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1. Stock Picking
Fundamental Analysis: Conclusion
2. Forex
3. Options Trading Printer friendly version (PDF format)
4. Credit Crisis
Sponsor: Cook up a market-stomping portfolio with our FREE report 7 Ingredients to
Topics Beating Stocks.
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By Ben McClure
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Whenever you’re thinking of investing in a company it is vital that you understand w
market and the industry in which it operates. You should never blindly invest in a com

One of the most important areas for any investor to look at when researching a comp
financial statements. It is essential to understand the purpose of each part of these sta
how to interpret them.

Let's recap what we've learned:

Financial reports are required by law and are published both quarterly and annually.
Management discussion and analysis (MD&A) gives investors a better understanding
company does and usually points out some key areas where it performed well.
Audited financial reports have much more credibility than unaudited ones.
The balance sheet lists the assets, liabilities and shareholders' equity.
For all balance sheets: Assets = Liabilities + Shareholders’ Equity. The two sides mu
equal each other (or balance each other).
The income statement includes figures such as revenue, expenses, earnings and earni
For a company, the top line is revenue while the bottom line is net income.
The income statement takes into account some non-cash items, such as depreciation.
The cash flow statement strips away all non-cash items and tells you how much actua
company generated.
The cash flow statement is divided into three parts: cash from operations, financing a
Always read the notes to the financial statements. They provide more in-depth inform
wide range of figures reported in the three financial statements.

Table of Contents
1) Fundamental Analysis: Introduction
2) Fundamental Analysis: What Is It?
3) Fundamental Analysis: Qualitative Factors - The Company
4) Fundamental Analysis: Qualitative Factors - The Industry
5) Fundamental Analysis: Introduction to Financial Statements
6) Fundamental Analysis: Other Important Sections Found in Financial Fil
7) Fundamental Analysis: The Income Statement
8) Fundamental Analysis: The Balance Sheet
9) Fundamental Analysis: The Cash Flow Statement
10) Fundamental Analysis: A Brief Introduction To Valuation
11) Fundamental Analysis: Conclusion

Printer friendly version (PDF format)


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