis of living standards
in every US countywas the tenth most visited
piece of content in 2014.
Other Upshot contentsuch as The Premier
League Standings If Only Goals By English Players Counted or Mapping Migration in the
United States [since 1900]has triumphed on
social media and readers loved the sports data
stories A Map of Baseball Nation, Which Team
Do You Cheer For? An N.B.A. Fan Map and
N.C.A.A. Fan Map: How the Country Roots for
College Football.
The Upshot team has made extensive use of
photography to present information efficiently, such as with the What 2,000 Calories Looks
Like project, produced with images of the different menu combinations offered by leading
restaurant chains in the United States.

The Who Will Win The Senate interactive


feature and The American Middle Class Is No
Longer the Worlds Richest story on the evolution of the purchasing power of the American
middle class also deserve a special mention.
On top of The Upshots work, the Times has
given us with the occasional master class in data
visualisation, like when it produced its Reshaping New York feature to explain urban change
in New York City over the twelve-year period
Michael Bloomberg was Mayor.
THE GUARDIAN
The data team at British newspaper The Guardian is one of the longest-serving and active in
the field of data journalism. Their Datablog continues to be one of the leading references for almost all of the journalists around the world who
are interested in working with data and making
it visual in some way.
Around 20 people work on The Guardians
data team. Thanks to the quality of their work
and high output, data journalism has become
one for the most distinctive elements of the online activity of the British newspaper.
One of the most spectacular pieces of 2014 was
a project on the situation with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transexual rights around the world:
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
For a newspaper like The Wall Street Journal,
where economic information is an absolutely
essential part of its offer, working with data is
obviously not new. Its journalists are used to analysing all types of data, but the paper still offers
specialist training in this field.
On WSJ.com, news stories that use data bases
and different data visualisations to better tell the
story are more and more frequent. More than a
special space dedicated to data journalism, the
newspaper is trying to spread the philosophy
across all of its work. Last year, in fact, they created a team of investigative journalists and data
experts to work together.
One of the newspapers ongoing blogs is
Numbers, where they analyse and explain in
detail the numbers behind all sorts of news stories. http://blogs.wsj.com/numbers/

STORIES

FIVE THIRTY EIGHT


Nate Silvers dedicated data journalism site.

VOX
Launched in April 2014, at the end of the year it had reached 20 million users

THE NEW YORK TIMES


Which Team Do You Cheer For? An N.B.A. Fan Map.

LA NACIN
Argentinian daily La Nacin has a core five-person team producing a special space dedicated
exclusively to data journalism: La Nacin Data
Team leader Momi Peralta Ramos says it is important to share knowledge: to infect the whole
newsroom and all the editors and journalists so

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

48

49

DATA

DATA

STORIES

THE GUARDIAN
The Guardians look at LGBT rights around the world

LA NACIN
Open Sworn Statements: the wealth of public sector workers

ZEIT ONLINE
Favourite German holiday destinations (A Nation Divided: German Reunification)

STORIES

they exchange subject-matter knowledge from


other sources to cross-check data and enrich
stories.
She says her team: stands out with the way
we evaluate public data as raw material to tell
stories, check others and provide proof for the
broader investigative journalism that comes out
of the data.
La Nacin does not have a fixed publishing
schedule for its data work.
Open sworn statements was a very well documented prize-winning project on the wealth
of public sector workers in Argentina that was
developed by La Nacin together with several
other organisations. www.lanacion.com.ar/data
LOS ANGELES TIMES DATA DESK
The LA Times is another paper that bet a long
time ago on data journalism. Among the abundant, exquisite work produced by Ben Walshs
Data Desk team, The Homicide Reportan
interactive map that lets people visualise information about all of the murders carried out in
Los Angeles since the year 2000 is legendary.
Concrete Risks, on the risks more than a thousand buildings in LA face if a big earthquake
strikes, is also worth highlighting.
Ben Walsh said there werent any hard and
fast rules about how many people you need on a
data journalism team: The key is that you have
people with computer programming skills in
the newsroom partnering with reporters and
editors who want to make data stories happen.
In some cases, big things can happen with only
one nerd.
ZEIT ONLINE
Zeit Online, the website of German newspaper Die Zeit, has been doing data journalism
for some time. Among its greatest work over
the past twelve months is A Nation Divided,
which analysed the reality of German reunification with graphs, statistics and images, and
which the paper published in both German and
English. http://www.zeit.de/datenjournalismus

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Tsunamis of data sloshing around the globe are a
fundamental aspect of the new media environment
and data journalism offers a chance to illustrate
stories, to be the story and to speak truth to
power in a new way around the world on issues
that affect us all.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

HOW TO GET STARTED


WITH DATA JOURNALISM
Aron Pilhofer, executive director of digital at The
Guardian and the former head of the interactive
team at The New York Times, is possibly one of
the most authoritative people in the world to offer
advice on how a newspaper can take its first steps
in the area of data journalism. These are the basic
recommendations Pilhofer gave WAN IFRA.
MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
It is essential to be able to count on the support from
the newspapers top leadership. Without it, any effort
will be in vain.
INTEGRATED
The data journalism team must be completely
integrated in the newsroom. It cannot be, for example,
an isolated team in the technical department.
SENIOR JOURNALIST
Ideally, the team must be led by an experienced
journalist who is familiar with data journalism. It
is not essential for him to completely master the
technology.
SUPPORT THE NEWSROOM
The team must help the whole newsroom work with
data and integrate the resulting information across
news stories, not only in those put together by the
data team.
SMALL TEAM
A small-sized team is ideal to begin with. The basic
team could be made up of three people: the journalist
leading the team, a specialist data editor and a
designer who knows how to program.
OPEN TOOLS
There are free or very cheap tools onlinelike Google
Spreadsheetsthat can be used to treat and visualise
data.
START SLOWLY
A big mistake you can make is wanting to begin
with big projects. This strategy normally fails and
can ruin the whole project. Its better to go step-bystep, starting with simple projects and tackle more
ambitious initiatives later on.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

48

49

DATA

DATA

STORIES

THE GUARDIAN
The Guardians look at LGBT rights around the world

LA NACIN
Open Sworn Statements: the wealth of public sector workers

ZEIT ONLINE
Favourite German holiday destinations (A Nation Divided: German Reunification)

STORIES

they exchange subject-matter knowledge from


other sources to cross-check data and enrich
stories.
She says her team: stands out with the way
we evaluate public data as raw material to tell
stories, check others and provide proof for the
broader investigative journalism that comes out
of the data.
La Nacin does not have a fixed publishing
schedule for its data work.
Open sworn statements was a very well documented prize-winning project on the wealth
of public sector workers in Argentina that was
developed by La Nacin together with several
other organisations. www.lanacion.com.ar/data
LOS ANGELES TIMES DATA DESK
The LA Times is another paper that bet a long
time ago on data journalism. Among the abundant, exquisite work produced by Ben Walshs
Data Desk team, The Homicide Reportan
interactive map that lets people visualise information about all of the murders carried out in
Los Angeles since the year 2000 is legendary.
Concrete Risks, on the risks more than a thousand buildings in LA face if a big earthquake
strikes, is also worth highlighting.
Ben Walsh said there werent any hard and
fast rules about how many people you need on a
data journalism team: The key is that you have
people with computer programming skills in
the newsroom partnering with reporters and
editors who want to make data stories happen.
In some cases, big things can happen with only
one nerd.
ZEIT ONLINE
Zeit Online, the website of German newspaper Die Zeit, has been doing data journalism
for some time. Among its greatest work over
the past twelve months is A Nation Divided,
which analysed the reality of German reunification with graphs, statistics and images, and
which the paper published in both German and
English. http://www.zeit.de/datenjournalismus

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Tsunamis of data sloshing around the globe are a
fundamental aspect of the new media environment
and data journalism offers a chance to illustrate
stories, to be the story and to speak truth to
power in a new way around the world on issues
that affect us all.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

HOW TO GET STARTED


WITH DATA JOURNALISM
Aron Pilhofer, executive director of digital at The
Guardian and the former head of the interactive
team at The New York Times, is possibly one of
the most authoritative people in the world to offer
advice on how a newspaper can take its first steps
in the area of data journalism. These are the basic
recommendations Pilhofer gave WAN IFRA.
MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
It is essential to be able to count on the support from
the newspapers top leadership. Without it, any effort
will be in vain.
INTEGRATED
The data journalism team must be completely
integrated in the newsroom. It cannot be, for example,
an isolated team in the technical department.
SENIOR JOURNALIST
Ideally, the team must be led by an experienced
journalist who is familiar with data journalism. It
is not essential for him to completely master the
technology.
SUPPORT THE NEWSROOM
The team must help the whole newsroom work with
data and integrate the resulting information across
news stories, not only in those put together by the
data team.
SMALL TEAM
A small-sized team is ideal to begin with. The basic
team could be made up of three people: the journalist
leading the team, a specialist data editor and a
designer who knows how to program.
OPEN TOOLS
There are free or very cheap tools onlinelike Google
Spreadsheetsthat can be used to treat and visualise
data.
START SLOWLY
A big mistake you can make is wanting to begin
with big projects. This strategy normally fails and
can ruin the whole project. Its better to go step-bystep, starting with simple projects and tackle more
ambitious initiatives later on.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

51

VISUAL

METAPHORS

RODRIGO SNCHEZ

Art director El Mundo (Madrid)

rodrigo.sanchez@unidadeditorialrevistas.es

CREATIVELY
SIMPLE VISUAL
HEADLINES
Distilling complex story ideas into simple, striking metaphors
is infinitely more difficult than the results suggest. INNOVATION
asked Rodrigo Snchez, the art director of Madrid daily
El Mundo, to explain how Metrpoli, the papers leisure
and entertainment supplement, comes up with
its award-winning front covers.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

51

VISUAL

METAPHORS

RODRIGO SNCHEZ

Art director El Mundo (Madrid)

rodrigo.sanchez@unidadeditorialrevistas.es

CREATIVELY
SIMPLE VISUAL
HEADLINES
Distilling complex story ideas into simple, striking metaphors
is infinitely more difficult than the results suggest. INNOVATION
asked Rodrigo Snchez, the art director of Madrid daily
El Mundo, to explain how Metrpoli, the papers leisure
and entertainment supplement, comes up with
its award-winning front covers.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

52

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

53
18

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

1. WORLD TRADE CENTER


is more about intuition
than reflection: we do reflective intuition, if you like,
based on lots of experience and
training, with bags of energy, audacity and value thrown in. Our front covers attempt brave steps forward. We do not fear putting a foot wrong, or staring big mistakes straight
in the eye; defects can be beautiful. Searching
for them takes us back to the beginning of the
graphic arts and highlights the artisan flavour
we seek; finding them teaches us how to avoid
the trap in the future, or at least know where
they are.
We flee boredom. Doing the same thing day
after day, over and over again, annihilates creativity. Variety, surprise, fun and freedom are
the graphic designers vitamins, and his vaccine
against the slavery of his creation; one should
master flexibility to avoid rigid, out-of-date ideas
that prevent us from growing, inventing, innovating and enjoying.
Publications normally put subjects on their
front covers and adapt them to the form of their
magazines. Metrpoli tries to do the opposite,
giving its front cover over to the subject to take
on the form and texture of the subject in question. If no two issues are the same, no two front
covers should be the same. The most important
thing is the story being told, not the magazine.
We print it but it is not ours; we are not the protagonists.
Our duty as communicators is to tell the sub-

jects story. Perseverance


and consistency make a
product identifiable over
time, not the magazines name.
That name must act as part of the
front cover, not be a distant observer of what is going on underneath. Integration is also information. After that, the secret is
to have a bit of fun, punch some emotion into
it and care about your work. Always strive to be
better and more audacious, to go to places others
dont dare. Do what the competition never does
(or doesnt know how to) and think about how
you can surprise your readers and yourself. The
magazine is the magazine but the subjects on the
front are unique, so why should we treat them
all the same? Equality is sometimes the biggest
inequality, the biggest injustice and, in journalism, the biggest mistake. Every subject deserves
its fifteen minutes of glory.
Our work does not have rules or conventions
and does not follow specific steps; there are no
pre-defined long-term guidelines. Our flag is
eclectic and it is hard to define borders between
styles, approaches and professional trends. Everything goes: screaming, whispering, caressing or singing, and we use a full range of colours,
shapes, sizes, illustration, photography and typography to achieve that end. We are flexible
and unpredictable.
The following six examples broadly represent
the Metrpoli style and include illustration,
photography, typography, material and a sense
of humour.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Probably our most iconic front cover. The smoking towers turning into a bar code provide a very strong
image. The bar code is a graphic way to represent commerce and the economy, the world business centre
that were the Twin Towers. The headline is part of that code.

2. MUNICH
This front cover is almost perfect. The possibility of bringing together three concepts in such a simple and
emphatic way was unique. The five Olympic rings, the Star of David and the single shot.
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Illustration: Carlos Rodrguez Casado

52

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

53
18

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

1. WORLD TRADE CENTER


is more about intuition
than reflection: we do reflective intuition, if you like,
based on lots of experience and
training, with bags of energy, audacity and value thrown in. Our front covers attempt brave steps forward. We do not fear putting a foot wrong, or staring big mistakes straight
in the eye; defects can be beautiful. Searching
for them takes us back to the beginning of the
graphic arts and highlights the artisan flavour
we seek; finding them teaches us how to avoid
the trap in the future, or at least know where
they are.
We flee boredom. Doing the same thing day
after day, over and over again, annihilates creativity. Variety, surprise, fun and freedom are
the graphic designers vitamins, and his vaccine
against the slavery of his creation; one should
master flexibility to avoid rigid, out-of-date ideas
that prevent us from growing, inventing, innovating and enjoying.
Publications normally put subjects on their
front covers and adapt them to the form of their
magazines. Metrpoli tries to do the opposite,
giving its front cover over to the subject to take
on the form and texture of the subject in question. If no two issues are the same, no two front
covers should be the same. The most important
thing is the story being told, not the magazine.
We print it but it is not ours; we are not the protagonists.
Our duty as communicators is to tell the sub-

jects story. Perseverance


and consistency make a
product identifiable over
time, not the magazines name.
That name must act as part of the
front cover, not be a distant observer of what is going on underneath. Integration is also information. After that, the secret is
to have a bit of fun, punch some emotion into
it and care about your work. Always strive to be
better and more audacious, to go to places others
dont dare. Do what the competition never does
(or doesnt know how to) and think about how
you can surprise your readers and yourself. The
magazine is the magazine but the subjects on the
front are unique, so why should we treat them
all the same? Equality is sometimes the biggest
inequality, the biggest injustice and, in journalism, the biggest mistake. Every subject deserves
its fifteen minutes of glory.
Our work does not have rules or conventions
and does not follow specific steps; there are no
pre-defined long-term guidelines. Our flag is
eclectic and it is hard to define borders between
styles, approaches and professional trends. Everything goes: screaming, whispering, caressing or singing, and we use a full range of colours,
shapes, sizes, illustration, photography and typography to achieve that end. We are flexible
and unpredictable.
The following six examples broadly represent
the Metrpoli style and include illustration,
photography, typography, material and a sense
of humour.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Probably our most iconic front cover. The smoking towers turning into a bar code provide a very strong
image. The bar code is a graphic way to represent commerce and the economy, the world business centre
that were the Twin Towers. The headline is part of that code.

2. MUNICH
This front cover is almost perfect. The possibility of bringing together three concepts in such a simple and
emphatic way was unique. The five Olympic rings, the Star of David and the single shot.
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

18

18

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

3. ARMAGEDDON

5. THE IMPOSSIBLE

We wanted to bring movement to the front cover. A simple Photoshop filter gave us speed
and depth for the Biblical Apocalypse text. Only the title of the film is still. The front cover
became the meteorite racing towards the Earth.

4. SNOW WHITE
The protagonist of our front cover was neither Snow White, the evil stepmother or the dwarves. It was the
apple, seven of them like the seven dwarves, but Metrpoli is nine letters, so we ate a couple more.

The wave is the main axis of the film: it causes the whole plot, drags everything in its wake and
generates the catastrophic landscape. Our own cover had to become that wave. Half of the cover
balanced by the other half. The impossible.

6. THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN


We took spider webs to the extreme, beyond even, given hes half man.
Simple, daily ideas that become iconic when mixed together.

18

18

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

3. ARMAGEDDON

5. THE IMPOSSIBLE

We wanted to bring movement to the front cover. A simple Photoshop filter gave us speed
and depth for the Biblical Apocalypse text. Only the title of the film is still. The front cover
became the meteorite racing towards the Earth.

4. SNOW WHITE
The protagonist of our front cover was neither Snow White, the evil stepmother or the dwarves. It was the
apple, seven of them like the seven dwarves, but Metrpoli is nine letters, so we ate a couple more.

The wave is the main axis of the film: it causes the whole plot, drags everything in its wake and
generates the catastrophic landscape. Our own cover had to become that wave. Half of the cover
balanced by the other half. The impossible.

6. THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN


We took spider webs to the extreme, beyond even, given hes half man.
Simple, daily ideas that become iconic when mixed together.

56

57

WELCOME

NEW FOCUS

MARTA BOTERO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Medellin

botero@innovation.media

BONO ELTON JOHN GIORGIO ARMANI KARL LAGERFELD JUANES LADY GAGA RICHARD BRANSON MARIO TESTINO JEAN PAUL GAULTIER

GUEST EDITORS:
TAKING
NEWSPAPERS
OUT OF THE BOX
FOR A DAY

Bono, Elton John, Richard Branson, Karl Lagerfeld and Lady Gaga
have all guest edited newspaper in recent years, drawing attention
to aspects of the news that are normally hidden in the standard
editorial routine. INNOVATION took a look at some examples

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

uest editors invite innovation. The idea


has been around for 10 years in leading
newspapers and promises more in the future. It is a chance to interrupt the predictable
environment of newspapers and offer readers a
new way of looking at things, a fresh idea to rally around or an extra touch of celebrity entertainment, but there is always someone famous
at the forefront, and its always done as a break
in the routine that lasts a day.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Vanity Fairs signature photographic style invaded the pages of Die Welt Am Sonntag on November 16, 2014 to celebrate the use of images. The inspiration for change came from Mario
Testino, the British fashion photographer born
in Peru, who sent a strong message to the editorial staff: forget about Beat Balzli, the editorin-chief of Die Welt Am Sonntag: now youre
working for me: the images must be bigger.
Wall Paper allowed Robert Wilsona multiskilled designer, choreographer, theatre and
opera director who experiments with portraits
using mixed video, photo and art techniques on
stars such as Isabella Rossellini and Johnny Depp,
as well as on everyday objets and old carsto
leave his mark.
On November 23, 2013, Libration, the centre-left French newspaper founded by Jean-Paul
Sartre, defended photography using the oppo-

site technique: readers saw white space where


they normally saw images. Articles ran without the visual impact photography provides,
to sound the alarm as press photographers are
sacked from newspapers around the world
and professional work is replaced by images
taken on smartphones. The days edition was
also dedicated to those press photographers
who lose their lives in armed conflict.
Brigitte Ollier, from Librations culture section, explained that the white photo frames created an uncomfortable silence thanks to the
missing information: it was a mute newspaper,
a newspaper without the normal internal music
accompanying the gaze.
The front page described the dailys creed:
Libration vows an eternal gratitude to photography, whether produced by photojourna
-lists, fashion photographers, portraitists, or
conceptual artists. Our passion for photography
has never been questioned not because its
used to beautify, shock or illustrate, but because
photography takes the pulse of our world.
DESIGN
Design is also used as an excuse to invite great
creators over for the day, like when Armani edited
British daily The Independent. Rival designer
Karl Lagerfeld knows the format better, though,
and has guest edited Die Welt, Libration and
Metro. He edited Die Welt Am Sonntag for a day

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

56

57

WELCOME

NEW FOCUS

MARTA BOTERO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Medellin

botero@innovation.media

BONO ELTON JOHN GIORGIO ARMANI KARL LAGERFELD JUANES LADY GAGA RICHARD BRANSON MARIO TESTINO JEAN PAUL GAULTIER

GUEST EDITORS:
TAKING
NEWSPAPERS
OUT OF THE BOX
FOR A DAY

Bono, Elton John, Richard Branson, Karl Lagerfeld and Lady Gaga
have all guest edited newspaper in recent years, drawing attention
to aspects of the news that are normally hidden in the standard
editorial routine. INNOVATION took a look at some examples

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

uest editors invite innovation. The idea


has been around for 10 years in leading
newspapers and promises more in the future. It is a chance to interrupt the predictable
environment of newspapers and offer readers a
new way of looking at things, a fresh idea to rally around or an extra touch of celebrity entertainment, but there is always someone famous
at the forefront, and its always done as a break
in the routine that lasts a day.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Vanity Fairs signature photographic style invaded the pages of Die Welt Am Sonntag on November 16, 2014 to celebrate the use of images. The inspiration for change came from Mario
Testino, the British fashion photographer born
in Peru, who sent a strong message to the editorial staff: forget about Beat Balzli, the editorin-chief of Die Welt Am Sonntag: now youre
working for me: the images must be bigger.
Wall Paper allowed Robert Wilsona multiskilled designer, choreographer, theatre and
opera director who experiments with portraits
using mixed video, photo and art techniques on
stars such as Isabella Rossellini and Johnny Depp,
as well as on everyday objets and old carsto
leave his mark.
On November 23, 2013, Libration, the centre-left French newspaper founded by Jean-Paul
Sartre, defended photography using the oppo-

site technique: readers saw white space where


they normally saw images. Articles ran without the visual impact photography provides,
to sound the alarm as press photographers are
sacked from newspapers around the world
and professional work is replaced by images
taken on smartphones. The days edition was
also dedicated to those press photographers
who lose their lives in armed conflict.
Brigitte Ollier, from Librations culture section, explained that the white photo frames created an uncomfortable silence thanks to the
missing information: it was a mute newspaper,
a newspaper without the normal internal music
accompanying the gaze.
The front page described the dailys creed:
Libration vows an eternal gratitude to photography, whether produced by photojourna
-lists, fashion photographers, portraitists, or
conceptual artists. Our passion for photography
has never been questioned not because its
used to beautify, shock or illustrate, but because
photography takes the pulse of our world.
DESIGN
Design is also used as an excuse to invite great
creators over for the day, like when Armani edited
British daily The Independent. Rival designer
Karl Lagerfeld knows the format better, though,
and has guest edited Die Welt, Libration and
Metro. He edited Die Welt Am Sonntag for a day

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

59

BLAIR

GAULTIER

WELCOME

NEW FOCUS

ARMANI

on the theme of luxury, an area the German designer knows well.


The motivating force in his creative life became the mantra for editing the paper: The moment you like your job, it is no longer work. It
was obvious he enjoyed being editor of a newspaper and broke with the normal print routine.
While it perhaps wasnt so shocking to see Lagerfeld editing Die Welt, it was more of surprise
to see him editing the French centre-left daily Libration or Metro. At Libration, the Kaiser made it clear that creation at the crossroads
of luxury, good design and great ideas knows no
boundaries.

TESTINO

LAGERFELD

BONO

BUT DOES IT WORK?


Guest editing requires enormous amounts of
editorial coordination before the big day, but the
main aim is to draw attention to worthy causes.
Selling extra copies is a bonus.
Special celebrity editions have an impact on
circulation. The record for an increase in sales
is still The Independents 70,000 extra copies
when U2s Bono edited it in 2007, after long
conversations to reach an agreement. Elton John
also made it work there, selling 10,000 more
copies and convincing stars such as Elizabeth
Taylor, Bill Clinton, Kanye West and Christiane
Amanpour to encourage solidarity with World
AIDS Day, covered from every angle in that days
edition.
Celebrity guest editors can have a big impact on that days edition, can increase circulation and can also increase reader participation, if
readers are invited to work as assistant editors to
a star for the day. Metrowith its 18 million readers across 22 editionsprovided Sir Richard Branson and Lady Gaga with a chance for lots of extra
exposure when they both enjoyed guest editing
the newspaper for a day alongside a reader. The
founder of the Virgin Group asked young Metro
readers to send in minute-long videos as a form
of CV, explaining with entrepreneurial initiative why they wanted to be his editorial assistant
for the day. The winner was Juan Nicols Garzn
Guevara from Bogot in Colombia. Juan Nicols
accompanied Sir Richard on October 4, 2012 in
New York and was also invited to Virgin Unites
World Business Forum, where new entrepreneurs are advised on how to: screw business as
usual.
Lady Gaga launched a similar competition
when she launched her album Born This Way,
this time asking candidate readers to better describe why they were born as they were and
which factors in the fight for equality most mo-

tivated them. She said in a statement that I say I


was born to be brave. Thats part of my mission
in life. I was born to follow my artistic visions.
Look into yourself. Are you born to be brave?,
and told the Metro newsroom she had been a
victim of bullying. 20-year-old Jeroen Engelen
from Holland, slightly older but no less fanatical
than her usual little monsters, won the competition and arrived at the Metro newsroom in
clothes he had designed himself.
FROM CELEBRITIES TO ISSUES
As Lady Gaga arrived at Metro with her pink
hair and raunchy style, Colombian singer Juanes
turned up in his black shirt to edit Bogot newspaper El Tiempo, with an open invite to writers
and analysts to offer arguments in favour of a climate of reconciliation and peace to help bring
about the end of the armed conflict the country has struggled with for decades. The Sunday
edition was called: Its time for change and the
singer said the aim of that days edition was to
offer a proposing, optimistic, inclusive, hopeful vision of Colombia across the newspaper
without at the same time hiding the reality of
the country.
Last February, El Mundo in Spain tried something different on World Cancer Day: a thematic
edition with something about cancer on every
page, as a homage to the patients, doctors, researchers, relatives, nurses and volunteers who
fight against the disease. The print and digital
editions maintained a hopeful tone, with positive
figures: the number of patients who survive the
disease has tripled since the 1970s. The website
offered a special Faces of Cancer presentation,
with the testimonies of nurses and volunteers.
It is clear the different ways of approaching
guest editing for a daycelebrities, good causes,
sensitive subjects, reader participation, design
potential and great photographyall transcend
how we normally think about newspapers and
suggest new frontiers for us to cross.
Letting someone else edit the paper for a day,
after weeks of preparation, offers readers a welcome surprise from the standard 365-day news
routine that makes them think, and a collectors
edition to keep.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Beyond the success of celebrity editing for a day,
which requires enormous preparatory effort, newspapers should think about how to incorporate these
more impactful changes into their normal product.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

59

BLAIR

GAULTIER

WELCOME

NEW FOCUS

ARMANI

on the theme of luxury, an area the German designer knows well.


The motivating force in his creative life became the mantra for editing the paper: The moment you like your job, it is no longer work. It
was obvious he enjoyed being editor of a newspaper and broke with the normal print routine.
While it perhaps wasnt so shocking to see Lagerfeld editing Die Welt, it was more of surprise
to see him editing the French centre-left daily Libration or Metro. At Libration, the Kaiser made it clear that creation at the crossroads
of luxury, good design and great ideas knows no
boundaries.

TESTINO

LAGERFELD

BONO

BUT DOES IT WORK?


Guest editing requires enormous amounts of
editorial coordination before the big day, but the
main aim is to draw attention to worthy causes.
Selling extra copies is a bonus.
Special celebrity editions have an impact on
circulation. The record for an increase in sales
is still The Independents 70,000 extra copies
when U2s Bono edited it in 2007, after long
conversations to reach an agreement. Elton John
also made it work there, selling 10,000 more
copies and convincing stars such as Elizabeth
Taylor, Bill Clinton, Kanye West and Christiane
Amanpour to encourage solidarity with World
AIDS Day, covered from every angle in that days
edition.
Celebrity guest editors can have a big impact on that days edition, can increase circulation and can also increase reader participation, if
readers are invited to work as assistant editors to
a star for the day. Metrowith its 18 million readers across 22 editionsprovided Sir Richard Branson and Lady Gaga with a chance for lots of extra
exposure when they both enjoyed guest editing
the newspaper for a day alongside a reader. The
founder of the Virgin Group asked young Metro
readers to send in minute-long videos as a form
of CV, explaining with entrepreneurial initiative why they wanted to be his editorial assistant
for the day. The winner was Juan Nicols Garzn
Guevara from Bogot in Colombia. Juan Nicols
accompanied Sir Richard on October 4, 2012 in
New York and was also invited to Virgin Unites
World Business Forum, where new entrepreneurs are advised on how to: screw business as
usual.
Lady Gaga launched a similar competition
when she launched her album Born This Way,
this time asking candidate readers to better describe why they were born as they were and
which factors in the fight for equality most mo-

tivated them. She said in a statement that I say I


was born to be brave. Thats part of my mission
in life. I was born to follow my artistic visions.
Look into yourself. Are you born to be brave?,
and told the Metro newsroom she had been a
victim of bullying. 20-year-old Jeroen Engelen
from Holland, slightly older but no less fanatical
than her usual little monsters, won the competition and arrived at the Metro newsroom in
clothes he had designed himself.
FROM CELEBRITIES TO ISSUES
As Lady Gaga arrived at Metro with her pink
hair and raunchy style, Colombian singer Juanes
turned up in his black shirt to edit Bogot newspaper El Tiempo, with an open invite to writers
and analysts to offer arguments in favour of a climate of reconciliation and peace to help bring
about the end of the armed conflict the country has struggled with for decades. The Sunday
edition was called: Its time for change and the
singer said the aim of that days edition was to
offer a proposing, optimistic, inclusive, hopeful vision of Colombia across the newspaper
without at the same time hiding the reality of
the country.
Last February, El Mundo in Spain tried something different on World Cancer Day: a thematic
edition with something about cancer on every
page, as a homage to the patients, doctors, researchers, relatives, nurses and volunteers who
fight against the disease. The print and digital
editions maintained a hopeful tone, with positive
figures: the number of patients who survive the
disease has tripled since the 1970s. The website
offered a special Faces of Cancer presentation,
with the testimonies of nurses and volunteers.
It is clear the different ways of approaching
guest editing for a daycelebrities, good causes,
sensitive subjects, reader participation, design
potential and great photographyall transcend
how we normally think about newspapers and
suggest new frontiers for us to cross.
Letting someone else edit the paper for a day,
after weeks of preparation, offers readers a welcome surprise from the standard 365-day news
routine that makes them think, and a collectors
edition to keep.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Beyond the success of celebrity editing for a day,
which requires enormous preparatory effort, newspapers should think about how to incorporate these
more impactful changes into their normal product.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

61

NEW
PAPERS

JUAN ANTONIO GINER

President & Founder, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Wales

giner@innovation.media

LE 1 GOES DEEP AND


FOLDED IN A NEW
PARISIAN GRAND
PETIT JOURNAL

The media crisis in France has not stopped new titles from appearing. Le 1 is one of the most innovative. We visited its newsroom in
Paris and spoke to the founders.

e first met ric Fottorino and Laurent


Greilsamer when Le Monde asked INNOVATION to help relaunch its weekend editions. The project was stopped when
the paper was bought by its current owners
but all of us saw the humanity and journalistic energy that characterised their effort. They
left the newspaper and played around with different ideas for a couple of years before finally launching Le 1an independent newspaper
that doesnt owe anything to anyoneon April
9, 2014.
When we met again just before their first anniversaryat new, warm, well-lit offices where 10
people work in the interior patio on the ground
floor of 44 Rue RichierI reminded them they
had gone from the Grand Journal De Gaulle
asked Huber Beuve-Mry to build to Le 1, a Petit Journal. As fate would have it, 70 years later
( 1944-2014 ), Le 1 was also born in Pariss 9eme
arrondissement, near the old headquarters of
Le Monde at 5 Rue Des Italiens, Somewhat more
modest but with similar ambitions: to be an

independent title of relevance. A Grand Petit


Journal, if you will.
COFOUNDERS
The new publication is borne of the passion for
journalism its four founders share.
Henry Hermandwho at 80 has been almost
everything in journalism, from an editorialist
at La Quinzaine to a reporter at LObservateur
or freelancing for Tribune Socialistelaunched
the daily Matin de Paris, founded Terra Nova
(an ideas laboratory close to French socialism)
and is now the chairman of HH Dvelopment,
the group that controls 51% of the share capital
of Le 1.
The other 49% is split between the other three
cofounders.
ric Fottorino is a journalist who has published 11 novels, a cycling fanatic and a fan of
the Tour de France who worked at Le Monde for
25 years as a reporter, section editor, editor and
chairman of the most famous paper in France,
which he wrote about in Mon Tour du Monde

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

61

NEW
PAPERS

JUAN ANTONIO GINER

President & Founder, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Wales

giner@innovation.media

LE 1 GOES DEEP AND


FOLDED IN A NEW
PARISIAN GRAND
PETIT JOURNAL

The media crisis in France has not stopped new titles from appearing. Le 1 is one of the most innovative. We visited its newsroom in
Paris and spoke to the founders.

e first met ric Fottorino and Laurent


Greilsamer when Le Monde asked INNOVATION to help relaunch its weekend editions. The project was stopped when
the paper was bought by its current owners
but all of us saw the humanity and journalistic energy that characterised their effort. They
left the newspaper and played around with different ideas for a couple of years before finally launching Le 1an independent newspaper
that doesnt owe anything to anyoneon April
9, 2014.
When we met again just before their first anniversaryat new, warm, well-lit offices where 10
people work in the interior patio on the ground
floor of 44 Rue RichierI reminded them they
had gone from the Grand Journal De Gaulle
asked Huber Beuve-Mry to build to Le 1, a Petit Journal. As fate would have it, 70 years later
( 1944-2014 ), Le 1 was also born in Pariss 9eme
arrondissement, near the old headquarters of
Le Monde at 5 Rue Des Italiens, Somewhat more
modest but with similar ambitions: to be an

independent title of relevance. A Grand Petit


Journal, if you will.
COFOUNDERS
The new publication is borne of the passion for
journalism its four founders share.
Henry Hermandwho at 80 has been almost
everything in journalism, from an editorialist
at La Quinzaine to a reporter at LObservateur
or freelancing for Tribune Socialistelaunched
the daily Matin de Paris, founded Terra Nova
(an ideas laboratory close to French socialism)
and is now the chairman of HH Dvelopment,
the group that controls 51% of the share capital
of Le 1.
The other 49% is split between the other three
cofounders.
ric Fottorino is a journalist who has published 11 novels, a cycling fanatic and a fan of
the Tour de France who worked at Le Monde for
25 years as a reporter, section editor, editor and
chairman of the most famous paper in France,
which he wrote about in Mon Tour du Monde

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

62

63

NEW

NEW

PAPERS

(Gallimard, 2012 ). He is the editor of the new


publication.
Laurent Greilsamer is a journalist who
worked at Le Figaro and spent most of his life at
Le Monde ( 1977-2011 ), where he began as a reporter before becoming associate editor of the
paper Huber Beuve-Mry created. He wrote a
magnificent biography of his time there titled
Lhomme du Monde (Perrin, 1990 ). Greilsamer is the managing editor of Le 1.
Natalie Thiriez is Fottorinos wife and a specialist in newsroom digitalisation (Tlegrama,
Vogue, Paris Match). She is the new weeklys art
director.
PRINT FORMAT
Fottorino and Greilsamer considered creating another print newspaper but concluded it
would be nearly impossible, despite the launch
of LOpinion in Paris in 2013 and compact dailies like Il Foglio or Il Fatto in Italy.
With the creative help of architect and graphic designer Antoine Ricardou (who did the
Centre Pompidou webpage), they came up with
what they all called a bird with foldable paper
wings, which was and is unheard of in global news.A single folded sheet of 90 gram, ecological 84 x 59 cm paper, printed at full colour
on both sides, then folded and unfolded into the
equivalent of 16 pages presented and readable
in three formats: magazine, tabloid and broadsheet.
First they thought about calling it In Fine,
then Caf Noir, and then LOriginal, before finally choosing Le 1.
When asked why they started another print

Newspaper fold

PAPERS

newspaper, Fottorino said: you cannot mix the


content crisis with the print crisis. He believes
the crisis many newspapers are living through
is not related so much to the platform or distribution model as to an inability to contextualise
and explain what is happening in a world dominated by instant information.
JOURNALISM FORMULA
The new papers slogan is: Each week, one current affairs topic, several views.
The Le 1 cocktail contains several different ingredients:
A broad view of life with an exponential
format
A 3D vision of issues where printed pages
are unfolded
The ambition to understand an unfolding
future in three reading periods
To offer a 30 minute read containing more
ideas than opinion
To inspire and inform: the short read
makes you think for a long time
Journalism that instructs rather than
exhausts
The beauty of an object that is read, kept
and collected
The publication of a tight read with no waste
The founders quote Hegel and Hugo to explain the need for this type of quality journalism. Friedrich Hegel said: Reading the morning newspaper is the realists morning prayer,
and Victor Hugo that: Freedom begins where
ignorance ends.

Newspaper unfold

www.inytluxury.com

Graphic of the newsroom published


in the cero number. Right, ric
Fottorino, co-founder of Le Un

CONTENT
Every Wednesday, the radicalness of choosing
just one topic demands a great, multi-faceted
creative effort because: the truth does not have
a single face. The newsroom looks to philosophers, historians, sociologists, anthropologists,
novelists, poets, political scientists, economists,
diplomats, academics, map makers, statisticians
or geographers to turn that vision into a reality.
They must distill their specialist knowledge
into a few lines of intelligible, readable wisdom,
and topics are usually planned three weeks in
advance.
In its first year, Le 1 looked at Putin, the Charlie Hebdo attack, the future of left-right politics,
the oil crisis, a France governed by Le Pen, the
cities of tomorrow and how to explain republican values to young people.
CAVIAR JOURNALISM
Le 1 is an example of essence journalism and its
newsroom exemplifies what INNOVATION calls
an information refinery, capable of distilling
information with a high octane news value.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

Brevity is not simplification or superficiality:


this Petit Journal demands work of the highest
intensity and effort is invested to maintain news
tension on each of its pages. The details, says
Greilsamer: are very important.
In September 1991, another visionary, Jean
Schalit, who founded The European with Robert Maxwell, launched La Truffe, a broadsheet
investigative daily with only four pages; it lasted just two months because it lacked financial
backing and advertising.
Le 1 only needs a few thousand readers because it targets the immense minority who
have stopped buying boring, over-politicised,

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

62

63

NEW

NEW

PAPERS

(Gallimard, 2012 ). He is the editor of the new


publication.
Laurent Greilsamer is a journalist who
worked at Le Figaro and spent most of his life at
Le Monde ( 1977-2011 ), where he began as a reporter before becoming associate editor of the
paper Huber Beuve-Mry created. He wrote a
magnificent biography of his time there titled
Lhomme du Monde (Perrin, 1990 ). Greilsamer is the managing editor of Le 1.
Natalie Thiriez is Fottorinos wife and a specialist in newsroom digitalisation (Tlegrama,
Vogue, Paris Match). She is the new weeklys art
director.
PRINT FORMAT
Fottorino and Greilsamer considered creating another print newspaper but concluded it
would be nearly impossible, despite the launch
of LOpinion in Paris in 2013 and compact dailies like Il Foglio or Il Fatto in Italy.
With the creative help of architect and graphic designer Antoine Ricardou (who did the
Centre Pompidou webpage), they came up with
what they all called a bird with foldable paper
wings, which was and is unheard of in global news.A single folded sheet of 90 gram, ecological 84 x 59 cm paper, printed at full colour
on both sides, then folded and unfolded into the
equivalent of 16 pages presented and readable
in three formats: magazine, tabloid and broadsheet.
First they thought about calling it In Fine,
then Caf Noir, and then LOriginal, before finally choosing Le 1.
When asked why they started another print

Newspaper fold

PAPERS

newspaper, Fottorino said: you cannot mix the


content crisis with the print crisis. He believes
the crisis many newspapers are living through
is not related so much to the platform or distribution model as to an inability to contextualise
and explain what is happening in a world dominated by instant information.
JOURNALISM FORMULA
The new papers slogan is: Each week, one current affairs topic, several views.
The Le 1 cocktail contains several different ingredients:
A broad view of life with an exponential
format
A 3D vision of issues where printed pages
are unfolded
The ambition to understand an unfolding
future in three reading periods
To offer a 30 minute read containing more
ideas than opinion
To inspire and inform: the short read
makes you think for a long time
Journalism that instructs rather than
exhausts
The beauty of an object that is read, kept
and collected
The publication of a tight read with no waste
The founders quote Hegel and Hugo to explain the need for this type of quality journalism. Friedrich Hegel said: Reading the morning newspaper is the realists morning prayer,
and Victor Hugo that: Freedom begins where
ignorance ends.

Newspaper unfold

www.inytluxury.com

Graphic of the newsroom published


in the cero number. Right, ric
Fottorino, co-founder of Le Un

CONTENT
Every Wednesday, the radicalness of choosing
just one topic demands a great, multi-faceted
creative effort because: the truth does not have
a single face. The newsroom looks to philosophers, historians, sociologists, anthropologists,
novelists, poets, political scientists, economists,
diplomats, academics, map makers, statisticians
or geographers to turn that vision into a reality.
They must distill their specialist knowledge
into a few lines of intelligible, readable wisdom,
and topics are usually planned three weeks in
advance.
In its first year, Le 1 looked at Putin, the Charlie Hebdo attack, the future of left-right politics,
the oil crisis, a France governed by Le Pen, the
cities of tomorrow and how to explain republican values to young people.
CAVIAR JOURNALISM
Le 1 is an example of essence journalism and its
newsroom exemplifies what INNOVATION calls
an information refinery, capable of distilling
information with a high octane news value.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

Brevity is not simplification or superficiality:


this Petit Journal demands work of the highest
intensity and effort is invested to maintain news
tension on each of its pages. The details, says
Greilsamer: are very important.
In September 1991, another visionary, Jean
Schalit, who founded The European with Robert Maxwell, launched La Truffe, a broadsheet
investigative daily with only four pages; it lasted just two months because it lacked financial
backing and advertising.
Le 1 only needs a few thousand readers because it targets the immense minority who
have stopped buying boring, over-politicised,

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

64

65

NEW

NEW

PAPERS

predictable newspapers that end up as cathedrals without a soul.


The first 52 copiesperhaps instalment is a
better wordcombine the presence of young
journalists with very well-known bylines such
as the philosopher Edgar Morin, the academic
Erik Orsenna, the cinema director Costa Gavras,
the politician Michel Rocard, the writer Rgis
Debray or the journalist Robert Sol who, for

they came up with


what they called
a bird with foldable
paper wings, which
was and is unheard
of in global news.

many years, wrote those 1,000-word columns


on page one of Le Monde, today considered a
classic of analytical journalism.
ric Fottorino sums up this selective content
focus with words inspired by the Czech-French
novelist Milan Kundera: Le 1 does not have the
answer for everything, but it does question everything.
DESIGN
Le 1 has exquisite graphic design and typography on its 16 pages. Caviar journalism wrapped
in care and elegance. No graphic genre is absent
and each copy combines very legible typography with infographics, illustration, ideograms,
explanatory cartoons, caricatures, maps, tables
and even comic strips. It makes readers want to
read and to enjoy reading.
READERSHIP
The average age of Le 1 readers (half men, half
women) is 46 but 15% are under 25. The paper
targets people who want to read beyond channel hopping and the present moment: by making newspapers for shareholders and advertisers, weve stopped making newspapers for
readers, says Fottorino.
Journalists meet readers every so often at the

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

PAPERS

Rond Point de Paris theatre to debate current affairs with the audience and listen to their criticism and suggestions. Tickets cost 10.
The print edition is promoted on the website
(http://le1hebdo.fr/) but readers can buy and
read the digital version.
The weekly is sold mainly in France but can
also be bought in Belgium, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Canada, the US, Morocco and Tunisia.
BUSINESS MODEL
Le 1 is sold in newsagents and 300 book shops
and does not carry advertising, relying solely on
income from copies sold (2.80).
Each edition costs around 20,000 to produce and the team hopes to reach profitability after 30,000 copies; they are already selling
25,000 copies ( 7,000 to subscribers).
5,000 per edition is spent on paying writers
and the print run costs another 5,000.
Support subscriptions cost 132, an ordinary 13-month subscription 89 and the
monthly subscription 9 (5 for students). Le 1
also launched a special one month for 1 offer
on their first anniversary.
They publish some special non-commercial
editionslike the one stuffed in guests bags at
the Cannes Film Festival or the 10,000 extra

copies distributed to teachers and students taking part in activities at the Centre Pompidou
for bulk purchase by companies for free distribution. Another is planned for the Cartier
Foundation.
Innovation
ric Fottorino believes the Le 1 adventure is
worth the effort: innovation is life insurance
for the press and journalism.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
An emphasis on the higest quality and innovative new print formats is commendable, as is a serious attempt to respect readers time in such a busy
world, but Le 1 should try hard to maintain a focus
on relating its deeper contextual explanations to the
weeks news.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

64

65

NEW

NEW

PAPERS

predictable newspapers that end up as cathedrals without a soul.


The first 52 copiesperhaps instalment is a
better wordcombine the presence of young
journalists with very well-known bylines such
as the philosopher Edgar Morin, the academic
Erik Orsenna, the cinema director Costa Gavras,
the politician Michel Rocard, the writer Rgis
Debray or the journalist Robert Sol who, for

they came up with


what they called
a bird with foldable
paper wings, which
was and is unheard
of in global news.

many years, wrote those 1,000-word columns


on page one of Le Monde, today considered a
classic of analytical journalism.
ric Fottorino sums up this selective content
focus with words inspired by the Czech-French
novelist Milan Kundera: Le 1 does not have the
answer for everything, but it does question everything.
DESIGN
Le 1 has exquisite graphic design and typography on its 16 pages. Caviar journalism wrapped
in care and elegance. No graphic genre is absent
and each copy combines very legible typography with infographics, illustration, ideograms,
explanatory cartoons, caricatures, maps, tables
and even comic strips. It makes readers want to
read and to enjoy reading.
READERSHIP
The average age of Le 1 readers (half men, half
women) is 46 but 15% are under 25. The paper
targets people who want to read beyond channel hopping and the present moment: by making newspapers for shareholders and advertisers, weve stopped making newspapers for
readers, says Fottorino.
Journalists meet readers every so often at the

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

PAPERS

Rond Point de Paris theatre to debate current affairs with the audience and listen to their criticism and suggestions. Tickets cost 10.
The print edition is promoted on the website
(http://le1hebdo.fr/) but readers can buy and
read the digital version.
The weekly is sold mainly in France but can
also be bought in Belgium, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Canada, the US, Morocco and Tunisia.
BUSINESS MODEL
Le 1 is sold in newsagents and 300 book shops
and does not carry advertising, relying solely on
income from copies sold (2.80).
Each edition costs around 20,000 to produce and the team hopes to reach profitability after 30,000 copies; they are already selling
25,000 copies ( 7,000 to subscribers).
5,000 per edition is spent on paying writers
and the print run costs another 5,000.
Support subscriptions cost 132, an ordinary 13-month subscription 89 and the
monthly subscription 9 (5 for students). Le 1
also launched a special one month for 1 offer
on their first anniversary.
They publish some special non-commercial
editionslike the one stuffed in guests bags at
the Cannes Film Festival or the 10,000 extra

copies distributed to teachers and students taking part in activities at the Centre Pompidou
for bulk purchase by companies for free distribution. Another is planned for the Cartier
Foundation.
Innovation
ric Fottorino believes the Le 1 adventure is
worth the effort: innovation is life insurance
for the press and journalism.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
An emphasis on the higest quality and innovative new print formats is commendable, as is a serious attempt to respect readers time in such a busy
world, but Le 1 should try hard to maintain a focus
on relating its deeper contextual explanations to the
weeks news.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

66

67

NEW

NEW

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

PAPERS

PAPERS

66

67

NEW

NEW

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

PAPERS

PAPERS

Image: Set of explanatory material about


the Russian energy sector prepared by
infographer.ru, a specialist infographics agency
for companies and multinationals,
for VBBR Bank.

16
69

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

VISUAL
INFORMATION

BARRY
SUSSMAN
sussmanb1@gmail.com
PABLO
RAMREZ Consultant,
Consultant,Innovation
InnovationMedia
MediaConsulting
ConsultingGroup,
Group,Washington
Madrid DCramirez@innovation.media

POPULAR
INFOGRAPHICS
FOR EVERYONE
The use of infographics is exploding and attempting to adapt
to the challenges of cross-platform technology limitations and
new super-rapid reading formats. INNOVATION asked
several infographics professionals and data visualisation
experts for their views.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

Image: Set of explanatory material about


the Russian energy sector prepared by
infographer.ru, a specialist infographics agency
for companies and multinationals,
for VBBR Bank.

16
69

NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHING

VISUAL
INFORMATION

BARRY
SUSSMAN
sussmanb1@gmail.com
PABLO
RAMREZ Consultant,
Consultant,Innovation
InnovationMedia
MediaConsulting
ConsultingGroup,
Group,Washington
Madrid DCramirez@innovation.media

POPULAR
INFOGRAPHICS
FOR EVERYONE
The use of infographics is exploding and attempting to adapt
to the challenges of cross-platform technology limitations and
new super-rapid reading formats. INNOVATION asked
several infographics professionals and data visualisation
experts for their views.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2013


2015

70

VISUAL
INFORMATION

nfographics are not dead but the media has


lost its monopoly over them and they no longer belong exclusively to journalism. Demand for them has awakened the interest of
other industries related to visual storytelling
and a new field of opportunities has opened up
that is already fishing for talented professionals in newsrooms. Graphic designers, information designers, visual communicators and specialist agencies control this market niche, which
could be big business for the communications
industry.
They are used more and more not just by media outlets but on all sorts of platforms and
channels. Big data and visual analytics, together with a growing need for companies to distribute content have made this visual, direct, attractive genre, with great potential to go viral,
more popular.
The demand for more content and more quality, distributed in attractive, quick-to-read formats, is transforming newsrooms and the
professionals that work in them. There are companies trawling LinkedIn for experienced infographics experts to train their reporters in data
visualisation, graphics and storytelling. There
are jobs websites like Idoneum publishing offers for Buzzfeed-like reporters who can mix
images and data and create viral content. Media
outlets are more and more visual, and their clients are expert consumers of this type of messaging. As far as print or digital infographics are
concerned, we are still innovating with content,
platforms and forms.
What follows are some examples worth highlighting for their innovative use of theme, focus,
development and distribution platform.
Thanks to Fernando Baptista and Chiqui
Esteban (National Geographic), Germn
Pizarro (Marca), Jaime Serra (La Vanguardia),
Adonis Durao (Times of Oman), Javier
Zarracina (Los Angeles Times), Rodrigo Silva
(El Pas), John Grimwade, (instructor for the
Show Dont Tell workshop), and Juan Velasco,
Manuel Romero and Max Gorbachevsky,
who all run their own infographics and data
visualisation agencies.

More visual analytics and less visual data.


We have abused figures and data. We have lost
our focus on storytelling and facts. Juan Velasco
says: all of the information is chucked in, in a
visually original manner, and we hope the reader can make some sense of it. We have passed
that clarifying role over to them too much.
Readers want less art and more understanding. Fortunately, there are many simple ideas
that, thanks to editing and clarity of information, manage to hook the reader in. La Vanguardias visual concert chronicles are one example of how to explain everything that goes on
during the show in a simple manner.
There is still room for big, well-focused data
visualisations that explain and clarify what is
happening. Bloombergs Billionaires feature
or The Guardians electoral surveys are of the
highest quality.
Neither platforms nor sizes are defined. Disruptive projects like the Times of Omans puzzle ball are still well liked. It was a series of cutout polyhedrons that tells the story of the 32
teams taking part in the Brazil World Cup. After
putting them all together, the reader got a replica of Brazuca, the official competition ball.
The New York Times had a different but no
less spectacular idea for its Brasil 2014 special,
where the reader could interact with the secrets
of the balls from all of the previous editions of
the World Cup.
Readers still like traditional print infographics. Readers appreciate well-planned stories like
in the case of the Times of Omans coverage of
the boxing match between Floyd Mayweather
and Manny Pacquiao that took place in Las Vegas in May.

La Vanguardias visual concert chronicles

Bloombergs Billionaires

There are no exclusive niches between print


and digital. Resources are shared and infographics planned for several platforms and multiple
channels at once. Chiqui Esteban says this tendency is becoming commonplace and that the
barriers that separate infographics from video,
design or text are blurring, especially online.
National Geographics work on the dome of
Florence Cathedral show how research and infographics can be optimised for multiple channels: print magazine, tablet version, smartphone
and online.

The Guardians Electoral Surveys


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

70

VISUAL
INFORMATION

nfographics are not dead but the media has


lost its monopoly over them and they no longer belong exclusively to journalism. Demand for them has awakened the interest of
other industries related to visual storytelling
and a new field of opportunities has opened up
that is already fishing for talented professionals in newsrooms. Graphic designers, information designers, visual communicators and specialist agencies control this market niche, which
could be big business for the communications
industry.
They are used more and more not just by media outlets but on all sorts of platforms and
channels. Big data and visual analytics, together with a growing need for companies to distribute content have made this visual, direct, attractive genre, with great potential to go viral,
more popular.
The demand for more content and more quality, distributed in attractive, quick-to-read formats, is transforming newsrooms and the
professionals that work in them. There are companies trawling LinkedIn for experienced infographics experts to train their reporters in data
visualisation, graphics and storytelling. There
are jobs websites like Idoneum publishing offers for Buzzfeed-like reporters who can mix
images and data and create viral content. Media
outlets are more and more visual, and their clients are expert consumers of this type of messaging. As far as print or digital infographics are
concerned, we are still innovating with content,
platforms and forms.
What follows are some examples worth highlighting for their innovative use of theme, focus,
development and distribution platform.
Thanks to Fernando Baptista and Chiqui
Esteban (National Geographic), Germn
Pizarro (Marca), Jaime Serra (La Vanguardia),
Adonis Durao (Times of Oman), Javier
Zarracina (Los Angeles Times), Rodrigo Silva
(El Pas), John Grimwade, (instructor for the
Show Dont Tell workshop), and Juan Velasco,
Manuel Romero and Max Gorbachevsky,
who all run their own infographics and data
visualisation agencies.

More visual analytics and less visual data.


We have abused figures and data. We have lost
our focus on storytelling and facts. Juan Velasco
says: all of the information is chucked in, in a
visually original manner, and we hope the reader can make some sense of it. We have passed
that clarifying role over to them too much.
Readers want less art and more understanding. Fortunately, there are many simple ideas
that, thanks to editing and clarity of information, manage to hook the reader in. La Vanguardias visual concert chronicles are one example of how to explain everything that goes on
during the show in a simple manner.
There is still room for big, well-focused data
visualisations that explain and clarify what is
happening. Bloombergs Billionaires feature
or The Guardians electoral surveys are of the
highest quality.
Neither platforms nor sizes are defined. Disruptive projects like the Times of Omans puzzle ball are still well liked. It was a series of cutout polyhedrons that tells the story of the 32
teams taking part in the Brazil World Cup. After
putting them all together, the reader got a replica of Brazuca, the official competition ball.
The New York Times had a different but no
less spectacular idea for its Brasil 2014 special,
where the reader could interact with the secrets
of the balls from all of the previous editions of
the World Cup.
Readers still like traditional print infographics. Readers appreciate well-planned stories like
in the case of the Times of Omans coverage of
the boxing match between Floyd Mayweather
and Manny Pacquiao that took place in Las Vegas in May.

La Vanguardias visual concert chronicles

Bloombergs Billionaires

There are no exclusive niches between print


and digital. Resources are shared and infographics planned for several platforms and multiple
channels at once. Chiqui Esteban says this tendency is becoming commonplace and that the
barriers that separate infographics from video,
design or text are blurring, especially online.
National Geographics work on the dome of
Florence Cathedral show how research and infographics can be optimised for multiple channels: print magazine, tablet version, smartphone
and online.

The Guardians Electoral Surveys


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2014

The Times of Oman World Cup Ball

The New York Times World Cup Ball

Javier
Zarrazinas
gifs about
Mr. Spock on
latimes.com

The Times of Oman World Cup Ball

The New York Times World Cup Ball

Javier
Zarrazinas
gifs about
Mr. Spock on
latimes.com

The Times of Oman Mayweather vs. Pacquiao infographic

The Times of Oman Mayweather vs. Pacquiao infographic

National Geographics illustration of the Dome in Florence.

How an Amateur Built the Worlds Biggest Dome


www.youtube.com/user/NationalGeographic

National Geographics illustration of the Dome in Florence.

How an Amateur Built the Worlds Biggest Dome


www.youtube.com/user/NationalGeographic

79

VISUAL
INFORMATION

People are still experimenting with new formats and languages, or sophisticated multimedia drawers. ProPublicas Losing Ground
has been one of the most commented examples on infographics blogs and forums over the
last twelve months, thanks to its combination of
multiple resources with a single unifying narrative: the story of the disappearance of the Louisiana coastline.

ProPublicas Losing Ground

In 2012, The New York Time surprised readers with its Snowfall project, without buttons
or menus. Since then, more intuitive scrolling
navigation allows readers to move around the
screen and naturally link up the narration with
the image. Two good examples of this are Faces
Of Fracking and The Dawn Wall.
Visual stories told with video are becoming
another resource. Javier Zarracina believes Motion Graphic Videos are easy to produce and can
be distributed on multiple platforms that allow
for easy monetisation; they work well as a prologue to bigger multimedia projects that can be
launched on social networks to bring in more
readers.

The New York Times Dawn Wall

We will also see simpler ideas taking form,


smaller infographics that are easier to take in,
or infographics made for mobile phones (a market still to be exploited, with 4.55 billion users
in 2014 ) and other mobile devices. Juan Velasco says glance journalism is coming, when just
a look at your Apple Watch will give you data or
a relevant headline immediately. Infographics
for all, and on all devices.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
People think and understand in different ways, some
with text and some with images, but we all want
stories. Well-structured infographics are an excellent opportunity to distill complex stories into visual simplicity.

Let us take the example of one of The New


York Timess major graphic stories: Areas Under ISIS Control. This was a series of images
that won the SNDs Peter Sullivan prizes, alongside The Oman Times, for the best journalism
infographic at the ceremony in Malofiej (Norway). As usual, this newspaper used visual simplicity and maximum quality.
Technologically, we are still looking for quick,
efficient formats. Animated .gifs and small multiplesa series of small graphics at the same
scale a reader can easily compareare well received, easy to make and can be published on
multiple platforms.
In the next few years, we will see how infographics fit into responsive site designs that automatically adjust elements to the formats each
platform can cope with. The Boston Globe and
other daily papers are already working on the
problem but have not yet found a clear solution
that responds to these needs. Each infographic
has a complex, diverse hierarchy of content that
is a challenge to be solved.

The New York Times Areas Under ISIS Control


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

79

VISUAL
INFORMATION

People are still experimenting with new formats and languages, or sophisticated multimedia drawers. ProPublicas Losing Ground
has been one of the most commented examples on infographics blogs and forums over the
last twelve months, thanks to its combination of
multiple resources with a single unifying narrative: the story of the disappearance of the Louisiana coastline.

ProPublicas Losing Ground

In 2012, The New York Time surprised readers with its Snowfall project, without buttons
or menus. Since then, more intuitive scrolling
navigation allows readers to move around the
screen and naturally link up the narration with
the image. Two good examples of this are Faces
Of Fracking and The Dawn Wall.
Visual stories told with video are becoming
another resource. Javier Zarracina believes Motion Graphic Videos are easy to produce and can
be distributed on multiple platforms that allow
for easy monetisation; they work well as a prologue to bigger multimedia projects that can be
launched on social networks to bring in more
readers.

The New York Times Dawn Wall

We will also see simpler ideas taking form,


smaller infographics that are easier to take in,
or infographics made for mobile phones (a market still to be exploited, with 4.55 billion users
in 2014 ) and other mobile devices. Juan Velasco says glance journalism is coming, when just
a look at your Apple Watch will give you data or
a relevant headline immediately. Infographics
for all, and on all devices.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
People think and understand in different ways, some
with text and some with images, but we all want
stories. Well-structured infographics are an excellent opportunity to distill complex stories into visual simplicity.

Let us take the example of one of The New


York Timess major graphic stories: Areas Under ISIS Control. This was a series of images
that won the SNDs Peter Sullivan prizes, alongside The Oman Times, for the best journalism
infographic at the ceremony in Malofiej (Norway). As usual, this newspaper used visual simplicity and maximum quality.
Technologically, we are still looking for quick,
efficient formats. Animated .gifs and small multiplesa series of small graphics at the same
scale a reader can easily compareare well received, easy to make and can be published on
multiple platforms.
In the next few years, we will see how infographics fit into responsive site designs that automatically adjust elements to the formats each
platform can cope with. The Boston Globe and
other daily papers are already working on the
problem but have not yet found a clear solution
that responds to these needs. Each infographic
has a complex, diverse hierarchy of content that
is a challenge to be solved.

The New York Times Areas Under ISIS Control


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

81

BREAKFAST

BITES
CHUS DEL RO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

delrio@innovation.media

YOUR MORNING
DOSE OF MOBILE
DAILY NEWS
Newsletters are having something of a second youth and some
media outlets are making the most of the opportunity. Those who
are not yet doing so must begin to incorporate them into their
content distribution strategy immediately. INNOVATION took
a look at some that work.

pam almost caused the format to disappear a few years ago but it has bounced
back thanks to increasing use of mobile phones. Email is in peoples pockets and
we check it constantly; the media industry is
more and more aware it must offer users content wherever we are.
There are four aspects that will allow us to understand the changes better
1. One of the most common activities among
US smartphone users is checking email. 88% of
them do it, a higher figure than those who use
their device to access social networks or look
at videos (Source: US Smartphone Use In 2015,
Pew Research Center)

3.The first thing 92% of New Yorkers do upon


waking each morning is check their mobile
phone. The favourite first activity? Checking
their email (Source: SOASTA, 2013)

It is not difficult to conclude that newsletters


must be adapted to mobile devices and that the
best times of day to reach users is first thing in
the morning. As the day breaks, people want to
know both what has happened since they fell
asleep and what will likely happen over the next
few hours. We are receptive, with our minds
waking, and planning what to do with our days,
open to receiving news and diary information
that fulfils those needs.
Such an analysis allows us to explain the
quick spread of morning newsletters around the
world. Digitally native media have pioneered
the their development, chiselling out a well-defined style and format.
Newsletters generally contain more text than
images and easy reading is more important than
design, but this in the end is also good design.
They offer a global vision of the news removed
from the traditional headline lists sent out by
news organisations since the beginning of the
digital age. The aim, beyond more traffic, is to
offer users an attractive service, increase en-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Ilustracin de Augusto Costhanzo www.costhanzo.com

2. In 2011 (just four years ago), only 8% of


emails were opened on mobile devices. In 2014,
that percentage has grown by 500% to reach
45% of the total; almost half of all emails are
opened on smartphones and tablets (Source:
Litmus Email Analytics, 2015)

4. 60% of executives read an email newsletter


as on of the first three news sources they check
every day, more than twice as many who check
a news app (Source: Quartz Global Executive
Study 2014)

81

BREAKFAST

BITES
CHUS DEL RO

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

delrio@innovation.media

YOUR MORNING
DOSE OF MOBILE
DAILY NEWS
Newsletters are having something of a second youth and some
media outlets are making the most of the opportunity. Those who
are not yet doing so must begin to incorporate them into their
content distribution strategy immediately. INNOVATION took
a look at some that work.

pam almost caused the format to disappear a few years ago but it has bounced
back thanks to increasing use of mobile phones. Email is in peoples pockets and
we check it constantly; the media industry is
more and more aware it must offer users content wherever we are.
There are four aspects that will allow us to understand the changes better
1. One of the most common activities among
US smartphone users is checking email. 88% of
them do it, a higher figure than those who use
their device to access social networks or look
at videos (Source: US Smartphone Use In 2015,
Pew Research Center)

3.The first thing 92% of New Yorkers do upon


waking each morning is check their mobile
phone. The favourite first activity? Checking
their email (Source: SOASTA, 2013)

It is not difficult to conclude that newsletters


must be adapted to mobile devices and that the
best times of day to reach users is first thing in
the morning. As the day breaks, people want to
know both what has happened since they fell
asleep and what will likely happen over the next
few hours. We are receptive, with our minds
waking, and planning what to do with our days,
open to receiving news and diary information
that fulfils those needs.
Such an analysis allows us to explain the
quick spread of morning newsletters around the
world. Digitally native media have pioneered
the their development, chiselling out a well-defined style and format.
Newsletters generally contain more text than
images and easy reading is more important than
design, but this in the end is also good design.
They offer a global vision of the news removed
from the traditional headline lists sent out by
news organisations since the beginning of the
digital age. The aim, beyond more traffic, is to
offer users an attractive service, increase en-

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Ilustracin de Augusto Costhanzo www.costhanzo.com

2. In 2011 (just four years ago), only 8% of


emails were opened on mobile devices. In 2014,
that percentage has grown by 500% to reach
45% of the total; almost half of all emails are
opened on smartphones and tablets (Source:
Litmus Email Analytics, 2015)

4. 60% of executives read an email newsletter


as on of the first three news sources they check
every day, more than twice as many who check
a news app (Source: Quartz Global Executive
Study 2014)

82

83

BREAKFAST

BREAKFAST

BITES
gagement and then to exploit them with advertising, increasingly with native ad formats.
Individual journalists or experts with a strong
personal brand can compete on an equal footing
with media giants in this field.
CURATION EXAMPLES
Among the newsletters that have become most
popular in the US over the past few years are
OZYs Presidential Daily Brief, Quartzs Daily
Brief, Voxs Sentences, the HuffPost Hill, Dave
Pells Next Draft and theSkimm.
They all offer users a selection of curated content. Some limit their selection to certain topics while others look specifically at national
or international news. There are sports focused
newsletters, tech focused summaries and media and fashion mails. Niches are very fertile
ground.
The sites own product definitions offer many
clues as to what companies need to think about
when they decide to offer a newsletter.
theSkimm is an email newsletter for anyone short on time. No one wants to be the deer
in the headlights when someone says Did you
hear about the latest in Syria? or Did you hear
about Johnny Football?. Our concept is simple.
We read. You Skimm.
This is a service everyone needs, reads the
spiel: You may follow the right people on
Twitter or get the right breaking news alerts

BITES

but with so much noise, its hard to filter what


you need to know in politics, international affairs, sports, entertainment, technology etc.
theSkimm is your filter. We cross party and subject lines to break down what it seems everyone
else is talking about.
Dave Pell is categorical with Next Draft: I am
the algorithm. Each morning I visit about 75
news sites, and from that swirling nightmare of
information quicksand, I pluck the top ten most

9 GREAT NEWSLETTERS
1. Quartz Daily Brief:
2. Politico:
3. Economist Espresso:
4. Expresso Curto:
5. theSkimm:
6. Next Draft:
7. Presidential Daily Brief:
8. Sentences:
9. HuffPost Hill:

fascinating items of the day, which I deliver with


a fast, pithy wit that will make your computer
device vibrate with delight. No bots. No computer algorithms.
EXPRESSO CURTO
A great non-US example is Expresso Curto,
sent out each morning by the prestigious Lisbon
newspaper Expresso. The formula created by Ricardo Costas newsroom is working well. An authored text sums up the most important news
from the previous day and alerts the reader to
what is about to happen. The links lead to Expresso articles, international news sites and the
papers Portuguese competitors.
In a little over three monthsthe first edition
was sent out on January 12it has seen open
rates reach between 35% and 40%.
About a fortnight after its launch, an Expresso
reader called Jose Relvas published a Facebook
comment that perfectly describes the essence of
the product in a comment that could be applied
to any of the successful newsletters described in
this article.
A few days ago I got something called Expresso Curto. I didnt open it for a few days. I
thought it was just some spam promising a new
Nespresso or an online promotion for Expres-

so. Last week, while I was waiting around at the


hospital [], I opened up Expresso Curto to kill
some time. From that moment on, that email
goes with my morning coffee. Expresso Curto
is one of the best things produced by the Portuguese media over the last few years.
It is well written, simple and uses a register similar to that smells like a chronicle, drawing our attention to everything that needs to
be seen. Each day, Expresso Curto has the byline of a different Expresso journalist (Henrique Monteiro, Ricardo Costa, Pedro Santos
Guerreiro,etc.). Although the philosophy is the
same, each writer brings his own expertise to
the days e-mail chronicle. With a single stroke,
we get to know what is happening, with contextualised information and more: the authors, rivalries apart, are not worried about linking out
to other sources, including competing titles, to
illustrate their news.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Newsletters are a great way to bring back a sense
of completion to always-on global news, but
must be tightly written and it is not yet clear early
morningalthough a fine time to catch readers with
a relatively clear mindis the best time of day for
readers to interact with them.

82

83

BREAKFAST

BREAKFAST

BITES
gagement and then to exploit them with advertising, increasingly with native ad formats.
Individual journalists or experts with a strong
personal brand can compete on an equal footing
with media giants in this field.
CURATION EXAMPLES
Among the newsletters that have become most
popular in the US over the past few years are
OZYs Presidential Daily Brief, Quartzs Daily
Brief, Voxs Sentences, the HuffPost Hill, Dave
Pells Next Draft and theSkimm.
They all offer users a selection of curated content. Some limit their selection to certain topics while others look specifically at national
or international news. There are sports focused
newsletters, tech focused summaries and media and fashion mails. Niches are very fertile
ground.
The sites own product definitions offer many
clues as to what companies need to think about
when they decide to offer a newsletter.
theSkimm is an email newsletter for anyone short on time. No one wants to be the deer
in the headlights when someone says Did you
hear about the latest in Syria? or Did you hear
about Johnny Football?. Our concept is simple.
We read. You Skimm.
This is a service everyone needs, reads the
spiel: You may follow the right people on
Twitter or get the right breaking news alerts

BITES

but with so much noise, its hard to filter what


you need to know in politics, international affairs, sports, entertainment, technology etc.
theSkimm is your filter. We cross party and subject lines to break down what it seems everyone
else is talking about.
Dave Pell is categorical with Next Draft: I am
the algorithm. Each morning I visit about 75
news sites, and from that swirling nightmare of
information quicksand, I pluck the top ten most

9 GREAT NEWSLETTERS
1. Quartz Daily Brief:
2. Politico:
3. Economist Espresso:
4. Expresso Curto:
5. theSkimm:
6. Next Draft:
7. Presidential Daily Brief:
8. Sentences:
9. HuffPost Hill:

fascinating items of the day, which I deliver with


a fast, pithy wit that will make your computer
device vibrate with delight. No bots. No computer algorithms.
EXPRESSO CURTO
A great non-US example is Expresso Curto,
sent out each morning by the prestigious Lisbon
newspaper Expresso. The formula created by Ricardo Costas newsroom is working well. An authored text sums up the most important news
from the previous day and alerts the reader to
what is about to happen. The links lead to Expresso articles, international news sites and the
papers Portuguese competitors.
In a little over three monthsthe first edition
was sent out on January 12it has seen open
rates reach between 35% and 40%.
About a fortnight after its launch, an Expresso
reader called Jose Relvas published a Facebook
comment that perfectly describes the essence of
the product in a comment that could be applied
to any of the successful newsletters described in
this article.
A few days ago I got something called Expresso Curto. I didnt open it for a few days. I
thought it was just some spam promising a new
Nespresso or an online promotion for Expres-

so. Last week, while I was waiting around at the


hospital [], I opened up Expresso Curto to kill
some time. From that moment on, that email
goes with my morning coffee. Expresso Curto
is one of the best things produced by the Portuguese media over the last few years.
It is well written, simple and uses a register similar to that smells like a chronicle, drawing our attention to everything that needs to
be seen. Each day, Expresso Curto has the byline of a different Expresso journalist (Henrique Monteiro, Ricardo Costa, Pedro Santos
Guerreiro,etc.). Although the philosophy is the
same, each writer brings his own expertise to
the days e-mail chronicle. With a single stroke,
we get to know what is happening, with contextualised information and more: the authors, rivalries apart, are not worried about linking out
to other sources, including competing titles, to
illustrate their news.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Newsletters are a great way to bring back a sense
of completion to always-on global news, but
must be tightly written and it is not yet clear early
morningalthough a fine time to catch readers with
a relatively clear mindis the best time of day for
readers to interact with them.

85

PAY
ATTENTION

ANA MOLINA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

molina@innovation.media

THE READERS
JOURNEY, THE
READERS TIME,
YOUR GAME
TO LOSE

http://www.gratisography.com

Tsunamis of global data and information, and an abundance of


screen sizes and formats, are placing enormous pressures on the
time people have available to consume news but they provide
an opportunity for renewed growth and connection.

85

PAY
ATTENTION

ANA MOLINA

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Madrid

molina@innovation.media

THE READERS
JOURNEY, THE
READERS TIME,
YOUR GAME
TO LOSE

http://www.gratisography.com

Tsunamis of global data and information, and an abundance of


screen sizes and formats, are placing enormous pressures on the
time people have available to consume news but they provide
an opportunity for renewed growth and connection.

2014

86

87

PAY

PAY

ATTENTION

ATTENTION

lisation grabbed the attention of design, strategy and


development teams.
Infographics have been turned into a navigation
model, like with the Berliner Morgenposts poster
commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall or the
Washington Posts CIA interrogation list.

was a great year for online media design. The


digital acceleration has begun. Design thinking, agile
methods, data analysis and innovation are flooding
the worlds newsrooms. Journalism, analytics, technology and design are coming together to define new
models, workflows and digital products, and mobilefirst but its not just a trend anymore: Google now
penalises sites that are not mobile-friendly.
THE GUARDIAN
One of the most interesting examples is The Guardian, which announced its official relaunch at the
beginning of the year despite its new look having
being available to readers in beta for several months.
This is a strategy inherited from Silicon Valley, where brands no longer worry about associating their
i-mage to an unfinished product: in exchange, they
get to exploit the benefits of customer intelligence.
The final model shows a deep analysis of mobile device access, and a complex and balanced exercise in design, development and content. It is not
just about making the content fit the screen but also
thinking about optimisation, hierarchy, formats and
comfort. The new navigation solution works coherently on different devices without having to hide all
the content under a single smartphone button.
This redesign goes far beyond aesthetics. The
Guardian itself described the redesign as a two-directional model, for readers and editors, who now
have faster, more usable and more flexible tools for
creating content.
PUBLISHING PLATFORMS
Beyond Wordpress, other platforms such as SquareSpace, Medium or Shorthand have brought new instruments to the space that offer new competitive
models bidding to redesign the user experience on
both sides of the line. Medium is among the most
interesting, with a proposal closer to the new collaborative economy, where authors stand out above
traditional media outlets and where participation
is a direct part of the tale with comments integrated into the narrative. This is niche-focused, quick to
consume content, and one of the signature features
of the design experience is reading time. Small, micro interactions, or micro experiences that manage
to hook the user in and turn him from a consumer
of content into a publisher.

The Guardian

It makes me
to want to
explore more
of the page

Bloomberg

Its clearer
and more
concise, more
organised
Quotes from Guardian user
research sessions:

FORMATS
The explosion of the long-form, interactive narrative
format among big publishers and new agents has
strengthened the idea of design and creation focused
on content.
Not only have we seen an obsession for long-form
this year, we have also seen how lists and data visua

NBC

Berliner Morgen Post

BLOOMBERG
More risqu proposals like Bloombergs did not go
unnoticed by readers at the start of 2015. For days,
social media was abuzz with a mixture of criticism
and praise for the new product. Beyond its daring
graphic design, the model allowed us to glimpse a
more ambitious idea. From the reunification of the
brand to the use of video as a strategic pillar, it was all
wrapped as an interesting solution to increase reader engagement.
Infinite scroll, which we had already seen with
Quartz and Time, was reinterpreted with new elements to help the reader feel more in control of the
interface. Two simple elements like the progress
bar and the now reading label help readers know
where they are and remind them of that simple, automatic gesture the analogical world never saw as a
challenge: turning the page.
LUMBERING INTO A NEW AGE
The New York Times made an accidental declaration
of strategic intent in its innovation study, confessing
openly that digital was here to stay and that digital
second was no longer a competitive option.
Media outlets born in the pre-digital age democratised information and made news, freedom of
thought and in many cases social transformation
more accessible. Independent, truth-seeking, balanced journalism was a product by itself and readers rushed to the newsagent or letter box to consume a solution that covered their information
needs. Today information is global and news hits
readers on their social media sites.
In this scenario, no one doubts agility, research,
work flows and iterations are the bases for success in
product creation. An obsession with metrics, search
optimisation and conversion are part of daily life at
most companies now and this is slowly happening at
media outlets too.
Concepts such as omni channel or engagement
and the exploitation of big data have made their
mark on big business strategies as competitive tools
that help generate greater loyalty. Start-up fever, the
Internet of things and the appearance of new players in different markets affect change in a global economic environment oriented towards digital. Companies illustrate and define the customer
journey in order to understand the needs of the new
product owners: users.

2014

86

87

PAY

PAY

ATTENTION

ATTENTION

lisation grabbed the attention of design, strategy and


development teams.
Infographics have been turned into a navigation
model, like with the Berliner Morgenposts poster
commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall or the
Washington Posts CIA interrogation list.

was a great year for online media design. The


digital acceleration has begun. Design thinking, agile
methods, data analysis and innovation are flooding
the worlds newsrooms. Journalism, analytics, technology and design are coming together to define new
models, workflows and digital products, and mobilefirst but its not just a trend anymore: Google now
penalises sites that are not mobile-friendly.
THE GUARDIAN
One of the most interesting examples is The Guardian, which announced its official relaunch at the
beginning of the year despite its new look having
being available to readers in beta for several months.
This is a strategy inherited from Silicon Valley, where brands no longer worry about associating their
i-mage to an unfinished product: in exchange, they
get to exploit the benefits of customer intelligence.
The final model shows a deep analysis of mobile device access, and a complex and balanced exercise in design, development and content. It is not
just about making the content fit the screen but also
thinking about optimisation, hierarchy, formats and
comfort. The new navigation solution works coherently on different devices without having to hide all
the content under a single smartphone button.
This redesign goes far beyond aesthetics. The
Guardian itself described the redesign as a two-directional model, for readers and editors, who now
have faster, more usable and more flexible tools for
creating content.
PUBLISHING PLATFORMS
Beyond Wordpress, other platforms such as SquareSpace, Medium or Shorthand have brought new instruments to the space that offer new competitive
models bidding to redesign the user experience on
both sides of the line. Medium is among the most
interesting, with a proposal closer to the new collaborative economy, where authors stand out above
traditional media outlets and where participation
is a direct part of the tale with comments integrated into the narrative. This is niche-focused, quick to
consume content, and one of the signature features
of the design experience is reading time. Small, micro interactions, or micro experiences that manage
to hook the user in and turn him from a consumer
of content into a publisher.

The Guardian

It makes me
to want to
explore more
of the page

Bloomberg

Its clearer
and more
concise, more
organised
Quotes from Guardian user
research sessions:

FORMATS
The explosion of the long-form, interactive narrative
format among big publishers and new agents has
strengthened the idea of design and creation focused
on content.
Not only have we seen an obsession for long-form
this year, we have also seen how lists and data visua

NBC

Berliner Morgen Post

BLOOMBERG
More risqu proposals like Bloombergs did not go
unnoticed by readers at the start of 2015. For days,
social media was abuzz with a mixture of criticism
and praise for the new product. Beyond its daring
graphic design, the model allowed us to glimpse a
more ambitious idea. From the reunification of the
brand to the use of video as a strategic pillar, it was all
wrapped as an interesting solution to increase reader engagement.
Infinite scroll, which we had already seen with
Quartz and Time, was reinterpreted with new elements to help the reader feel more in control of the
interface. Two simple elements like the progress
bar and the now reading label help readers know
where they are and remind them of that simple, automatic gesture the analogical world never saw as a
challenge: turning the page.
LUMBERING INTO A NEW AGE
The New York Times made an accidental declaration
of strategic intent in its innovation study, confessing
openly that digital was here to stay and that digital
second was no longer a competitive option.
Media outlets born in the pre-digital age democratised information and made news, freedom of
thought and in many cases social transformation
more accessible. Independent, truth-seeking, balanced journalism was a product by itself and readers rushed to the newsagent or letter box to consume a solution that covered their information
needs. Today information is global and news hits
readers on their social media sites.
In this scenario, no one doubts agility, research,
work flows and iterations are the bases for success in
product creation. An obsession with metrics, search
optimisation and conversion are part of daily life at
most companies now and this is slowly happening at
media outlets too.
Concepts such as omni channel or engagement
and the exploitation of big data have made their
mark on big business strategies as competitive tools
that help generate greater loyalty. Start-up fever, the
Internet of things and the appearance of new players in different markets affect change in a global economic environment oriented towards digital. Companies illustrate and define the customer
journey in order to understand the needs of the new
product owners: users.

88

89

PAY

PAY

ATTENTION

ATTENTION

NBC
In February 2014, just in time for the Winter Olympics, NBC launched a new homepage design. Convinced mobile would be the winning horse, and that
the homepage as a way to distribute traffic has lost
value, they focused on responsive design, improving
load times and building an architecture based on a
controversial hamburger button.
The 35% of users who continued to use the homepage structure as a navigation tool began to protest, but beyond their natural rejection to change,
they opened a petition on Change.org with a clear
message: Reinstate a content-rich, word-navigated
NBCnews.com site design.
A few months later, the NBC News team launched
a revised version of their homepage and included
many of the requests received from users.
We really wanted to systematically get data and
feedback not only around the desktop homepage but
around the whole experience, said Gregory Gittrinch executive editor of NBCNews.com: The thin-king
and the goal is we will continue to iterate and optimize
based on audience feedback and audience data.

The Washington Post

DEEPER INNOVATION
Innovation is now so deep in some editorial proposals that media outlets like the BBC have begun projects to bring together digital experiments and user
feedback. BBC Taster is one example. Your Story,
which makes the most of the organisations historical
archive to provide a new social media product, is another. BBC Radio Explorer, a themed search engine
that brings users closer to audio content in a digital
environment, is a third.
Have these best practices arrived in time, though?
What has happened to readers? Does the readers
journey exist? What are they asking traditional media outlets for? Do they even taken them into account when consuming content?DIGITAL NEWS CONSUMERS
A digital news consumer study from Reuters in 2014
said users still get most of their news from traditional media outlets. Europe and Latin America are stable markets, while Japan and the US have seen huge
growth for new digitally native competitors, although there are significant differences in different
countries, as well as between sexes and age groups.
Young people are most likely to discover news via
social networks like Facebook. Europeans are more
committed to news outlets that reflect neutrality and
readers in the US prefer brands and journalists that are
transparent about their ideology. History, the concept of the state, society and even proximity to politics cause significant differences in consumer behaviour, and news is not an isolated case.

BBC

Time affects
product design,
from search
optimisation
(how long it
takes to locate
the content) to
code optimisation
(page load times),
architecture
design and
structure
simplification
(decoding time)

DONT WASTE MY TIME


Something similar is happening with formats: a
large majority prefers to watch videos that last longer
than 45 seconds on big screens, although the appearance of phabletsoversize mobile phonescould
change that. Video content is more popular in the
United States and Brasil, where there are high levels of Video on Demand penetration, and where deciding what to watch from one moment to the next
is part of the entertainment cycle.
Maybe that is why NowThisNews has seen good
growth in the US over the past few months. The idea
is simple: video news clips, most of which last less
than a minute, to share on your social networks. The
desktop version cuts straight to the chase: Homepage. Even the word sounds old. Today the news
lives where you live. No trending topics, no channels; easy, timely, practical and, above all, short. Viral
is as important as Politics.
Much depends on a user experience that allows the
reader to manage the pace of the journey, empowering him to make decisions about how many minutes he will invest in reading our news, and when.
Time affects product design, from search optimisation (how long it takes to locate the content) to code
optimisation (page load times), architecture design
and structure simplification (decoding time).
TIME TO CHOOSE
Companies that welcome these new forms of doing journalism will continue to receive user feedback, define use cases and improve their experience.
Those that have not interiorised the digital component within their organisations will have to get moving with a new focus: their users.
Ethnographya concept within experience design
that is getting quite a lot of attentionand research
are areas to watch because in content consumption
as in other areas of life, we are global, but not that
global.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Readers time, and respecting it fully, is perhaps the
most important aspect of our new attention econonmy.
Money can buy most other things, but theres no getting
lost time back, and users will guard it with increasing
jealousy. Media outlets must understand that.

88

89

PAY

PAY

ATTENTION

ATTENTION

NBC
In February 2014, just in time for the Winter Olympics, NBC launched a new homepage design. Convinced mobile would be the winning horse, and that
the homepage as a way to distribute traffic has lost
value, they focused on responsive design, improving
load times and building an architecture based on a
controversial hamburger button.
The 35% of users who continued to use the homepage structure as a navigation tool began to protest, but beyond their natural rejection to change,
they opened a petition on Change.org with a clear
message: Reinstate a content-rich, word-navigated
NBCnews.com site design.
A few months later, the NBC News team launched
a revised version of their homepage and included
many of the requests received from users.
We really wanted to systematically get data and
feedback not only around the desktop homepage but
around the whole experience, said Gregory Gittrinch executive editor of NBCNews.com: The thin-king
and the goal is we will continue to iterate and optimize
based on audience feedback and audience data.

The Washington Post

DEEPER INNOVATION
Innovation is now so deep in some editorial proposals that media outlets like the BBC have begun projects to bring together digital experiments and user
feedback. BBC Taster is one example. Your Story,
which makes the most of the organisations historical
archive to provide a new social media product, is another. BBC Radio Explorer, a themed search engine
that brings users closer to audio content in a digital
environment, is a third.
Have these best practices arrived in time, though?
What has happened to readers? Does the readers
journey exist? What are they asking traditional media outlets for? Do they even taken them into account when consuming content?DIGITAL NEWS CONSUMERS
A digital news consumer study from Reuters in 2014
said users still get most of their news from traditional media outlets. Europe and Latin America are stable markets, while Japan and the US have seen huge
growth for new digitally native competitors, although there are significant differences in different
countries, as well as between sexes and age groups.
Young people are most likely to discover news via
social networks like Facebook. Europeans are more
committed to news outlets that reflect neutrality and
readers in the US prefer brands and journalists that are
transparent about their ideology. History, the concept of the state, society and even proximity to politics cause significant differences in consumer behaviour, and news is not an isolated case.

BBC

Time affects
product design,
from search
optimisation
(how long it
takes to locate
the content) to
code optimisation
(page load times),
architecture
design and
structure
simplification
(decoding time)

DONT WASTE MY TIME


Something similar is happening with formats: a
large majority prefers to watch videos that last longer
than 45 seconds on big screens, although the appearance of phabletsoversize mobile phonescould
change that. Video content is more popular in the
United States and Brasil, where there are high levels of Video on Demand penetration, and where deciding what to watch from one moment to the next
is part of the entertainment cycle.
Maybe that is why NowThisNews has seen good
growth in the US over the past few months. The idea
is simple: video news clips, most of which last less
than a minute, to share on your social networks. The
desktop version cuts straight to the chase: Homepage. Even the word sounds old. Today the news
lives where you live. No trending topics, no channels; easy, timely, practical and, above all, short. Viral
is as important as Politics.
Much depends on a user experience that allows the
reader to manage the pace of the journey, empowering him to make decisions about how many minutes he will invest in reading our news, and when.
Time affects product design, from search optimisation (how long it takes to locate the content) to code
optimisation (page load times), architecture design
and structure simplification (decoding time).
TIME TO CHOOSE
Companies that welcome these new forms of doing journalism will continue to receive user feedback, define use cases and improve their experience.
Those that have not interiorised the digital component within their organisations will have to get moving with a new focus: their users.
Ethnographya concept within experience design
that is getting quite a lot of attentionand research
are areas to watch because in content consumption
as in other areas of life, we are global, but not that
global.

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Readers time, and respecting it fully, is perhaps the
most important aspect of our new attention econonmy.
Money can buy most other things, but theres no getting
lost time back, and users will guard it with increasing
jealousy. Media outlets must understand that.

90

MOBILE
MINIMUM

Corym Grenier / Flickr

MARC BAST

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Barcelona

baste@innovation.media

IF YOU HAVENT
GOT A MOBILE-ONLY
STRATEGY,
START RUNNING

Digital, content and ad spend are all going mobile fast, and Google
is now penalising mobile-unfriendly sites. Newspapers have many
options to choose from, but choose they must, if they are to keep up
with readers.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

oogles Larry Page knows where we


are: We are no longer in a mobile-first
world, we are in a mobile-only world.
This years Mobile World Congress in Barcelona
welcomed more than 2,000 exhibitors, 5,000
CEOs and 90,000 visitors from 200 countries.
The event filled the citys hotels and left behind 440 million, almost three times as much
as the next biggest event. Mark Zuckerberg was
the star turn for the second year in a row.
Three years ago, MWC was a sub-sector event
for the telecoms industry, focused on gadgets
and major operators. Now its about the Internet, digital and content. There were over 300
speakers from AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, The
Huffington Post, The FT, Facebook and others.

traffic was 40% of the digital total in 2014, and


media outlets were well above the average: 50%
of FT and New York Times visitors came on a
mobile device, as did 67% of visitors to ESPN
and 70% of visitors to Buzzfeed.
Thirdly, digital advertising is more mobile.
Mobile advertising spend is sky-rocketing, especially in the US and China. According to eMarketer.com, spending on mobile ads will grow to
51% of digital ad spend worldwide in 2016, up
from 28% in 2014. $101 billion, compared to the
$198 billion spent on digital and a $615 billion
total estimated global ad spend. The trend is towards mobile; desktops and laptops are being
left behind. Newspapers need to have serious
mobile strategies.

THREE MAIN ELEMENTS EXPLAIN THE SHIFT.


Firstly, digital is going mobile. IDC reported in
2014 that smartphones, tablets and phablets
now represent 83% of all personal computing
pu-rchases. Laptops were 9.5% and desktops
just 7.4%. In 2015, phabletslarge-screen
smartphonesare set to be 28% of the total.
Secondly, mobile is about content. Mobile

ACT. NOW.
In such a brutal growth environment, acting
early is more important than finding the perfect strategy: market speed is better than standing still.
A responsive site is not just an option now
but an urgent necessity, after Google began penalising sites that are not mobile-friendly.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

90

MOBILE
MINIMUM

Corym Grenier / Flickr

MARC BAST

Consultant, Innovation Media Consulting Group, Barcelona

baste@innovation.media

IF YOU HAVENT
GOT A MOBILE-ONLY
STRATEGY,
START RUNNING

Digital, content and ad spend are all going mobile fast, and Google
is now penalising mobile-unfriendly sites. Newspapers have many
options to choose from, but choose they must, if they are to keep up
with readers.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

oogles Larry Page knows where we


are: We are no longer in a mobile-first
world, we are in a mobile-only world.
This years Mobile World Congress in Barcelona
welcomed more than 2,000 exhibitors, 5,000
CEOs and 90,000 visitors from 200 countries.
The event filled the citys hotels and left behind 440 million, almost three times as much
as the next biggest event. Mark Zuckerberg was
the star turn for the second year in a row.
Three years ago, MWC was a sub-sector event
for the telecoms industry, focused on gadgets
and major operators. Now its about the Internet, digital and content. There were over 300
speakers from AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, The
Huffington Post, The FT, Facebook and others.

traffic was 40% of the digital total in 2014, and


media outlets were well above the average: 50%
of FT and New York Times visitors came on a
mobile device, as did 67% of visitors to ESPN
and 70% of visitors to Buzzfeed.
Thirdly, digital advertising is more mobile.
Mobile advertising spend is sky-rocketing, especially in the US and China. According to eMarketer.com, spending on mobile ads will grow to
51% of digital ad spend worldwide in 2016, up
from 28% in 2014. $101 billion, compared to the
$198 billion spent on digital and a $615 billion
total estimated global ad spend. The trend is towards mobile; desktops and laptops are being
left behind. Newspapers need to have serious
mobile strategies.

THREE MAIN ELEMENTS EXPLAIN THE SHIFT.


Firstly, digital is going mobile. IDC reported in
2014 that smartphones, tablets and phablets
now represent 83% of all personal computing
pu-rchases. Laptops were 9.5% and desktops
just 7.4%. In 2015, phabletslarge-screen
smartphonesare set to be 28% of the total.
Secondly, mobile is about content. Mobile

ACT. NOW.
In such a brutal growth environment, acting
early is more important than finding the perfect strategy: market speed is better than standing still.
A responsive site is not just an option now
but an urgent necessity, after Google began penalising sites that are not mobile-friendly.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

92

93

MOBILE

MOBILE

MINIMUM

Moving towards a true omni-channel presence, acceleration and aggressive action are
needed if your mobile strategy has been weak
until now.
Dany Satine, cofounder and CEO of the
Barcelona-based The Mobile Bakery, said:
making web and mobile traffic compatible is
essential, but if your only strategy is a responsive
site, youre dead. The perfect strategy, he says,
needs great content, engagement features and
fast, easy-to-use native apps with specific aims.
NATIVE APPS OR MOBILE WEB?
Different industry giants have adopted diffe-rent mobile strategies, and we can learn
from them all. The New York Times, as well as
its basic brand portal app, mobile-friendly site
and a few free native apps like Scoop or Cooking, has experimented with native paid apps to

try to generate more income: NYT Opinion and


NYT Now.
NYT Opinion was launched in June 2014 at
$5.99 a month just on the iPhone but by October, it had disappeared after failing to build an
audience.
NYT Now worked better. It offers curated, edited stories and two daily news briefings. The
app is free to download and users get 10 free articles a month before being asked to pay $7.99 a
month for the full experience.
It was aimed at hooking young, mobile-friendly non-subscribers but allowing
them to access the papers normal web content
meant normal subscribers began using the app
to avoid paying the normal fees, putting subscriptions at risk, so they stopped the web content, dropped the price and added sharing and
push notifications.

MINIMUM

WEARABLES

Editor Clifford Levy told Nieman Labs that:


We did that in part because we realized that
perhaps we went too fast toward monetizing
NYT Now and NYT Opinion. Maybe in the
future, a better path is to first do audience
development and then do monetization.
Sports giant ESPN created a catalogue of up
to 45 vertical apps from 2011, targeting specific
sports and countries and fantasy leagues, games
and data. In 2015 they are channelling a huge
mobile audience67% of traffic and 40% engagementinto fewer apps and more screens,
relaunching Sports Center App as the ESPN App
and, in April, a 100% responsive site, in an effort to provide more context and more personalisation.
The FT chose a mobile website instead of native apps, a decision it took after editorial and
commercial discrepancies with Apple. The bold

The Apple Watch went on sale on April 24, 2015,


after similar models made by Samsung, Motorola
and LG. It is supposed to represent a turning point
for wearables, similar to the effect the iPad had on
tablets. JP Morgan believes 26 million will be sold in
the first year.
Big brands, from Twitter and Instagram to American
Airlines and BMW, are readying their Apple Watch
apps and there are several emerging trends:
The extension of an existing model;
Service information: flights, hotels, electric car
charge levels, bank accounts;
Personal services: health and sports;
News;

The New York Times, The Guardian, CNN and
ESPN are editing and adapting articles to the new
platform, with the emphasis on breaking news, push
notifications and read it later functionality. The watch
becomes a first step in mobile engagement, allowing
users to read the full story later on an iPhone or an
iPad.
The Guardians Apple Watch app, called
Moments, goes further, offering more context and
personalisation related to the time of day: a morning
brief, photos to look at during your break and the
latest real-time news about your favourite sports
team.
Does content need re-packaging (again!) for the
Apple Watch? That depends on the brand position
each media outlet wishes to occupy and how
developed its technology strategy is. If a brand wants
digital and mobile early-adopter mindshare, its a
must. The rest can stick to mobile, for now.

Izzy Plante / Flickr

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

92

93

MOBILE

MOBILE

MINIMUM

Moving towards a true omni-channel presence, acceleration and aggressive action are
needed if your mobile strategy has been weak
until now.
Dany Satine, cofounder and CEO of the
Barcelona-based The Mobile Bakery, said:
making web and mobile traffic compatible is
essential, but if your only strategy is a responsive
site, youre dead. The perfect strategy, he says,
needs great content, engagement features and
fast, easy-to-use native apps with specific aims.
NATIVE APPS OR MOBILE WEB?
Different industry giants have adopted diffe-rent mobile strategies, and we can learn
from them all. The New York Times, as well as
its basic brand portal app, mobile-friendly site
and a few free native apps like Scoop or Cooking, has experimented with native paid apps to

try to generate more income: NYT Opinion and


NYT Now.
NYT Opinion was launched in June 2014 at
$5.99 a month just on the iPhone but by October, it had disappeared after failing to build an
audience.
NYT Now worked better. It offers curated, edited stories and two daily news briefings. The
app is free to download and users get 10 free articles a month before being asked to pay $7.99 a
month for the full experience.
It was aimed at hooking young, mobile-friendly non-subscribers but allowing
them to access the papers normal web content
meant normal subscribers began using the app
to avoid paying the normal fees, putting subscriptions at risk, so they stopped the web content, dropped the price and added sharing and
push notifications.

MINIMUM

WEARABLES

Editor Clifford Levy told Nieman Labs that:


We did that in part because we realized that
perhaps we went too fast toward monetizing
NYT Now and NYT Opinion. Maybe in the
future, a better path is to first do audience
development and then do monetization.
Sports giant ESPN created a catalogue of up
to 45 vertical apps from 2011, targeting specific
sports and countries and fantasy leagues, games
and data. In 2015 they are channelling a huge
mobile audience67% of traffic and 40% engagementinto fewer apps and more screens,
relaunching Sports Center App as the ESPN App
and, in April, a 100% responsive site, in an effort to provide more context and more personalisation.
The FT chose a mobile website instead of native apps, a decision it took after editorial and
commercial discrepancies with Apple. The bold

The Apple Watch went on sale on April 24, 2015,


after similar models made by Samsung, Motorola
and LG. It is supposed to represent a turning point
for wearables, similar to the effect the iPad had on
tablets. JP Morgan believes 26 million will be sold in
the first year.
Big brands, from Twitter and Instagram to American
Airlines and BMW, are readying their Apple Watch
apps and there are several emerging trends:
The extension of an existing model;
Service information: flights, hotels, electric car
charge levels, bank accounts;
Personal services: health and sports;
News;

The New York Times, The Guardian, CNN and
ESPN are editing and adapting articles to the new
platform, with the emphasis on breaking news, push
notifications and read it later functionality. The watch
becomes a first step in mobile engagement, allowing
users to read the full story later on an iPhone or an
iPad.
The Guardians Apple Watch app, called
Moments, goes further, offering more context and
personalisation related to the time of day: a morning
brief, photos to look at during your break and the
latest real-time news about your favourite sports
team.
Does content need re-packaging (again!) for the
Apple Watch? That depends on the brand position
each media outlet wishes to occupy and how
developed its technology strategy is. If a brand wants
digital and mobile early-adopter mindshare, its a
must. The rest can stick to mobile, for now.

Izzy Plante / Flickr

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

94

95

MOBILE

PURE
PLAYERS

MINIMUM

choice worked: there are now more than 4 million users, more than 50% of total traffic is mobile and more than 60% of subscribers use it.

Three years ago,


MWC was a sub-sector
event for the telecoms
industry [] Now its
about the Internet, digital
and content

AJ+, MOBILE CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS


AJ+, which appeared in September 2014 to reimagine the news for a mobile-centric generation, is Al Jazeeras attempt at conquering the
mobile universe. It targets millennials and Al
Jazeera hired David Cohn, the former head of
content at Circa, to make it work. The secret?
Bite-sized content on card stacks, mixed with
edited, on-the-go video optimised for social engagement. The videos dont need sound and
80% of the traffic comes from Facebook. Al Jazeera wants to join the conversation and AJ+ is
a stand-alone media product.
TOWARDS A MOBILE-CENTRIC NEWSROOM
Lisa McLeod, the former head of operations at
the FT, said: Desktop is the new print and the
trend has grown in strength. This year, mobile
users are expected to outnumber desktop users, but most newsrooms are still focused on
print and do not fully understand the transition
to digital, never mind mobile, which demands
speed and the ability to adapt. To win in that environment, newspapers must understand content flows, build up an omni-channel strategy
and never forget the industry is all about great
journalism

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Mobile phones, more so already than laptops, desktops or tablets, are the media, if we think of the
physical distribution platform. Home screen real-estate will become increasingly valuable and the ability
to buzz readers with push notifications, interrupting
their day and attention flow, increasingly prized.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Anne Worner / Flickr

MOBILE 3.0: PERSONALISATION & CONTEXT


Apps and mobile tech evolve alongside content
consumption. We have moved quickly from
1.0simple and not very usefulto 2.0online
services that make the most of mobileand in
2015 its time for 3.0: mobile-only services that
use the most sophisticated smartphone features.
Its all about anticipating user needs, before
they know they have them. Imagine products
that do user context (location, time, weather,
traffic density) and behaviour (big data, analysis,
activities, patterns, consumer decisions) within
the app. Facebook and Twitter have moved
towards personalising our news and content
diet. On Twitter, users choose who they want
information from and whose content they
want to consume. Shuffle, a free app launched
at the end of 2014, uses its Courier algorithm
to present each user with news based on their
interests, what their friends are reading, their
location, current affairs and popularity.
Courier works by taking note of the way users interact with its own stories: swipe left to
get rid of a story, swipe right to read later, or tap
to open, read more, share and follow. The swipe
gesture was popularised by dating app Tinder.
The Daily Beasts app is not as technologically
sophisticated. The app was recently relaunched,
follows the users in-app behaviour and offers a
personal dashboard, the idea being to push users towards the stories they will enjoy.

CURATION & EDITORIAL STANDARDS


The Economist Espresso is the first daily the
weekly has ever published, and its an app. A
short, dark shot of daily news you can read in five
minutes. At $3.99, a dedicated team of editors
offers up five stories a day, a world news briefing
and the main data points from global stock markets and exchange rates. The Economist reckons
there are 200 million potential users.
Yahoo Digest sends out its Top 10 news stories twice daily. Each begins with an image and
some text, before offering a deeper level with
more information, Twitter mentions, interactive maps or links to Wikipedia. Stories are
marked as read and a calendar archive of past
stories is kept.

9 TIPS FOR GETTING STARTED WITH MOBILE


1) Act Now: Get on with it, move, disrupt, develop,
deploy, advance. Quickly. If budget or security worry
you, get on with it anyway, there are lots of examples
of low-cost mobile success
2) Responsive Minimum: Google is now ranking
mobile-friendly sites differently. Now a mobile site is
table stakes if you want to survive, while native apps
are great drivers of reader engagement
3) Specific Apps: Make your app do something
specific, not just be a generic brand access point.
Think about information services you can provide
with reusable content or newly tailored material. Help
your users with something they enjoy
4) Simple, Smart Content: make the most of
usability guidelines and design principles; dont
make the app too complicated, for readers or writers,
and fill it with smart, creative content
5) Making Money: Charge to download, sell things
in-app, set up a traditional subscription model or do
a mobile freemium membership app like Slate Plus

6) Hook Your Audience: Mobile is about


engagement, loyalty and a better audience, which
returns more often to provide you with more chances
to monetise their visits with a multi-platform
strategy
7) Make It Local: geolocation is part of
smartphones; you can use it to create greater
editorial value and greater commercial value for
users you know more about. Local news, local
trending topics, local weather, local traffic, local
accidents
8) Chat: some countries come with a favourite
mobile chat app (Whatsapp, Line, Telegram, etc),
which you can use to your advantage as part of
your viral or social strategy. Initial studies show very
favourable traffic data
9) Easy-To-Consume Formats: use formats that
users love to see on their mobile devices. Short,
explanatory, even silent videos work for users on the
go. Cards, content capsules that focus on the facts
and then lead users to other cards, do too

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

94

95

MOBILE

PURE
PLAYERS

MINIMUM

choice worked: there are now more than 4 million users, more than 50% of total traffic is mobile and more than 60% of subscribers use it.

Three years ago,


MWC was a sub-sector
event for the telecoms
industry [] Now its
about the Internet, digital
and content

AJ+, MOBILE CONTENT FOR MILLENNIALS


AJ+, which appeared in September 2014 to reimagine the news for a mobile-centric generation, is Al Jazeeras attempt at conquering the
mobile universe. It targets millennials and Al
Jazeera hired David Cohn, the former head of
content at Circa, to make it work. The secret?
Bite-sized content on card stacks, mixed with
edited, on-the-go video optimised for social engagement. The videos dont need sound and
80% of the traffic comes from Facebook. Al Jazeera wants to join the conversation and AJ+ is
a stand-alone media product.
TOWARDS A MOBILE-CENTRIC NEWSROOM
Lisa McLeod, the former head of operations at
the FT, said: Desktop is the new print and the
trend has grown in strength. This year, mobile
users are expected to outnumber desktop users, but most newsrooms are still focused on
print and do not fully understand the transition
to digital, never mind mobile, which demands
speed and the ability to adapt. To win in that environment, newspapers must understand content flows, build up an omni-channel strategy
and never forget the industry is all about great
journalism

INNOVATIONS TAKE
Mobile phones, more so already than laptops, desktops or tablets, are the media, if we think of the
physical distribution platform. Home screen real-estate will become increasingly valuable and the ability
to buzz readers with push notifications, interrupting
their day and attention flow, increasingly prized.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Anne Worner / Flickr

MOBILE 3.0: PERSONALISATION & CONTEXT


Apps and mobile tech evolve alongside content
consumption. We have moved quickly from
1.0simple and not very usefulto 2.0online
services that make the most of mobileand in
2015 its time for 3.0: mobile-only services that
use the most sophisticated smartphone features.
Its all about anticipating user needs, before
they know they have them. Imagine products
that do user context (location, time, weather,
traffic density) and behaviour (big data, analysis,
activities, patterns, consumer decisions) within
the app. Facebook and Twitter have moved
towards personalising our news and content
diet. On Twitter, users choose who they want
information from and whose content they
want to consume. Shuffle, a free app launched
at the end of 2014, uses its Courier algorithm
to present each user with news based on their
interests, what their friends are reading, their
location, current affairs and popularity.
Courier works by taking note of the way users interact with its own stories: swipe left to
get rid of a story, swipe right to read later, or tap
to open, read more, share and follow. The swipe
gesture was popularised by dating app Tinder.
The Daily Beasts app is not as technologically
sophisticated. The app was recently relaunched,
follows the users in-app behaviour and offers a
personal dashboard, the idea being to push users towards the stories they will enjoy.

CURATION & EDITORIAL STANDARDS


The Economist Espresso is the first daily the
weekly has ever published, and its an app. A
short, dark shot of daily news you can read in five
minutes. At $3.99, a dedicated team of editors
offers up five stories a day, a world news briefing
and the main data points from global stock markets and exchange rates. The Economist reckons
there are 200 million potential users.
Yahoo Digest sends out its Top 10 news stories twice daily. Each begins with an image and
some text, before offering a deeper level with
more information, Twitter mentions, interactive maps or links to Wikipedia. Stories are
marked as read and a calendar archive of past
stories is kept.

9 TIPS FOR GETTING STARTED WITH MOBILE


1) Act Now: Get on with it, move, disrupt, develop,
deploy, advance. Quickly. If budget or security worry
you, get on with it anyway, there are lots of examples
of low-cost mobile success
2) Responsive Minimum: Google is now ranking
mobile-friendly sites differently. Now a mobile site is
table stakes if you want to survive, while native apps
are great drivers of reader engagement
3) Specific Apps: Make your app do something
specific, not just be a generic brand access point.
Think about information services you can provide
with reusable content or newly tailored material. Help
your users with something they enjoy
4) Simple, Smart Content: make the most of
usability guidelines and design principles; dont
make the app too complicated, for readers or writers,
and fill it with smart, creative content
5) Making Money: Charge to download, sell things
in-app, set up a traditional subscription model or do
a mobile freemium membership app like Slate Plus

6) Hook Your Audience: Mobile is about


engagement, loyalty and a better audience, which
returns more often to provide you with more chances
to monetise their visits with a multi-platform
strategy
7) Make It Local: geolocation is part of
smartphones; you can use it to create greater
editorial value and greater commercial value for
users you know more about. Local news, local
trending topics, local weather, local traffic, local
accidents
8) Chat: some countries come with a favourite
mobile chat app (Whatsapp, Line, Telegram, etc),
which you can use to your advantage as part of
your viral or social strategy. Initial studies show very
favourable traffic data
9) Easy-To-Consume Formats: use formats that
users love to see on their mobile devices. Short,
explanatory, even silent videos work for users on the
go. Cards, content capsules that focus on the facts
and then lead users to other cards, do too

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

96

YOUR NEWS

STORY

This book does


not exist yet. We
want you, your
newsroom and
your stories to
be in it.

THE NEWSPAPER:
A DAILY MIRACLE
THIS IS A SHOW, DONT TELL
BOOK PROJECT THAT NEEDS
YOUR HELP. INNOVATION
IS GOING TO PUBLISH THIS
PICTORIAL TRIBUTE TO THOSE
WHO CREATE NEWSPAPERS, A
NOSTALGIC BLACK AND WHITE
COLLECTION OF SOME OF THE
MOST APPEALING OLD PHOTOS
FROM OUR INDUSTRY AROUND
THE WORLD.
With your help. We would like you to send
us old photos of your newspaper, just as it
was all those years ago: from the building,
journalists, newsroom and printing presses to
the newsstands, paper boys and readers.
Check with your photo editor, delve into the
archives and lets reproduce the best images
from your glorious past. This is a non-profit
project and as token of appreciation for
your efforts, INNOVATION will send you a
print edition of this +200 pages book free of
charge and a digital version you can share
with your friends, family and colleagues.

The deadline is October 1, 2015.

NOSTALGIA
IN BLACK & WHITE
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Please send us only digital copies of the


highest resolution, along with a brief caption
explaining what the photo shows (newspaper,
city, country, year of the picture and author if
known).

Send it all, and any other suggestions, to:


Juan Antonio Giner
giner@innovation.media
Antonio Martn Hervs
martin@innovation.media

96

YOUR NEWS

STORY

This book does


not exist yet. We
want you, your
newsroom and
your stories to
be in it.

THE NEWSPAPER:
A DAILY MIRACLE
THIS IS A SHOW, DONT TELL
BOOK PROJECT THAT NEEDS
YOUR HELP. INNOVATION
IS GOING TO PUBLISH THIS
PICTORIAL TRIBUTE TO THOSE
WHO CREATE NEWSPAPERS, A
NOSTALGIC BLACK AND WHITE
COLLECTION OF SOME OF THE
MOST APPEALING OLD PHOTOS
FROM OUR INDUSTRY AROUND
THE WORLD.
With your help. We would like you to send
us old photos of your newspaper, just as it
was all those years ago: from the building,
journalists, newsroom and printing presses to
the newsstands, paper boys and readers.
Check with your photo editor, delve into the
archives and lets reproduce the best images
from your glorious past. This is a non-profit
project and as token of appreciation for
your efforts, INNOVATION will send you a
print edition of this +200 pages book free of
charge and a digital version you can share
with your friends, family and colleagues.

The deadline is October 1, 2015.

NOSTALGIA
IN BLACK & WHITE
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Please send us only digital copies of the


highest resolution, along with a brief caption
explaining what the photo shows (newspaper,
city, country, year of the picture and author if
known).

Send it all, and any other suggestions, to:


Juan Antonio Giner
giner@innovation.media
Antonio Martn Hervs
martin@innovation.media

98

99

MEDIA VOICES
I dont have any kids, no wife,
no car, no loans. What Im about
to say is perhaps a bit pompous,
but I prefer to die standing
than live on my knees.
CHARB

EDITOR OF CHARLIE HEBDO, SEPTEMBER 2012

Today, its the whole Republic that has been attacked. The
Republic is freedom of expression. The Republic is culture,
is creation, is pluralism, is democracy. Thats what has
been targeted by the assassins. Thats the ideal of justice
and peace that France takes all around the world and that
message of peace, of tolerance that we also defend with our
soldiers to fight against terrorism and fundamentalism
FRANOIS HOLLANDE
JANUARY 7, 2015

KATHARINE VINER

NEW EDITOR OF THE GUARDIAN,


IN HER CANDIDATES STATEMENT,
FEBRUARY 2015

This brings me to a second and even more


important point that bears not just on the fate
of one newspaper but on public life as a whole.
A free press is essential to a healthy democracy.
There is a purpose to journalism, and it is not just
to entertain. It is not to pander to political power,
big corporations and rich men. Newspapers have
what amounts in the end to a constitutional duty
to tell their readers the truth. It is not only the
Telegraph that is at fault here. The past few years
have seen the rise of shadowy executives who
determine what truths can and what truths cant
be conveyed across the mainstream media
PETER OBORNE

FORMER CHIEF POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT, ON RESIGNING FROM


THE TELEGRAPH, FEBRUARY 17, 2015
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

ALAN RUSBRIDGER

IN E-MAIL TO STAFF ANNOUNCING


HIS RESIGNATION AS EDITOR OF
THE GUARDIAN, DECEMBER 10, 2015

The fact that they met at all, on 4 January 1981, was vehemently
denied for 30 years. Since their lie was revealed, it has been
possible to uncover how the greatest extension of monopoly
power in modern press history was planned and executed
with such furtive brilliance. All the wretches in the subsequent
hacking sagas the predators in the red-tops, the scavengers and
sleaze merchants, the blackmailers and bribers, the liars, the
bullies, the cowed politicians and the bent coppers were but
the detritus of a collapse of integrity in British journalism and
political life. At the root of the cruelties and extortions exposed
in the recent criminal trials at the Old Bailey, was Margaret
Thatchers reckless engorgement of the media power of her guest
that January Sunday. The simple genesis of the hacking outrages
is that Murdochs News International came to think it was above
the law, because it was.

HAROLD EVANS FORMER EDITOR OF THE SUNDAY TIMES, WRITING IN


THE GUARDIAN ON THE SECRET MEETING IN 1981 BETWEEN MARGARET
THATCHER AND RUPERT MURDOCH, APRIL 28, 2015

Maybe content
paywalls would work
better if you didnt have to
re-log-in on every app,
every phone, every tablet,
every PC, every browser
MARC ANDREESSEN

CO-FOUNDER
OF ANDREESSEN HOROWITZ,
APRIL 25, 2015

We have fostered a tight


working relationship with our
Engineering department, with
47 engineers working with
our journalists. Four years ago,
we had only four engineers in
newsroom. When we move into
a new office within a year, all
47 engineers will be embedded
in our newsroom, working side
by side with our journalists.
A symbiotic ajournalists is
essential for innovation.
MARTIN BARON

We live in streams
on our phones and
brands need to be in
those streams too.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR OF THE WASHINGTON POST,


HAYS PRESS-ENTERPRISE LECTURE, APRIL 2015

STACY MARTINET

CMO MASHABLE, MARCH 2015


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Bryan Winter/Knight Center/Flickr

Report, report, report.


Breaking stories is our
primary mission. We build
on a tradition of accuracy
and fairness; giving readers
the information they need
to understand the world;
holding power to account;
defending liberties; exposing
injustice. We must embrace
new digital ways to find,
verify, tell and deliver stories
so that they are relevant to
our readers, and protect our
sources and reporters.

When I assumed the editorship


in 1995, the senior team at
the Guardian was debating
whether we should switch to
using colour photography in the
paper. (There were quite a few
distinguished voices believing
black and white was the proper
mtier for news.) Today we are
doing our journalism in words,
(colour!) pictures, video, data,
animation, audio; on mobile and
other platforms and in social
and every possible combination
of the above.

98

99

MEDIA VOICES
I dont have any kids, no wife,
no car, no loans. What Im about
to say is perhaps a bit pompous,
but I prefer to die standing
than live on my knees.
CHARB

EDITOR OF CHARLIE HEBDO, SEPTEMBER 2012

Today, its the whole Republic that has been attacked. The
Republic is freedom of expression. The Republic is culture,
is creation, is pluralism, is democracy. Thats what has
been targeted by the assassins. Thats the ideal of justice
and peace that France takes all around the world and that
message of peace, of tolerance that we also defend with our
soldiers to fight against terrorism and fundamentalism
FRANOIS HOLLANDE
JANUARY 7, 2015

KATHARINE VINER

NEW EDITOR OF THE GUARDIAN,


IN HER CANDIDATES STATEMENT,
FEBRUARY 2015

This brings me to a second and even more


important point that bears not just on the fate
of one newspaper but on public life as a whole.
A free press is essential to a healthy democracy.
There is a purpose to journalism, and it is not just
to entertain. It is not to pander to political power,
big corporations and rich men. Newspapers have
what amounts in the end to a constitutional duty
to tell their readers the truth. It is not only the
Telegraph that is at fault here. The past few years
have seen the rise of shadowy executives who
determine what truths can and what truths cant
be conveyed across the mainstream media
PETER OBORNE

FORMER CHIEF POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT, ON RESIGNING FROM


THE TELEGRAPH, FEBRUARY 17, 2015
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

ALAN RUSBRIDGER

IN E-MAIL TO STAFF ANNOUNCING


HIS RESIGNATION AS EDITOR OF
THE GUARDIAN, DECEMBER 10, 2015

The fact that they met at all, on 4 January 1981, was vehemently
denied for 30 years. Since their lie was revealed, it has been
possible to uncover how the greatest extension of monopoly
power in modern press history was planned and executed
with such furtive brilliance. All the wretches in the subsequent
hacking sagas the predators in the red-tops, the scavengers and
sleaze merchants, the blackmailers and bribers, the liars, the
bullies, the cowed politicians and the bent coppers were but
the detritus of a collapse of integrity in British journalism and
political life. At the root of the cruelties and extortions exposed
in the recent criminal trials at the Old Bailey, was Margaret
Thatchers reckless engorgement of the media power of her guest
that January Sunday. The simple genesis of the hacking outrages
is that Murdochs News International came to think it was above
the law, because it was.

HAROLD EVANS FORMER EDITOR OF THE SUNDAY TIMES, WRITING IN


THE GUARDIAN ON THE SECRET MEETING IN 1981 BETWEEN MARGARET
THATCHER AND RUPERT MURDOCH, APRIL 28, 2015

Maybe content
paywalls would work
better if you didnt have to
re-log-in on every app,
every phone, every tablet,
every PC, every browser
MARC ANDREESSEN

CO-FOUNDER
OF ANDREESSEN HOROWITZ,
APRIL 25, 2015

We have fostered a tight


working relationship with our
Engineering department, with
47 engineers working with
our journalists. Four years ago,
we had only four engineers in
newsroom. When we move into
a new office within a year, all
47 engineers will be embedded
in our newsroom, working side
by side with our journalists.
A symbiotic ajournalists is
essential for innovation.
MARTIN BARON

We live in streams
on our phones and
brands need to be in
those streams too.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR OF THE WASHINGTON POST,


HAYS PRESS-ENTERPRISE LECTURE, APRIL 2015

STACY MARTINET

CMO MASHABLE, MARCH 2015


INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Bryan Winter/Knight Center/Flickr

Report, report, report.


Breaking stories is our
primary mission. We build
on a tradition of accuracy
and fairness; giving readers
the information they need
to understand the world;
holding power to account;
defending liberties; exposing
injustice. We must embrace
new digital ways to find,
verify, tell and deliver stories
so that they are relevant to
our readers, and protect our
sources and reporters.

When I assumed the editorship


in 1995, the senior team at
the Guardian was debating
whether we should switch to
using colour photography in the
paper. (There were quite a few
distinguished voices believing
black and white was the proper
mtier for news.) Today we are
doing our journalism in words,
(colour!) pictures, video, data,
animation, audio; on mobile and
other platforms and in social
and every possible combination
of the above.

100

101

MEDIA VOICES
as a result of a new Spanish law, well shortly have to close Google
News in Spain. Let me explain why. This new legislation requires
every Spanish publication to charge services like Google News for
showing even the smallest snippet from their publications, whether
they want to or not. As Google News itself makes no money (we do
not show any advertising on the site) this new approach is simply
not sustainable. So its with real sadness that on 16 December (before
the new law comes into effect in January) well remove Spanish
publishers from Google News, and close Google News in Spain.
RICHARD GINGRAS

HEAD OF GOOGLE NEWS SPAIN, DECEMBER 11, 2014

TOM STANDAGE

DEPUTY EDITOR OF THE ECONOMIST,


IN AN INTERVIEW WITH NIEMAN LABS, APRIL 1, 2015

Web Summit/Flickr

The youve got to the end and


now youve got permission to go
do something else is something
you never get. You can never finish
the Internet, you can never finish
Twitter, and you can never really
finish The New York Times, to
be honest. So at its heart is that
we have this very high density of
information, and the promise we
make to the reader is that if you
trust us to filter and distill the news,
and if you give us an hour and a
half of your time which is roughly
how long people spend reading The
Economist each week then well
tell you what matters in the world
and whats going on. And if you only
read one thing, we want to be the
desert-island magazine. And our
readers, thats what they say. So
thats the starting point. The word
print and the word digital dont
appear in thaere.

Certain new realities are


beyond argument: Clutter is
up more ads, more channels,
more content advertising
rates continue to drop, and
audiences are programming
their own universe in text, video
and audio. Consumers dont
want to watch commercials,
are fleeing networks, hate
reruns, are increasingly bored
by reality programming, shun
print products and, oh, by the
way, dont want to pay much for
content either. Yikes.

Eversify. Mobile publishing.


Delivered in one touch.
Eversify is the most convenient mobile publishing service
automating the transformation of newspapers and magazines
into interactive, entertaining mobile editions.

Agfa Graphics Eversify mobile publishing service captures existing


content from any editorial or other content system and automatically
transforms it into a mobile publication using sophisticated business rules
combined with predefined, yet easily customizable templates.
For any device, at any moment of the day.

Built as cloud service, Eversify delivers an immediate return through


minimal up-front investment and predictable operational cost.

DAVID CARR

THE MEDIA EQUATION, THE NEW YORK TIMES,


DECEMBER 28, 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

www.eversify.me
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

100

101

MEDIA VOICES
as a result of a new Spanish law, well shortly have to close Google
News in Spain. Let me explain why. This new legislation requires
every Spanish publication to charge services like Google News for
showing even the smallest snippet from their publications, whether
they want to or not. As Google News itself makes no money (we do
not show any advertising on the site) this new approach is simply
not sustainable. So its with real sadness that on 16 December (before
the new law comes into effect in January) well remove Spanish
publishers from Google News, and close Google News in Spain.
RICHARD GINGRAS

HEAD OF GOOGLE NEWS SPAIN, DECEMBER 11, 2014

TOM STANDAGE

DEPUTY EDITOR OF THE ECONOMIST,


IN AN INTERVIEW WITH NIEMAN LABS, APRIL 1, 2015

Web Summit/Flickr

The youve got to the end and


now youve got permission to go
do something else is something
you never get. You can never finish
the Internet, you can never finish
Twitter, and you can never really
finish The New York Times, to
be honest. So at its heart is that
we have this very high density of
information, and the promise we
make to the reader is that if you
trust us to filter and distill the news,
and if you give us an hour and a
half of your time which is roughly
how long people spend reading The
Economist each week then well
tell you what matters in the world
and whats going on. And if you only
read one thing, we want to be the
desert-island magazine. And our
readers, thats what they say. So
thats the starting point. The word
print and the word digital dont
appear in thaere.

Certain new realities are


beyond argument: Clutter is
up more ads, more channels,
more content advertising
rates continue to drop, and
audiences are programming
their own universe in text, video
and audio. Consumers dont
want to watch commercials,
are fleeing networks, hate
reruns, are increasingly bored
by reality programming, shun
print products and, oh, by the
way, dont want to pay much for
content either. Yikes.

Eversify. Mobile publishing.


Delivered in one touch.
Eversify is the most convenient mobile publishing service
automating the transformation of newspapers and magazines
into interactive, entertaining mobile editions.

Agfa Graphics Eversify mobile publishing service captures existing


content from any editorial or other content system and automatically
transforms it into a mobile publication using sophisticated business rules
combined with predefined, yet easily customizable templates.
For any device, at any moment of the day.

Built as cloud service, Eversify delivers an immediate return through


minimal up-front investment and predictable operational cost.

DAVID CARR

THE MEDIA EQUATION, THE NEW YORK TIMES,


DECEMBER 28, 2014

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

www.eversify.me
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

102

Our mission is to defend and promote press freedom, provide


knowledge and strategic advice to help members and the industry
understand and manage structural and cyclical changes, conduct
relevant industry research with academic and media partners,
and provide leadership in matters of common interest.

www.wan-ifra.org

apping and promoting innovation within


the news media industry has long been
a hallmark of the World Association of
Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).
The leading global association drives news media
transformation, be it new forms of journalism,
business models, strategic organization or technology
all with the aim of securing a sustainable and strong
independent press.

Research: into the industrys most pressing issues,


but also into about emerging trends and technologies
that may impact publishers for years to come. WANIFRA Reports delve deep into specific topics and our
World Press Trends database features statistics,
trends, analyses and commentary from nearly 80
countries. A new development is the formation of the
World Printers Forum to continue WAN-IFRAs crucial
work for all things print.

THE INNOVATION BRIDGE

Global advisory: located around the globe, the most


experienced and successful business minds offer
independent and pragmatic guidance on transforming
the news media businesses and growing digital
audience and revenues. Our eRev Executive Program
offers our members an exclusive network, insight and
opportunity to grow their businesses.

WAN-IFRA upped the stakes last June at the World


News Media Congress in Torino, Italy, by launching
the Global Alliance for Media Innovation (GAMI). The
primary goal of GAMI is to foster long-term growth
in the news media business and unlock the potential
of innovation provided by the growing ecosystem of
emerging technology providers and innovation centres
worldwide.
Specifically, GAMI aims to create a networking
platform for publishers, suppliers, start-ups,
innovators, developers and academic and research
centres to enhance and encourage cooperation among
the stakeholders of the news media industry, as
well as encourage and facilitate business/academic
collaboration through multi-disciplinary R&D projects.
.

RESEARCH, CURATE
AND SHARE BEST PRACTICE

WAN-IFRAs unique global network of national


associations, regional committees, advisory boards,
academic and research partners, and constant
contact with its members, industry and other industry
professionals provide a virtuous exchange of knowhow, inspiration and services through:

World Publishing Expo 2014 in Amsterdam above and below right

Ethiopian journalist Eskinder Nega


awarded the 2014 Golden Pen of
Freedom. Swedish journalist Martin
Schibbye accepted the award on the
jailed journalists behalf.

News & insights: featuring daily business news,


analyses, developments, trends and technologies
through our various digital and print platforms
(newsletters, blogs, magazine, reports).
Networking: through various international
conferences, exhibitions, workshops and webinars that
bring together the leading global experts, visionaries,
analysts and technology providers within and outside
our industry to share best practices, debate and
dissect the latest business trends and technologies.
All of WAN-IFRAs activities are interlinked around
central topics. A great example is our recent report,
Wearables: the key considerations for news
publishers. Wearables is one of the central topics
that GAMI is focusing on in its ongoing research and

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

activities. The report featured contributions from Jeff


Jarvis, Mario Garca and Bruce Tognazzi, input from
our GAMI partners about their visions and guidance on
wearables, and, naturally, interviews with some of the
leading publishers around the world who are testing
the waters with wearables and smartwatches.
We have held several wearables workshops for our
members, the topic is embedded in our Congress
programme, and members are inquiring about advice
for next steps.

TRANSFORMATION ADVICE

On the last note, WAN-IFRA has helped hundreds of


companies, including local, national and international
media houses. Areas of expertise include:
Diversifying digital revenue
Media transformation & change management
Monetizing mobile products
Newsroom organization and workflow
Paid content evaluation and implementation
Digital advertising strategy

INNOVATIONS
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015
2014

102

Our mission is to defend and promote press freedom, provide


knowledge and strategic advice to help members and the industry
understand and manage structural and cyclical changes, conduct
relevant industry research with academic and media partners,
and provide leadership in matters of common interest.

www.wan-ifra.org

apping and promoting innovation within


the news media industry has long been
a hallmark of the World Association of
Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).
The leading global association drives news media
transformation, be it new forms of journalism,
business models, strategic organization or technology
all with the aim of securing a sustainable and strong
independent press.

Research: into the industrys most pressing issues,


but also into about emerging trends and technologies
that may impact publishers for years to come. WANIFRA Reports delve deep into specific topics and our
World Press Trends database features statistics,
trends, analyses and commentary from nearly 80
countries. A new development is the formation of the
World Printers Forum to continue WAN-IFRAs crucial
work for all things print.

THE INNOVATION BRIDGE

Global advisory: located around the globe, the most


experienced and successful business minds offer
independent and pragmatic guidance on transforming
the news media businesses and growing digital
audience and revenues. Our eRev Executive Program
offers our members an exclusive network, insight and
opportunity to grow their businesses.

WAN-IFRA upped the stakes last June at the World


News Media Congress in Torino, Italy, by launching
the Global Alliance for Media Innovation (GAMI). The
primary goal of GAMI is to foster long-term growth
in the news media business and unlock the potential
of innovation provided by the growing ecosystem of
emerging technology providers and innovation centres
worldwide.
Specifically, GAMI aims to create a networking
platform for publishers, suppliers, start-ups,
innovators, developers and academic and research
centres to enhance and encourage cooperation among
the stakeholders of the news media industry, as
well as encourage and facilitate business/academic
collaboration through multi-disciplinary R&D projects.
.

RESEARCH, CURATE
AND SHARE BEST PRACTICE

WAN-IFRAs unique global network of national


associations, regional committees, advisory boards,
academic and research partners, and constant
contact with its members, industry and other industry
professionals provide a virtuous exchange of knowhow, inspiration and services through:

World Publishing Expo 2014 in Amsterdam above and below right

Ethiopian journalist Eskinder Nega


awarded the 2014 Golden Pen of
Freedom. Swedish journalist Martin
Schibbye accepted the award on the
jailed journalists behalf.

News & insights: featuring daily business news,


analyses, developments, trends and technologies
through our various digital and print platforms
(newsletters, blogs, magazine, reports).
Networking: through various international
conferences, exhibitions, workshops and webinars that
bring together the leading global experts, visionaries,
analysts and technology providers within and outside
our industry to share best practices, debate and
dissect the latest business trends and technologies.
All of WAN-IFRAs activities are interlinked around
central topics. A great example is our recent report,
Wearables: the key considerations for news
publishers. Wearables is one of the central topics
that GAMI is focusing on in its ongoing research and

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

activities. The report featured contributions from Jeff


Jarvis, Mario Garca and Bruce Tognazzi, input from
our GAMI partners about their visions and guidance on
wearables, and, naturally, interviews with some of the
leading publishers around the world who are testing
the waters with wearables and smartwatches.
We have held several wearables workshops for our
members, the topic is embedded in our Congress
programme, and members are inquiring about advice
for next steps.

TRANSFORMATION ADVICE

On the last note, WAN-IFRA has helped hundreds of


companies, including local, national and international
media houses. Areas of expertise include:
Diversifying digital revenue
Media transformation & change management
Monetizing mobile products
Newsroom organization and workflow
Paid content evaluation and implementation
Digital advertising strategy

INNOVATIONS
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015
2014

104

105

Christoph Keese, Executive VP of Axel Springer, at WAN-IFRAs Digital Media Europe conference in London

Big data strategy & implementation


Newspaper production evaluation
Audit of sales capabilities

ADVOCACY AT OUR CORE

We are, along with our members, passionate about


the future of news. We promote press freedom, ethical
journalism, news literacy and editorial integrity. The
World Editors Forum connects editors and journalists
from all over the world in support of press freedom
and the advancement of journalism. Equally, we are
mindful of the issues affecting the news industry
as we navigate this digital revolution - for example
issues around online copyright, Internet regulation, and
the right to be forgotten. Thats why WAN-IFRA has
formal associate status to represent the newspaper
industry at UNESCO, and consultative status at the
United Nations.
An excellent recent example of WAN-IFRAs advocacy
efforts that will result in meaningful and practical
change took place in late April: Denmark announced
the allocation of 14 million Danish Kroner (1.9 million
Euros) to launch an initiative to be carried out together
with WAN-IFRA to support the development of free
and independent media in developing countries and
fragile states.

With the new allocation, WAN-IFRA will provide


support and training to more than 60 media in 12
countries in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin
America. Among other things, the project will focus on
digital development, professional training for women
editors and executives, and better legislative protection
of media.

WAN-IFRA FACT BOX

WAN-IFRA represents 78 national newspaper


associations, more than 18,000 publications, 15,000
online sites and more than 3,000 companies in more
than 120 countries. The organization is headquartered
in Paris and Frankfurt, Germany, and has regional
offices in Mexico, Singapore and India.
Its mega-events:
World News Media Congress, World Editors Forum
and World Advertising Forum: the global summit
meetings of the worlds press.
World Publishing Expo: the worlds largest global
trade exhibition for the industry
Contacts
WAN-IFRA,Rotfeder-Ring 11,
60327 Frankfurt, Germany
Tel. 49.69.2400630
96 bis, rue Beaubourg,75003 Paris, France
Tel. +33.1.47428500
info@wan-ifra.org / www.wan-ifra.org

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

104

105

Christoph Keese, Executive VP of Axel Springer, at WAN-IFRAs Digital Media Europe conference in London

Big data strategy & implementation


Newspaper production evaluation
Audit of sales capabilities

ADVOCACY AT OUR CORE

We are, along with our members, passionate about


the future of news. We promote press freedom, ethical
journalism, news literacy and editorial integrity. The
World Editors Forum connects editors and journalists
from all over the world in support of press freedom
and the advancement of journalism. Equally, we are
mindful of the issues affecting the news industry
as we navigate this digital revolution - for example
issues around online copyright, Internet regulation, and
the right to be forgotten. Thats why WAN-IFRA has
formal associate status to represent the newspaper
industry at UNESCO, and consultative status at the
United Nations.
An excellent recent example of WAN-IFRAs advocacy
efforts that will result in meaningful and practical
change took place in late April: Denmark announced
the allocation of 14 million Danish Kroner (1.9 million
Euros) to launch an initiative to be carried out together
with WAN-IFRA to support the development of free
and independent media in developing countries and
fragile states.

With the new allocation, WAN-IFRA will provide


support and training to more than 60 media in 12
countries in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin
America. Among other things, the project will focus on
digital development, professional training for women
editors and executives, and better legislative protection
of media.

WAN-IFRA FACT BOX

WAN-IFRA represents 78 national newspaper


associations, more than 18,000 publications, 15,000
online sites and more than 3,000 companies in more
than 120 countries. The organization is headquartered
in Paris and Frankfurt, Germany, and has regional
offices in Mexico, Singapore and India.
Its mega-events:
World News Media Congress, World Editors Forum
and World Advertising Forum: the global summit
meetings of the worlds press.
World Publishing Expo: the worlds largest global
trade exhibition for the industry
Contacts
WAN-IFRA,Rotfeder-Ring 11,
60327 Frankfurt, Germany
Tel. 49.69.2400630
96 bis, rue Beaubourg,75003 Paris, France
Tel. +33.1.47428500
info@wan-ifra.org / www.wan-ifra.org

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

106

www.innovation.media

From Media Companies


To Information Engines

NNOVATION is a leading global media


consulting company based in London (UK),
founded 32 years ago, working with more
than 100 media and management consultants
fluent in 27 languages in almost 60 countries,
which:
Develops and implements strategic plans
for diversification, convergence and full
multimedia integration.
Plans, directs and implements high quality
editorial projects for the modernization of
newsroom management, graphic presentation,
tablet applications, mobile media, and editorial
content to drive greater advertising revenues
and increased circulation.
Produces detailed and unique editorial
multimedia integration models and news
operations manuals, including news workflows
for INNOVATIONs state-of-the-art open-space
newsrooms.
Organizes tailored in-house training programs
for journalists and publishing executives.
Works with family-owned media companies
to successfully navigate generational changes.
Publishes reports and newsletters on
global media trends, including a quarterly
Confidential Newsletter in English and Spanish.
Produces an annual report on Innovations
in Newspapers for the World Association of
Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).
Published since 1999, the report appears in
English, and several other languages including
Arabic and Chinese.
Publishes (since 2010 ) an annual report
on trends in the magazine industry for the
London-based International Federation of the
Periodical Press (FIPP); the report is published
in English and Chinese.

OUR VISION

INNOVATION believes that old style media


companies must convert themselves into
multimedia information engines.TM We
firmly believe that good journalism is good
business, and we believe that an information
companys first responsibility is to be profitable
because without profitability there is no
independence, and without independence
there is no credibility. Without credibility
there is no audience, and without an
audience there is no advertising. These new
Multiplatform Information and Marketing
Solutions EnginesTM must lead from Readers
to Audiences, and from Audiences to
Communities.

HOW WE OPERATE

We believe that change should not be imposed,


but negotiated and based on consensus. We do
not believe in magic formulas. Every project
is unique. Every market is different. Every
company has its own characteristics. Every
newsroom has its own culture and personality.
We are not a general management consulting
company. Journalism is in our DNA. We come
from the industry, and speak its language.
Although all our projects are tailored to
the clients specific requirements, they
always include three key steps: analysis,
implementation and follow-up. All three are
critical elements in any consulting project.

INNOVATIONs media architect Manuel Moncada


developed the new integrated newsrooms of Grupo
Expansin in Mxico City.

THE CHANGE PROCESS

Analysis, implementation and follow-up are the


three main phases of INNOVATIONs editorial,
graphic, technical, management, and business
change processes. We do not believe in cosmetic
changes or miracles. Every serious project
requires time and reflection. Improvisation
only leads to failure. We work closely with
our clients executives and professional staffs.
INNOVATION projects build on close creative
interaction between our clients and our
consultants. Success is heavily dependent on
follow-up, training and implementation.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONs Chus del Rio and Ana Molina redesigned


the new website of Guatemalas leading newspaper,
Prensa Grfica.

INNOVATIONs Antonio Martin redesigned


the new Cambio16 (Sapin) and Expreso
Weekend Magazine Revista E (Portugal).

106

www.innovation.media

From Media Companies


To Information Engines

NNOVATION is a leading global media


consulting company based in London (UK),
founded 32 years ago, working with more
than 100 media and management consultants
fluent in 27 languages in almost 60 countries,
which:
Develops and implements strategic plans
for diversification, convergence and full
multimedia integration.
Plans, directs and implements high quality
editorial projects for the modernization of
newsroom management, graphic presentation,
tablet applications, mobile media, and editorial
content to drive greater advertising revenues
and increased circulation.
Produces detailed and unique editorial
multimedia integration models and news
operations manuals, including news workflows
for INNOVATIONs state-of-the-art open-space
newsrooms.
Organizes tailored in-house training programs
for journalists and publishing executives.
Works with family-owned media companies
to successfully navigate generational changes.
Publishes reports and newsletters on
global media trends, including a quarterly
Confidential Newsletter in English and Spanish.
Produces an annual report on Innovations
in Newspapers for the World Association of
Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).
Published since 1999, the report appears in
English, and several other languages including
Arabic and Chinese.
Publishes (since 2010 ) an annual report
on trends in the magazine industry for the
London-based International Federation of the
Periodical Press (FIPP); the report is published
in English and Chinese.

OUR VISION

INNOVATION believes that old style media


companies must convert themselves into
multimedia information engines.TM We
firmly believe that good journalism is good
business, and we believe that an information
companys first responsibility is to be profitable
because without profitability there is no
independence, and without independence
there is no credibility. Without credibility
there is no audience, and without an
audience there is no advertising. These new
Multiplatform Information and Marketing
Solutions EnginesTM must lead from Readers
to Audiences, and from Audiences to
Communities.

HOW WE OPERATE

We believe that change should not be imposed,


but negotiated and based on consensus. We do
not believe in magic formulas. Every project
is unique. Every market is different. Every
company has its own characteristics. Every
newsroom has its own culture and personality.
We are not a general management consulting
company. Journalism is in our DNA. We come
from the industry, and speak its language.
Although all our projects are tailored to
the clients specific requirements, they
always include three key steps: analysis,
implementation and follow-up. All three are
critical elements in any consulting project.

INNOVATIONs media architect Manuel Moncada


developed the new integrated newsrooms of Grupo
Expansin in Mxico City.

THE CHANGE PROCESS

Analysis, implementation and follow-up are the


three main phases of INNOVATIONs editorial,
graphic, technical, management, and business
change processes. We do not believe in cosmetic
changes or miracles. Every serious project
requires time and reflection. Improvisation
only leads to failure. We work closely with
our clients executives and professional staffs.
INNOVATION projects build on close creative
interaction between our clients and our
consultants. Success is heavily dependent on
follow-up, training and implementation.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

INNOVATIONs Chus del Rio and Ana Molina redesigned


the new website of Guatemalas leading newspaper,
Prensa Grfica.

INNOVATIONs Antonio Martin redesigned


the new Cambio16 (Sapin) and Expreso
Weekend Magazine Revista E (Portugal).

108

INNOVATION CLIENTS CLUB

Our clients meet periodically at the Harvard


University Faculty Club (USA) and Oxford
University Reuters Institute (UK) for private
Digital Media Newspaper and Magazine Club
meetings, sharing and exchanging experiences
on best practices: upcoming sessions will be
devoted to multimedia newsroom integration
trends, paywall content and management
strategies, new content models for the day
after newspaper, design of mobile-first news
products, and the future of news-magazines.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS
NEW EDITOR

INNOVATIONS NEW SITE

Matthew Bennett, publisher of www.


thespainreport.com, joins our editors team.

INNOVATIONs designers,
Spiro Polikiandrotis, Vasco
Ferreira and Antonio Martn
developed new prototypes for
Il Corriere della Sera. Pablo
Ramrez did the style book
for the infographics.

INNOVATION WORK

The Innovations in
Newspaper World
Report started in 1999
and this is our 17th
edition. The report is
published in English
and many other
languages. including
Arab and Chinese. Last
year we launched three
commemorative sets
with all the reports to
conmemorative our
15th issues.

NEW MEDIA BUSNESS CONSULTANT

Alvaro Triana, former Arthur D. Little and


McKinsey consultant joins INNOVATION. His
last job was with the Tony Blair Associates.

NEW APPOINTMENTS

Our new website, designed by INNOVATIONs


Chus del Rio and Ana Molina, was launched in
May 2015. www.innovation.media

INNOVATIONs graphic consultants,


Javier Zarracina and Chiqui Esteban moved
from Los Angeles Times and The Boston
Globe to Washington DC to work for Vox.
com and National Geographic. INNOVATIONs
Eduardo Tessler, joins Grupo Jaime Cmara
in Goias.

Our services were engaged in the last few


months by companies and news trade
associations including: RCS Media Group
(Italy), La Stampa (Italy), Independent
Daily (Nigeria), La Vanguardia (Spain),
Expresso (Portugal), Elle Magazines at
Lagardere Active (Francia), 14ymedio.
com (Cuba), Rio Negro (Argentina),
RPPGeorgian Public Broadcasting
(Georgia), Radio Programas del Peru
(RPP), Southern Cross/Expansion
(Mxico), Danske Medier (Denmark), Il
Seccolo (Italy), Cambio 16 (Spain), Grupo
RBA (Spain), Prensa Libre (Guatemala), La
Prensa (Panama), Unidad Editorial (Spain),
World Association of Newspapers and News
Publishers (WAN-IFRA), International News
Media Association (INMA), International
Federation of Periodical Publications (FIPP),
Oxford University Reuters Institute for the
Study of Journalism (UK), Association of Indian
Magazines AIM (India), MYbusinessmedia
(The Netherlands), Ananda Vikatan Publishers
(India), Katedra SA de CV (Mxico), CPA
(China), Asia Pacific Digital Magazine Media
Conference, Czech Publishers Association
(Czech Republic).

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Integrated
newsroom of
Daily Independent
in Nigeria.
INNOVATIONs
Vasco Ferreira
explaining his
redesign to the
design team in
Lagos.

108

INNOVATION CLIENTS CLUB

Our clients meet periodically at the Harvard


University Faculty Club (USA) and Oxford
University Reuters Institute (UK) for private
Digital Media Newspaper and Magazine Club
meetings, sharing and exchanging experiences
on best practices: upcoming sessions will be
devoted to multimedia newsroom integration
trends, paywall content and management
strategies, new content models for the day
after newspaper, design of mobile-first news
products, and the future of news-magazines.

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS
NEW EDITOR

INNOVATIONS NEW SITE

Matthew Bennett, publisher of www.


thespainreport.com, joins our editors team.

INNOVATIONs designers,
Spiro Polikiandrotis, Vasco
Ferreira and Antonio Martn
developed new prototypes for
Il Corriere della Sera. Pablo
Ramrez did the style book
for the infographics.

INNOVATION WORK

The Innovations in
Newspaper World
Report started in 1999
and this is our 17th
edition. The report is
published in English
and many other
languages. including
Arab and Chinese. Last
year we launched three
commemorative sets
with all the reports to
conmemorative our
15th issues.

NEW MEDIA BUSNESS CONSULTANT

Alvaro Triana, former Arthur D. Little and


McKinsey consultant joins INNOVATION. His
last job was with the Tony Blair Associates.

NEW APPOINTMENTS

Our new website, designed by INNOVATIONs


Chus del Rio and Ana Molina, was launched in
May 2015. www.innovation.media

INNOVATIONs graphic consultants,


Javier Zarracina and Chiqui Esteban moved
from Los Angeles Times and The Boston
Globe to Washington DC to work for Vox.
com and National Geographic. INNOVATIONs
Eduardo Tessler, joins Grupo Jaime Cmara
in Goias.

Our services were engaged in the last few


months by companies and news trade
associations including: RCS Media Group
(Italy), La Stampa (Italy), Independent
Daily (Nigeria), La Vanguardia (Spain),
Expresso (Portugal), Elle Magazines at
Lagardere Active (Francia), 14ymedio.
com (Cuba), Rio Negro (Argentina),
RPPGeorgian Public Broadcasting
(Georgia), Radio Programas del Peru
(RPP), Southern Cross/Expansion
(Mxico), Danske Medier (Denmark), Il
Seccolo (Italy), Cambio 16 (Spain), Grupo
RBA (Spain), Prensa Libre (Guatemala), La
Prensa (Panama), Unidad Editorial (Spain),
World Association of Newspapers and News
Publishers (WAN-IFRA), International News
Media Association (INMA), International
Federation of Periodical Publications (FIPP),
Oxford University Reuters Institute for the
Study of Journalism (UK), Association of Indian
Magazines AIM (India), MYbusinessmedia
(The Netherlands), Ananda Vikatan Publishers
(India), Katedra SA de CV (Mxico), CPA
(China), Asia Pacific Digital Magazine Media
Conference, Czech Publishers Association
(Czech Republic).

INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

Integrated
newsroom of
Daily Independent
in Nigeria.
INNOVATIONs
Vasco Ferreira
explaining his
redesign to the
design team in
Lagos.

THE CHALLENGE

MEDIA HUBS

TM

NEWSROOM MANAGEMENT
+ DESIGN
+ ARCHITECTURE

CREATION

TWO -RHYTHM
NEWSROOMS
SPEED
& DEPTH

CONTEMPLATION

INNOVATION

THE CHALLENGE

MEDIA HUBS

TM

NEWSROOM MANAGEMENT
+ DESIGN
+ ARCHITECTURE

CREATION

TWO -RHYTHM
NEWSROOMS
SPEED
& DEPTH

CONTEMPLATION

INNOVATION

A BUILDING WITH
OPEN SPACE IS
A METAPHOR FOR
HOW THE WEB
WORKS:

FREE & OPEN


CONNECTING
PEOPLE AROUND
COMMON INTERESTS

CONCENTRATION

COMMUNICATION

THE SOLUTION

COLLABORATION

A BUILDING WITH
OPEN SPACE IS
A METAPHOR FOR
HOW THE WEB
WORKS:

FREE & OPEN


CONNECTING
PEOPLE AROUND
COMMON INTERESTS

CONCENTRATION

COMMUNICATION

THE SOLUTION

COLLABORATION

SUPERDESK

THE RESULT

RADAR &
ECHO DESKS

VIDEOWALL

OMNIDESIGN

INTAKE
OUTPUT
SYSTEM

WORKFLOWS

SUPERDESK

THE RESULT

RADAR &
ECHO DESKS

VIDEOWALL

OMNIDESIGN

INTAKE
OUTPUT
SYSTEM

WORKFLOWS

116

We Consult. We Learn. We Publish

INNOVATION IN MAGAZINES WORLD REPORT

An Annual Report for the International Federation of


Periodical Press (FIPP). A look at the top magazines and
publishers, and what theyre doing to innovate and stay
ahead of the curve. Featuring new marketing strategies,
new technologies, and emerging forms of journalism and
content. But most of all, youll see where the magazine
industry is headed.

INNOVATION IN NEWSPAPERS WORLD REPORT


An annual examination of innovations in newspapers,
distributed at the general meeting of the World
Association of Newspapers, now WAN-IFRA. The
Report features richly illustrated articles with insights by
INNOVATION consultants on the latest editorial, marketing
and other developments and trends in newspapers
around the world.

INNOVATIONS
IN NEWSPAPERS
WORLD REPORT
CONFIDENTIAL NEWSLETTER

A quarterly review of the technological changes,


journalistic innovations and commercial challenges of
the new Information Society, written by experts sensitive
to the needs of the professional market. It is aimed at
senior executives with an international perspective and a
creative mentality. It is published in English and Spanish.

INNOVATION IPAPERS

All our clients and subscribers receive a new periodical


publication devoted to time-sensitive issues. The
INNOVATION PAPERS cover new editorial products, new
technology developments and digital platforms, and new
advertising and marketing innovations. It is published in
English and Spanish.

We hope you will become a part of our readership


For subscriptions and to obtain copies visit:
www.innovation.media
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

To order the full collection


or past editions of these reports,
please contact:
headquarters@innovation.media

116

We Consult. We Learn. We Publish

INNOVATION IN MAGAZINES WORLD REPORT

An Annual Report for the International Federation of


Periodical Press (FIPP). A look at the top magazines and
publishers, and what theyre doing to innovate and stay
ahead of the curve. Featuring new marketing strategies,
new technologies, and emerging forms of journalism and
content. But most of all, youll see where the magazine
industry is headed.

INNOVATION IN NEWSPAPERS WORLD REPORT


An annual examination of innovations in newspapers,
distributed at the general meeting of the World
Association of Newspapers, now WAN-IFRA. The
Report features richly illustrated articles with insights by
INNOVATION consultants on the latest editorial, marketing
and other developments and trends in newspapers
around the world.

INNOVATIONS
IN NEWSPAPERS
WORLD REPORT
CONFIDENTIAL NEWSLETTER

A quarterly review of the technological changes,


journalistic innovations and commercial challenges of
the new Information Society, written by experts sensitive
to the needs of the professional market. It is aimed at
senior executives with an international perspective and a
creative mentality. It is published in English and Spanish.

INNOVATION IPAPERS

All our clients and subscribers receive a new periodical


publication devoted to time-sensitive issues. The
INNOVATION PAPERS cover new editorial products, new
technology developments and digital platforms, and new
advertising and marketing innovations. It is published in
English and Spanish.

We hope you will become a part of our readership


For subscriptions and to obtain copies visit:
www.innovation.media
INNOVATIONS IN NEWSPAPERS 2015

To order the full collection


or past editions of these reports,
please contact:
headquarters@innovation.media

INNOVATION

DREAM
FACTORY
IDEAS
INNOVATION
CAPITAL

You have fantastic ideas.


We have great media clients.

Empower
the newsroom!
You are looking for smart investors.
Our clients are looking for creative people like you.

Lets meet, talk and dream, not with memos but with demos.

Smartwatch, new apps,


new websites, live coverage,
Interested? Contact us at:
web TV...
whatever
comes!
DreamFactory@innovation-mediaconsulting.com
Journalism can take any form.

INNOVATION DREAM FACTORY


An INNOVATION Media Consulting New Business Investment
Unit
escenic.com
ccieurope.com